35 Burst results for "Penn State University"

Is It Muggy Out? Check the Dew Point!

Short Wave

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Is It Muggy Out? Check the Dew Point!

"Okay thomas lou. Summer hater. here's a scenario. I wake up in the morning. I'm preparing to go on an afternoon bike. Ride on my hog around the city. Check my weather app for the forecast. It's hot you know. Say about eighty-five but manageable and the humidity is like fifty seven percent. Let's say does that. Mean i'm still going to have like a nice bike ride or sort of. It's a little hard to hell with just humidity. Okay but humidity is telling us how much water is in the air. Right right right so yes. Here's where it gets a little bit tricky to understand this. We need to consider a couple of things watering the air temperature and how these to interact with one another okay so i caught up someone. I thought might have some answers. I am greg jenkins. i'm a professor. In department of meteorology and atmospheric sciences at penn state university in greg explained relative humidity like this relative humidity is ratio or percentage of water vapor over a term that is related to order vapor in a saturated state. Okay okay so. I'm going to oversimplify here. But relative humidity is the moisture content in the air compared to the maximum moisture content. That could be in the air totes. That's why it's called relative humidity. It's not an absolute measure of moisture. Greg says a key factor in relative humidity is air temperature. You know the number we usually look at when describing if it's going to be hot or cold out. Dre warmer air can contain more moisture while cooler air can contain less moisture. So over the course of a day if you just had the amount of water vague bernie atmosphere sixth and you let the temperature run. Its normal course. The relative humidity would go up and down just based on

Thomas Lou Greg Jenkins Department Of Meteorology And Penn State University Greg Bernie
"penn state university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:42 min | 4 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Intersections. Dangerous because they are where cars often moving very fast than in different directions must cross paths when drivers make left turns. They must cross oncoming traffic which makes intersections much more complicated one way to accommodate turns is to have vehicles wait until a gap appears in oncoming traffic. However this can be dangerous relies entirely on the driver to make the left turn safely another way to allow left hand. Turns you stop oncoming traffic and give cars turning left their own green arrow. This is safer but it shuts down the entire intersection to let left turning vehicles go which slows traffic instead. A simpler solution might be best. Restrict left hand turns in busy cities. This would be safer and allow the intersection to serve more cars. There's a downside. Eliminating left turns would require some vehicles to travel longer distances however eliminating left turns on grid like street networks would on average require people to drive only one additional block. This would be more than offset by the smoother traffic flow. Getting rid of left turns may be difficult to implement across an entire city but they might not need to be left turn. Restrictions are most effective at busier intersections in the centers of towns or cities than it less busy intersections. Farther away from the town center. This is because the busier. The intersection the more people benefit from smoother traffic flow the central intersections also tend to have alternative routes available than minimize any additional distance travel due to the restrictions. So the next time you're sitting in traffic stuck behind someone waiting to make a left turn know that your frustration is justified. There's a better way in this case. The answer is simple. Get rid of the left turn.

Lin pascarella association of american colleg department of civil and enviro penn state university
Improve Traffic Flow in Cities by Banning Left Turns

The Academic Minute

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Improve Traffic Flow in Cities by Banning Left Turns

"Intersections. Dangerous because they are where cars often moving very fast than in different directions must cross paths when drivers make left turns. They must cross oncoming traffic which makes intersections much more complicated one way to accommodate turns is to have vehicles wait until a gap appears in oncoming traffic. However this can be dangerous relies entirely on the driver to make the left turn safely another way to allow left hand. Turns you stop oncoming traffic and give cars turning left their own green arrow. This is safer but it shuts down the entire intersection to let left turning vehicles go which slows traffic instead. A simpler solution might be best. Restrict left hand turns in busy cities. This would be safer and allow the intersection to serve more cars. There's a downside. Eliminating left turns would require some vehicles to travel longer distances however eliminating left turns on grid like street networks would on average require people to drive only one additional block. This would be more than offset by the smoother traffic flow. Getting rid of left turns may be difficult to implement across an entire city but they might not need to be left turn. Restrictions are most effective at busier intersections in the centers of towns or cities than it less busy intersections. Farther away from the town center. This is because the busier. The intersection the more people benefit from smoother traffic flow the central intersections also tend to have alternative routes available than minimize any additional distance travel due to the restrictions. So the next time you're sitting in traffic stuck behind someone waiting to make a left turn know that your frustration is justified. There's a better way in this case. The answer is simple. Get rid of the left turn.

"penn state university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:38 min | 4 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh he waiting to make a left. Turn at a busy intersection. You're not alone doctor. Lin pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute vic guy associate professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at penn state university delves into how to fix these timewasters intersections. Dangerous because they are where cars often moving very fast than in different directions must cross paths when drivers make left turns. They must cross oncoming traffic which makes intersections much more complicated one way to accommodate turns is to have vehicles wait until a gap appears in oncoming traffic. However this can be dangerous relies entirely on the driver to make the left turn safely another way to allow left hand. Turns you stop oncoming traffic and give cars turning left their own green arrow. This is safer but it shuts down the entire intersection to let left turning vehicles go which slows traffic instead. A simpler solution might be best. Restrict left hand turns in busy cities. This would be safer and allow the intersection to serve more cars. There's a downside. Eliminating left turns would require some vehicles to travel longer distances however eliminating left turns on grid like street networks would on average require people to drive only one additional block. This would be more than offset by the smoother traffic flow. Getting rid of left turns may be difficult to implement across an entire city but they might not need to be left turn. Restrictions are most effective at busier intersections in the centers of towns or cities than it less busy intersections. Farther away from the town center..

Lin pascarella association of american colleg department of civil and enviro penn state university
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:19 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Done on. Which leads you to believe that. Hey this screaming. I sometimes feel I think we have a focus on sort of research capabilities. But i d slack lacked before and still lack is sort of entrepreneurial aspects it. Oh sort of combining business of engineering that sort of set been behind. I would say in some sense to stanford or something like that and so then the question would be again. You know on fully objective exam is is. That is sufficiently predictor of success. I don't know it's an opium addict. I agree with in the sending of what we used to call them. You know mitchell. People just memorized things. But yes i'll fuel will get into the much easier for somebody who's smart to kids deputies somebody who just tries to memorize as much as he can so what you see. Even in despite i think often very bad teaching students we tell you at least one class whether had teachers and a lack of choices compared to get at stanford or any top school. These kids aren't really good as they see something. This smart enough to about the. Don't move very much about how the started when they for the each. Hp job to silicon valley then look for company for a few years. I can start by talking. These knocking it entrepreneurship. The number of startups. That these kinds of study very impressive. Excellent yet they. There's there's a lot here to to think about. I think Into himself. I'll be signed exams. What exactly should be test. Our often should one best. How many retailers. I like the idea of the scandinavian approach. Which is basically saying. You have woken now. So that's not really memorize begin. Google any fact. Any number is the internet so then education really has to be about about concepts About ideas about thinking right That's what it is now. it's not learning. It's learning to learn what education gives. You is the capability and the confidence that you can learn anything. Because you don't even before i think that's going to be because change. Nothing stays the same but as things change if you know how to non me. That's the most important thing excellent. Yeah this has been great. Thanks so much for spending time with me. Thank you very much the last thank you. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. If you'd like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to in full. At scientific sense dot com..

mitchell stanford Hp Google
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:11 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The other things given and that makes sense because if the students were very bright when newbie there are different sort of battle. You not talk to you. it's like talking. I mean somebody who's better than too much better than the city. Do much better than you will be talking to so when baseman class you gain from this kind of interaction as much as you do when the classes literally larger but the last night then the teacher has running ragged trying to get these kids to non and sort of it made sense. There was a sweet sweet. Spot was roughly about two hundred hundred students. Problem in class size is extremely expensive to use class that feel very happy because we managed makes sense of conflicting estimates. That have been prevalent in the class size literature. In fact i'm reported to be on this age wise that he can't find any consensus in this happy mason. You consensus of this. It's tom and then what we do. Is we take these estimates and embed dynamic. It's says dc some sort of a. You mentioned a some sort of a social clause loves morning system so student learning not only from the teacher also appears to some extent lay so so sorry finding here that said that optimum on is sort of let. The system woke me fishing. If that's the case East this vessel. I wonder decimal implications even for one place. You know Departments and goo of project teams. You know they they they. They learned from From like that to you constellation. That's a very good question. I mean something that nobody is actually on the optimum size of the team with all this remote were going on. People have noticed that who this interaction is less but on the other hand people seem to enjoy the ability to be more flexible but the context of the people..

mason
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:57 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"For a different countries we just watch much more accurately actually knows that this is a problem and then trying to you basically if you stop the examines point. Ignore everything often so then. It's not like this time. Considering because then time most people have lots of time left over after this these things they do want to impute this and when we do this we think we find the rankings change coin you can find eight ranking changes for thirty. And if that's the case maybe we don't have to take these rankings seriously or we should try adjust for these rankings the best ability because it does make a difference and this is particularly useful in the middle of the distribution. Bottom last is the bottom at least is a top ranking and given how much importance we assigned to this tonight i wanted. They are no incentives in the system needed for the student nor for school of teacher to take it seriously. I wondered if if some sort of Teach a rating or even teach a compensation could be tight to it that way in could it could but then the question comes up which even worry about what teaching if you want to meet. Teachers monitor say that. What do in class teaching the curriculum so coming up. Let's chinese practice exams. That's distortion movements. On that's the good thing about because it's not something. They're stunning for. Actually see how much they know without the cramming getting into. That's one of the things that i think we see is google to see where in every school the top few participants will wanted to get some books on. Something just knows. It's november new enough. That won't massive distortions in terms of effort and so on so forth but enough that people want to take things apple. Best of the edison beautiful thing because it is international survey..

google apple
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:31 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Differences in me really really wanted. Talk to a and it's very hard to explain to china. All of this didn't get into the school. They're trying to fix this inquiry of example they're trying to put limits on holiday. These cranston's can stay because the students were just their lives. And so the occupancy. I'm begging green children into rome. Because in china the president recently said that these crap schools are not hooping which point the stock of these crashes fed store. There's also evidence that the uniting that this is a good thing for society. So i think it's it's sort of obvious when you realize the economics of it. The general equilibrium impacts of it in a lot of these of onto settings comparison to this one the india sort of to illicit effort. You want people to putting more effort because not putting enough in this city or any movie exam actors aging.

china cranston rome india
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:48 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Clean up in the same place. So there's a distinction made in the paper on ex ante before you reading. So somebody said. Should we digging an hour. what's on. Tv show everybody gains when you managing the exports with afternoon of course india percent. Even if you bad so it's sort of like complete waste because it's ridiculous extra awfully yet at the same place that you would have boundary taking a complete waste of resources. It's an actress if i do better. He had it over time. It says an expectation and so if you sort of pushing the to the right you know somebody taking it. Twenty times assume ablaze doing going to do best twentieth time. So you took the right right and so at some point you save. I have to do it five times before i can. You know get anywhere reasonable in in a very dear friend of mine. He took the university entrance exam. Honestly what the tokyo because he had to get him to talk into four times. The stopped allowing individuals to take the civil suits exam after a certain age. Because people won't grow taking this surtees shown rents there the preferred to other in so much more came with yuna waiting to get in in channeling impudence. China jetting into the administrative service. They're getting us to get into this thing. This is a social reached. It might even be better for me to do this. I might be off study. Twenty years getting into the chinese periods of but what a monk for society and then i needed somebody else and we that guy holding me so this is the this this idea. And you're on the paper. Retaking in high stakes exam is less more so as you ask you a placement. Both university in the civil service. According to performance company exams is the nom in much of the world and do p..

india yuna tokyo China
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:40 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"But that's going to be seen by people after the people and so there's going to be some but i doubt that the biases huge. It's there but it's probably not. The turkish data tells you that disadvantaged students benefit from retake exam and so from a policy perspective you mentioned only given once a year so you want we take your to beat the years. Do you see some sort of a policy. Perspect- you start early. Maybe dating know three four. A sam's before you actually come to that that do that in this that. There's a huge in timing industry of preparation protest. So even the students in spoiler naming in some crap school have probably deacon twenty thirty exams before they take this exam. You know just how follow you away from potential and i think the same things to an indian reservations koch drives. The aim is to try and give them a chance to catch up. Books is another story. Yeah i i was one of these standardized tests then League taking may potentially skew the standardization to great yes. It messes things up in a very fundamental way in so as we've seen when you are retaking taking you re taking because you had a miserable day did sleep. Where would concentrated the test. It was hard to whatever you have a decent wi fi. You did worse than expected. And so you say. I need to read. I very sympathetic with that. Because i asked we seek when be when when the exams will be always get asked should retake but at the scene tyne the people that we have on retaking sure something very simple reduce mindfully individual who. It's one hundred percent true that allowing the option of retaking makes them better off us mess. It's life is doing but what about. The equilibrium is excellent. So as happens until he gets for the first time when if more people are taking exam and the scene number of seats wants one problem. The cutoffs for million people are taking the exam forgetting to one school to get into the saudis saying not higher than if only hundred thousand people so powerfully. Equilibrium is when you are now taking on cutoffs rhines so that in our estimate we show.

sam
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"What happens in junkie both the one two million people who took the university entrance exam of the data for you one trillion with need for the first time and you can take a young people are waiting four young age. What is going on. So i was hoping better than not something in between this this morning. And that's what drove this first people and it was a lotta fun because what we had was what's kind of conception we one all the data on this one two thousand two. We didn't have a pattern. Which is we can track blue cross yards and that made of the technical part very very clever ways of dealing with those things that we found something which i think makes a lot of sends. We found that the poor tended to catch up when we took because they needs will then don't of the better off and that sort of makes sense because think of rich cape. He's become an every shots he's had to jerseys happy every extracurricular thing that could help him grow out. He's production possibility frontier. Not gonna get better. Why did you take a disadvantage. And you give him some time to non more then make. You'd expect that he would seek substantially. Its ballooning right. So there's no penalty of retaking big sam Oftentimes i think sat and gre. And things like that. You know every time you take it going to pull the entire previous exam scores still. That's not the case here now. But it's not that is actually better food because many colleges the us sat's the the best most recent school but it's not penalty it actually the new team scores. So if you do worst one thing that remains is your gp so when you take the exam you have to that go into your policemen score. You have high school gpa. Which stays with a knife and then have the exam scores in different subjects and depending on what check your in science to should study is language whatever w smack the other track. I'll go wait even be celtics which makes sense to be. Scientists in science and math and physics should matter more than if you social sites. so that's the only vanity comes in is when you're already enrolled in college pro then your gpa. Haft so there is a substantial penalty dig examined and try for replacement a ready.

sam celtics us Haft
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:13 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday is professor color krishna. Economics and liberal arts research at penn state university usa into spent international trade and development cutter. Thank you for having. Thanks for doing this so i would start with one of your papers at this one from twenty sixteen entitled better luck next time learning the retaking using this paper we provide some evidence that repeat taking of competitive exams move use impact of back of disadvantages on educational outcomes and i can relate to this guy that i i do in south india and then i was getting ready for Engineering school India has this Central xm ge as joined enders exam. And i got education my local language so essentially. I got to re learn english woods before i could say gee a so. You're looking at data here from turkey. I think right sort of a similar situation where yes or no in toki. There's a high school levy at the end of high school. You take the university entrance examined. Unlike many countries only fuel they late university entrances in turkey. Almost everyone takes who graduates from high school. So that's the other thing in turkey. Is that the way. That system is designed this amazing huge ashen editor who deserves the credit for pulling took into the modern era but the weeds designed. It's like you choose what you want to do in the tacking onto tape to senior high school and daddy before the before you to go to high school there. These open competitive exams. Why school science high schools anatolian high schools these exams so this sort of announced talent a different income listens to boom. Because even if you're born you can go to this great science high school and it's the money for tuition given to countries have this including kenya has Been in has this love. African countries have this and get some to mark way off ensuring that accused some chances there for upward mobility of bowl. So you take the university entrance exam and we will man curious.

color krishna penn state university turkey south india Mike usa India kenya
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:49 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:02 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday our prof. Soda cam sorrow koos assistant professor of public policy at Versity and Emily gin who is assistant professor public policy at penn state university. That comes sarah emily. I think he's having us thanksgiving is so i want to start with you. A couple of video recent peepers And one of them just came out this year on pause and osias it breath of fresh air local authority absences. You say be studied the effects of clea. Large nearly simultaneous scored His own school absences in chicago. Ba- flying the Assertiveness seven percent reduction in absenteeism. It nearly nearby schools very Related to those formative from The closure so before we get to the details of this. I just want to mention saturday navy. I spent quite a bit of time in chicago. Radio both on the north side and south side I have no conflict of interest. I used to be in the power plant sector but mostly in the nuclear power plants. So i haven't done anything in the cold. Fired power plant rena. So before we get the details of the paper so coal-fired power plant these thermal appliance that is circulating listening right..

Mike chicago yesterday sarah emily Versity this year seven percent penn state university saturday one both thanksgiving Emily gin
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 5 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

What Separates Humans From Other Animals?

No Stupid Questions

02:15 min | 7 months ago

What Separates Humans From Other Animals?

"Animals. I mean my dog has a 401k. Also why do we pace. When we're stressed or anxious like in the bugs bunny cartoons. Somebody's waiting outside the delivery for so andrew came across a paper in the journal. Frontiers in psychology which. I was so charmed by that. You've read as we can talk about it. It's called acquisition of a joystick operated video task by pigs. How could i forget for the listener. I'll just explain. These experiments were carried out at penn state university. There were four pigs. A pair of yorkshire pigs named hamlet an omelette and a pair of panna pinto micro pigs named ebony and ivory. I guess after stevie wonder and paul mccartney or the song of that name or after piano keys and the paper describes what the pigs were and were not able to learn in these experiments manipulating video game joystick with their snouts. And what i really want to know is tell us how it changes your thinking as a psychologist if it all about non human animals their capabilities. The way we should think about them perhaps differently about ourselves differently. Well thank you for broadening. My academic horizons. I would not have read this paper on video games and makes were it not for our friendship so i i will just say that when i read this line i literally laughed out loud after twelve weeks of training. Hamlet and omelette were terminated from the experiment because they had grown too large no fit within the constraints of the test pen. Academic research is tough. You lose fifty percent of your research pool just like that so anyway now down to two test subjects by the way. So one of my intuitions is that one ought not an. I understand that this research is hard. But maybe not generalize to olive pig them based on this very small number of pigs because look at wilbur wright some pig yeah so maybe ebony or ivory were some one of them was much better than the other in the research so there's various across pigs even yes. It is

Penn State University The Journal Stevie Wonder Paul Mccartney Andrew Yorkshire Wilbur Wright
Do Produce-Saver Products Really Keep Food Fresh Longer?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

07:27 min | 10 months ago

Do Produce-Saver Products Really Keep Food Fresh Longer?

"My friend gary rights. I've been seeing ads for products that claim to absorb ethylene which allows produce to last longer to these products. Work would baking soda or activated charcoal. Do the same thing. I think we've all had the disheartening experience of having to throw away expensive fruits and vegetables because we didn't use them up quickly enough. No one likes to waste money of course but there's even more at stake with food waste we throw away. Shocking percentage of the food that we produce which is especially tragic when you consider how many people around the world experience hunger on a daily basis hunger and food. Insecurity is not just an issue in developing nations here in the united states the richest nation in the world within ten percent of households typically struggle to put food on the table and that number has increased by sixty six percent just since the beginning of the covid nineteen pandemic right now. Fifty million americans including seventeen million children do not have enough to eat on a regular basis. No matter where you live if you are lucky enough as i have been to have weathered this year long crisis without worrying about whether you'd be able to feed yourself and your family. Perhaps you will join me in donating to your local food bank or an organization like feeding america dot org. And if you or someone you know is experiencing hunger or food insecurity. You don't have to go it alone if you are in the. Us feeding america dot org can help. Connect you with resources in your area. Food waste is also a major player in climate change. Rotting food is responsible for almost ten percent of greenhouse gas emissions globally. In fact if oud waste were country it would come in third after the united states and china in terms of impact on global warming and fresh produce about a third of all the food that we throw away all of which is to say if a ten dollar product can keep us from throwing away so much food it would be money well spent and i'm happy to report that there is some solid science to support them but their usefulness maybe just a bit more targeted than the marketing sometimes suggests ethylene is a harmless gas. That's released or exhaled if you will buy fruits and vegetables. In general ethylene. Production increases as fruits ripen. And turn accelerates the ripening process so when we put unripe fruit in paper bag the idea is to trap some of that ethylene. That's being given off by the produce and use it to hasten the ripening process this works especially well for apricots bananas mangoes tomatoes avocados and melons. They're all particularly sensitive to ethylene gas. But once fruit is ripe continued exposure to ethylene can cause the fruit to become overripe and start to rot. Ethylene can also speed the decline of other types of produce according to horticultural scientist kathleen brown of penn state university at the lean can cause carrots and parsnips to get bitter broccoli and kale to turn yellow cucumbers and summer squash to get soft and mushy asparagus to turn tough apples to get mealie and lettuce to wilt herbs such as parsley and mint are also particularly sensitive to ethylene gas now low temperatures across the board reduce plants sensitivity to at the lane so just keeping produce refrigerated will help to preserve it for example if your avocados get ripe before you need them. You can hold them for a few days by putting them in the fridge. I find it most effective to move them into the fridge when they're still maybe a day short of fully ripe because some ripening will continue in the fridge but it goes much more slowly in addition you can use something to absorb ethylene gas. Today's episode supported by hair food. Hair food believes in feeding your hair like you. Feed your body with simple clean and nourishing ingredients it. Produces the softest and silk strands. You can imagine hair. Food offers different collections for every hair type and feature like the nourishing collection infused with the essences of coconut milk and chai spice for soft and healthy strands. It nourishes while it cleanses leaving your hair silky smooth and you won't believe how good it smells. It's like a warm mug of coconut milk. Chai plus haircut is always free of sulfates parabens dyes and mineral oils. I know i always appreciate products. That do a great job in smell. Good while they're doing it. So if you wanna feed your hair. Delicious nourishing ingredients feed it hair food. All their products are under ten dollars. And you can find them at amazon walmart and zeolite is a complex of minerals including aluminum and silica. That's highly absorbent. It's used as drying agent to suck moisture out of the air. This is also the stuff that makes clumping cat litter work but it also absorbs ethylene. Gas zero lights are widely used by food growers shippers and retailers to extend the life of fruits and vegetables in transit by slowing down the ripening process produce saving products that you may have seen in the consumer marketplace such as the green produce bags or the hollow ball. That you place in the crisper drawer of your fridge contain zeolite. And they are effective at absorbing lean and they can prevent types of spoilage. The bags are reusable but they do eventually lose their effectiveness. You can also buy a rechargeable zeolite filled ball to place in your crisper drawer to absorb ethylene gas now. Gary also asked whether baking soda or activated charcoal might be effective at absorbing ethylene. I can't find any data to suggest that baking soda would be particularly useful here. Activated charcoal can absorb but not nearly as effectively as zeolite. Interestingly that rechargeable ball. it's called the blue. Apple contains both zeolite and activated charcoal but the manufacturer only talks about charcoal in their marketing. I wonder if they think that charcoal sounds more natural and therefore would be more appealing to consumers than something unfamiliar like zeolite but in terms of absorbing ethylene gas. I suspect it's the zeolite that's actually doing. The heavy lifting their the chuckle may also have some odor absorbing properties. Keeping your produce in special ethylene absorbing bags may indeed extend the shelf life. Keeping high at the lean producers particularly apples and avocados quarantined from your other produce can also help just remember that ethylene is only one thing that can shorten the life of your produce and ethylene absorbing bag isn't gonna prevent moldy berries or slimy lettuce for example. The best way to keep fruits and vegetables from going bad and going to waste is really to eat them up

United States Kathleen Brown Penn State University Gary China Walmart Amazon Apple
New book charts changing tactics of fossil fuel lobby

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 11 months ago

New book charts changing tactics of fossil fuel lobby

"2021 brings a new president and new priorities for climate change solutions. How quickly can the. Us pivot toward a cleaner. Climate policy penn state university professor. Michael mann's new book. The new climate war the fight to take back. Our planet has some ideas. Michael welcome back to climate cast. Thanks great to be with you. Give us a thumbnail sketch of your book. What's the message here. The message here is actually pretty simple. Look climate change. Denial is no longer tenable fossil fuel interests. Those who've done their bidding. Those forces of inaction the inactive. Est says i call them simply recognize that they can credibly claim that climate change isn't real that it isn't human caused in that it isn't doing real damage now and so they've turned to other tactics in an effort to delay that necessary transition away from fossil fuels Moving attention away from the need for systemic solutions for policies that incentivize renewable energy and put a price on carbon to individual lifestyle changes Another one is false. Solutions the idea that there are simple technological fixes that somehow don't necessitate us getting off of fossil fuels. Michael twenty twenty one brings a new president may be what i would call an opportunity point for climate solutions and making them a priority. What has president elect biden proposed that heads in the direction you want to see. The biden plan the plan that he has put forward. is a bold climate plan It includes massive investment government investment in renewable energy which is very important part of the solution. There is support for carbon pricing of putting a price on carbon polluters pay when they dumped carbon pollution into the atmosphere right. Now they don't have to pay for that so the biden administration is Emphasizing the importance of those actions They are also reengaging the global community Reasserting our support for international treaties like the paris treaty and in fact for going beyond the paris treaty. So we know the bottom line where the rubber meets. The road is the atmosphere and when we talk about these policy changes how quickly can policy changes start to have an impact on our atmosphere. Yeah you know. There's some good news there. The prevailing thinking a decade or so ago is that when we stop emitting carbon. The planet will still warm up for decades. There is a substantial revision now in understanding of the problem that we can stop emitting carbon in the atmosphere we will see the fruits of those efforts Pretty quickly and that's why it is important for us to act dramatically over the next ten years. What would you say to those who are apprehensive about climate solutions and the economy. And what will you be watching for the next four years. Yeah what i would say is that you know there's a fallacy that somehow we have to choose between the economy and the environment that's simply not true if we act on the climate crisis we will save literally trillions of dollars because extreme weather events are costing tens of billions of dollars every year here in the united states alone there were record number of them in two thousand twenty and so it's a win win we act on this problem now We can avert destroying this planet for future generations and we potentially have a healthier economy as a result of it. Michael man with penn state university. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective today Thank you very much. Paul was a pleasure talking with you.

Climate Policy Penn State Univ Biden Michael Mann Michael Biden Administration Paris United States Penn State University Paul
Despite La Nia, 2020 could be hottest year on record

Climate Cast

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Despite La Nia, 2020 could be hottest year on record

"Just how far out of balance is earth's climate system when the numbers are in two thousand twenty is likely the first or second warmest year on record globally and that makes the past seven years the seven warmest years on record. It's an unprecedented run of warmth. In the global surface temperature record dating back to eighteen. Eighty penn state university professor. Michael man has spent a career tracking climate trans. Hi michael welcome back to climate cast. Thanks it's good to be with you. Paul let's start with twenty twenty. Where does it look like. Global temperatures will finish. There's a good chance that twenty twenty will be the warmest year on record. That's particularly surprising given. It's a la nina year. We have a la- nina event. The tropical pacific that tends to cool global temperatures a bit michael in a balanced climate system. We would expect a mix of warmer and colder than average years. How far out of balance is earth's climate system to have the past seven years be the warmest on record. Yeah well it's way out of balance and in fact a few years ago we estimated the likelihood that we would see these sort of streaks from chance alone in the absence of human caused warming and that probability is tiny one in ten thousand In one of our estimates as one article an article in discover magazine summarizing findings stated that the chances are a snowball's chance in hell basically is how likely we would see that from natural factors alone so when we include the human factor of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the models that we are able to reproduce these stretches of record warm temperatures that we're seeing we saw what you might call one benefit from the pandemic this year it looks like global greenhouse gas emissions are down about seven percent but i noticed the atmospheric. Co two levels aren't budging michael. What does that tell us about how much we need to lower emissions to get an atmospheric response in co two levels. Yeah it's sort of like a bathtub and you know if we turn the faucet down but it still on and the drain is closed. The water level won't stop rising until we turn the knob all the way off and that's essentially what we have to do. When it comes to the climate crisis we need to turn down that knob in reach what we call net zero no net carbon emissions into the atmosphere within a few decades and we need to bring carbon emissions down by roughly factor of to within the next decade if were to stay on that path where we keep warming below truly catastrophic levels more than a degree in half celsius or roughly three degrees

Penn State University Paul Let Michael La Nina Nina Discover Magazine LA
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest sued as professor james kasting. Who's a professor at penn state university where he holds joint appointments departments of geosciences and meteorology and atmospheric signs. His lucid focuses on on the evolution of plants most fears and climates and on the question of whether life might exist on planets around the around other stars in two thousand eighteen. He was inducted into the national academy of sciences. His book hoped to find a habitable planet was published in twenty ten belkin. Jim good to be here guilt yet. Thanks for doing this. So i want to set the context for our conversation Older papers Which was has told us nineteen ninety-three entitled habitable zones around main sequence stars. And i guess that is rich history around the habitable zone right. It goes back to the goes back to the fifties. It actually goes farther back than that. it goes back to nineteen thirteen. Only learned this your ago. Yeah it was term was brought up in a book by walter monitor The same monitor from the monitor minimum sunspots who was a book on the possibilities of life elsewhere here so he actually called it the cabinet zone up at the same meeting as use it now with the same meaning right and then that was lost. It was ralph lorenzo. A colleague of mine who who discovered that old book and then the the term was. Reinvented by michael. Hart in late seventies but there were other people who studied the concept under other names. Okay and so. We used the term habitable zone to to sort of indicate if a planet is in that zone around a star it is it is habitable habitable in the sense that life could exist there and life as feed know it. I guess that's a qualification. You have to make right. Because behave won't one instance The light off life that did know. But there's some characteristics that that makes it habitable zone so you in the nineties. What would expectations of that will Right so i would narrow the your definition just a little bit that the way i like to define habitable zone the way michael hart to find it Is the region around of star. Were a planet can maintain liquid water on its surface. Now that does that does not mean that the planet is necessarily habitable right. You could have planets with liquid water that were for some reason uninhabitable. They were way too hot or something. But but but just liquid water. And you know. There's an assumption built in there that life as we know it requires liquid water so that assumption is built in tibet. Concert liquid water sister. Jim wouldn't that automatically mean that the temperature has to be in a rage that that's useful. Well that's not quite right. Liquid water boils at one hundred degrees celsius on earth. But that's because we have a one bar atmosphere and the vapor pressure of water is at one hundred degrees celsius is one bar. So that's why it boils but if you you can liquid water you know if you raise the surface temperature on earth liquid water would continue to exist on the surface until you got up to the critical pressure which will critical temperature which is four hundred seventy four celsius and most of us. Don't think that that would be habitable..

Jim michael hart professor national academy of sciences belkin james kasting penn state university ralph lorenzo tibet
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Dinosaur Asteroid Hit Worst Case Place

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Dinosaur Asteroid Hit Worst Case Place

"Sixty, six, million years ago a giant asteroid crashed into earth killing off three quarters of all species including most of the dinosaurs researchers suspect that the impact caused the extinction by kicking up a cloud of dust and tiny droplets called aerosols that plunged the planet into something like a nuclear winter. And these components in the atmosphere drew of Global Cooling and darkness that would've stopped photosynthesis from occurring ultimately shutting down the food chain. Shelby Lyons a recent PhD graduate from Penn State University. But scientists have also found lots of sit in the geologic layers deposited immediately after the asteroid impact and the set may have been part of the killing mechanism to depending on where it came from. Some of the probably came from wildfires that erupted around the planet following the impact but most of these. Would have lingered in the lower atmosphere for only a few weeks and wouldn't have had much of an effect on global climate. But scientists hypothesized that soot may also have come from the very rocks that the asteroid pulverized when it struck if those rocks contain significant amounts of organic matter such as the remains of marine or. It would have burned up on impact sending such shooting up into the stratosphere in that case. So it would have spread around the globe in a matter of hours and stayed there for years and it would have radically altered earth's climate. So lions on her team set out to. The source of the suit they looked at chemicals known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or ages which are another byproduct of combustion. So you can find peaches and neater veggies that you grill. You can find them from the me exhaustive a car. You can also find them in smoke and debris from the wildfires. TODAY OUT WEST PH is are made up a fused rings of carbon atoms think of chicken wire to determine. The origin of the set the researchers looked at the structure and chemistry of the Ph is buried along with it. Specifically, the researchers looked for groups of atoms that stick off the rings like spikes Ph is generated from burning wood don't have many spikes but ph is from burning fossil carbon like what would have been in the target rocks have more Lien's her team found that most of the Ph is deposited after. The impact were spiky, which suggests that set from the rocks hit by the asteroid played a major role in the mass extinction. There was more dust and more sulfate aerosols than soot, but sit is a stronger locker sunlight than either of those two. So a small amount of set Ken drives, large reductions in sunlight. The findings are in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the results suggest that the devastation. Of this very city asteroid impact maybe due in part to a fluke of geography, the space rock smashed into the Gulf of Mexico where the sediments were rich organic matter. They still are the region produces large amounts of today where it had occurred was likely. One of the reasons that led to a major mass extinction. It was kind of the perfect storm or the perfect asteroid impact I guess you could call it.

Shelby Lyons Gulf Of Mexico National Academy Of Sciences Penn State University Lien KEN
Do Americans Trust Scientists

After The Fact

04:01 min | 1 year ago

Do Americans Trust Scientists

"So much of the public focuses on discovery and they. Scientists going to influence their life scientists. Of course, love the search does that explain maybe just a little bit of the dichotomy I use I think sometimes feel between scientists in the public. View that actually people are quite fascinated by. Approach that scientists take in they're quite curious about it I i. think many of the of the television shows, for example, in books about science or or very very attracted to people and can help bring them in to science and even become scientists themselves. I don't really take a do view of things concerning trust I think trust house to start with the scientists themselves they have to really be. Truthful about their exploration about what they discovered they have to try to be bias free and politically in free free politics and free of self-aggrandizement and just want to pursue the tree. We were President of one of the best engineering schools in the country and have been involved in education but your role at the national science. Foundation. And now your role with the science philanthropy alliance a little little. Bit More of a cheerleader with FBI. Correct way of saying some of this in terms of trying to let people understand the need and support for basic science and our society. Yeah I think you always go back to your roots in at high school. I was cheer. So I think there are definitely a large group of people who liked cheer and that's a very, very important to do, and of course, it demands a different kind of skill set but there's a step beyond cheering. That is just incredibly important to do what I call move the needle to really make things change at sociologically culturally there are many many disparities that abound and they affect science as well as every other field of endeavor and Jake. It's important for institutions like the National Science Foundation's to. All sorts of approaches to to blossom into encourage them scientific discovery come through many many different approaches. And by the way I've Kurd a number of times that Isaac Newton did his greatest most prevalent work during a pandemic. So crisis can also bring about the environment for making a great discovery. You were the chief scientist at NASA. That's pretty cool. What did you take from that role and how did that guy your thinking in the broader scientific community? I really want to be a researcher and that's it. I wanted to explore science deep league. In particular attracted to the cosmos. And Mike Goodness on. There's just some mysteries that it offers and so I was very very focused on that I didn't want anything to take me away from that and so when I was giving the invitation invitation to join NASA as its cheat scientists asked various close friends and colleagues. If it was a good idea, all my department heads around the country who knew me? said, what about idea will take you out of your research because they knew empower engaged wasn't that but then I talked to some of my female colleagues like a colleague who headed the history of science? Department. At Penn State University and my mother who obviously knew me well, if people like that said, well, you can't talk about how important it is that women. and. Underrepresented minorities go into science, and then not take the opportunity to do something about out to have a platform where you can be a role model for that when you can actually affect changes in that.

President Trump National Science Foundation Mike Goodness Nasa FBI Isaac Newton Penn State University Jake Researcher Scientist
Malaria Mosquitoes Biting Before Bednet Time

60-Second Science

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Malaria Mosquitoes Biting Before Bednet Time

"Than two hundred million. People get malaria each year and about half a million die mostly in Africa. Many of them children and those staggering numbers aren't improvement. Malaria deaths have been cut in half since two in many places are remarkably. Simple tool has led. The fight bednets treated with a mild insecticide at stopped mosquitoes from biting people in their sleep. Both people end. Mosquitoes are pawns in the malaria transmission cycle if an infected person gets by a mosquito. The parasite gets picked up along with the blood meal. That mosquito can then transfer the parasite to the next person bites. Bednets help stop mosquitoes from easy attacks on motionless sleepers but now some mosquitoes seem to be giving up the night shift malaria. Mosquitoes in Africa tend to ship their biting behavior and Mall. All USA from Penn State University's Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics normally they Tend to by people during the night but because of extensive use of bednets. He's mosquitoes started fighting in the evening or the morning. The assumption is that the bednets are weeding out the nighttime biters while not affecting the mosquitoes that prefer feeding at other times so those mosquitoes are thriving son and his team wanted to know whether the observed changing biting time had any impact on malaria transmission. Back in the lab. They presented Anopheles mosquitoes with the opportunity to feed on blood at six PM at midnight and six am when the laboratory was kept at an even eighty degrees Fahrenheit evening and morning biters or no more or less likely to become infectious than the midnight biters but in the real world of the warming Humid Tropics. Nightime is slightly cooler than the daytime and win. The researchers introduced that time variation. The evening biters were a lot more likely to have potent malaria parasites. The results are in the Journal. Nature Ecology and evolution. Not all mosquito. Bite sorry so Mosquitoes biting evening. Can't have highest transmission potential comparing to mosquitoes biting at midnight or in the morning suffer so the difference in the likelihood of mosquitoes becoming infectious has to do with the way that the malaria parasite matures. The parasites have a tougher time developing when Mosquitos too warm but if a mosquito picks up the parasites from blood around dusk those parasites have more hours of cooler nighttime temps to complete their developments next so wants to conduct a similar study of wild mosquitoes and wild malaria parasites in Africa to see if there's lots from his lab mosquitoes hold up either way. Bednets will remain an important tool but understanding the enemies. Behavior is always crucial information in any

Malaria Bednets Africa Center For Infectious Disease USA Penn State University
‘Dancing for my dad’: Penn State’s THON unites generations in the fight against cancer

Business Rockstars

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

‘Dancing for my dad’: Penn State’s THON unites generations in the fight against cancer

"Penn state university's dance marathon came to a close with the announcement that the largest student run philanthropy in the world top almost twelve million dollars in donations for its twenty twenty event the total goes towards funding pediatric cancer research and covering the medical expenses of patients being treated at the Penn state children's hospital the weekend featured a fashion show the dance competitions and performances by a number of Penn state's singing groups there are more than seven hundred dancers this year who spent the entire forty six hours without

Penn State University Penn State
What Podcast Newsletters Should I Subscribe To?

Feedback with EarBuds

09:33 min | 2 years ago

What Podcast Newsletters Should I Subscribe To?

"There are tons of podcasts. Newsletters out there. Some are monthly summer weekly and some are even daily since ear. Buds podcast collective was initially a newsletter. The podcast newsletter. Seen is near and dear to my heart. I become friends on and off the Internet with other newsletter writers over the past years and I wanted to give them a chance to share what they're up to some of the newsletters you'll learn about our recommendation. Roundups others are podcast industry info engines and some are a combination of both. You'll hear from these writers in their own words. All about the. Why the how the WHO you get it? All about their newsletters. I asked them to share who they are the names of their newsletters where to find them a bit more so without further. Ado Let me hand the the mic over to my podcast newsletter writer friends. Let's do this. Hi This is Sarah from the audible. Feast appetizer mine. Newsletter comes out monthly in it features the best podcast episodes. I've heard all month links to my listening logs. Right track everything. Listen to and some editorial content about stuff going on and podcast land. I especially like to feature indie shows. You can subscribe to it at audible DOT COM I. I started my website and newsletter. Back in two thousand fifteen because there weren't a lot of review sites at the time and I wanted to create a resource that went much deeper than the popular stuff on it used to be the I tunes charts. Hey ear buds fans. This is Paul Condo and I write the podcast Gumbo newsletter which recommends three main podcast podcast episodes plus a little more every Wednesday. My mom calls snarky fun and self deprecating all the recommendations are episodes. Says I love for one reason or another which is why started this newsletter. I wanted to share all the great shows that I was listening to that may be the average listener. I wasn't aware of. You can sign up at PODCAST GUMBO DOT COM which also gets you a copy of my rather large e book of recommendations and lastly don't let anybody tell you that I don't love puppies. Hey everyone my name is Jenna Spinelli and I. I am the creator of a newsletter called the University of podcast it's a newsletter that looks specifically at the role of podcasting in higher education. I I work at Penn State University where I host and produce a podcast called democracy works and I started the newsletter because I was seeing lots of great examples. Also podcasts in Higher Ed also having people reach out to me ask questions about how to get started or how to shape their show how to find an audience it's the newsletter shares. Tips Resources Best Practices an awesome examples of some really great podcasts that are being produced by colleges and universities abuse throughout the US and around the world you can find it at Jena Spinelli Dot com slash newsletter. That's J. E. N. N. A. S. appea- I N. E. L. L. E. dot com slash newsletter. Thank you to Arielle and air buds for including me in this episode and I look forward to hearing about all the other great podcast newsletters out there. Thanks Hi my name. Is Eric Jones and I write the hurt your brain newsletter. You can find past issues and sign up hurt. Your brain dot com the types of shows that I talk about and recommend in the newsletter are largely non fiction by love learning from podcast. It's one of of The best ways for me to learn about the world so anything that makes me think Ortiz's me something new. I like to share with other people. So that's really how it started was us taking taking notes as listening to these shows anyway and this was a way for me to to share that with others so in addition to the recommendations each newsletter as a bonus of sorts includes a podcast related drawing as well. So thank you and please check it out. My name is an NFL on this collins. And I write the newsletter audio dramatic which is dedicated to showcasing and discussing all things relevant to fiction. PODCASTS you can sign up for my newsletter over at my website site at Honda's Collins Dot Com. I write Minna reviews essays spotlight important news and linked to other commended reading for creators and listeners alike. When I started audio dramatic fiction podcasts desperately needed more platforms like this places that were dedicated to helping those creators find their audiences? I think fiction's fiction having a moment now in audio and I'm excited to see where it takes us. I'm Mike yes and I write this week and podcasts which directs listeners to the most notable so an interesting podcast every week I focus on four things. Kick it off with a hot. Take a funder provocative line pulled from podcast a second I highlight worthwhile all deep dives which are either multi part series or singular dies into a topic stuff you can binge? The third section is guest appearances. I highlight usually thirty to fifty fifty notable guests each week and I close it out with the section on debut podcasts. I always tried to highlight what I think are the key developments on the charts but also include in these and I give my own takes here and there but mostly. I'm just a podcast lever looking to help listeners. Know what's out there and find podcast they'll love to you can sign up at weakened PODCAST DOT com. I'm Lauren and the creator of podcast the newsletter. Your weekly love letter to podcasts. And the people who make them. And if you subscribe the every single Friday you get an email for me at has a little introduction. Something I've written about podcasts. Long list of my weekly recommendations. And there's always as an interview with the host or producers somebody in the podcasting industry whom I love and I want you to love to so good a podcast the newsletter dot dot com. And you can see my archive and decide if you want to subscribe and they hope you do. Thanks Heather my name's Ashen and I run the find the pod newsletter. Her find that part is a weekly email newsletter that features five great podcasts that I think my newsletter audience will enjoy. I started the newsletter because frankly the podcast discover ability is still kind of terrible. The podcast feature cover almost every topic but must meet the criteria of what I believe is a podcast that is high quality and the my newsletter audience will find either interesting entertaining or useful. You can subscribe to the newsletter at that. Find that POT DOT com. My name is even gradient on the CO founder of podcast delivery. Where if you sign up that PODCAST DELIVERY DOT COM? You'll receive weekly podcast recommendations in your inbox every Monday. We started this because we understood that the podcast discovery struggle was Israel and we wanted to make things easier and simple we. We'd through the endless stream of new content and dig through all the noise until we find a jam and then we send it your away. Our goal is to let listeners. Listen and forget about discovering we know that you want to start off every week on the right foot and we're here to help with that we'll deliver a fresh rush. PODCAST recommendation. The moment you sign up and every Monday once you subscribe at podcast delivery Dot Com. Hi My name is will Williams. This newsletter is the Williams podcast newsletter. You can find that by going to my website. It's will williams dot reviews with one L. so it's W. I l. w. w. I l. l. a. m. s. doc reviews. There should be a little pop up there. And there's also something on the side where you can sign up for the newsletter. I made the newsletter because I wanted a place to write about just kind of my observations of the industry gives them a shout out to people who don't typically get shoutouts in most big publications and to keep up with my work when I am writing for other sources in my newsletter. You can usually find some kind of advice or something that I have learned for. We're just a little bit of an update on the industry as a whole it's kind of whatever I'm thinking of that month as the industry changes so much. Hello I'm James Cridland an and Eireann called news your free daily briefing on podcasting and on demand. It's a daily email and you can also find senior smart speaker news briefing to where we sound like this. It should take less than three minutes to keep up to speed with all the news and you can subscribe to pot news for free at pod. News Dot net. I started at eighteen months ago because ever since I got involved in podcasting in two thousand and five. The wasn't quick way to keep up to speed on an increasingly global industry and there is now. Oh which is nice. Hey My name is Sky Pillsbury and I write the inside podcasting email newsletter. It goes out three times a week and it contains the ten most most interesting things that happened in podcasting that day. According to me it could be industry news. An eye opening twitter thread information about a new podcast. Whatever has caught my eye and I try to make it fun? I wanted to be something you look forward to reading. And doesn't feel like a chore you can subscribe to It for free at inside dot com forward slash podcasting. I jumped at the chance to write this newsletter which is part of the inside dot com network of newsletters because I am super passionate about podcast us and the podcast industry as a whole. Wow Wow wow so much newsletter knowledge for you to absorb a big thanks to everyone who contributed to this

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

Thom Hartmann

05:37 min | 2 years ago

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

"In our science fact of the day this just in according to the world meteorological association no you know flaming left wing think tank the a this is the W. ammo the literally the world meteorological association atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide CO two are now at the highest ever in three million years now that is longer than human history human history only goes back a couple hundred thousand years so atmosphere CO two levels right now are higher than when Lucy was around right the the pre human and a higher than when Lucy's ancestors were around getting Lucy was only about a million or so ago all of which means that our children and grandchildren can expect temperatures to continue to rise more extreme weather more sea level rise more destruction to marine life more destruction of land based ecosystems more death of insects and and stuff at the bottom of the food chain which then echoes up so that the birds die and and we're saying this right now you know sixty seventy percent of certain kinds of birds particularly the insect insectivorous birds drawn from our planet we're looking at at at an insect apocalypse right now and and this is just the very beginning we have not yet even hit one point five degrees Celsius increase in temperature over the bass line and the pre industrial base line I mean we're just about there but we haven't quite hit it and the bottom line what what all these climate scientists are saying is is that we have to stop it right there I can't go any farther and yet what is the industry doing right now and and in on the right wing media that is that is supportive of industry while they're making fun of the stuff I mean Michael Mann for example the the the scientist he's been a guest on this program many times as a brilliant easy university of Pennsylvania sciences he's the guy who invented the cop the hockey stick conception of the SCO to going up that Al Gore popularized bed professor of cleans climate science or atmospheric science or whatever it is add to Penn state university one of probably a top five climate scientists in the world Michael Mann me was made fun of by the competitive interest enterprise institute in their blog ran Samberg wrote that well first of all they they attacked Michael Mann they said that his science was nonsense and and that is so Penn state did an investigation because there was all this ball Rollin publicity Penn state did an investigation what they found was that he was totally stand up everything he said was true and the way he said it was fine and though he published it was in compliance with scientific rigorous scientific standards reviews stuff so the compatible devices that is one of these right wing think tanks in quotes it really just a propaganda show operation for industry guy name brand Sandburg wrote that Penn state had quote covered up one two in by Michael Mann and characterize man as quote the Jerry Sandusky of climate science because he had quote molested and tortured data in service of politicized science and then not a blog posted by hosted by the National Review online the national reviews the magazine that William F. Buckley started back in the day when he was alive the saying that the you know the National Review is supporting segregation not just in South Africa but in the United States as well apartheid the National Review still around even though he is gone and they said in the end they oppose this was mark staying he said the man was behind the fraudulent climate change study in the investigation clearing him was a cover up basically and so Michael Landon Jr mattered factions from from the competitive enterprise institute see I am from National Review and instead they naturally you published an op ed by rich Lowry their editor titled get lost well so Matt Michael Mann suit and they just tried to get the lawsuit dismissed and here's the headline this is in the Washington post's Robert Barnes a climate scientists may pursue his definition lawsuit against a magazine in a Washington think tank after the Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene at this stage of the litigation Sam Alito dissented Sam Mr craze right wing dissented but the the Supreme Court said not spread go ahead and so on it's absolutely amazing I mean this is this is so so here we are we've got more CO two in the atmosphere than at any time in the history of the human race or even the pre human race day in other holidays mmhm more and more CO two in the air our course it takes sometimes as much as a century to that for the CO two in a holding heat and to accumulate to the point where you really start seeing the effects we're already starting to and you've got industry trying to pretend that there's not and there's nothing to see here and making fun of it ridicule and the folks and I've got real scientists were starting to fight back and say no this is real stuff and then the world meteorological organization just comes out and says CO two levels higher than they've ever been

World Meteorological Associati Hundred Thousand Years Sixty Seventy Percent Five Degrees Celsius Three Million Years
Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls

All Things Considered

02:48 min | 2 years ago

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls

"Thanks there are millions of dairy cows in the U. S. producing an amazing amount of milk but the drive to maximize production has come with an undesirable side effect the cows have become more and more genetically similar in fact the vast majority of them are descended from just two bowls NPR's Dan Charles has the story Chad deck out is sitting in his office at Penn state university explaining help Jerry cal's ended up so much alike this is the company select sires we're looking at the website of a company that sells semen from bowls so if we just look at their whole scheme lineup Holstein cows in the black and white ones that make a lot of milk they dominate the dairy business says loading America's finest bowls there on the screen that's right there are just a few companies like this with hundreds of stud bowls thirty farmers go online pick a bowl and the company's ship doses of semen to impregnate their cal's factors one bowl who we figure he has well over a quarter million dollars the company's rank their bowls based on how their daughters perform how much milk they produce this is a bull named frazzled his daughters are predicted to produce two thousand one hundred and fifty eight pounds more milk than daughters of the average ball farmers pay extra for semen from top ranked bulls and the company's keep breeding even better what's meeting their top bowls with the most productive cal's they keep selecting the same families over and over again well a few years ago Chad deck ounce mother scientist at Penn state made the discovery that shocked a lot of people all the Holstein bulls that farmers are using can trace their lineage back to just one of two male ancestors everything goes back to two bowls born in the nineteen fifties and sixties and their names their names were around oak rag apple elevation in Pawnee farm are Linda chief now this doesn't mean that all the bulls in the catalog are genetically identical have lots of different mothers and grandmothers but judge Eckels says it does show the system of large scale artificial insemination farmers picking top ranked bowls has made cal's genetically less diverse trait that you have found in Holstein cows a generation ago have disappeared we've lost genetic variation some of that genetic variation was garbage that we didn't want to begin with some of it was valuable stuff that will be gone to see what might have been lost decal decided to do an X. he located some old seem from other bowls that were alive decades ago with names like university of Minnesota Cuthbert then Zimmerman all star pilot heirloom bulls the US department of agriculture keeps samples of the semen in deep freeze storage in fort Collins Colorado decal used it to impregnate some modern counts they gave birth and now you can see some lost pieces of the hosting family tree come to life in a barn at

Milk Fifty Eight Pounds Million Dollars
How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 2 years ago

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

"Welcome how can a community grow in population while cutting carbon emissions that is the challenge facing the whole planet in the fight against climate change NPR's Dan Charles reports on how Penn state university is doing that from the top of beaver stadium one of the very biggest stadiums in the entire world you can see just part of Penn state's vast and beautiful campus he picked a spectacular data come visit the new rob Cooper is the university's director of engineering and energy we've got six hundred major buildings here over twenty two million square feet parking lots with thousands of cars the couple of gas burning steam plants for heating we have our own water system wells we have our own waste water plant basically it's a city with sixty thousand people and students on campus a lot more when there's football. and like most American cities it runs largely on fossil fuels releasing hundreds of thousands of tons of greenhouse gases every year from those steam plants from power stations far away that supply electricity from the cars the people drive to campus from aircraft that faculty take to conferences. state has added up all those emissions over the past twenty years and it makes kind of an amazing graph twenty years ago the line was going up up up the university was growing more people more buildings burning more coal and gas just like the rest of America and then you get to two thousand four and the line suddenly changes direction it starts falling like it's rolling down a mountain and it's been falling ever since even though the university still growing yeah we've been pretty successful over the last fifteen years I wanted to know how it happened so I went to see professor Chris you'll in the department of biology and my I guess Passionist with ecology in the mid nineteen nineties you'll helped organize a small environmental movement on campus there were students calculating greenhouse emissions from specific buildings looking at technical alternatives when we unveil these different reports we would meet on the steps of old main which is you know and stuff like this big center the university and lots of people showed up you know the press was there they put the university under pressure and as it happened these activists had some allies deep inside the university administration building engineers maintenance guys led by a former navy officer named Ford striker who was in charge of buildings and construction we've seen a lot of evidence that global warming was a real thing and we you know we were concerned about it striker pulled off a classic bureaucratic move he convinced the university president to declare environmental stewardship an official priority the pressure from students probably helped this give them leverage inside the administration he got the university to set up a fund to pay for upgrades that cut greenhouse emissions it took awhile. to get the budget guys and you know in the finance guys to agree but you know we're like they they had to be convinced that it was money that could be paid back yeah heck yeah I mean we had to demonstrate to we're actually saving money and this is what turned around that graph of greenhouse emissions a whole bunch of projects that cut the university's demand for energy and they typically paid for themselves within ten years through lower energy bills rob Cooper who worked for strikers as some what they did was really basic like fine tuning heating and air conditioning systems and you'd be surprised what you find when you try

Twenty Years Fifteen Years Ten Years
How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half  And Saving Money

Environment: NPR

05:12 min | 2 years ago

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half And Saving Money

"How can a community grow in population while cutting carbon emissions? That is the challenge facing the whole planet in the fight against climate change. NPR's NPR's Dan Charles reports on how Penn State University is doing that from the top of beaver Stadium One of the very biggest stadiums in the entire world. You can see just part of Penn State's vast and beautiful campus. You picked a spectacular day. Come visit. Didn't you rob. Cooper is the university's director of Engineering and energy. We've got six hundred major buildings here over twenty two million square feet parking lots with thousands of cars a couple of gas burning steam plants for for heating. We have our own water system wells. We have our own wastewater plant. Basically it's a city with sixty thousand people when students are on campus a lot more when there's walking and like most American cities it runs largely on fossil fuels releasing hundreds of thousands of tons of greenhouse gases every year from those steam plants from from power stations far away that supply electricity from the cars that people drive to campus from aircraft that faculty take to conferences. Penn state has added up all those emissions over the past twenty years and it makes kind of an amazing Graf twenty years ago the line was going up up up the university was growing more people more buildings burning more coal and gas just like the rest of America and then you get to two thousand four and the lines suddenly changes direction. It starts falling like it's rolling down a mountain and it's been falling ever since even though the university still growing yeah. We've been pretty successful over the last fifteen years. I wanted to know how it happened so I went to see Professor Chris. You'll I'm in the department of Biology and my guest passion is with ecology. In the mid nineteen ninety s you'll help organize a small mall environmental movement on campus. There were students calculating greenhouse emissions from specific buildings looking at technical alternatives. When we unveiled these different reports we would meet eat on the steps of old main. Which is you know? It's like this big center. The university and lots of people showed up you know the press was there. They put the university under pressure and as it happened these activists had some allies deep inside the university administration building engineers maintenance guys led by a former navy officer named Ford striker who was in charge of buildings and construction. We've seen a lot of evidence that global warming was a real thing and we you know we were concerned about it. Striker pulled off a classic bureaucratic move. He convinced the university president to declare environmental stewardship and official priority. The pressure from students probably helped this. This gave him leverage inside the administration. He got the university to set up a fund to pay for upgrades that cut greenhouse emissions. It took a while to get the budget guys in You know in a finance guys to agree but you know we're like they. They had to be convinced that it was money. That could be paid back. Oh Yeah Heck Yeah I mean we had to demonstrate mm straight to we're actually saving money and this is what turned around that graph of greenhouse emissions a whole bunch of projects that cut the university's demand for energy and they typically really paid for themselves within ten years through Lower Energy Bills Rob Cooper who worked for striker says some what they did was really basic like fine tuning heating and air conditioning questioning systems and you'd be surprised what you find when you try to tune up buildings. HVAC system. It's one of the shortest paybacks consistently three to five years on on every building that we go into in the central heating plant. They switched the fuel from coal to natural gas. They installed new energy saving motors and windows this here. The university signed a deal to buy electricity from a new five hundred acre solar farm. Here's Andrew Gut Berlet Penn State's manager of Engineering Services. Every time we looked at added before the economics weren't there we could not get solar power or any renewable energy for less than we were buying it off the grid until now now penn state's greenhouse emissions now are down by a third compared to the peak in two thousand four in a few years with solar power rolling in they should be down almost fifty percent which which seems really hopeful because in principle any city could do this. The country could in essence. We are demonstrating that this can be done to notes of caution though I I ben States not irregular city with thousands of homeowners making their own decisions it owns all the buildings and heating plans. It can make decisions that take ten years to pay off and the second caution is cutting emissions in half is good but it's not enough not if you're really trying to stop global warming so penn state has a much more ambitious. Just go an eighty percent reduction by twenty fifty. Some people on campus are pushing for one hundred percent so I ask shelley mccaig the person at Penn State. WHO's in charge of measuring those emissions. Are you going to make that goal. You're asking me we we need to. I mean do. We have a concrete plan to get there. We we do not and there is the country doesn't either but they are studying lots of possibilities figuring out how much each one would cost what it would accomplish so far. They are on track to reach their goal.

Penn State Penn State University Rob Cooper NPR Beaver Stadium Dan Charles Professor Chris Department Of Biology Director Of Engineering Graf America Andrew Gut
"penn state university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Former Penn State university, president Graham Spaniard has been thrown up by federal judge. She'll the eve of his prison sentence issued a decision state. Prosecutors three months to retry Spaniard he had been due to report to jail early Wednesday to begin serving a minimum sentence of two months Daniels forced out at president shortly after Jerry Sandusky twenty eleven arrest on child molestation charges in twenty twelve's Banya with accused of criminal cover up, although many of those charges were dismissed by an appeals court Spaniards lawyers argue the application of the law who acts that occurred years before the measure was passed violated the US constitution, but the judge didata agree with their argument that the statute of limitations had been improperly applied. Lisa, sarah. Fox News Minneapolis police officer humming nor convicted Tuesday, the shooting death last summer of a woman who had called nine one one. Report a possible of fault near her home, nor who said he fired Justin Daymond as she approached their patrol car. So he feared for his partner safety he'll be sentenced June. Seventh bailed nine for the nineteen year old suspect and Saturday shooting at a synagogue in southern California John Ernest charged with murder will they tinker with interest rates. We'll find out later today when the Federal Reserve Board wraps up its two day meeting. The uneventful gathering will be different from the two meetings earlier this year where the central Bank pivoted back in December the fed raise rates and penciled in more increases this year. However at the January and March gatherings. They had shelved plans for any changes when their meeting ends is afternoon. The fed is expected to keep interest rates steady with solid growth and muted price measures. Supporting they're holding pattern the prospect of continued low rates keeping borrowing costs low for both households and companies, and is helping drive record. Highs on Wall Street. Hillary barsky, Fox News. Stocks closing Wednesday mixed futures daily one hundred. Points higher.

Graham Spaniard president Justin Daymond Penn State university sarah Hillary barsky fed Fox News Jerry Sandusky Federal Reserve Board Minneapolis US California Daniels Lisa officer John Ernest
The Story of GE's $22 Billion Writedown

WSJ What's News

03:29 min | 2 years ago

The Story of GE's $22 Billion Writedown

"Electric is scheduled to update its financial outlook on Thursday and the struggling conglomerate might be asked to explain the massive amounts of goodwill that it's recorded then written down. The Wall Street Journal's Michael Rapaport has written a piece about how GE built up then wrote down twenty two billion dollars in goodwill. Michael joins us in our studio. Michael first of all tell us what goodwill is and how GE has employed over the past few years. Goodwill is an asset that a company recognizes when it buys another company it basically reflects the difference between the costs it paid require the of the company and the value of the assets as it acquire like its properties in real estate. And the difference essentially goes on a company's balance sheet is goodwill, but gee, made some fairly unusual decisions. When it bought the French company Alstom MAC in twenty fifteen and recorded thirteen point five billion dollars in goodwill. Even though it had only paid him at ten billion dollars for the company, and that was followed by smother unusual decisions in they. Boosted that amount of goodwill more than seventeen billion. They kept all that good role in their Brooks. Even when they arguably should should have taken a right down right down in value when their business started going sour until he finally took that big twenty two million dollar right down to the fall of twenty eighteen you, quote, a Penn State university associate professor of accounting ever cats as saying that while GE's accounting follows the rules. He couldn't recall another case in which the goodwill accompany recognized from a deal exceeded his costs, and you quote him saying the justification is on the aggressive side. That's right. He's a candidate with when accounting rules, which are very elaborate and very complex in terms of how come to calculates the amount of goodwill. It puts on its books, but as in some other areas to the Wall Street Journal reporter on the past jeez. Accounting was seen as aggressive by. But pushing the boundaries by by number of accounting experts, and these maneuvers that you tell us about is this how GE ended up totaling twenty two billion dollars in goodwill. As does it add up to that? Well, the good-will. Geez. Books comes from from a bunch. Of past acquisitions, and then also was only the biggest most recent of them a lot of goodwill went into their at their power unit. That started having such problems. What happens is that a company has to test its goodwill every year, it has to that the value of the reporting unit that contains a good role is still high enough to justify carrying if you'll be reporting. You're the Tony worth five billion dollars. But his ten billion dollars worth of goodwill. That doesn't make sense that that means that value has to be written down. Gene kept testing that goodwill as as was required until it finally in the fall of two thousand eighteen reach a conclusion that the value of of some of its power reporting units could no longer support Terry men of goodwill. And that's when I took the right down, right? Isn't it questionable because the right down has the effective shielding and assets problems from investors aren't they titled to now. Yes, they are. And what happens is that keeping all that goodwill and jeeze books that contributes towards shareholder equity its book value there that the value actually in the company actually owned by investors having that on there. Kind of mask the fact that when you take out that goodwill which afterwards intangible did it doesn't produce anything for the company. Geez. Book value was actually sharply negative since about mid twenty sixteen having all that goodwill, essentially, what g did import was recognized al-shams acid says goodwill as opposed to some of the more tangible assets, they lowered the value of some of the tangible assets, while increasing the value of the goodwill that benefit g because mo- many types of assets you have to they lose valuable for a period of time.

Goodwill Michael Rapaport GE The Wall Street Journal Associate Professor Of Account Alstom Mac Brooks Penn State University Reporter Gene Terry Twenty Two Billion Dollars Five Billion Dollars Ten Billion Dollars Twenty Two Million Dollar
Parents sue 28 Penn State frat brothers after son's hazing death

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:49 sec | 3 years ago

Parents sue 28 Penn State frat brothers after son's hazing death

"The parents of a young man killed in a two thousand seventeen hazing tragedy has settled a lawsuit against Penn State university. But USA's Chris Barnes reports they filed a new lawsuit in connection with their son's death is death in two thousand seventeen made worldwide headlines after he'd fallen down a flight of stairs. After fraternity members forced him to drink huge amounts of alcohol, then they left him on a couch and didn't call to get treatment for them for about twelve hours. Now, the parents of Timothy Piazza have settled that lawsuit against the university. Terms of it have not been released now, though, they're following a federal wrongful death lawsuit against those twenty eight former fraternity members. There's several of them have already pled guilty to criminal charges related to the hazing death.

Penn State University Timothy Piazza Chris Barnes USA Twelve Hours
Turkey's Markets Plunge Into the Unknown After U.S. Sanctions

Bloomberg Markets

08:45 min | 3 years ago

Turkey's Markets Plunge Into the Unknown After U.S. Sanctions

"It filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors and Turkish markets plunging today deeper into the. Wild on president at. Sanctions imposed by the United States, its NATO ally of added to, the cross currents buffeting investors they of already, been despairing policymakers failure to contain inflation, and stem the slide in the lira under. Pressure from president one to bolster growth recapping. US equities, higher across the board with the s&p up. Fourteen of five tenths of one percent I'm Charlie Pellett and that is. A Bloomberg business flash Thank you very much Charlie Pellett art it's, time to bring in, Joe Weisenthal our markets editor for Bloomberg news, also co host of what you miss yes. Every weekday every trading, day three. Thirty PM Wall Street time, only on Bloomberg television and you can follow Joe on Twitter at the stalwart also joining us in studios Dave Wilson Bloomberg stocks editor and you can follow Dave on Twitter at the one Dave all, right Joe Weisenthal post Federal Reserve meeting no change in interest. Rates for the United States but a change of interest rates for. The United Kingdom from the Bank of England is, that relevant to what, you're, looking at today I mean the thing is about the Bank of England is that it really. Only affects the, UK when we talk about central banks Having an influence on global market is usually the via we and the b.. O. j. and the fed, but I still think it's interesting that the. Bank of England hiked not. Because it's gonna, have any ripple effects outside of outside. Of the market there but because for. Whatever reason central bankers seemed to really like hiking rates and the proof. Of, that is that it's hard to imagine that the UK's risk of overheating the economy decelerating they're facing a potentially big shock and they still went ahead with it anyway. But why, did they do it they do it because they were concerned about inflationary, pressures. Because of, the devaluation of the pound maybe it's very compelling there's like a little bit of, inflation but it's already trending down there was some point there was some talk before. That they needed to hike because they didn't hike? Some other, time they were expected to hike and now they need to show some credibility I don't really get that so you know I think central banker. Just like to hike they can? Okay we can pass on that I guess all right I really believe I've every let's bring. The one Dave in. Here David Wilson stocks editor for Bloomberg, news has the hike had. Any impact on the. Stock markets here in the states you wanna talk about what's going on in stocks look at. Across the pie you're looking, at apple and tesla right mean apple becoming. The first US could apple. And tesla again Yesterday was Day NASDAQ is up one and a. Quarter percent the NASDAQ is up more than ninety six, points? Today right and apple is read the forefront. Of that this is the first US company to cross a trillion dollars in. Market value and when you look at the way that the stock has, moved up it doesn't look like it's going to be a one, day wonder which is what. You saw November two thousand seven when petrochina's started trading in Shanghai and got above the trillion dollars four day while apple is the largest stock in, the? NASDAQ right, I mean it accounts for something like eight and a half percent of the total. NASDAQ waiting so when apple moves the NASDAQ's gonna, move well. That's true a bear. In mind you go back and look at how this stock. Has done it is been, up all but two years since two thousand three I mean it's not something. That just sort of happened all at once and you can argue whether, the reaction to the earnings that came out earlier this week me, justifies the latest move in. That said there were definitely some pluses in the numbers and we know that apple has a history of introducing models in September which is the last, month? Of their, fiscal year so that's something to look forward to and when you put it all. Together this history making day not only for apple, but also. For the US market. And you mentioned tesla certainly the story there is very different. This is a company that's, never made money a company that day Oh no it's not. I mean even Amazon, was in that situation once upon a. Time but taste certainly make a whole lot of money these days Years, later I mean you know you had to wait for it right yeah the point is though they've never made a profit they'd been using up cash, and you know this story is they didn't use up as. Much cast last quarter is analysts were looking for only seven hundred and forty million dollars and that. Was enough to send Tesla's shares on a roll so that's sort of where that company is. And musk is starting to sound more like a CEO not like he did three months ago when he was berating analysts on his quarterly conference call so you got. Tesla up fourteen and a half percent at the moment it it, does kind of show, you that, it, doesn't, take much. Sometimes to, get investors excited and when you get sort of a, few points to focus on you see the results Joe is Is apple. The best stock ever and his tesla are we being old fashioned in saying that test is. Gonna make money no I don't think we're being I mean I don't know what the best ever is I think there probably are stocks that have had better returns. In shorter periods of time Netflix comes to mind if we're just, thinking about the century, so far You know Apple's one trillion is a really high number Breathtaking story as for tesla look I think what got investors excited yesterday was partly the indication and the promise of positive, cash flow going forward and prophets that big said a they've had predictions in the past about this stuff that I think disappointed. Investors in the end and be they gotta, hit it and so I think that sort. Of shows you know. There is a limit to it quick question for you Joe Weisenthal you're going to. Buy any new apple, product that comes out in September you're on your phone you probably will because. I, think I'll be up for. A, new phone, at yeah you got an apple now yeah Yeah. Yeah No I have like the seven. Or, whatever no, Dave Wilson. Just curious I also had. The seven I was thinking about buying one, last year. Skipped it I'll think a whole lot hard harder about buying one this year Bob every I'm not even going. As, pigeons yeah I figured you it's tried. And true. My, friend, yeah But. It's Feed bill Rooftops still cheaper than I guess. It is thanks very much Joe Weisenthal co host of what Jim is check. It out, Bloomberg television three thirty PM Wall. Street time and, of course Dave Wilson Bloomberg stocks columnist David e dwilson Bloomberg. Dot net sign up for his daily free. Email newsletter now let's go to. Our ninety nine one studios in Washington DC where Martin dicara has world the, national headlines Martin thanks him happening. Right now top White House officials are describing plans to safeguard the midterm elections from. Foreign interference the administration's been criticized for not. Doing more stay tuned to Bloomberg radio for more on this. Developing story the, massive wildfire northern California grew overnight fueled, by wind the blaze in and around the city of reading now covers two hundred. Square miles Cal. Fire director Ken Pimlot says an army. Of firefighters thirteen thousand strong is working to contain it and other blazes across the state over twenty seven thousand Firefighters on the fire lines throughout the western United States so almost half of. Those are right here in California wildfires are also scorching hundreds of square miles. In Oregon, more than eleven hundred people likely. Died after hurricane, Maria hit Puerto Rico far more than the official death count. Of sixty four Penn State university study is. The second such review to make. Clear President Trump initially underestimated the tragedy when he compared it favorably to the, aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in two. Thousand five this new report suggests nearly seven hundred of the deaths occurred during two. Months when much of Puerto Rico had no. Electricity Republican hopes for a quick confirmation of supreme court nominee. Brett Cavanaugh might, be over the national archive says won't, be able to complete its review of nearly a million documents regarding Kavanagh's time in. The.

Apple Bloomberg United States Tesla Joe Weisenthal Dave Wilson Bloomberg Bank Of England Dave President Trump FED Editor United Kingdom Charlie Pellett David Wilson Dave Wilson