35 Burst results for "Penn State University"

New book charts changing tactics of fossil fuel lobby

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 5 d ago

New book charts changing tactics of fossil fuel lobby

"2021 brings a new president and new priorities for climate change solutions. How quickly can the. Us pivot toward a cleaner. Climate policy penn state university professor. Michael mann's new book. The new climate war the fight to take back. Our planet has some ideas. Michael welcome back to climate cast. Thanks great to be with you. Give us a thumbnail sketch of your book. What's the message here. The message here is actually pretty simple. Look climate change. Denial is no longer tenable fossil fuel interests. Those who've done their bidding. Those forces of inaction the inactive. Est says i call them simply recognize that they can credibly claim that climate change isn't real that it isn't human caused in that it isn't doing real damage now and so they've turned to other tactics in an effort to delay that necessary transition away from fossil fuels Moving attention away from the need for systemic solutions for policies that incentivize renewable energy and put a price on carbon to individual lifestyle changes Another one is false. Solutions the idea that there are simple technological fixes that somehow don't necessitate us getting off of fossil fuels. Michael twenty twenty one brings a new president may be what i would call an opportunity point for climate solutions and making them a priority. What has president elect biden proposed that heads in the direction you want to see. The biden plan the plan that he has put forward. is a bold climate plan It includes massive investment government investment in renewable energy which is very important part of the solution. There is support for carbon pricing of putting a price on carbon polluters pay when they dumped carbon pollution into the atmosphere right. Now they don't have to pay for that so the biden administration is Emphasizing the importance of those actions They are also reengaging the global community Reasserting our support for international treaties like the paris treaty and in fact for going beyond the paris treaty. So we know the bottom line where the rubber meets. The road is the atmosphere and when we talk about these policy changes how quickly can policy changes start to have an impact on our atmosphere. Yeah you know. There's some good news there. The prevailing thinking a decade or so ago is that when we stop emitting carbon. The planet will still warm up for decades. There is a substantial revision now in understanding of the problem that we can stop emitting carbon in the atmosphere we will see the fruits of those efforts Pretty quickly and that's why it is important for us to act dramatically over the next ten years. What would you say to those who are apprehensive about climate solutions and the economy. And what will you be watching for the next four years. Yeah what i would say is that you know there's a fallacy that somehow we have to choose between the economy and the environment that's simply not true if we act on the climate crisis we will save literally trillions of dollars because extreme weather events are costing tens of billions of dollars every year here in the united states alone there were record number of them in two thousand twenty and so it's a win win we act on this problem now We can avert destroying this planet for future generations and we potentially have a healthier economy as a result of it. Michael man with penn state university. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective today Thank you very much. Paul was a pleasure talking with you.

Climate Policy Penn State Univ Biden Michael Mann Michael Biden Administration Paris United States Penn State University Paul
Despite La Nia, 2020 could be hottest year on record

Climate Cast

02:48 min | Last month

Despite La Nia, 2020 could be hottest year on record

"Just how far out of balance is earth's climate system when the numbers are in two thousand twenty is likely the first or second warmest year on record globally and that makes the past seven years the seven warmest years on record. It's an unprecedented run of warmth. In the global surface temperature record dating back to eighteen. Eighty penn state university professor. Michael man has spent a career tracking climate trans. Hi michael welcome back to climate cast. Thanks it's good to be with you. Paul let's start with twenty twenty. Where does it look like. Global temperatures will finish. There's a good chance that twenty twenty will be the warmest year on record. That's particularly surprising given. It's a la nina year. We have a la- nina event. The tropical pacific that tends to cool global temperatures a bit michael in a balanced climate system. We would expect a mix of warmer and colder than average years. How far out of balance is earth's climate system to have the past seven years be the warmest on record. Yeah well it's way out of balance and in fact a few years ago we estimated the likelihood that we would see these sort of streaks from chance alone in the absence of human caused warming and that probability is tiny one in ten thousand In one of our estimates as one article an article in discover magazine summarizing findings stated that the chances are a snowball's chance in hell basically is how likely we would see that from natural factors alone so when we include the human factor of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the models that we are able to reproduce these stretches of record warm temperatures that we're seeing we saw what you might call one benefit from the pandemic this year it looks like global greenhouse gas emissions are down about seven percent but i noticed the atmospheric. Co two levels aren't budging michael. What does that tell us about how much we need to lower emissions to get an atmospheric response in co two levels. Yeah it's sort of like a bathtub and you know if we turn the faucet down but it still on and the drain is closed. The water level won't stop rising until we turn the knob all the way off and that's essentially what we have to do. When it comes to the climate crisis we need to turn down that knob in reach what we call net zero no net carbon emissions into the atmosphere within a few decades and we need to bring carbon emissions down by roughly factor of to within the next decade if were to stay on that path where we keep warming below truly catastrophic levels more than a degree in half celsius or roughly three degrees

Penn State University Paul Let Michael La Nina Nina Discover Magazine LA
"penn state university" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:31 min | Last month

"penn state university" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"10 25. Although we cannot see spotted lantern flies in the winter, their eggs are waiting to hatch in the spring. Hey, Y W is Kim Global's spoke to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture about where the lantern flies laid their eggs so that people can head out and make sure next year's infestation is not so bad. Kim. Where are those egg masses right now? Well, they're everywhere. Shannon Powers is with the Department of Agriculture and says, except for some out liars, the spotted lantern flies are all dead now, but they laid eggs on every surface imaginable tree sidewalks, walls, the undercarriage of your car, lawn furniture. Anything that's outside was fair game. Our says That's why it's so important right now to go out and identify the egg masses. These grace mirrors that almost look like gum and she says, scraping them off and then squishing them is key. So everyone we scrape off now over the winter means 32, 50 and sex You don't have to deal with next spring when they hatch since the spotted lantern flight arrived in the state in 2014, it has spread to 26 counties. Most of them they central and eastern part of the state. Researchers at Penn State University's show The spotter lantern fly has the potential to cause $324 million worth of damage and eliminate 2800 jobs just in a single year. However, money news on K Y W Here's corny Donahoe from Bloomberg, Health Care workers and Nursing Home residents are first in line as hospitals begin giving.

Kim Global Pennsylvania Department of Agr Penn State University Department of Agriculture Shannon Powers Donahoe Bloomberg Nursing Home
"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 2 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:55 min | 3 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Dinosaur Asteroid Hit Worst Case Place

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 3 months ago

Dinosaur Asteroid Hit Worst Case Place

"Sixty, six, million years ago a giant asteroid crashed into earth killing off three quarters of all species including most of the dinosaurs researchers suspect that the impact caused the extinction by kicking up a cloud of dust and tiny droplets called aerosols that plunged the planet into something like a nuclear winter. And these components in the atmosphere drew of Global Cooling and darkness that would've stopped photosynthesis from occurring ultimately shutting down the food chain. Shelby Lyons a recent PhD graduate from Penn State University. But scientists have also found lots of sit in the geologic layers deposited immediately after the asteroid impact and the set may have been part of the killing mechanism to depending on where it came from. Some of the probably came from wildfires that erupted around the planet following the impact but most of these. Would have lingered in the lower atmosphere for only a few weeks and wouldn't have had much of an effect on global climate. But scientists hypothesized that soot may also have come from the very rocks that the asteroid pulverized when it struck if those rocks contain significant amounts of organic matter such as the remains of marine or. It would have burned up on impact sending such shooting up into the stratosphere in that case. So it would have spread around the globe in a matter of hours and stayed there for years and it would have radically altered earth's climate. So lions on her team set out to. The source of the suit they looked at chemicals known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or ages which are another byproduct of combustion. So you can find peaches and neater veggies that you grill. You can find them from the me exhaustive a car. You can also find them in smoke and debris from the wildfires. TODAY OUT WEST PH is are made up a fused rings of carbon atoms think of chicken wire to determine. The origin of the set the researchers looked at the structure and chemistry of the Ph is buried along with it. Specifically, the researchers looked for groups of atoms that stick off the rings like spikes Ph is generated from burning wood don't have many spikes but ph is from burning fossil carbon like what would have been in the target rocks have more Lien's her team found that most of the Ph is deposited after. The impact were spiky, which suggests that set from the rocks hit by the asteroid played a major role in the mass extinction. There was more dust and more sulfate aerosols than soot, but sit is a stronger locker sunlight than either of those two. So a small amount of set Ken drives, large reductions in sunlight. The findings are in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the results suggest that the devastation. Of this very city asteroid impact maybe due in part to a fluke of geography, the space rock smashed into the Gulf of Mexico where the sediments were rich organic matter. They still are the region produces large amounts of today where it had occurred was likely. One of the reasons that led to a major mass extinction. It was kind of the perfect storm or the perfect asteroid impact I guess you could call it.

Shelby Lyons Gulf Of Mexico National Academy Of Sciences Penn State University Lien KEN
Do Americans Trust Scientists

After The Fact

04:01 min | 4 months ago

Do Americans Trust Scientists

"So much of the public focuses on discovery and they. Scientists going to influence their life scientists. Of course, love the search does that explain maybe just a little bit of the dichotomy I use I think sometimes feel between scientists in the public. View that actually people are quite fascinated by. Approach that scientists take in they're quite curious about it I i. think many of the of the television shows, for example, in books about science or or very very attracted to people and can help bring them in to science and even become scientists themselves. I don't really take a do view of things concerning trust I think trust house to start with the scientists themselves they have to really be. Truthful about their exploration about what they discovered they have to try to be bias free and politically in free free politics and free of self-aggrandizement and just want to pursue the tree. We were President of one of the best engineering schools in the country and have been involved in education but your role at the national science. Foundation. And now your role with the science philanthropy alliance a little little. Bit More of a cheerleader with FBI. Correct way of saying some of this in terms of trying to let people understand the need and support for basic science and our society. Yeah I think you always go back to your roots in at high school. I was cheer. So I think there are definitely a large group of people who liked cheer and that's a very, very important to do, and of course, it demands a different kind of skill set but there's a step beyond cheering. That is just incredibly important to do what I call move the needle to really make things change at sociologically culturally there are many many disparities that abound and they affect science as well as every other field of endeavor and Jake. It's important for institutions like the National Science Foundation's to. All sorts of approaches to to blossom into encourage them scientific discovery come through many many different approaches. And by the way I've Kurd a number of times that Isaac Newton did his greatest most prevalent work during a pandemic. So crisis can also bring about the environment for making a great discovery. You were the chief scientist at NASA. That's pretty cool. What did you take from that role and how did that guy your thinking in the broader scientific community? I really want to be a researcher and that's it. I wanted to explore science deep league. In particular attracted to the cosmos. And Mike Goodness on. There's just some mysteries that it offers and so I was very very focused on that I didn't want anything to take me away from that and so when I was giving the invitation invitation to join NASA as its cheat scientists asked various close friends and colleagues. If it was a good idea, all my department heads around the country who knew me? said, what about idea will take you out of your research because they knew empower engaged wasn't that but then I talked to some of my female colleagues like a colleague who headed the history of science? Department. At Penn State University and my mother who obviously knew me well, if people like that said, well, you can't talk about how important it is that women. and. Underrepresented minorities go into science, and then not take the opportunity to do something about out to have a platform where you can be a role model for that when you can actually affect changes in that.

President Trump National Science Foundation Mike Goodness Nasa FBI Isaac Newton Penn State University Jake Researcher Scientist
Malaria Mosquitoes Biting Before Bednet Time

60-Second Science

03:04 min | 8 months ago

Malaria Mosquitoes Biting Before Bednet Time

"Than two hundred million. People get malaria each year and about half a million die mostly in Africa. Many of them children and those staggering numbers aren't improvement. Malaria deaths have been cut in half since two in many places are remarkably. Simple tool has led. The fight bednets treated with a mild insecticide at stopped mosquitoes from biting people in their sleep. Both people end. Mosquitoes are pawns in the malaria transmission cycle if an infected person gets by a mosquito. The parasite gets picked up along with the blood meal. That mosquito can then transfer the parasite to the next person bites. Bednets help stop mosquitoes from easy attacks on motionless sleepers but now some mosquitoes seem to be giving up the night shift malaria. Mosquitoes in Africa tend to ship their biting behavior and Mall. All USA from Penn State University's Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics normally they Tend to by people during the night but because of extensive use of bednets. He's mosquitoes started fighting in the evening or the morning. The assumption is that the bednets are weeding out the nighttime biters while not affecting the mosquitoes that prefer feeding at other times so those mosquitoes are thriving son and his team wanted to know whether the observed changing biting time had any impact on malaria transmission. Back in the lab. They presented Anopheles mosquitoes with the opportunity to feed on blood at six PM at midnight and six am when the laboratory was kept at an even eighty degrees Fahrenheit evening and morning biters or no more or less likely to become infectious than the midnight biters but in the real world of the warming Humid Tropics. Nightime is slightly cooler than the daytime and win. The researchers introduced that time variation. The evening biters were a lot more likely to have potent malaria parasites. The results are in the Journal. Nature Ecology and evolution. Not all mosquito. Bite sorry so Mosquitoes biting evening. Can't have highest transmission potential comparing to mosquitoes biting at midnight or in the morning suffer so the difference in the likelihood of mosquitoes becoming infectious has to do with the way that the malaria parasite matures. The parasites have a tougher time developing when Mosquitos too warm but if a mosquito picks up the parasites from blood around dusk those parasites have more hours of cooler nighttime temps to complete their developments next so wants to conduct a similar study of wild mosquitoes and wild malaria parasites in Africa to see if there's lots from his lab mosquitoes hold up either way. Bednets will remain an important tool but understanding the enemies. Behavior is always crucial information in any

Malaria Bednets Africa Center For Infectious Disease USA Penn State University
‘Dancing for my dad’: Penn State’s THON unites generations in the fight against cancer

Business Rockstars

00:33 sec | 11 months ago

‘Dancing for my dad’: Penn State’s THON unites generations in the fight against cancer

"Penn state university's dance marathon came to a close with the announcement that the largest student run philanthropy in the world top almost twelve million dollars in donations for its twenty twenty event the total goes towards funding pediatric cancer research and covering the medical expenses of patients being treated at the Penn state children's hospital the weekend featured a fashion show the dance competitions and performances by a number of Penn state's singing groups there are more than seven hundred dancers this year who spent the entire forty six hours without

Penn State University Penn State
"penn state university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"penn state university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Penn state university has reached a settlement with the family of its one time iconic football coach Kent state fire the late Joe Paterno eight years ago following the arrest of assistant coach Jerry Sandusky on child molestation charges paternal son Jay subsequently filed a lawsuit against Penn state claiming the university's report into the scandal unfairly tarnished him and hurt his chances to find a football job as part of the resolution announced yesterday the school has agreed to pay an undisclosed amount to the paternal family but will not return a statue of Joe Paterno to its place outside the football stadium Jay Paterno called the agreement a relief and a long time coming but Michigan CBS news may I be the first to wish you a happy national Margarita day it is national Margarita day yeah the drink Todd macculloch founded the day to spread his love for the drink but he tells K. next the February twenty second celebration has gotten so popular he really can't enjoy it you know most people think that I'm just drinking margaritas all day long to be honest with you it's typically not until later in the evening that I even have one because it's missing a little business for that day to me in the evening all black school didn't have a Margarita but I typically I'm on my computer for most of the day can't you just hear Jimmy buffet in the background there wastin away I'm not color says the classic Margarita by the way was invented sometime in the thirties or forties but there is quite a dispute about whether the drink began in Mexico or wait did it actually begins in Texas could it be monos well LA in Orange County residents are you ready to vote you can beginning today will.

Penn state university Jerry Sandusky Joe Paterno Jay Paterno Michigan Todd macculloch K. Jimmy buffet Mexico Texas football Penn CBS Orange County
What Podcast Newsletters Should I Subscribe To?

Feedback with EarBuds

09:33 min | 1 year ago

What Podcast Newsletters Should I Subscribe To?

"There are tons of podcasts. Newsletters out there. Some are monthly summer weekly and some are even daily since ear. Buds podcast collective was initially a newsletter. The podcast newsletter. Seen is near and dear to my heart. I become friends on and off the Internet with other newsletter writers over the past years and I wanted to give them a chance to share what they're up to some of the newsletters you'll learn about our recommendation. Roundups others are podcast industry info engines and some are a combination of both. You'll hear from these writers in their own words. All about the. Why the how the WHO you get it? All about their newsletters. I asked them to share who they are the names of their newsletters where to find them a bit more so without further. Ado Let me hand the the mic over to my podcast newsletter writer friends. Let's do this. Hi This is Sarah from the audible. Feast appetizer mine. Newsletter comes out monthly in it features the best podcast episodes. I've heard all month links to my listening logs. Right track everything. Listen to and some editorial content about stuff going on and podcast land. I especially like to feature indie shows. You can subscribe to it at audible DOT COM I. I started my website and newsletter. Back in two thousand fifteen because there weren't a lot of review sites at the time and I wanted to create a resource that went much deeper than the popular stuff on it used to be the I tunes charts. Hey ear buds fans. This is Paul Condo and I write the podcast Gumbo newsletter which recommends three main podcast podcast episodes plus a little more every Wednesday. My mom calls snarky fun and self deprecating all the recommendations are episodes. Says I love for one reason or another which is why started this newsletter. I wanted to share all the great shows that I was listening to that may be the average listener. I wasn't aware of. You can sign up at PODCAST GUMBO DOT COM which also gets you a copy of my rather large e book of recommendations and lastly don't let anybody tell you that I don't love puppies. Hey everyone my name is Jenna Spinelli and I. I am the creator of a newsletter called the University of podcast it's a newsletter that looks specifically at the role of podcasting in higher education. I I work at Penn State University where I host and produce a podcast called democracy works and I started the newsletter because I was seeing lots of great examples. Also podcasts in Higher Ed also having people reach out to me ask questions about how to get started or how to shape their show how to find an audience it's the newsletter shares. Tips Resources Best Practices an awesome examples of some really great podcasts that are being produced by colleges and universities abuse throughout the US and around the world you can find it at Jena Spinelli Dot com slash newsletter. That's J. E. N. N. A. S. appea- I N. E. L. L. E. dot com slash newsletter. Thank you to Arielle and air buds for including me in this episode and I look forward to hearing about all the other great podcast newsletters out there. Thanks Hi my name. Is Eric Jones and I write the hurt your brain newsletter. You can find past issues and sign up hurt. Your brain dot com the types of shows that I talk about and recommend in the newsletter are largely non fiction by love learning from podcast. It's one of of The best ways for me to learn about the world so anything that makes me think Ortiz's me something new. I like to share with other people. So that's really how it started was us taking taking notes as listening to these shows anyway and this was a way for me to to share that with others so in addition to the recommendations each newsletter as a bonus of sorts includes a podcast related drawing as well. So thank you and please check it out. My name is an NFL on this collins. And I write the newsletter audio dramatic which is dedicated to showcasing and discussing all things relevant to fiction. PODCASTS you can sign up for my newsletter over at my website site at Honda's Collins Dot Com. I write Minna reviews essays spotlight important news and linked to other commended reading for creators and listeners alike. When I started audio dramatic fiction podcasts desperately needed more platforms like this places that were dedicated to helping those creators find their audiences? I think fiction's fiction having a moment now in audio and I'm excited to see where it takes us. I'm Mike yes and I write this week and podcasts which directs listeners to the most notable so an interesting podcast every week I focus on four things. Kick it off with a hot. Take a funder provocative line pulled from podcast a second I highlight worthwhile all deep dives which are either multi part series or singular dies into a topic stuff you can binge? The third section is guest appearances. I highlight usually thirty to fifty fifty notable guests each week and I close it out with the section on debut podcasts. I always tried to highlight what I think are the key developments on the charts but also include in these and I give my own takes here and there but mostly. I'm just a podcast lever looking to help listeners. Know what's out there and find podcast they'll love to you can sign up at weakened PODCAST DOT com. I'm Lauren and the creator of podcast the newsletter. Your weekly love letter to podcasts. And the people who make them. And if you subscribe the every single Friday you get an email for me at has a little introduction. Something I've written about podcasts. Long list of my weekly recommendations. And there's always as an interview with the host or producers somebody in the podcasting industry whom I love and I want you to love to so good a podcast the newsletter dot dot com. And you can see my archive and decide if you want to subscribe and they hope you do. Thanks Heather my name's Ashen and I run the find the pod newsletter. Her find that part is a weekly email newsletter that features five great podcasts that I think my newsletter audience will enjoy. I started the newsletter because frankly the podcast discover ability is still kind of terrible. The podcast feature cover almost every topic but must meet the criteria of what I believe is a podcast that is high quality and the my newsletter audience will find either interesting entertaining or useful. You can subscribe to the newsletter at that. Find that POT DOT com. My name is even gradient on the CO founder of podcast delivery. Where if you sign up that PODCAST DELIVERY DOT COM? You'll receive weekly podcast recommendations in your inbox every Monday. We started this because we understood that the podcast discovery struggle was Israel and we wanted to make things easier and simple we. We'd through the endless stream of new content and dig through all the noise until we find a jam and then we send it your away. Our goal is to let listeners. Listen and forget about discovering we know that you want to start off every week on the right foot and we're here to help with that we'll deliver a fresh rush. PODCAST recommendation. The moment you sign up and every Monday once you subscribe at podcast delivery Dot Com. Hi My name is will Williams. This newsletter is the Williams podcast newsletter. You can find that by going to my website. It's will williams dot reviews with one L. so it's W. I l. w. w. I l. l. a. m. s. doc reviews. There should be a little pop up there. And there's also something on the side where you can sign up for the newsletter. I made the newsletter because I wanted a place to write about just kind of my observations of the industry gives them a shout out to people who don't typically get shoutouts in most big publications and to keep up with my work when I am writing for other sources in my newsletter. You can usually find some kind of advice or something that I have learned for. We're just a little bit of an update on the industry as a whole it's kind of whatever I'm thinking of that month as the industry changes so much. Hello I'm James Cridland an and Eireann called news your free daily briefing on podcasting and on demand. It's a daily email and you can also find senior smart speaker news briefing to where we sound like this. It should take less than three minutes to keep up to speed with all the news and you can subscribe to pot news for free at pod. News Dot net. I started at eighteen months ago because ever since I got involved in podcasting in two thousand and five. The wasn't quick way to keep up to speed on an increasingly global industry and there is now. Oh which is nice. Hey My name is Sky Pillsbury and I write the inside podcasting email newsletter. It goes out three times a week and it contains the ten most most interesting things that happened in podcasting that day. According to me it could be industry news. An eye opening twitter thread information about a new podcast. Whatever has caught my eye and I try to make it fun? I wanted to be something you look forward to reading. And doesn't feel like a chore you can subscribe to It for free at inside dot com forward slash podcasting. I jumped at the chance to write this newsletter which is part of the inside dot com network of newsletters because I am super passionate about podcast us and the podcast industry as a whole. Wow Wow wow so much newsletter knowledge for you to absorb a big thanks to everyone who contributed to this

Eating chili peppers may prevent fatal heart attacks and stroke

KNX In Depth with Charles Feldman and Mike Simpson

02:46 min | 1 year ago

Eating chili peppers may prevent fatal heart attacks and stroke

"Right now though an extensive new study out of Italy finds regularly eating chili peppers can help reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke penny Chris Atherton is a professor of nutrition specializing in diet risk factors for cardiac disease at Penn state university so penny what we think about this well it's a very exciting study of basically there were almost twenty three thousand men and women who were studied for a period of about eight years or so and basically the researchers found that regular consumption greater than four times a week of chili peppers had a lot of health benefits compared with hardly ever eating them at all and so mainly there were kind of asked the benefits so you know decrease card vessel mortality by thirty four percent decreased this call to scan the card disease that's just the narrowing of the arteries by forty four percent and that it had benefits sense river vested disease you know diseases like stroke that are very common worldwide and didn't you know just overall it decreased all cause mortality by about twenty three percent so lots of benefits of well do do do we know why that's the case and can whatever the reason is the chili peppers you know I have this result can it be put in pill form well it a nutritionist like to talk about eating good healthy foods but it's thought that maybe capsaicin an ingredient in church peppers as well as pepper may have some of the benefits that these investigators have reported that I like to tell people to eat there the food so corporate chili peppers in your diet and make sure that your diet is healthy too yeah well is this an independent of what's your diet is kind of study or were these people are following a diet that had a lot of spicy foods in it anyways well they did have some other spicy foods you are right and you know it was done and movies Italy where the people were following a medic training die and that's much better than the average western diet so they had a lot of good things going for them but in general you know people are going to reap the greatest benefits if they eat chili peppers in the context of a healthy diet yeah the chili peppers how many times a week three four times a week that's a lot well it says greater than four times a week great four times if that's like chili peppers everyday yeah that's so that's what a chilly peppers rich would you take the weekend off which would you would you eat a chart that was five days a week I'd like to the vet yeah but which is five days we come on come on maybe not maybe not two or three all right penny Chris either's improviser nutrition specializing in died risk factors cardiac disease Penn state

Italy Chris Atherton Professor Penn State University Penn Five Days Twenty Three Percent Thirty Four Percent Forty Four Percent Eight Years
Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

Thom Hartmann

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

"In our science fact of the day this just in according to the world meteorological association no you know flaming left wing think tank the a this is the W. ammo the literally the world meteorological association atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide CO two are now at the highest ever in three million years now that is longer than human history human history only goes back a couple hundred thousand years so atmosphere CO two levels right now are higher than when Lucy was around right the the pre human and a higher than when Lucy's ancestors were around getting Lucy was only about a million or so ago all of which means that our children and grandchildren can expect temperatures to continue to rise more extreme weather more sea level rise more destruction to marine life more destruction of land based ecosystems more death of insects and and stuff at the bottom of the food chain which then echoes up so that the birds die and and we're saying this right now you know sixty seventy percent of certain kinds of birds particularly the insect insectivorous birds drawn from our planet we're looking at at at an insect apocalypse right now and and this is just the very beginning we have not yet even hit one point five degrees Celsius increase in temperature over the bass line and the pre industrial base line I mean we're just about there but we haven't quite hit it and the bottom line what what all these climate scientists are saying is is that we have to stop it right there I can't go any farther and yet what is the industry doing right now and and in on the right wing media that is that is supportive of industry while they're making fun of the stuff I mean Michael Mann for example the the the scientist he's been a guest on this program many times as a brilliant easy university of Pennsylvania sciences he's the guy who invented the cop the hockey stick conception of the SCO to going up that Al Gore popularized bed professor of cleans climate science or atmospheric science or whatever it is add to Penn state university one of probably a top five climate scientists in the world Michael Mann me was made fun of by the competitive interest enterprise institute in their blog ran Samberg wrote that well first of all they they attacked Michael Mann they said that his science was nonsense and and that is so Penn state did an investigation because there was all this ball Rollin publicity Penn state did an investigation what they found was that he was totally stand up everything he said was true and the way he said it was fine and though he published it was in compliance with scientific rigorous scientific standards reviews stuff so the compatible devices that is one of these right wing think tanks in quotes it really just a propaganda show operation for industry guy name brand Sandburg wrote that Penn state had quote covered up one two in by Michael Mann and characterize man as quote the Jerry Sandusky of climate science because he had quote molested and tortured data in service of politicized science and then not a blog posted by hosted by the National Review online the national reviews the magazine that William F. Buckley started back in the day when he was alive the saying that the you know the National Review is supporting segregation not just in South Africa but in the United States as well apartheid the National Review still around even though he is gone and they said in the end they oppose this was mark staying he said the man was behind the fraudulent climate change study in the investigation clearing him was a cover up basically and so Michael Landon Jr mattered factions from from the competitive enterprise institute see I am from National Review and instead they naturally you published an op ed by rich Lowry their editor titled get lost well so Matt Michael Mann suit and they just tried to get the lawsuit dismissed and here's the headline this is in the Washington post's Robert Barnes a climate scientists may pursue his definition lawsuit against a magazine in a Washington think tank after the Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene at this stage of the litigation Sam Alito dissented Sam Mr craze right wing dissented but the the Supreme Court said not spread go ahead and so on it's absolutely amazing I mean this is this is so so here we are we've got more CO two in the atmosphere than at any time in the history of the human race or even the pre human race day in other holidays mmhm more and more CO two in the air our course it takes sometimes as much as a century to that for the CO two in a holding heat and to accumulate to the point where you really start seeing the effects we're already starting to and you've got industry trying to pretend that there's not and there's nothing to see here and making fun of it ridicule and the folks and I've got real scientists were starting to fight back and say no this is real stuff and then the world meteorological organization just comes out and says CO two levels higher than they've ever been

World Meteorological Associati Hundred Thousand Years Sixty Seventy Percent Five Degrees Celsius Three Million Years
Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls

All Things Considered

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls

"Thanks there are millions of dairy cows in the U. S. producing an amazing amount of milk but the drive to maximize production has come with an undesirable side effect the cows have become more and more genetically similar in fact the vast majority of them are descended from just two bowls NPR's Dan Charles has the story Chad deck out is sitting in his office at Penn state university explaining help Jerry cal's ended up so much alike this is the company select sires we're looking at the website of a company that sells semen from bowls so if we just look at their whole scheme lineup Holstein cows in the black and white ones that make a lot of milk they dominate the dairy business says loading America's finest bowls there on the screen that's right there are just a few companies like this with hundreds of stud bowls thirty farmers go online pick a bowl and the company's ship doses of semen to impregnate their cal's factors one bowl who we figure he has well over a quarter million dollars the company's rank their bowls based on how their daughters perform how much milk they produce this is a bull named frazzled his daughters are predicted to produce two thousand one hundred and fifty eight pounds more milk than daughters of the average ball farmers pay extra for semen from top ranked bulls and the company's keep breeding even better what's meeting their top bowls with the most productive cal's they keep selecting the same families over and over again well a few years ago Chad deck ounce mother scientist at Penn state made the discovery that shocked a lot of people all the Holstein bulls that farmers are using can trace their lineage back to just one of two male ancestors everything goes back to two bowls born in the nineteen fifties and sixties and their names their names were around oak rag apple elevation in Pawnee farm are Linda chief now this doesn't mean that all the bulls in the catalog are genetically identical have lots of different mothers and grandmothers but judge Eckels says it does show the system of large scale artificial insemination farmers picking top ranked bowls has made cal's genetically less diverse trait that you have found in Holstein cows a generation ago have disappeared we've lost genetic variation some of that genetic variation was garbage that we didn't want to begin with some of it was valuable stuff that will be gone to see what might have been lost decal decided to do an X. he located some old seem from other bowls that were alive decades ago with names like university of Minnesota Cuthbert then Zimmerman all star pilot heirloom bulls the US department of agriculture keeps samples of the semen in deep freeze storage in fort Collins Colorado decal used it to impregnate some modern counts they gave birth and now you can see some lost pieces of the hosting family tree come to life in a barn at

Milk Fifty Eight Pounds Million Dollars
How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 1 year ago

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

"Welcome how can a community grow in population while cutting carbon emissions that is the challenge facing the whole planet in the fight against climate change NPR's Dan Charles reports on how Penn state university is doing that from the top of beaver stadium one of the very biggest stadiums in the entire world you can see just part of Penn state's vast and beautiful campus he picked a spectacular data come visit the new rob Cooper is the university's director of engineering and energy we've got six hundred major buildings here over twenty two million square feet parking lots with thousands of cars the couple of gas burning steam plants for heating we have our own water system wells we have our own waste water plant basically it's a city with sixty thousand people and students on campus a lot more when there's football. and like most American cities it runs largely on fossil fuels releasing hundreds of thousands of tons of greenhouse gases every year from those steam plants from power stations far away that supply electricity from the cars the people drive to campus from aircraft that faculty take to conferences. state has added up all those emissions over the past twenty years and it makes kind of an amazing graph twenty years ago the line was going up up up the university was growing more people more buildings burning more coal and gas just like the rest of America and then you get to two thousand four and the line suddenly changes direction it starts falling like it's rolling down a mountain and it's been falling ever since even though the university still growing yeah we've been pretty successful over the last fifteen years I wanted to know how it happened so I went to see professor Chris you'll in the department of biology and my I guess Passionist with ecology in the mid nineteen nineties you'll helped organize a small environmental movement on campus there were students calculating greenhouse emissions from specific buildings looking at technical alternatives when we unveil these different reports we would meet on the steps of old main which is you know and stuff like this big center the university and lots of people showed up you know the press was there they put the university under pressure and as it happened these activists had some allies deep inside the university administration building engineers maintenance guys led by a former navy officer named Ford striker who was in charge of buildings and construction we've seen a lot of evidence that global warming was a real thing and we you know we were concerned about it striker pulled off a classic bureaucratic move he convinced the university president to declare environmental stewardship an official priority the pressure from students probably helped this give them leverage inside the administration he got the university to set up a fund to pay for upgrades that cut greenhouse emissions it took awhile. to get the budget guys and you know in the finance guys to agree but you know we're like they they had to be convinced that it was money that could be paid back yeah heck yeah I mean we had to demonstrate to we're actually saving money and this is what turned around that graph of greenhouse emissions a whole bunch of projects that cut the university's demand for energy and they typically paid for themselves within ten years through lower energy bills rob Cooper who worked for strikers as some what they did was really basic like fine tuning heating and air conditioning systems and you'd be surprised what you find when you try

Twenty Years Fifteen Years Ten Years
How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half  And Saving Money

Environment: NPR

05:12 min | 1 year ago

How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half And Saving Money

"How can a community grow in population while cutting carbon emissions? That is the challenge facing the whole planet in the fight against climate change. NPR's NPR's Dan Charles reports on how Penn State University is doing that from the top of beaver Stadium One of the very biggest stadiums in the entire world. You can see just part of Penn State's vast and beautiful campus. You picked a spectacular day. Come visit. Didn't you rob. Cooper is the university's director of Engineering and energy. We've got six hundred major buildings here over twenty two million square feet parking lots with thousands of cars a couple of gas burning steam plants for for heating. We have our own water system wells. We have our own wastewater plant. Basically it's a city with sixty thousand people when students are on campus a lot more when there's walking and like most American cities it runs largely on fossil fuels releasing hundreds of thousands of tons of greenhouse gases every year from those steam plants from from power stations far away that supply electricity from the cars that people drive to campus from aircraft that faculty take to conferences. Penn state has added up all those emissions over the past twenty years and it makes kind of an amazing Graf twenty years ago the line was going up up up the university was growing more people more buildings burning more coal and gas just like the rest of America and then you get to two thousand four and the lines suddenly changes direction. It starts falling like it's rolling down a mountain and it's been falling ever since even though the university still growing yeah. We've been pretty successful over the last fifteen years. I wanted to know how it happened so I went to see Professor Chris. You'll I'm in the department of Biology and my guest passion is with ecology. In the mid nineteen ninety s you'll help organize a small mall environmental movement on campus. There were students calculating greenhouse emissions from specific buildings looking at technical alternatives. When we unveiled these different reports we would meet eat on the steps of old main. Which is you know? It's like this big center. The university and lots of people showed up you know the press was there. They put the university under pressure and as it happened these activists had some allies deep inside the university administration building engineers maintenance guys led by a former navy officer named Ford striker who was in charge of buildings and construction. We've seen a lot of evidence that global warming was a real thing and we you know we were concerned about it. Striker pulled off a classic bureaucratic move. He convinced the university president to declare environmental stewardship and official priority. The pressure from students probably helped this. This gave him leverage inside the administration. He got the university to set up a fund to pay for upgrades that cut greenhouse emissions. It took a while to get the budget guys in You know in a finance guys to agree but you know we're like they. They had to be convinced that it was money. That could be paid back. Oh Yeah Heck Yeah I mean we had to demonstrate mm straight to we're actually saving money and this is what turned around that graph of greenhouse emissions a whole bunch of projects that cut the university's demand for energy and they typically really paid for themselves within ten years through Lower Energy Bills Rob Cooper who worked for striker says some what they did was really basic like fine tuning heating and air conditioning questioning systems and you'd be surprised what you find when you try to tune up buildings. HVAC system. It's one of the shortest paybacks consistently three to five years on on every building that we go into in the central heating plant. They switched the fuel from coal to natural gas. They installed new energy saving motors and windows this here. The university signed a deal to buy electricity from a new five hundred acre solar farm. Here's Andrew Gut Berlet Penn State's manager of Engineering Services. Every time we looked at added before the economics weren't there we could not get solar power or any renewable energy for less than we were buying it off the grid until now now penn state's greenhouse emissions now are down by a third compared to the peak in two thousand four in a few years with solar power rolling in they should be down almost fifty percent which which seems really hopeful because in principle any city could do this. The country could in essence. We are demonstrating that this can be done to notes of caution though I I ben States not irregular city with thousands of homeowners making their own decisions it owns all the buildings and heating plans. It can make decisions that take ten years to pay off and the second caution is cutting emissions in half is good but it's not enough not if you're really trying to stop global warming so penn state has a much more ambitious. Just go an eighty percent reduction by twenty fifty. Some people on campus are pushing for one hundred percent so I ask shelley mccaig the person at Penn State. WHO's in charge of measuring those emissions. Are you going to make that goal. You're asking me we we need to. I mean do. We have a concrete plan to get there. We we do not and there is the country doesn't either but they are studying lots of possibilities figuring out how much each one would cost what it would accomplish so far. They are on track to reach their goal.

Penn State Penn State University Rob Cooper NPR Beaver Stadium Dan Charles Professor Chris Department Of Biology Director Of Engineering Graf America Andrew Gut
"penn state university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"penn state university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Former Penn State university, president Graham Spaniard has been thrown up by federal judge. She'll the eve of his prison sentence issued a decision state. Prosecutors three months to retry Spaniard he had been due to report to jail early Wednesday to begin serving a minimum sentence of two months Daniels forced out at president shortly after Jerry Sandusky twenty eleven arrest on child molestation charges in twenty twelve's Banya with accused of criminal cover up, although many of those charges were dismissed by an appeals court Spaniards lawyers argue the application of the law who acts that occurred years before the measure was passed violated the US constitution, but the judge didata agree with their argument that the statute of limitations had been improperly applied. Lisa, sarah. Fox News Minneapolis police officer humming nor convicted Tuesday, the shooting death last summer of a woman who had called nine one one. Report a possible of fault near her home, nor who said he fired Justin Daymond as she approached their patrol car. So he feared for his partner safety he'll be sentenced June. Seventh bailed nine for the nineteen year old suspect and Saturday shooting at a synagogue in southern California John Ernest charged with murder will they tinker with interest rates. We'll find out later today when the Federal Reserve Board wraps up its two day meeting. The uneventful gathering will be different from the two meetings earlier this year where the central Bank pivoted back in December the fed raise rates and penciled in more increases this year. However at the January and March gatherings. They had shelved plans for any changes when their meeting ends is afternoon. The fed is expected to keep interest rates steady with solid growth and muted price measures. Supporting they're holding pattern the prospect of continued low rates keeping borrowing costs low for both households and companies, and is helping drive record. Highs on Wall Street. Hillary barsky, Fox News. Stocks closing Wednesday mixed futures daily one hundred. Points higher.

Graham Spaniard president Justin Daymond Penn State university sarah Hillary barsky fed Fox News Jerry Sandusky Federal Reserve Board Minneapolis US California Daniels Lisa officer John Ernest
The Story of GE's $22 Billion Writedown

WSJ What's News

03:29 min | 2 years ago

The Story of GE's $22 Billion Writedown

"Electric is scheduled to update its financial outlook on Thursday and the struggling conglomerate might be asked to explain the massive amounts of goodwill that it's recorded then written down. The Wall Street Journal's Michael Rapaport has written a piece about how GE built up then wrote down twenty two billion dollars in goodwill. Michael joins us in our studio. Michael first of all tell us what goodwill is and how GE has employed over the past few years. Goodwill is an asset that a company recognizes when it buys another company it basically reflects the difference between the costs it paid require the of the company and the value of the assets as it acquire like its properties in real estate. And the difference essentially goes on a company's balance sheet is goodwill, but gee, made some fairly unusual decisions. When it bought the French company Alstom MAC in twenty fifteen and recorded thirteen point five billion dollars in goodwill. Even though it had only paid him at ten billion dollars for the company, and that was followed by smother unusual decisions in they. Boosted that amount of goodwill more than seventeen billion. They kept all that good role in their Brooks. Even when they arguably should should have taken a right down right down in value when their business started going sour until he finally took that big twenty two million dollar right down to the fall of twenty eighteen you, quote, a Penn State university associate professor of accounting ever cats as saying that while GE's accounting follows the rules. He couldn't recall another case in which the goodwill accompany recognized from a deal exceeded his costs, and you quote him saying the justification is on the aggressive side. That's right. He's a candidate with when accounting rules, which are very elaborate and very complex in terms of how come to calculates the amount of goodwill. It puts on its books, but as in some other areas to the Wall Street Journal reporter on the past jeez. Accounting was seen as aggressive by. But pushing the boundaries by by number of accounting experts, and these maneuvers that you tell us about is this how GE ended up totaling twenty two billion dollars in goodwill. As does it add up to that? Well, the good-will. Geez. Books comes from from a bunch. Of past acquisitions, and then also was only the biggest most recent of them a lot of goodwill went into their at their power unit. That started having such problems. What happens is that a company has to test its goodwill every year, it has to that the value of the reporting unit that contains a good role is still high enough to justify carrying if you'll be reporting. You're the Tony worth five billion dollars. But his ten billion dollars worth of goodwill. That doesn't make sense that that means that value has to be written down. Gene kept testing that goodwill as as was required until it finally in the fall of two thousand eighteen reach a conclusion that the value of of some of its power reporting units could no longer support Terry men of goodwill. And that's when I took the right down, right? Isn't it questionable because the right down has the effective shielding and assets problems from investors aren't they titled to now. Yes, they are. And what happens is that keeping all that goodwill and jeeze books that contributes towards shareholder equity its book value there that the value actually in the company actually owned by investors having that on there. Kind of mask the fact that when you take out that goodwill which afterwards intangible did it doesn't produce anything for the company. Geez. Book value was actually sharply negative since about mid twenty sixteen having all that goodwill, essentially, what g did import was recognized al-shams acid says goodwill as opposed to some of the more tangible assets, they lowered the value of some of the tangible assets, while increasing the value of the goodwill that benefit g because mo- many types of assets you have to they lose valuable for a period of time.

Goodwill Michael Rapaport GE The Wall Street Journal Associate Professor Of Account Alstom Mac Brooks Penn State University Reporter Gene Terry Twenty Two Billion Dollars Five Billion Dollars Ten Billion Dollars Twenty Two Million Dollar
Parents sue 28 Penn State frat brothers after son's hazing death

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Parents sue 28 Penn State frat brothers after son's hazing death

"The parents of a young man killed in a two thousand seventeen hazing tragedy has settled a lawsuit against Penn State university. But USA's Chris Barnes reports they filed a new lawsuit in connection with their son's death is death in two thousand seventeen made worldwide headlines after he'd fallen down a flight of stairs. After fraternity members forced him to drink huge amounts of alcohol, then they left him on a couch and didn't call to get treatment for them for about twelve hours. Now, the parents of Timothy Piazza have settled that lawsuit against the university. Terms of it have not been released now, though, they're following a federal wrongful death lawsuit against those twenty eight former fraternity members. There's several of them have already pled guilty to criminal charges related to the hazing death.

Penn State University Timothy Piazza Chris Barnes USA Twelve Hours
"penn state university" Discussed on X96

X96

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on X96

"Certificate. He he understands sizzler. You gotta training certificates. Like a manager that went through some manager training now for sizzler. That's that's not a business degree. And when he was called out on it. He said, well, and it was changed. They changed it on his resume. I think it was on the website of the website Republican party. I hope somebody that worked with him at sizzler went you've ever got any degree terrible at that too. But he he he claimed that he didn't really realize there was a difference between a certificate and a degree no difference between a business. And what you did. Yeah. So the expo question is, and I described how I lied on. My we'll do it again. I put on my resume. Of course, several times that I had an A a master of fine arts degree from Penn State university. That's really not true. I mean, it's often technically it's true did all the work. It all the work all of the coursework wrote the thesis that I was supposed to write. And then put the thesis in a suitcase and put it under my bed and never send it into the, you know, the MFA committee. So I never received my final. Here's your. It's not like you totally made up, but it's a lot. It was a lie. So I changed it. I said completed coursework for MFA Penn State university. That's what like how I which I can still talk about it. And put it on there. So the expo question is simply. What lies you told on your resume? Did you get away with her? You or maybe you were interviewing people that lied. Clearly. One of my favorite movies, which give the phone number eight seven seven six zero two nine six nine six is the number to call in and tell us about your your lies on resumes. What are my favorite movies? She's having a baby. It's the John Hughes movie. Nobody ever watched because it's not good to good, Kevin bacon. And he's trying to get a job. And he's sitting there in a job interview. And they're going through his rent resume, and they're like so you worked at at nets who a Japanese marketing firm as a cab I worked there, and they're like, well, we own that. So out of all the marketing firms in the world, you could have picked a lie about on your resume. You picked one we own you never lied on a resume, gene. Carey says, no when I never have because he was just so afraid of getting caught I was just convinced that they were going to call and all my reference numbers and check on me. Yeah. No. I I mean, I put I put studied at the university of new never said, I graduated from there is that would ally. No, I know. Well, that means that I could put studied at Salt Lake community college because I took a writing class I took a writing class. So I studied they're so what lies of you told on your resume were or stories that, you know, about people eight seven seven six zero two nine six nine six is the number. I just I I hear the story like the certificate guy. And I just think to myself, you know, I'll bet that there are a lot of people who who lie about their qualifications for thanks. I'm wondering how many employers though, actually go through and check. I'll bet they don't. I'll bet they don't because they're just so busy. They've got a lot of things to do. They just didn't hurry and hire this person and get it taken care of. I mean, I found the movie clip from she's having a baby. But no, I think about it. I mean. You can say this show is worldwide. Yeah. And technically you'd be right now, we have people listening in London and Ireland. But we're not sure we are. But technically we are. But we can lie about it and say that this this morning show is worldwide. Now what now North America's most important radio broadcasts? That's not a lie. That's true. Because who determines it? It's important to to us. That's who it's important. So it reminds this reminds me of two things the two times that I've lied Richie Steadman. Our producer one of them wasn't necessarily ally. When I was in college. With DJ Robbie we did a community access television show. You an rob ferry? Yeah. Rob cherry was called s you you live. And and we said it was the number one rated in local and cedar city. It was the number one local produced television talk show in its timeslot. That's probably true. Yeah. But what it makes it sound? Like is it? It's a great thing. Really? It was the only locally produced. Your resume. So that was one and then the other one also my freshman year of college. When I went to go to audition for how to succeed in business without really trying. Yeah. As I was putting together a theater resume up to that point. I really hadn't done anything as far as high school theater. And so I just I I said, you know, what they're probably not gonna call my high school director. So I just took the shows that we did in high school and picked the roles that I really liked or the people that were friends of mine. This show got I didn't get Cassidy great role in that show. But I did outright lie about what roles I'd had in which Jesus is disappointed. That's why I didn't get any of the roles carry hasn't been honest. And that's it. That's how magic works. I don't li-. I just make less interesting things sound better. For instance. I had to lay people off on my team this appears as reduced headcount by twenty percent improvement. Hey, let's go to the phone Mindy. On line three Kerry. This is another aspect. We could ask about two. It looks to me like she's an employer Mindy. Hi mindy. Hi, you employ people and look at resumes in my reading this correctly. If you're eating back had you employ people and look at the resume. Tell us. What you do you always check. References. You always check to see if they're telling the truth. I do I always check references because in my experience people may look really good on paper. But they're not what they seem on paper in the real world. So you're saying that a lot of people do this. Yeah. I do I even honestly go so far. Look them up on Facebook to their profile pages. Is it can you can you roughly estimate a percentage of people who? Inflator outright lie on their resumes. So far in the past four years that I've been doing this lots of them were craft most of most people. Are not. Because it's easier to stuff easier to check on Mike. You said you Google their name comes up. All right. Thanks mindy. Thank you. Let's see I majored in history with a minor in English on my resume. I list a BA in history slash English. It's a little misleading because it looks like a dual major do you think this is fair? No one's ever asked me about it. Just trying to boost at useless history. Major. It depends on what kind of job you're here. Mike for a job as a history teacher in this case. It doesn't matter. Nobody cares. Somebody says I lied on my mission paper saying I had four years of French. I still went to a Spanish speaking country. Does that mean they don't read those Ritchie or eight.

Mindy MFA Republican party MFA Penn State university Salt Lake community college Kevin bacon Mike John Hughes North America university of new Ireland Penn State university Richie Steadman Jesus Facebook Carey Rob cherry London Google
U.S. estimates 80,000 Americans died of flu and its complications last winter

The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. estimates 80,000 Americans died of flu and its complications last winter

"A student at Penn State university's main campus is being treated for bacterial meningitis, Dr Michael green, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at UP MC children's hospital of Pittsburgh tells the Katie KYW radio afternoon news chronicle syndrome known as bacterial meningitis is an infection. That impacts the membranes that line of the brain and its venture cold. Dr green says there are vaccines. Protect against bacterial meningitis one of the most series infections that can affect children and adults in recent years flu related deaths in the US have range about twelve thousand to fifty six thousand. But last winter the CDC estimates eighty thousand Americans died of flu and its complications, the flus highest death toll in at least forty years last year's flu season was driven by kind of flu that tends to put more people in the hospital and cause more deaths particularly among young children and the

Bacterial Meningitis FLU Dr Michael Green Dr Green Hospital Of Pittsburgh Penn State University Katie Kyw United States CDC Forty Years
"penn state university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Now a rising senior at Penn State university, welcome to the show for having me. So some of the problems that you had our issues that a lot of students face every day. Why do you think things like this are happening? What's going on here? I think part of it is that there are some people that don't understand disability law. Like I got a lot of backlash suggesting that I was trying to get special treatment, not understanding that like it was literally an access issue. I was not able to be in this classroom and be healthy, and a lot of people didn't understand that and thought I was seeking special treatment. There was a lot of criticism that I caught that, oh, just doesn't want the rigor of Stanton. And like they responded with multiple times to me saying for the integrity of the program. And I want that difficulty like I came to the school specifically to be in that IB program to graduate doing the work that the rest of the students did accommodations, don't change that my ability to do AP calculus is not impacted by my ability to handle flashing lights, and that shouldn't be requirement of the class. You know, when I listen to you this Lizzy when I listened to you talk about this obviously took a sort of mental and emotional toll to keep slogging through this fight. I guess. I'm wondering also, you know, since we're doing an economic show here, do you know what this cost you and your family to keep pursuing a legal remedy till you one? Oh, man. The cost to me was utterly extreme. I don't have a ballpark estimate for you, but I can tell you some of the bigger costs. 'cause I grew up first of all, I grew up with. A single mother, so understand that the lawyers that we got, luckily the trial lawyer, Aaron Bates was great enough to be willing to do the case pro Bono very thankful for that. But we had to get other lawyers before that in order to try to get an IEP. So that was out of pocket. My mother had to miss a lot of work to come drive me from school to the hospital. And since that was every other day, it's not like she has the kind of flex time where you can just say, oh, well, every other day this week I'm just going to be taking off the hospital bills. This was literally I was in the emergency room to three days a week. So those things stacked up that was very, very expensive. And I know there is still some aspects of this, even though it started my junior year of high school, and I'm going into my senior year of college. I know there's still some aspects of that that were still trying to pay off because it was so very expensive from. Our perspective you were able to settle with your district, but a lot of people aren't able to litigate this kind of thing at all. Honestly, I wouldn't have graduated high school. There is no other option. It was you fight or you fail out. And I know I didn't have the resources to do that. Have the money to be able to keep bringing in lawyers and talking to the district. And I really do wonder how many other students there are that because they don't have the know-how or the wealth necessary to be able to pursue a gay shin as well. Because this also wasn't like a brief. Let me grab this lawyer. Now everything's moved out. They were retained for at least a year and a half. I really do think about the number of students that are in this exact situation that need a simple accommodation that they are legally entitled to have. I think there's a subset of students with disabilities that aren't served by the educational system. And I think that leads to a lot of them ending up dropping out. Unless you Armstrong, thank you so much for coming on to talk with us. Thank you very on the show. Thanks to my education co host Maria town, and one note on language we know sensitive. So we're using terms that the people we've spoken to prefer, we've also got a cloth Serie of terminology on our website, marketplace dot org..

Stanton Penn State university Aaron Bates Lizzy Maria town Armstrong three days
Turkey's Markets Plunge Into the Unknown After U.S. Sanctions

Bloomberg Markets

08:45 min | 2 years ago

Turkey's Markets Plunge Into the Unknown After U.S. Sanctions

"It filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors and Turkish markets plunging today deeper into the. Wild on president at. Sanctions imposed by the United States, its NATO ally of added to, the cross currents buffeting investors they of already, been despairing policymakers failure to contain inflation, and stem the slide in the lira under. Pressure from president one to bolster growth recapping. US equities, higher across the board with the s&p up. Fourteen of five tenths of one percent I'm Charlie Pellett and that is. A Bloomberg business flash Thank you very much Charlie Pellett art it's, time to bring in, Joe Weisenthal our markets editor for Bloomberg news, also co host of what you miss yes. Every weekday every trading, day three. Thirty PM Wall Street time, only on Bloomberg television and you can follow Joe on Twitter at the stalwart also joining us in studios Dave Wilson Bloomberg stocks editor and you can follow Dave on Twitter at the one Dave all, right Joe Weisenthal post Federal Reserve meeting no change in interest. Rates for the United States but a change of interest rates for. The United Kingdom from the Bank of England is, that relevant to what, you're, looking at today I mean the thing is about the Bank of England is that it really. Only affects the, UK when we talk about central banks Having an influence on global market is usually the via we and the b.. O. j. and the fed, but I still think it's interesting that the. Bank of England hiked not. Because it's gonna, have any ripple effects outside of outside. Of the market there but because for. Whatever reason central bankers seemed to really like hiking rates and the proof. Of, that is that it's hard to imagine that the UK's risk of overheating the economy decelerating they're facing a potentially big shock and they still went ahead with it anyway. But why, did they do it they do it because they were concerned about inflationary, pressures. Because of, the devaluation of the pound maybe it's very compelling there's like a little bit of, inflation but it's already trending down there was some point there was some talk before. That they needed to hike because they didn't hike? Some other, time they were expected to hike and now they need to show some credibility I don't really get that so you know I think central banker. Just like to hike they can? Okay we can pass on that I guess all right I really believe I've every let's bring. The one Dave in. Here David Wilson stocks editor for Bloomberg, news has the hike had. Any impact on the. Stock markets here in the states you wanna talk about what's going on in stocks look at. Across the pie you're looking, at apple and tesla right mean apple becoming. The first US could apple. And tesla again Yesterday was Day NASDAQ is up one and a. Quarter percent the NASDAQ is up more than ninety six, points? Today right and apple is read the forefront. Of that this is the first US company to cross a trillion dollars in. Market value and when you look at the way that the stock has, moved up it doesn't look like it's going to be a one, day wonder which is what. You saw November two thousand seven when petrochina's started trading in Shanghai and got above the trillion dollars four day while apple is the largest stock in, the? NASDAQ right, I mean it accounts for something like eight and a half percent of the total. NASDAQ waiting so when apple moves the NASDAQ's gonna, move well. That's true a bear. In mind you go back and look at how this stock. Has done it is been, up all but two years since two thousand three I mean it's not something. That just sort of happened all at once and you can argue whether, the reaction to the earnings that came out earlier this week me, justifies the latest move in. That said there were definitely some pluses in the numbers and we know that apple has a history of introducing models in September which is the last, month? Of their, fiscal year so that's something to look forward to and when you put it all. Together this history making day not only for apple, but also. For the US market. And you mentioned tesla certainly the story there is very different. This is a company that's, never made money a company that day Oh no it's not. I mean even Amazon, was in that situation once upon a. Time but taste certainly make a whole lot of money these days Years, later I mean you know you had to wait for it right yeah the point is though they've never made a profit they'd been using up cash, and you know this story is they didn't use up as. Much cast last quarter is analysts were looking for only seven hundred and forty million dollars and that. Was enough to send Tesla's shares on a roll so that's sort of where that company is. And musk is starting to sound more like a CEO not like he did three months ago when he was berating analysts on his quarterly conference call so you got. Tesla up fourteen and a half percent at the moment it it, does kind of show, you that, it, doesn't, take much. Sometimes to, get investors excited and when you get sort of a, few points to focus on you see the results Joe is Is apple. The best stock ever and his tesla are we being old fashioned in saying that test is. Gonna make money no I don't think we're being I mean I don't know what the best ever is I think there probably are stocks that have had better returns. In shorter periods of time Netflix comes to mind if we're just, thinking about the century, so far You know Apple's one trillion is a really high number Breathtaking story as for tesla look I think what got investors excited yesterday was partly the indication and the promise of positive, cash flow going forward and prophets that big said a they've had predictions in the past about this stuff that I think disappointed. Investors in the end and be they gotta, hit it and so I think that sort. Of shows you know. There is a limit to it quick question for you Joe Weisenthal you're going to. Buy any new apple, product that comes out in September you're on your phone you probably will because. I, think I'll be up for. A, new phone, at yeah you got an apple now yeah Yeah. Yeah No I have like the seven. Or, whatever no, Dave Wilson. Just curious I also had. The seven I was thinking about buying one, last year. Skipped it I'll think a whole lot hard harder about buying one this year Bob every I'm not even going. As, pigeons yeah I figured you it's tried. And true. My, friend, yeah But. It's Feed bill Rooftops still cheaper than I guess. It is thanks very much Joe Weisenthal co host of what Jim is check. It out, Bloomberg television three thirty PM Wall. Street time and, of course Dave Wilson Bloomberg stocks columnist David e dwilson Bloomberg. Dot net sign up for his daily free. Email newsletter now let's go to. Our ninety nine one studios in Washington DC where Martin dicara has world the, national headlines Martin thanks him happening. Right now top White House officials are describing plans to safeguard the midterm elections from. Foreign interference the administration's been criticized for not. Doing more stay tuned to Bloomberg radio for more on this. Developing story the, massive wildfire northern California grew overnight fueled, by wind the blaze in and around the city of reading now covers two hundred. Square miles Cal. Fire director Ken Pimlot says an army. Of firefighters thirteen thousand strong is working to contain it and other blazes across the state over twenty seven thousand Firefighters on the fire lines throughout the western United States so almost half of. Those are right here in California wildfires are also scorching hundreds of square miles. In Oregon, more than eleven hundred people likely. Died after hurricane, Maria hit Puerto Rico far more than the official death count. Of sixty four Penn State university study is. The second such review to make. Clear President Trump initially underestimated the tragedy when he compared it favorably to the, aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in two. Thousand five this new report suggests nearly seven hundred of the deaths occurred during two. Months when much of Puerto Rico had no. Electricity Republican hopes for a quick confirmation of supreme court nominee. Brett Cavanaugh might, be over the national archive says won't, be able to complete its review of nearly a million documents regarding Kavanagh's time in. The.

Apple Bloomberg United States Tesla Joe Weisenthal Dave Wilson Bloomberg Bank Of England Dave President Trump FED Editor United Kingdom Charlie Pellett David Wilson Dave Wilson
Senate Intel probes experts on election interference amid renewed concerns of 2018

Sonoma County's Morning News with Pat Kerrigan

02:17 min | 2 years ago

Senate Intel probes experts on election interference amid renewed concerns of 2018

"Said to contain the remains of fifty five, Americans last week the war dead or being, transferred to Hawaii where the former process of identification will. Begin vice President Mike Pence will be on hand to receive them. In a statement Pence noted that he is the son of, a Korean war combat veteran and, called this. Occasion deeply humbling two US senators are introducing a Bill that would require the census to ask Americans about their sexual orientation. And gender identity Brian shook. Reports on that the, democratic Senator say having that data would help the federal government provide better services for the LGBTQ community, senators, Kamala Harris California and Tom Carper of Delaware introduced the. Census equality act it would require those questions be included in the long questionnaire That goes to, about one in every thirty eight households by. The twenty thirty census Brian shook NBC News Radio and social media experts will brief the Senate intelligence committee, today on the latest foreign influence operations aimed, at midterm elections the open hearing will focus on how. Foreign intelligence agencies are using social media platforms to conduct influence on. Campaigns today's hearing comes a day after Facebook told congress the, social media giant has removed more, than thirty. Fake pages and accounts from Facebook and Instagram Facebook said it moved after determining the fake accounts and pages were engaged in. Political efforts to influence the. November election sentence in, the hazing story a former Penn State university fraternity brother getting three months of house arrest for his, role, in the 2017 seventeen hazing death of a pledge Ryan. Burke was sentenced yesterday after pleading guilty to nine misdemeanor charges In the death of. Timothy Piazza the nineteen year old pledge was ordered to drink alcohol fell repeatedly including wants down the stairs he injured his brain ruptured his spleen, Burke is the first to be sentenced, in that case the other twenty five defendants all pled not guilty and are, awaiting trial in February. It is six twenty five at k. SRO let's check your traffic Tom Scott the story on, that yeah we've. Got the usual soul going.

Mike Pence Facebook United States Brian Vice President Burke Timothy Piazza Hawaii Tom Carper Tom Scott Senate Intelligence Committee NBC Kamala Harris California Senator Delaware Penn State University Ryan
Facebook uncovers yet another fake news campaign

Mark Levin

03:23 min | 2 years ago

Facebook uncovers yet another fake news campaign

"Make three d., printed guns that. Are untraceable is on hold for now a federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order late today Senator Chuck Schumer I wish President Trump looked into this month this matter months ago. Or even last week and urged the Justice department and. The State Department not. To reach the settlement in the first place eight attorneys general had filed a lawsuit yesterday among them Washington state's Bob Ferguson President Trump is completely able to inform his department of Justice to, stand down this litigation to agree with our briefing and to say it is unlawful. For anyone to make this information available blueprints uploaded early last Friday have already been downloaded by more than, two thousand people Facebook admitting it's uncovered news officiated efforts to meddle in upcoming elections here in the US the social media giant Says it has removed thirty two apparently fake accounts from Facebook, and Instagram because they were involved in coordinated political behavior the, top democrat on the Senate intelligence committee Mark Warner this. Is Russian related carbon black security strategist Rick McElroy pretty typical about advanced persistent threats don't just suddenly stop attacking you he says everything over the past two years has given other, nations a road. Map on how to do this Alison keys CBS news Washington Manafort facing the music the former Trump campaign chief considered himself to be above the law that's according to prosecutors as the high. Profile trial on Bank fraud charges begins correspondent Bill Rakoff. From the courthouse at. The center of the government's case against Paul Manafort is the idea that he made tens of millions of dollars off Ukrainian politician Victor Yannick kovic is successful presidential run the first witness political, strategist tad divine help to establish that theme as he described the work he did. With, Manafort in the two thousand ten Ukrainian election a plane heading to Mexico City crashes six miles after takeoff But the more than one hundred passengers and crew on board have survived correspondent Omar Villafranca the plane went down. Outside of Durango Mexico no fatalities idle Mexico flight twenty. Four thirty one was going, from durang go, to Mexico. City and that's about an hour. And a half flight idle Mexico. Says they are looking into the incident reports on the scene so a plane on its belly badly damaged there was obviously some sort, of fire, because thick black. Smoke could be seen for miles a Penn State university frat number. Who gobbled a pledge with vodka the night he was fatally injured in a series of falls has avoided jail. Time Ryan Burke was sentenced to three months of. House arrest more than two dozen other members of the now closed beta Theta pi. For Turkey still face charges in the. Case this is, CBS news, are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on qualified candidates in, an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash ir Eighty three degrees at nine zero three I'm Steven Pickering. On NewsRadio ten eighty KRLD to collapses in an, urban parking garage have. Engineers worried about a domino effect KRLD's Austin York has details from one fourteen. In O'Connor the first collapse occurred at around eleven thirty this, morning Mervyn fire. Officials say a, portion of the garage. Collapsed onto the deck? Below affecting around twenty one cars completely crushing several this man says he heard the rumble saw the crash and then a. Huge cloud of dust erupt.

President Trump Paul Manafort Mexico Durango Mexico CBS Justice Department Facebook Senator Chuck Schumer Rick Mcelroy State Department Mexico City Department Of Justice Krld Seattle Victor Yannick Kovic Washington Manafort Bill Rakoff Mark Warner Bob Ferguson Senate
"penn state university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Commercial Probably not eight four four dig. Chad onboard eight, four four dig Chad and. While we're talking about some interesting stories there's. A website called study finds and they just keep looking at all the latest studies coming out and. This one makes total sense to me It, was from. Penn State university, and, instead, of looking. Just at the effects of stress they looked, at how much you were stress can be increased by how you think and how much that can. Impact your memory and behavior throughout the day And here's what they found If you wake up believing your day, is going to be stressful You will. Probably be less productive and have a tougher day at the office And what they mean. By that, let let's say that you have. A big presentation you wake. Up oh man it's going to. Be tough day I got that big presentation we got all the bigwigs there. I've gotta do. This with my PowerPoint that I'm still not, really sure about got fifty people I got to. Put this in front of, I, don't even have the answers all. The questions I know they're gonna ask man. It's just gonna be so stressful what you're going to have a. Harder day what they found is it's even to affect your short term memory Says humans can think about, an, anticipated things before they happen now. It can help us prepare for and even. Prevent certain events this is one of the authors of the study But the study, suggested disability can also be harmful to your daily memory function independent of whether the stress events actually happened or not so. In other words even if you end up doing well that day distress is still, going to be there and it's still, going, to, negatively impact your performance throughout the entire day so even if the things that you didn't think we're going, to happen to Navin let's say you were stressed out. About oh man I'm. Worried that this the. Shipman isn't gonna come on time into. The ship and doesn't come on time. Then this is going to. Happen that's going to happen that's going? To, happen you, worried all day and then the shipment comes on time, the the stressful thing didn't even happen it's still impacted your day so what do you do about it well they say if. You wake up optimistic about what's going to happen You don't have those problems Well how do? You, end up getting optimistic well. There's a couple of things if it's, something you can prepare for. Obviously prepare for a better but if it's something like, is gonna come or not and you have. No control over it anyway then you do. Things like deep breathing, exercises you rational emotive, therapy some cognitive behavioral therapy those kind of things to get your. Mind in the right set have you ever had that situation where he just woke up knowing who was going, to be a bad day and then you had a really bad day the old self fulfilling prophecy study finds. That, probably, makes perfect sense eight four four. Dig, jagged, Chambord, the. Program. Eight four four dig Chad do you remember the missing Malaysian Airlines. Flight m h three seventy Well there now coming out with their final report Malaysia on what they think happened okay. You, the, details on that in just. A minute eight four four dig jagged John board my name is Greg Knapp. In, for Chad Benson on the Chad Benson show I've been talking about bitcoin for. Years and I believe that the blockchain technology and crypto currencies. Are the future my uncle and I began investing years ago. And even though they're extremely volatile bitcoin performs like it. Did in two thousand seventeen it'll be worth. Ten times more by this. Time next year but I'm no expert and there's lots of scams out there so. I found. Someone I trust to help educate us it's tika to worry from Palm Beach letter, he's a former Wall Street hedge fund manager who arguably has helped more. People profit from crypto currencies than anyone he's created an education course. On cryptos that so easy to understand it explains what cryptos are how they work.

Chad Benson fund manager Shipman Penn State university Malaysian Airlines Greg Knapp Malaysia Navin Palm Beach
"penn state university" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on WLOB

"You're still going to be able to get the award so how could they possibly be more inclusive well it turns out apparently at penn state university they have a lot of these gender fluid folks these are folks that don't identify as a male or female some as a matter of fact they might be both you could wake up in the morning and you could be the homecoming queen and by lunchtime the homecoming queen and that's a problem so they wanna fix it and that's exactly what they're doing at penn state university abolishing the king and queen homecoming titles all the lgbtq a oh they don't have the eye at penn state or the plus sign that doesn't sound very inclusive to me but i i who am i to judge well the local lgbtq a student resource center said they're just amazed amazed at the decisions and they're celebrating they say that it's going to make the penn state experience and even more inclusive one yes by excluding guys and gals by excluding kings and queens this makes absolutely no sense whatsoever anyway the university by the way has a new program called a commitment to diversity and inclusion and they want to be sure they inspire and include all members of the community to take an active role in promoting respecting and embracing diversity by the way they're not the only folks that are that are doing this university of minnesota seeing the go state university and our our good friends in cheese country the university of wisconsin have also done away with those dirty titles of keying and queen.

penn state university university of minnesota university of wisconsin
"penn state university" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Last year's hazing death of a student at penn state university as men sheehan with member station w psu reports attorney general josh shapiro is seeking to reinstate the most serious charges against five former members of a fraternity shapiro says he's office is determined to pursue involuntary manslaughter charges against five defendants because their action met three elements of the crime he says the former fraternity brothers planned and participated in hazing they were aware of tim piazza's fall andy fell to get piaggio the help he need it the president judge of center county court of common police will make a decision on that appeal shapiro says if necessary he's office will take the issue to the superior court of pennsylvania a third preliminary hearing in this case regarding twelve new defendants will head to court on wednesday for npr news mention in harrisburg in iowa state lawmakers have passed a bill banning most abortions after six weeks of pregnancy this is npr news as a private equity firm based in texas is preparing to take over the weinstein company the hollywood movie and tv studio co founded by harvey weinstein the studio landed in bankruptcy after weinstein was accused of sexual misconduct and assault by a number of women as npr's giles snyder reports lantern capital's takeover bid is said to be worth four hundred thirty five million dollars the weinstein company is this you'd a statement saying lantern is the winning bidder for company assets that include a two hundred seventy seven film librarian television production business lantern capitals based in dallas it may what's known as a stalking horse bid meant to set the bar for an auction that had been set for this friday no other qualified bidder emerged lander made an opera three hundred ten million dollars in march and has agreed to assume about one hundred twenty five million dollars in debt and other weinstein company obligations a bankruptcy court hearing for the sale is set for next week in delaware.

lander stalking dallas giles snyder hollywood npr iowa pennsylvania president involuntary manslaughter attorney sheehan delaware penn state university lantern capital assault harvey weinstein weinstein company
"penn state university" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Penn state university this isn't like a remote college somewhere says penn state university penn state and a spokesperson for the university is defending this asinine decision lisa powers tells the post gazette the reason many of the events for the outing club were deemed too dangerous was because they took place in remote locations away from cell phone service so instead of finding an area that has cell phone service i mean i've made calls from the top of mount eisenhower so instead of making they just cancel the outdoor the outing club can't go outdoors anymore at the university of pennsylvania i definitely folks in some academic commentary this morning i definitely would not last long as a college president or a member of the administration i i i'd be kind of the one person in their board meetings would say i'm jackie need to just go take a jog or something we'll take a walk right you're you're being a little rambunctious in the meeting i oh my goodness oh my god and you know what don't blame the don't plan the students here don't think that like is jeff sinister would say these are snowflakes students collar shirts no the students who want to be in the outing club warning and consultant in the two month processes student leaders of the outing club at penn state university weren't even consulted in a twomonth decision decisionmaking process that the risk in assessment committee worked on to decide the for the outing club the yeah the the the outing club ninety eight year old outing club it's no longer permitted to go outside because the administrators and there's the big problem in the story that word i believe it's too dangerous to go outside wow too many administrators here's a question in terms of cost and it's almost like you know when it's two in the federal government i don't know how you become an administrator by the way i don't know i don't know how you do that i guess that means you've got seniority that means you're a nice job but it's like when i was having fun at the was it the noah the national oceanic atmospheric administration i think it was the i was i went on the website because we pay for all this tax payers and i was looking at the number of regional administrators not the.

Penn state university lisa powers mount eisenhower president jeff sinister consultant administrator university of pennsylvania ninety eight year two month twomonth
"penn state university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"This you play football penn state and that means you're part of an amazing tradition a proud tradition put on top of that you're a captain at penn state so what did that honor means to you and then how would you describe your leadership style that's a that's a blessing to be a cap in at penn state university like you're you're you're like your talk your talked about with light on the legends and all the people that were captains and stuff before you so i mean that meant a lot to me and it made me look at it like my teammates really looking at me like they respect me and everything so like when i was voted captain i was very happy and i knew what it came with i knew that i had you know mature even more than that already dead and like just lead by example i guess that's how i lead i don't really i don't really lead by like getting in your face and tell you what the do rods that that's not me that's not my motto but what i am going to do i'm going to show you you know and the way i show it's like you're gonna wanna you're gonna wanna follow because i'm doing it the right way you know on and off the field so that's just me talking to mark god guys marks will tell you yeah you know it's a it's a once in a lifetime so i'm just gonna enjoy the process it sounds like it's the thing you're supposed to say but i'm looking at what you've done since you started get ready for the draft so i believe you when you say it as an example you're part of a group from penn state who dominated dominated at the combine and we're the talk of indianapolis what is it about that strength and conditioning program at penn state the makes it special and then how did it feel to show up in dominate like that as a group felt nfl really good because we were pushing each other you know like we always do like when a workouts the weight room practice extra work anything we do at penn state we push each other so i remember when you know lining up at forty eight.

football penn state penn state university indianapolis nfl
"penn state university" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And within politics fear and i think that getting language right it's something like the paralympic games and understanding these kind of technical things than and really getting this education when you have the platform like nbc and when you have this platform of the olympic movement behind you can also be parlayed into society overall amir rose davis cohost of the burn it all down podcast also assistant professor of history and women's gender and sexuality studies at penn state university in state college pennsylvania professor davis has been great having you thank you thank you it's a new dumb is a new day it's a new love me to newness new dating new from me who unknown fees i'll take us home nina simone that's our show for today you can find a play list of all the music you heard on the take away today all by women the takeaway dot org happy international women's day thanks so much for listening i'm todd's will like this take three you knew soon the new in a be doing.

nbc penn state university todd amir rose davis cohost assistant professor of history professor
"penn state university" Discussed on The Sports Hub 98.5

The Sports Hub 98.5

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on The Sports Hub 98.5

"Radio darwin zork with another update here in just about nineteen minutes he each course should've are the warriors unbeatable in the playoffs this year well they run the table sixteen onoh that would make them the big the sixteen and out eighty three in fifteen on the air including the playoffs regular season and then aside bar question the mention in a huge opinion why can't we just sit back and support tiger woods we're the most forgiving country on earth later this broadcast i'll deliver another huge opinion on what price did penn state university really pay for the atrocities and the mental and physical damage caused by saying dusky and university officials looking the other way what price did they university really pay the huge opinion later he want to join and right now one eight five five two one to forests cbs that's one eight five five two one two four to do seven at saturday huge on twitter and saturday night huge show on facebook salmon los angeles here on the saturday night healed show.

twitter los angeles darwin penn state university facebook nineteen minutes
"penn state university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"In new york sharia trivial sports radio darwin jacques with another update here in just about nineteen minutes huge course should've are the warriors unbeatable in the playoffs this year well they run the table sixteen no no that would make them they've figured the sixty no eighty three in fifteen on the year including the poilcy regular season another sidebar cushion the mention and a huge opinion why can't we just sit back and support tiger woods were the most forgiving country on earth later this broadcast deliver another huge opinion on what price the penn state university really pay for the atrocities am the mental and physical damage caused by fan dusky and university officials looking the other way what price did they university really pay the huge opinion later he want to join and right now one eight five five two one two forestry cbs that's one eight five five two one two four two seven at saturday huge on twitter and saturday night healed show on facebook salmon los angeles here on the saturday night healed show hey what's going on now harkin uh about the nba finals to me i think it's overreaction after one game.

penn state university twitter los angeles new york darwin facebook harkin nba nineteen minutes
"penn state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Greene and army till martin today penn state university is expected to announce big changes for its fraternities and sorority this after 19 yearold fraternity pledge timothy piazza died of injuries after an alcoholfuelled party back in february that party was captured on site valence video eighteen people face criminal charges related to the death if he has jeff brady reports at penn state beta theta pi was supposed to be a dry fraternity it was not alcohol was at the centre of sophomore tim piazza's death says center county district attorney stacy parks miller right after the gauntlet which is what they call it where they bring the pledges in make engulfing stations station drink copious amounts of alcohol really quickly he fell down these steps which are really long parks miller says the video shows piazza stumbling around for hours sinn falling down those same stairs a second time when medical help was finally called the next day it was too late parents evelyn and jim piazza stood next to the prosecutor at a press conference last month but they can't imagine watching the video prosecutors relied on to bring charges it's bad enough then when i close my eyes i see him in the hospital and that whole night that's burned into my brain i don't know that had one sees hate hitting a floor a wall a railing she would also see that fraternity leaders were aware of tim piazza's injuries he's but they did little to help him the prosecutor says some people on the video were pointing to piazza's head court documents show someone put a backpack on him to reduce the risk he'd rollover and choke on his own vomit the prosecutor says one person wanted to call nine one one.

Greene army penn state university timothy piazza stacy parks miller prosecutor jeff brady district attorney sinn evelyn jim piazza
"penn state university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"penn state university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Known as longrange kucic devices during protests over the chokehold death barrettconnor back in 2014 most lee sunny today highs near seventy eight degrees this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene an army till martin today penn state university is expected to announce big changes for its fraternities and sorority this after 19 yearold fraternity pledge timothy piazza died of injuries after an alcoholfuelled party that contemporary that party was captured on surveillance video eighteen people face criminal charges related to the death and he has jeff brady reports at penn state beta theta pi was supposed to be a dry fraternity it was not alcohol was at the centre of sophomore tim piazza's death says center county district attorney stacy parks miller right after the gauntlet which is what they call it where they bring the pledges make engulfing station and drink copious amounts of alcohol really quickly he fell down these steps which are really long parks miller says the video shows piazza stumbling around for hours and falling down those same stairs a second time when medical helpless finally called the next day it was too late parents evelyn and jim piazza stood next to the prosecutor at a press conference last month but they can't imagine watching the video prosecutors relied on to bring charges its back enough than when i closed my eyes i see him in the hospital and that whole night that's burned into my brain i don't know that have cease hate hitting a floor a wall a railing she would also see that fraternity leaders were aware of tempe out that's his injuries but they did little to help him the prosecutor says some people on the video were pointing to piazza's head court documents show someone put a backpack on him to reduce the risk he'd rollover and choke on his own vomit the prosecutors has one person wanted to call nine one one.

david greene penn state university timothy piazza stacy parks miller prosecutor tempe npr jeff brady district attorney evelyn jim piazza seventy eight degrees