19 Burst results for "Penn Jia"

"penn jia" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

04:02 min | 5 d ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"Very impactful my childhood in a good way or bad way. I don't know. I think it's a mixed bag because little foots mom does die. Just i felt very emotional watching the land before time movies as a child. How many movies joined up seeing like twenty three. I mean i would say the first three. We're all on scene definitely seen one the one where the they have to like escape. Like basically like penn. Jia breaks apart. I don't know but petri well. We're going to take the patriots smoldering scully alias. And we're gonna to finish off season six next week. Just as you've been loading it we have two more episodes. Though they are the last two episodes of the season. They're not connected not at all you. This was true to steaming. You may before. This was an episode. You really want to wash. we're going to squeeze it in. I don't know why. I liked this episode so i'm not sure that you'll like it. I don't know if people it's one of those episodes. That's like it sticks out to me as being something that i really like. I don't remember why okay. Maybe it's it's interesting. It's a little emotional times like in a weird way like not in like a forest way which is fun and then season six episode twenty one field trip which i imagine is some sort of bastardized. Magic school. bus knocked off course more. It's like i don't know child. Murderers and it turns out. Miss frizzle is the one who did it with her sentient bus. Unfortunately no but that sounds like a great episode there at the x. Files one more time. Just so i can write that episode and then the season finale season six episode to biogenesis. You said it right. I know some empty says biogenesis. I for some reason. That's what my mind jumps to. When i read the i mean it is but i think it's biogenesis. Almost sounds like a disease does it does. and this. I mean not far off but reimagined that biogenesis is much like all the other premieres and finales is are focused It's been a. We've been art focused by can imagine something's going on that some students going on. I don't know it's it. I don't think it's about colonization it's about you know the rest of the alien situation we're going to. This isn't i. Don't wanna say in newark but this new alien stuff. Because i know that we talked about this right with two fathers and one son that they want to for lack of a better term. Kill off that whole yes. So this is hone station stuff. Not about colonization..

scully alias Jia Miss frizzle patriots penn Magic school newark
"penn jia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Out of Afghanistan. But Panji, a policy founder, Terry Haynes tells Bloomberg chaotic withdrawal will continue to be a crisis of confidence and competence for the Biden administration. They've got a lot of lot of explaining to do, frankly. Both in terms of how the United States can be made safer from terrorism going forward Major problem. Secondly, how to write the write the political ship Terry Haines at Penn JIA Policy says Afghanistan might not be top of mind for voters in next year's midterms, but it could resonate if it shakes. The perception of President Biden is a steady hand in leadership. President will be speaking about Afghanistan at 2 45 Wall Street time. You can listen here on Bloomberg Radio. Power is still out in Louisiana in areas hit by Hurricane Ida 25,000 out of state utility workers are on the scene to help with restoration. Bloomberg spoke with Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy about the situation. He says he addressed his concerns during a conference call today with FEMA. They tell me they're coordinating with the state. As to where to put their generators, obviously hospitals or priority, but so should sewer list stations. You don't want raw sewage backing up into people's homes. Clearly, that's the public health hazard. Cassidy says. Some residents are being told to stay away. Mike Richards recently asked it as the new host of Jeopardy is now out as the show's executive producer. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg Quick take powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts and more than 120 countries..

Terry Haynes Mike Richards FEMA Bloomberg Cassidy today Jeopardy Louisiana more than 120 countries more than 2700 journalists Afghanistan next year Biden Both 24 hours a day Senator Bill Cassidy Hurricane Ida Bloomberg Radio 2 45 Wall Street
"penn jia" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

03:26 min | 2 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Really so everybody. On december sixteenth. Just said you know what today's the day virginity account. Yes so i mean. Virginia was trending on different social media platforms and they were to talk videos that had millions of years and so i think everyone in the college age group was exposed to account once and it was getting so much is in feedback that they were inspired to make their own and we try to encourage them as giving kids. Let's be here. A lot of these. Other accounts are in fact. mostly jokes. there is one saying why penn jia needs to be brought back for virginity and the thing about these. It's really there was yo. Their impeccable memes. So you said at least once on the record that this account is not satire. How can you expect somebody to believe that. When you're talking about the pope whole loophole. Obviously some accounts jacomb more way approach to it on genuine. It's just it's hard to tell which ones are real art. So what would you say to someone who is just dead. Said believes that this is a really good well executed satire account at a certain point. There's nothing i can say what we've told we've said multiple times that it's not satire the round because he think it's a joke honestly that's preferred because we'd rather that they continue to digest consume are positive and radical message virginity and destabilization. Pretty good for selling merge too. Yeah we tackle your shorts now which holds so kind of going back to the group chat the hot tub of virgins. I guess i'm just curious. If you're in these group chats with these other pages that are clearly satirical how are you kind of coordinating content with them. I don't know. I think i definitely been a victim. Since maybe sh- allow tearful counts to come in and like convince me that they're just trying to like iggy back on on har the time wake..

penn jia Virginia iggy
"penn jia" Discussed on Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

08:16 min | 2 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

"Work fuck capitalism fucking to the ground. Look it right dan. Lewis fucking downtown. Who we can give me. Did you find out the leases. yes i did. I then was looking up obtuse to make sure obtuse does have two meetings. You are right. And i saw sleaze. Triangles a triangle. That has two sides of equal length. So that's a very specific time. We'll show you an image of one here amid a. b. exactly though pyramid has a square base. That just ahead yes. Yup sure pyramid probably isn't isosceles. Triangles you're also right. Oh yes. I did we did you. Some video about their about If someone's theory on pyramids. But there's like i guess evidence that pyramids were actually like could unquote power plants again. Like no one. Don't don't call me out. Internet like i'm just raising the novel instagram video. That i saw so. I don't know facts are power plants. They had like graphite and something at the top of the pyramid to to attract electricity leg interest. Lightning and that energy would be used to like go through the city. I mean i buy. I think that like earlier civilizations were very very ingenious. And i think it's hard. It was hard because they didn't have the technology to capture the things that they were doing. But again internet come from me. I don't know we don't know we're not going to do this in an archaeologist. Yes my guy can say time. Archaeologists theologists today. Say you did. Thank you very hard for me. It didn't roll off my fucking tongue. Okay thank you. I often think about like the olden days. And like how like. It must've been like hard brosseau fun. Why do you think he spent like if you lived in like egypt like oh my god all that sand and stuff. Oh my god all that sand and stuff around in the sand like playing in the sand. Milton pyramids i know nothing about earlier. Civilizations i truly do we learned about like the mayans and the incas with like those there in mexico They may lead in the sand. Don't constantly playing fan parting. You play and then you have your lunch break in the sand and right before you go to sleep. Kicks them saying. I think if you live in a place that is very sandy. Probably sort of like sandy. You know you're like let me enjoy the sand. That's what you do in your beach vacation. Yeah you're right okay. All right fine fine they. They weren't playing in the sand. The dancing emma sand. They've they probably actually were but like everyday occurrence fame way okay so like early early early civilizations they were like in mexico we had our indigenous folks here in the united states and then why people the white people come from. We're the fucked way people come from. I think it's pretty involved. But i think it's like because they again basing this off of really hearsay that piece together over years of my life but i think it's like when people emigrated from africa to colder weather countries The lack of sunlight and vitamin d. They were getting changed their skin town. Oh so it's not like they came from. They did come from places. But it's like they evolved to look different you all To your byron. Oh yeah and then there's paying g uh they're sure all continents were together they were is that how okay so before. Png broke apart which is like fuck you like. Did some people like just travel over to mexico wasn't panja and then it was like. Oh we're moving away. Like the titanic. Just like just they just landed somewhere else mirror man. It's hot here. I have no idea where people on fangio or is it. I don't actually know people have been on panji eh because how did everyone get to mexico from africa. That's a long ride build a buck and africa. We've both through back then. So the miami took a boat from africa to mexico. I think. I don't know. I think both been around for a very long time. Awesome the only seemed to know the my egos and the people who built the pyramids egypt win. I'm sorry can we. I didn't even read what you put up on the screen. Can you with a back. What was the first phases of homo sapiens. Developed less than two million years ago penn jia the supercontinent existed approximately three hundred thirty five years ago. Wait no three hundred thirty. Five million years ago it would be impossible for any species that even slightly classify as humans listed on panja. So my theory is wrong. You away on the country's as they parted so okay you mean to tell me that like people appeared on africa and like shit. We're here and they're were like let's fucking build a boat and get the fuck out outta here and then went to mexico to become izing impact. And they're like hey. Do you mind me singer and now the americas are thought to have been the first established by people from eastern asia who crossed the bering land bridge rich but there was a land bridge to present. Day alaska the land separated and the continents are divided by the bering strait. Okay so they crossed the bridge. Okay so they were walking. I mean they must've mad where they were at to walk all the way to alaska from from asia. Yeah the barren. Land bridges between russia and alaska. There they're like really close together even now and there used to be land and that land has since sunk underwater. So it used to be just connected russian alaska. Whoa so we made fun of sarah palin but she could probably really actually see russia from her house that she really good bitch. She's like that's why i know international policy. Wow i didn't realize it. Alaska was so close to russia. You could walk. You could just walk to fucking russia. Oh my god if we if we go to russia we could just fly to alaska. I mean i think there's other ways supplied arrested fly.

mexico brosseau panja africa egypt Lewis dan Milton penn jia fangio alaska united states miami asia bering strait russia americas sarah palin Alaska
"penn jia" Discussed on Mind Pump

Mind Pump

01:53 min | 3 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Mind Pump

"Then we talked about. Loki that series on disney plus. We now know what the style is on that show called retro fusion then i talked about the supplement and a see it is now. Fda it's now fda approved as a medicine in other words you can't buy it over the counter anymore. And there's some conspiracies around that it's kind of interesting then we talked about dry scooping pre-workout is taking your pre workout powder dry different than taking it mixed in liquid. Then we talked about how coca-cola lots of value on the market because rinaldo said drink water instead Then we talked about the podcast. Call her daddy. That signed a three year deal for sixty million dollars. The podcast world is exploding enough. Then we talked about one of our early mind clips. This was back from two thousand fourteen. Doug actually posted it on his instagram at my pump. Doug warning we sucked a lot back in the crane. Then we talked about one of our new sponsors super coffee. This is coffee infused with things like amino acids and other compounds to enhance the effects of coffee. Also it tastes really really good. Go check them out. You actually get twenty five percents off your entire purchase. If you go to drink super coffee dot com for slash mind pump. Just use the code. Mind pump for that discount. The talked about creating and its effect on arthritis. We talked about jeff bezos and his ex wife. And how much money they donated. It's a tremendous amount of money. Then we talked about. China has graciously allowed their citizens now to have more children also nice. That's great then. We talked about john. Cena and his Weird apology to china. Looks like the pump them a little bit just a bit. Then we talked about panja just talked. About how penn. Jia may come back apparently but other weird names and then we talked about another sponsor..

sixty million dollars john Doug jeff bezos Loki china twenty five percents one three year disney plus -cola super coffee dot com instagram rinaldo China panja penn two thousand fourteen coca Cena
"penn jia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:54 min | 4 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"60 minutes from the opening bell in New York City. Good morning to you alongside some keenly so grounded son, Jonathan Farrow directory market Shaping up as follows up 16 and we advanced by 4/10 of 1% on the S and P Bond market, just south of 1 62 on 10. Some headlines across the Bloomberg the I'm F Backing a $50 billion plan to help the world escaped the covert crisis on narrow the gap and access the lifesaving vaccines that's threatening the global economic recovery from the pandemic. So Tom that's the effort right now calling for a $50 billion spending plan. To narrow that gap that the I'm f with that story this morning. Part of that is the word proposal and it is a proposal. They've got to line up the developed nations. There's some really serious Action in there about the percent vaccinated the United Kingdom in the U. S. Call it all in 50%, 50 and John and Africa. They published 2%. Is the percent of vaccination. That's to me the lead quote. But John, this is a proposal. They've gotta line up America to fund an ambitious a bet of effort and ambitious effort to immunize at least 40% of the global population. By the end of this year, at least 60% or more. By the first time for 2022. The IMF's has been talking about this great divergence. The idea that a number of emerging markets have really liked behind and you actually see the middle class shrinking and just to quote the deputy deputy secretary general United Nations, This has become the inequality virus, The diverging world were hurtling towards a catastrophe. Can you get Developed world that is rebounding rapidly to get on board and help pay for some of these initiatives. That's unclear. Great just to recap the FBI math calling for a $50 billion spending plan to we protect the arrest of the world against Cove in 19. Narrow the gap and access the lifesaving vaccines. Tom the headline Just crossing No, the headline Just crossing It Does fold into what we see in Washington in the markets. John, help me here quickly on the date. I think it is important on a Friday. I see a persistent lift in equities, even though it's not that big a movie full 10th of 1% on the S and P. Donna coming back just a little bit stronger. I should point out a little bit later, we'll catch up with the IMF managing director Christina go together a little bit later today to Terry Haines joins us now with Penn JIA policy there found her here in a good student of the dynamics of Washington. Terry. There's isolationism in America. It's always been there back to the founders. Certain character, Let's say in the pre World War, two era, all sorts of shades after World War two. Ah, unique trump isolationism a sense there. And now with Israel, Gaza and even with this announcement from the I M F for a cash call a new isolationism in Washington. What does that look like? Tom. Good morning. What I think it looks like is a essentially a re balancing of international responsibilities with domestic responsibilities. There's ah I think there's a sense and there's been a sense for about five or six years that frankly, I think, predates Trump that we've been spending too much time and effort. Taking globalism is going to solve all our problems and instead understanding that it's exacerbated a lot. What I'll shorthand is the flyover country problem. And fried flyover part, bro. They should problem and and we ought to be spending some more time with that. So we're back to the old Rangel of exactly how much time and effort we ought to be spending on. On domestic priorities, as opposed to worrying about the international and, you know, frankly, that complicates policy making across the board. Do you ascribe to the tradition that foreign policy doesn't matter when people walk into the 2022? 2024 booth, Or does it matter this time around? I think it matters to them always. Frankly, there are there are always issues that differentiate candidates and, you know, we see a lot of those happening right now. You've already You've already hit on it with part of it with Middle East policy. China put China Policy, of course, is a very big and, you know, frankly, bipartisan initiative at this point anybody that wanted to change China policy at this point would be Looked at very skeptically. You know that Dr Eyeballs on Russia. Same thing just to name three off the top. But, yeah, it does matter. Toe does matter to voters. Sorry. Let's jump to June, the president's first big overseas trip when he's going over to Europe. What you think the priorities are The priorities for them. Are they want to show firstly, they want to show up. That's just their America's vaccine that they want to show cozy relationships across the board with the European Union number one number two. They actually want to show how there Moving the ball forward, and they're gonna have to get past this this Nord stream problem and put it into a broader context to show how that decision to waive sanctions there. His positive for other aspects of the European project, and third they want to show United Front against Russia. But more importantly China of that's where they go. I've got a Germany problem Having night with that in mind, Terry, not so much as a European problem is the Germany problem. Yeah, exactly. You know, some wags and Brussels always say if Hitler it understood that Dolly to do was to conquer everybody. Economically. Yeah, Azi Germany has with you, You know that we wouldn't have the second World War. But the more important part of this is that You've got a new government. You've got more instability in Germany for the first time in a long time. You've got a new government a new way of looking at things that some people say a loss of confidence. S o. That is that those roles variables that the administration is going to have to work with to resolve. So it's a higher mountain and it was just a few months ago. Meanwhile, here at home, Terry one reason why I love reading the reports because you actually assign probabilities to the likelihood of certain legislative addition, shivs getting past. Where are we, in terms of the probability of a bipartisan infrastructure bill getting passed in near term? Thank you. Listen, and you know, I've been non consensus was not consensus stuff about 60 65% for some time on that. I think that's coming together in a kind of 800 billion to one trillion range at the top. Was clearly a desire to want to do something there and on a bipartisan basis. It amounts to a plus up of about 100% over what we would be spending on infrastructure anyway, so it's not insignificant. But it would take quite a while to roll out. The bigger question is that you know whether or not it's going to be able to roll out faster. It doesn't sound like that's gonna happen, so the people won't see in businesses..

Terry Haines New York City Jonathan Farrow Hitler Trump Terry 800 billion Europe European Union 2% $50 billion 2022 4/10 World War 50% Christina Tom World War two 50 June
"penn jia" Discussed on The Atheist Experience

The Atheist Experience

06:31 min | 5 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on The Atheist Experience

"I'll definitely do that. But i tell you what to be to be fair about this possible. I'm going to return you to the q. And take another call while you're sending in that picture and we'll take another call and we'll get back to you since we the picture. Sweet thanks It's it's much easier. Because maybe i can get the bruiser. We can put it up on the screen. Then people can see what you're talking about. I mean i'm not here to necessarily analyze signs in the sky. But let's take a look. I mean i'm just curious what an imprint in the air looks like now and just description a anyway. Yeah there's a. There's a housing subdivision really close to me where they have these huge letters like probably ten yards or so with the name of the housing development. But it's styled in such a way that as you drive pass it. It's like you would see in a movie where there's the superimposed. Cg title in that. Same font that's like beside a building as you drive by it as thinking contrails making. We'll get okay. We have jewels from the netherlands. Something about Panja and dsp. God's welcome jones how are you hi drills favourite countries ever and thanks for the guy who Took my call at the beginning. He was very nice. Yeah screen yet. He was very friendly so thanks to him. Well we'll fire him. They're supposed to be mean teasing. How can we help. What what is it you wanted to talk about okay i think i had like. I'm pretty good. Evidence predicted driving force behind evolution. It's like conclusive for god. But for like i. I guess i would describe if nafta catholic but like I don't know. But if i guess i would say empathic that the christian god exists and catholicism correct doctrine so in that way um what's more interesting go ahead. No go ahead. Yeah okay not anyway Like you know the supercontinent penn jia The like broke par one hundred seventy five million years ago and The first humans. They originated like two point four million years years ago. So does that a huge guy back and it would be like weird. Human montana's cly evolved on multiple continents at once And i would think that's too big coincidence for not being driving force behind it. You know what i mean. i'm i'm having. I'm having trouble understanding. So one hundred and seventy five million years ago or so. Approximately fangio breaks up. And and you think that's evidence for what and how i think jewels. Are you saying that humans evolved on two different continents at the same time. Yeah multiple because humans in north america and europe in australia and all these. But you know there are things called boats right but people have lived there for and for very long and right but if panty pinch you broke up one hundred seventy. A pantheon broke up. One hundred. Seventy five million years ago and humans a or even. The early hominids didn't start until fifteen to twenty million years ago. You still got like one hundred million years or so. How has panji relevant to human evolution. And why then do we trace our ancestry. Only back to you like single progenitor out of africa now School decided everything i mean. And because what. I was trying to say that If the supercontinent still be there at the moment that humans originated wouldn't be weird that we're be humans are multiple continents once because Because they wouldn't have got their oversee There weren't there. Weren't humans on multi. The we trace the evolutionary history of humans. Back we trace them back to africa and at and at that time that's it. It's not like there's simultaneously in australia and in north america that that's not what the evidence shows it tools. I still don't understand your point. Like yes. There are these two i. I still don't get what you are trying to what you think you have discovered. I mean you should try to publish it in a pure review journal if you really think you have something to. But i still don't understand your the logic you're renting nervous and that's okay it's okay very expected actually get on the show Going out troubling point one of the things here gills and that is you don't need a boat for most of can walk his shits connected. You can like walk around. Cross a river from especially over the million years species. It's not hard to move very far. I i would. I would recommend joel's kind of all right one more shot go ahead But if you want to go. From africa to north america because native american people existed Simultaneously to people in africa gills. I think his jewels. Let's try this. So the the that were in africa some of them stayed some of them migrated elsewhere over generations including to europe including across asia than down through australia asia also across the barren break into into north america and the down but they were not just like it wasn't just like one little group that went all over those vices. It was like humanity hominids spreading out through all boats and staying in the other places too. So yes you had people. In africa and europe asia and north america at the same time just like we do now not the same kind of like the fallacy of like woman wire there if a if humans evolved from monkeys wire. They're still monkeys thing. It's like i i. Maybe i don't know if that answered your question or not. But i think i would just encourage you to read more about this because you seem to be missing a large yeah..

north america europe africa australia joel Seventy five million years ago ten yards one hundred seventy five milli four million years years ago asia australia asia two one hundred and seventy five m one One hundred twenty million years ago two different continents first humans Panja jones
"penn jia" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:12 min | 6 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"It's simply should say, Don't be afraid the dangers of getting cold. But if you don't take the vaccine are many, many more times the dangers of any side effect. Schumer referenced polls indicating one in three American adults still are hesitant about a vaccine. America's listening to Fox News. He's coming body was pulled from the mouth of the Anacostia River near joint base, Anacostia Bolling this afternoon. Police and fire rescue personnel arrived at the scene just after three o'clock and members of the Harbor Patrol unit are investigating. The Maryland State Highway Administration is doing work this week on the Ocean City Expressway to make sure you can get to the beach safely, spokesman Bob Reagor says crews. They're trying to get a lot done. And once 12 miles of road, we tried all 12 miles and yet God will worked on compassionate and did some good work done with an overhead lighting worked on all of about the same time. The expressway will be closed tomorrow through Thursday from eight p.m. to six. A.m.. And spring is pothole season and Triple A's John Townsend says It will be worse this year because we had snow melted snow seeps into dense and cracks in the road turns the ice, then expands as a thaws and makes potholes. We were spared last year because it was one of the mildest winters on record. But this year we are seeing Pothos crop up of greater regularity. Larger potholes and we've seen in two years, Johnson says. If you can't avoid a pothole, the best way to not damage your car is too slow down before you hit it. Been cooped up too long in the house. Well, the Dino Safari is in town at National Harbor, T. Rex, Try Sarah topspin a source. You can see them all from the safety of your car. Drive through this awesome sort of 45 minute experience that is you traveling through Penn JIA National Park. So we give you a little passports for the kiddos can have a passport coloring page. And they can check off the continent's. They've been to Tom's dollar producer of Dinos Tafari Open every day of the week. There's different very hours. You can see on the website Donna's Safari in.

Bob Reagor John Townsend Anacostia River Johnson last year eight p.m. Thursday 45 minute Tom Schumer Fox News tomorrow Harbor Patrol Maryland State Highway Adminis one six. A.m Sarah Ocean City Expressway this year Dinos Tafari Open
"penn jia" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

06:35 min | 10 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Adlandia

"We're like my secret weapons. So i knew very well what those two companies were capable of. And how fantastic. They were a even. If other people didn't know that yet and i was making a living on the work they were doing. The the truth is blackbird. As as you know it was going well. It was two two and a half years old and i loved it but every once in a while or like once in your lifetime there's a generational opportunity to do something really unique and special not just disrupt but game changing so. The hypothesis of known represented a generational opportunity. If what we believe to be true and possible could actually be achieved than this. This wouldn't be just a good business opportunity but it would be a game. Changing i guess inflection point for how marketing gets done in the twenty first century. And i know it. Sounds like i'm vastly overstating that and maybe i'm a couple of years ahead of other people getting what we're trying to do and it probably sounds a little arrogant but in the beginning we weren't sure right so we put these companies together and we started to try to go to market together as a unified set of capabilities. And think of it. Almost like a moment of penn jia where the continents come back together on earth when the marketing capabilities advertising capabilities. That never should've been separated are actually unified. And there's no fidelity lost between them. When that happens you actually return to being not just efficient and effective and transparent but you can actually align the goals of your company with business interests of your client and when you can do that then you provide the first meaningful alternative to the holding company model in a long long time. That's the opportunity that i saw. That's the opportunity that we saw and more importantly it's the opportunity that dozens of clients saw an and really pulled us together To provide a comprehensive set of marketing services for them so a lot of holding companies would say the same thing Why is setting known apart. What i think is setting apart is truly best in class in every discipline right in some cases and i was kind of joking about it before. You've got companies that are pretty good at data and analytics in processing technology trying to glue on a creative capability. And now you know exactly how that relationship works. You know who is the stepchild of who who drives you know who's got the bigger revenue. Line him what. Brad is better right like we all know. In other cases you've got a creative shop or a traditional media company hiring a couple of people who maybe haven't undergrad degree in math comics. And no little are or sequel and now we have data capabilities or even buying data company. Which by the way is lake the most ridiculous thing for a supposedly impartial agency to be doing but leaving that to the side for a second. What we thought was excited about this. In kind of the cultural synergy that led up to this combination was not just the thesis touches the business opportunity but the cultural synergies and the fact that currently the top creative director at known studios won't stop calling our chief technology officer to talk about you know nonstop casting modeling and like creative optimization. And that's happening. That's actually happening. Because the creative team is totally. Juliana the data the data scientists in this is also a real a real different thing. Twenty five postdoctoral. Hd data scientists like actual data scientists who extend the analytics capability of clients like amazon and microsoft and google when they're not working on our advertising hides and that's that's not that's not even in the realm of firepower these other agencies and creatives who are making these moments break culture are also best in class and they love each other and our strategists are sitting there in the middle of anything. I cannot believe like the weapons that we get to deploy both on the inbound customer insight and the the creation of breakthrough storytelling so who gets the tiebreaker and data versus gut will there. There isn't one that's not a that's not like a. It's not the process that we run the like. They're not odds with each other. What happens is our creative strategy. Teams have brilliant ideas and as often happens in in creative ideas in all sort of like work that leads up to incredible campaign is there are a bunch of things that people love and then there's like that final round of tweaking and tuning of like do we alpha this upper. What's the color mix. How big is that like. How much do we pull into the foreground background like what you know. Where like how tight is the focus. Those things it turns out. You don't have to guess so the gut is all like that. You see the heart. I would think in our tiktok campaigns. You see the heart in see her. You see the heart in what everything our studios turns out like the creative minds at work that that's real. That wasn't computer generated and then the question is of all the thousands of different perspectives and backgrounds and sort of The the constellation of audience out there each person's a little bit different each platforms. A little bit different. So how do i match the absolute best version of the creative to the right individual audience member based on everything. I can intuit about them in the right place at the right time in the right format on the right platform. That's where data takes creative and beautiful creative creative and superchargers and that's where we see the results going absolutely crazy. I wanna go back to something that he said that i think is probably if we don't go back to his probably passed over.

penn jia Brad postdoctoral chief technology officer amazon director google microsoft
"penn jia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"C. See if there has been any significant changes in the stimulus situation, let's get to Nathan Heger. I can tell you this. Vanni three PM Wall Street time. That is when a source tells Bloomberg, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will hold what may be their final call. To try to come up with an agreement on stimulus before Speaker Pelosi self imposed deadline of tonight. Terry Haynes with Penn JIA policy has his doubts. I could make any sort of deal that they want and there's there are a variety of reasons that they would political and otherwise that they would want to do so, but I think it has very little chance of getting through the Senate. That's one of the many reasons why I remain with my 10% likely to have a stimulus deal before the election. In an interview on Fox News this morning, President Trump said he's still willing to spend more than Pelosi does and could get Senate Republicans to go along. Speaker Pelosi joins Bloomberg Radio and Television for an update at 12 30 Wall Street time Ahead of as we mentioned at 3 P.m. phone call with Treasury Secretary Mnuchin. The Justice Department has filed the most significant antitrust case against the US company in decades. The complaint accuses Google Using anti competitive practices to maintain its dominant position in Internet search, Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen says this case is a milestone, but it's not the end of it. We plan to continue our review of computer competitive practices by market leading online platforms and were necessary address those well. Google calls the Justice Department case deeply flawed. Fully half of President Trump's supporters believe the Cuban on conspiracy theory. That's according to a Yahoonews YouGov survey that also finds most registered voters. 55%.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi President Trump Speaker Pelosi Senate Steven Mnuchin Justice Department Nathan Heger Google Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Vanni President Terry Haynes Jeffrey Rosen Fox News Penn JIA Pelosi US Deputy Attorney General
How Did the Ancient Land Blob Called Gondwana Become Today's Southern Continents?

BrainStuff

05:50 min | 1 year ago

How Did the Ancient Land Blob Called Gondwana Become Today's Southern Continents?

"Lauren Bogle bomb here sometimes. Good Science Science can happen just by looking at a map of the world and letting your mind wander for instance observe how Africa and South America seemed to have been very recently cuddled together even though there are currently a couple of thousand miles of ocean between them similarly Madagascar fits perfectly into a little nick in the eastern edge of Africa and the Middle East seems seems to be pulling away from the top of Africa like a corner being pulled off of a hot cookie with a reasonably good representation of the shape and arrangement of the world's continents in front of them. Anyone could easily assess the earth's land masses have definitely been speaking around the name for the southern landmass that once was is Gondwanaland and also known as Gondwana but it wasn't just the shape of the continents that clued researchers into its former existence. They've also looked at similarities. Among plants and animals that live across the modern separate continents from those clues. Gondwana was an idea long before anybody figured out how or why. It worked the secret of course being plate. tectonics and idea that didn't really start gaining steam. Until the mid twentieth century but a nineteenth century Austrian geologist named Edward Seuss put a name to the concept of the supercontinent in his book. The face of the earth the first volume of which was published in eighteen eighty. Three SEUSS didn't come up with many completely novel ideas ideas. But he did a great job of synthesizing. A bunch of the research of the day to conclude that the southern continents and landmasses we now know as South America Africa Arabia India via Sri Lanka and Madagascar had at one point in time been connected because one well just look at them and two. They contained the same rocks and the same fossil's from an extinct feathery leafed tree called gloss of terrace Austria and in Arctic. Oh would be added theory. Thirty years later Gondwana on what was named for a densely forested region of central India where the first fossil evidence of the supercontinent was found in the nineteenth century. WanNa is a word for forest in Sanskrit and the guns are tribe that European explorers. I found living in the region. Even though we now know a lot about the mechanism by which Gondwana China was formed. It's extremely complicated and still being investigated. There's at least one. Peer Reviewed Scientific Journal devoted entirely to the study of the supercontinent. It's it's called appropriately Gondwana research however. There are a few things that we're pretty certain of I got Wada wasn't built in a day. The the making of Gondwana was a long process. Most likely through three major mountain building events driven by the movement of Earth's tectonic plates we spoke spoke via email with Joseph Merit professor in the Department of Geological Sciences. At the University of Florida he explained during the interval from about six hundred fifty to five hundred in fifty million years ago. Various pieces of Africa and South America collided along an ancient mountain chain called the Brazilian belt slightly older but overlapping with the Brazilian. Oh seven seven hundred and fifty to six hundred and fifty million years. AGO is the east African Oregon or Mozambique Belt that resulted from the collision between East Africa and Madagascar India Tree Lanka and parts of East Antarctica. The final collision was along the Kouanga Oregon between all those assembled pieces and the rest of Antarctica and Australia between five five hundred eighty and five hundred and thirty million years ago so it was a couple hundred million years of extremely slow continental car wrecks the created this Beta Ada version of Gondwana. But it wasn't done yet later about three hundred million years ago other landmasses join forces with it to form the giant ball of land. We now no no as Panja. But one continent rule them all couldn't last and sometime between two hundred eighty and two hundred million years ago. Hingis started started disintegrating as magma began pushing up from beneath the mega supercontinent creating rifts in the land that would later become seafloor as Penn.. Jia cracked the top part was pushed to the north creating the continent Laura Asia and Gondwana headed south back when Gondwana was just a baby supercontinent between five hundred and fifty and four hundred eighty five million years ago it hosted some of the very first complex life forms like trial abides bracket pods but since it continued to exist I didn't the drastic period lots of plant and animal. Evolution went down there merit said Gondwana contains evidence for evolutionary changes in the very first complex complex animals. The very first fish amphibians and reptiles the most famous fossils are the gun doina flora such as the loss of terrace fern a freshwater reptile called. Messo Soroush Soroush in a land. Reptile called Lyster Soroush Gondwana existed as a single landmass for more than three hundred million years because of its humongous assize by covered an area of one hundred billion square kilometers or about thirty nine billion square miles and because the continents moved a lot during that time Gondwana experienced many different climates said during the Cambridge. When Gondwana I formed the earth and Gondwana were in a greenhouse state in the late order vision? Four four hundred fifty million years ago gun was moving over. The South Pole and the climate was very cold. Gondwana continued to move through variety of latitudes and depending on where you are located hated. The climate might have been quite warm or more temperate. The continent was so large. That one part of Gondwana might be located at the quarter while another might be located at the poll. It's true it would have been cool to see Gondwana in its prime and although you won't personally get to see its victorious return. That doesn't mean that it's not possible. Possible the continents are always moving and scientists have a lot of ideas about what our next supercontinent is going to look like.

Gondwana Gondwana China Lyster Soroush Gondwana Africa Madagascar Edward Seuss Messo Soroush Soroush India Lauren Bogle Middle East South America Gondwanaland Madagascar India Tree Lanka Terrace Austria Joseph Merit Professor East Africa Geologist Scientific Journal
"penn jia" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital, One card with Capital, One saver card. You can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores, and one percent on all other purchases. Now, when you go out you cash in Capital, One, what's in your wallet terms apply? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff, learn vocal Bon here ever since Neil Armstrong. I set foot on the moon. Scientists have been toying with the idea of forming potential colonies, there and more recently on Mars to, but extreme fluctuating temperatures cosmic radiation, and micrometeorites showers colloquially known as space dust pose challenges to human excavation of both the moon and Mars, however, Astro biologists are in the process of exploring nifty geological structures the conservative natural shelter from these harsh elements lava tubes. So what are lava tubes? We spoke by Email with doctor Ricardo puzzle Abban of the department of geosciences at the university of pet ova. He's been at the forefront of European research on lava tubes. He explained lava tubes are caves that are carved by flowing lava, that eventually drained out leaving a subsurface void, although there are different types of lava tube formations, these caves often form out of a type of fluid basaltic lava that flows down a slope, like. The side of a volcano as the outermost portion of the hot lava flow comes in contact with the cold air, it cools rapidly forming a hardened crest, but liquid lava continues to flow like water in channel underneath this newly hardened surface. At some point that liquid lava runs out, and cools underneath the surface forming a curvy tube shaped structure, and thus Alava tube is born geologist. No lava tubes from volcanic areas in Hawaii, or Iceland, but they've also become a hot, commodity within the Astro biology community due to high resolution images, indicating that lava tubes may exist on the moon and Mars as well. Many sites thought to be lava tubes are detected by the presence of these curvy channels and more recently, the SETI institute announced the discovery of possible skylights or lava tube openings in a crater near the North Pole of moon using images obtained from Nasr's lunar reconnaissance orbiter, but lava tubes are tricky business. Scientific technology is still playing catch up and identifying these underground habitats, we also. Spoke by Email with Leonardo career of the remote sensing laboratory at the university of Trento. He said the main difficulty comes from the fact that lava tubes are centrally subsurface structures. Very few instruments are capable of performing direct measurements of underground structures. But careers team is working to modernize the technology and bus aid future human settlement of these lunar caves the technology involves using radar, which can detect lava tubes from orbit based on their unique electromagnetic signatures, basically, they can pro below the surface of the moon using low frequency electromagnetic waves, and then measure the reflected waves that come back to them. Those reflections offer insight into a lava tubes characteristics, like its shape size and composition. But one thing is clear lava tubes on the moon and Mars are invaluable is natural potential habitats, or at the very least could serve as convenient storage units between space missions. Meanwhile, back on earth, scientists are preparing for future missions to the moon and Mars through a little cave, diving the European Space Agency, developed a program called Penn Jia. The prepares European astronauts to explore other planets one of its projects concerns, a lava tube in Spain called corona that's eight kilometers long, or about five miles the team has undertaken advanced mapping of the tube to create three D model. That's attract down to the millimetre. They've also been testing out new robots or Rovers to identify how best to navigate these tubes. Developing a greater understanding of the challenges associated with incursions into lava tubes on other planets in the process. Other researchers have also taken an interest in exploring the microbiology of lava tubes by focusing their efforts on the lava beds, national monument in California, this project funded by the Canadian space agency is looking to explore lava tubes habitats of biker organisms, which may leave traces behind through certain minerals, and thus indicate the presence of life once upon a time, which is cool enough. On earth, but would be an amazing find on the moon or Mars. So what's the difference between lava tubes on earth in their lunar, and Martian counterparts? Well, gravity for one, the lower gravity on the moon and Mars seems to impact the size of lava tubes, significantly tubes on Mars can stretch for two hundred and fifty meters in width, or about eight hundred and twenty feet and tubes on the moon can reach a whopping Colombia, or more across that's about two thirds of a mile, the lower gravity. Also stabilizes, the roofs of these tubes and causes fewer collapses, especially on the moon, thereby creating a potentially safer dwelling for human habitation, but otherwise lava tubes on earth are fairly similar in composition and structure to those on the moon and Mars and serve as excellent reference points for researchers. The potential for lunar caves, and possible human settlements has many people excited even the White House is making a bid for moon colonies in the near future, and the possibility of answering whether life has existed or may still flourish in caves on Mars is a tantalizing one for space explorers. But if you're wondering whether or not martians will be found hanging around these lava tubes on the red planet, the answer is likely no, unless you count microbial critters radiation, a dry environment and frigid temperatures make the planet inhospitable to most forms of life while using ground Rovers to access lava tubes on the moon and Mars could be difficult due to surface conditions other devices are being developed to aid these explorations including climbing, and hopping pit bots and flying helicopter, like vehicles likes of which may appear Nasr's Mars twenty twenty Rover mission. Today's episode was written by Terry llegado and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other totally tubular topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply.

iheartradio Rovers Nasr Capital One European Space Agency Neil Armstrong SETI institute geologist department of geosciences university of Trento Spain Iceland California Leonardo Hawaii apple White House Penn Jia Colombia Terry llegado
Lava Tubes Could Aid Humans Life on the Moon and Mars

BrainStuff

06:37 min | 2 years ago

Lava Tubes Could Aid Humans Life on the Moon and Mars

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital, One card with Capital, One saver card. You can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores, and one percent on all other purchases. Now, when you go out you cash in Capital, One, what's in your wallet terms apply? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff, learn vocal Bon here ever since Neil Armstrong. I set foot on the moon. Scientists have been toying with the idea of forming potential colonies, there and more recently on Mars to, but extreme fluctuating temperatures cosmic radiation, and micrometeorites showers colloquially known as space dust pose challenges to human excavation of both the moon and Mars, however, Astro biologists are in the process of exploring nifty geological structures the conservative natural shelter from these harsh elements lava tubes. So what are lava tubes? We spoke by Email with doctor Ricardo puzzle Abban of the department of geosciences at the university of pet ova. He's been at the forefront of European research on lava tubes. He explained lava tubes are caves that are carved by flowing lava, that eventually drained out leaving a subsurface void, although there are different types of lava tube formations, these caves often form out of a type of fluid basaltic lava that flows down a slope, like. The side of a volcano as the outermost portion of the hot lava flow comes in contact with the cold air, it cools rapidly forming a hardened crest, but liquid lava continues to flow like water in channel underneath this newly hardened surface. At some point that liquid lava runs out, and cools underneath the surface forming a curvy tube shaped structure, and thus Alava tube is born geologist. No lava tubes from volcanic areas in Hawaii, or Iceland, but they've also become a hot, commodity within the Astro biology community due to high resolution images, indicating that lava tubes may exist on the moon and Mars as well. Many sites thought to be lava tubes are detected by the presence of these curvy channels and more recently, the SETI institute announced the discovery of possible skylights or lava tube openings in a crater near the North Pole of moon using images obtained from Nasr's lunar reconnaissance orbiter, but lava tubes are tricky business. Scientific technology is still playing catch up and identifying these underground habitats, we also. Spoke by Email with Leonardo career of the remote sensing laboratory at the university of Trento. He said the main difficulty comes from the fact that lava tubes are centrally subsurface structures. Very few instruments are capable of performing direct measurements of underground structures. But careers team is working to modernize the technology and bus aid future human settlement of these lunar caves the technology involves using radar, which can detect lava tubes from orbit based on their unique electromagnetic signatures, basically, they can pro below the surface of the moon using low frequency electromagnetic waves, and then measure the reflected waves that come back to them. Those reflections offer insight into a lava tubes characteristics, like its shape size and composition. But one thing is clear lava tubes on the moon and Mars are invaluable is natural potential habitats, or at the very least could serve as convenient storage units between space missions. Meanwhile, back on earth, scientists are preparing for future missions to the moon and Mars through a little cave, diving the European Space Agency, developed a program called Penn Jia. The prepares European astronauts to explore other planets one of its projects concerns, a lava tube in Spain called corona that's eight kilometers long, or about five miles the team has undertaken advanced mapping of the tube to create three D model. That's attract down to the millimetre. They've also been testing out new robots or Rovers to identify how best to navigate these tubes. Developing a greater understanding of the challenges associated with incursions into lava tubes on other planets in the process. Other researchers have also taken an interest in exploring the microbiology of lava tubes by focusing their efforts on the lava beds, national monument in California, this project funded by the Canadian space agency is looking to explore lava tubes habitats of biker organisms, which may leave traces behind through certain minerals, and thus indicate the presence of life once upon a time, which is cool enough. On earth, but would be an amazing find on the moon or Mars. So what's the difference between lava tubes on earth in their lunar, and Martian counterparts? Well, gravity for one, the lower gravity on the moon and Mars seems to impact the size of lava tubes, significantly tubes on Mars can stretch for two hundred and fifty meters in width, or about eight hundred and twenty feet and tubes on the moon can reach a whopping Colombia, or more across that's about two thirds of a mile, the lower gravity. Also stabilizes, the roofs of these tubes and causes fewer collapses, especially on the moon, thereby creating a potentially safer dwelling for human habitation, but otherwise lava tubes on earth are fairly similar in composition and structure to those on the moon and Mars and serve as excellent reference points for researchers. The potential for lunar caves, and possible human settlements has many people excited even the White House is making a bid for moon colonies in the near future, and the possibility of answering whether life has existed or may still flourish in caves on Mars is a tantalizing one for space explorers. But if you're wondering whether or not martians will be found hanging around these lava tubes on the red planet, the answer is likely no, unless you count microbial critters radiation, a dry environment and frigid temperatures make the planet inhospitable to most forms of life while using ground Rovers to access lava tubes on the moon and Mars could be difficult due to surface conditions other devices are being developed to aid these explorations including climbing, and hopping pit bots and flying helicopter, like vehicles likes of which may appear Nasr's Mars twenty twenty Rover mission. Today's episode was written by Terry llegado and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other totally tubular topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply.

Iheartradio Rovers Nasr Capital One European Space Agency Neil Armstrong Seti Institute Geologist Department Of Geosciences University Of Trento Spain Iceland California Leonardo Hawaii Apple White House Penn Jia Colombia Terry Llegado
"penn jia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:06 min | 2 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on KGO 810

"Every part of my fourth grade education about Jamestown Charles man is the author. He is the author of the previous groundbreaking fourteen ninety one about the new world before Columbus arrived. But now we apply. Globalization to the concept of the late fifteenth early sixteenth century, the north and South America, Charles very good evening. Do congratulations Jamestown. We call it the tobacco coast in your book. And that has a reason because you not only discuss the people who came here and. They're they're turmoil and their strife and their deaths and their promises and their ambitions. But also, the plants and animals that migrate here. I want to step back a moment, you're telling the story of what we today. Call globalization. Did they have that word in fourteen ninety three or fifteen hundred the idea of the world working together? No, not what we're talking about is a phenomenon. It's really was just understood recently in the man who came up with the phrase to describe it was called the Columbian exchange. Manley Melford Crosby wonderfully story, and what he noticed is that you step back. The perhaps the best way to think about Columbus is as an agent via logical change is if you think about it. We also learned in fourth and fifth grade or sixth and seventh grade depending on your school that, you know, couple hundred million years ago the world consisted of a single giant landmass, scientists call Penn Jia geological forces broke. Hit up forever. Separating eastern hemisphere, the western hemisphere and forever, separating the plants and animals on those two hemispheres ecosystem and what Columbus did accidentally without knowing about. It was ring the continents together he recreated Panja in huge numbers of creatures from over there came over here. Huge numbers of creatures over here went over there. And the result was an explosion and ecological explosion the biggest event in the history of life. So the dinosaurs. And underlies a lot of human history that you and I learned in school, homo, Gino. Scene period. That's some some scientists call this period that we live in now the period started by Columbus. The homogeneous the time when all your being homogenized biologically because all the different ecosystems are all being mixed up and moving all around, and that's why you get things like tomatoes in Italy tomatoes from Mexico, and you get chili peppers, which are from Central America and South America in places like Thailand, and you get potatoes from the Andes Ireland, and you get horses and in Eurasia in the middle west and on and on and on I wanna go immediately Jamestown because it describes this process. Not only in front of us with the conflict between the native American settling in the area where the Jamestown settlers, remember? They set sail from London December sixteen six it's an investment society. There are investors in this. And they're going to throw themselves on the unknown shore. The vast forest of North America that has been managed by the native Americans quite nicely. Thank you very much for hundreds of perhaps thousands of years, but as Jamestown builds it chooses a place that is brackish they have brackish water. In fact, you you right Charles at the current so strong. They can tie their ships right up off the shore. And they're in the presence of an older society. A group of people who found themselves very carefully and deal with the environment. Why are they allowed to stay? Why aren't they immediately driven out these settlers, well, the as far as we can tell there's a they landed right in the middle of a small native empire that they called coma. Co and the English were from the native point of view undesirable people who sort of showed up, but they had some goods that were worth trading for and so the game the worst piece of land. People didn't have any good water. Was mar it was marshy and Brian brackish as instead, essentially, you can stay there for a while long as you keep producing the iron goods knives and things like that that we like, and this was from the point of view a very sound procedure. And they believe they could kick them out at any time. And so you would have these undesirable people who had a few things that you liked and you would sort of fence them off, and that was their strategy and it worked for quite a while you write that or you have the comment that is very Dur here saying that they're both sides enjoyed confidence born of ignorance of each other. And so as the two societies having nothing to do with each other whatsoever. Other than the fact that they're living in the same area deal with each other. There's going to be something that you see out front, which is the tale of Pocahontas and John Smith and John Roth, and then what happens underneath with which is the sudden introduction of the earthworm. I like this part Charles a lot while the fighting. That's going on in the threats and John Smith tries to burn himself by having gunpowder exploded his belt. What is the earth worm doing? What's happening is that starting a few years after they've they're trying to figure out that Michelin Jamestown is there because the English want to do what the Spaniards did find lots of golden silver. And they're convinced that there's golden silver all over the Americas. And so companies they can just set up shop in North America. They will find the golden silver. And the second thing they want is that they are believe that North America is a lot narrower than it actually is they have convinced themselves just a couple of hundred miles across and so they should be able to sail up Chesapeake Bay, which they think at the mouth of giant river and go across to the Pacific established in start trading with China which is their goal. They're going to take all the gold and silver and use it to buy things in China. When this doesn't work out for all the obvious reasons. There's no golden silver in Virginia and the United States is a lot bigger than they thought. It was they desperately cast about for other things to do. And they start trying to go wine grapes. They try to go silk. They try to make everything and the thing that catches on is when John Rawls becomes the husband to poke Hondas and the famous story begins to plant a Brazilian plant type of tobacco and this explodes. And they start taking over huge areas of this land and growing tobacco on it. And as they do so the introduce all kinds of other crops, and plants and animals from England most of them without knowing it, including the earthworm, which begins a very slow motion transformation of the ecosystems in the northern part of the United States. And the reason is the reason it does this is that the earthworm in North America didn't exist at the time of Columbus. They're all squished. So I'm using technical language here. Right by the by the glaciers, the time of the ice age. And as I was explained to me by some of the. Experts. I talked to get up and go they don't move around much. And so they didn't very very slowly move north to recolonize and they hadn't reached Chesapeake Bay. They hadn't reached Pennsylvania. They hadn't reached new Montana all this area by the time of Columbus and win. And that the result all the plants in this area. Miss northern part of North America. Weren't used to having earthworms or to these tremendous soil engineers, and they take all the nutrients that are on the surface from leaf litter and so forth. Can they stick it underground? And as a result when earth was were introduced in spread by these European colonists. They started. Recycling. The nutrients in the way that gardeners are familiar with. And as a result of slow motion. Wave ecological disturbance as one set of plants couldn't tolerate earthworms is replaced by another in their areas in places like the far north of Minnesota bitter, still earthworm free. And there's in fact in Minnesota worm watch isn't Alburto watches areas of western Massachusetts that are trying to fight back the tide. It's wonderful that the earth worm while the India while the native Americans and the settlers are combating and fighting and and remember when they first landed the maze. The corn those fields weren't fenced because they didn't have catalytic enough to worry about that. All of that is happening as men are staring at each other, and the earthworm is very gradually transforming the landscape. The other thing transformed the landscaping I love this is the most intelligent animal. I've ever met the pig the pig arrives. And everything changes. The the counter thrive have lots of pigs pigs immediately escape and start swarming. Over everything. And I don't know if any of your listeners have ever been around place where wild pigs are, but they are tremendously clever creatures were enormously good at turning up the soil with his shovel lake noses, and they just reek havoc in native fields. And of course, the native point of view until the pigs arrived if you know, a deer came in or something like that. Shot it for dinner. Right. You didn't mind wildlife coming in because it was it was something to eat when the peaks shoot them, then the colonists start objecting. And there's a enormous wave up and down the east coast of conflicts over colonise animals and there where I live in Massachusetts. There was a big fight in sixteen seventy four which is sort of the war over New England, which was in fact, head off Wei a fight over and over Indian killing columnists animals. They were eating their crops Gino scene where watching the merging of the Asian and European and African all in the new world starting with Columbus. When we come back, not only the merging, but also the pen democ, Saul clash together here in the new world. The book is fourteen ninety three Charles man is the author uncovering the new world Columbus created. I'm.

Columbus North America Jamestown Charles South America Massachusetts United States Michelin Jamestown John Smith Manley Melford Crosby Columbian exchange China John Rawls Central America Brian brackish Penn Jia geological New England Saul
"penn jia" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:25 min | 2 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Columbus arrived. But now we apply. Globalization to the concept of the late fifteenth early sixteenth century in north and South America. Charles, very good evening. Do. Congratulations jamestown. We call it the tobacco coast in your book. And that has a reason because you not only discuss the people who came here and. And they're they're turmoil and their strife and their deaths and their promises and their ambitions. But also, the plants and animals that migrate here. I wanted to step back a moment you're telling the story of what we today. Call globalization. Did they have that word in fourteen ninety three or fifteen hundred the idea of the world working together? No -lutely not what we're talking about is a phenomenon. That's really was just understood recently in the man who came up with the phrase to describe it was called the Columbian exchange. Manley Melford Crosby's wonderful story. And what he noticed is that you step back. The perhaps the best way to think about Columbus is as an agent of biological change. And reason is if you think about it. We also learned in fourth and fifth grade or six seventh grade depending on your school that, you know, couple hundred million years ago the world consisted of single giant landmass, scientists call Penn Jia geological forces broke. Hit up forever, separating eastern hemisphere in the western hemisphere and forever, separating the plants and animals on those two hemispheres ecosystem and what Columbus did accidentally without knowing about. It was ring the continents together he recreated pen Jia in huge numbers of creatures from over there over here in huge numbers of creatures over. Here went over there. And the result was an explosion ecological explosions the biggest event in the history of since the death. So the dinosaurs. And underlies a lot of human history that you and I learned in school, homo, Gino. Scene period. That's some of some scientists called this period that we live in now the period started by Columbus, the homogeneous team time when all the earth is being homogenized biologically because all the different ecosystems are all being mixed up and moving all around. And that's why you get things like tomatoes in Italy tomatoes are from Mexico, and you get chili peppers which are from Central America and South America in places like Thailand than you get potatoes from the Andes Ireland, and you get horses and and cows, which you're Asia in the middle west and on and on and on I wanna go immediately Jamestown because it describes this process. Not only in front of us with the conflict between the native American settling in the area where the Jamestown settlers, remember? They set sail from London December sixteen six it's an investment society. There are investors in this. And they're going to throw themselves on the unknown shore. The vast forest of North America that has been managed by the native Americans quite nicely. Thank you very much for hundreds of perhaps thousands of years, but as Jamestown builds it chooses a place that is brackish they have brackish water. In fact, you you right Charles at the current so strong. They can tie their ships right up off the shore. And they're in the presence of an older society. A group of people who found themselves very carefully and deal with the environment. Why are they allowed to stay? Why aren't they immediately driven out these settlers? Well, the if I can tell there's a they landed right in the middle of small native empire that they called Seneca Moco, and the English were from the native point of view, these undesirable people who sort of showed up, but they had some goods that were worth trading for and so the gave him the worst piece of land piece land didn't have any good water. People land was. Mar it was marshy, and Brian brackish and so forth. Instead, essentially, you can stay there for a while as long as you keep producing the iron goods knives and things like that that we like, and this was from the Indian point of view a very sound of procedure. And they believed they kick them out at any time. And so you would have these undesirable people who had a few things that you liked and you would sort of fence them off, and that was their strategy and it worked for quite a while you write that or you have the comment that is very door here saying that both sides enjoyed confidence born of ignorance of each other. And so as these two societies having nothing to do with each other whatsoever of the fact that they're living in the same area deal with each other. There's going to be something that you see out front, which is the tale of Pocahontas and John Smith and John Roth, and then what happens under Neath with which is the sudden introduction of earthworm. I like this part Charles a lot while the fighting is going on in the. Threats and John Smith tries to burn himself by having gunpowder exploded his belt, what is the earth worm doing? What's happening is starting a few years after they is they're trying to figure out that Michelin Jamestown is there because the English want to do what the Spaniards did find lots of golden silver. And they're convinced that there's gold and silver all over the Americas. And so companies they can just set up shop in North America. They to find the golden silver, and the second thing they want is that they are believe that North America is a lot narrower than it actually is they have convinced themselves just a couple of hundred miles across and so they should be able to sail up Chesapeake Bay, which they think it's the mouth of giant river and go across to the Pacific establish basic music in start trading with China which is goal. They're going to take all the gold and silver and use it to buy things in China. When this doesn't work out for all the obvious reasons. There's no golden silver in Virginia and the United States a lot bigger than they. Thought it was the desperately cast about for other things to do when they start trying to wine grapes. They tried to go silk. They try to make iron they try to do everything. And the thing that catches on is when John Rolfe manned becomes the husband to poke Honda's famous story begins to plant, a Brazilian plant of type of tobacco and this explodes. And they start taking over huge areas of this land and growing tobacco on it. And as they do so the introduce all kinds of other crops, and plants and animals from England most of them without knowing it, including the earthworm which begins very slow motion transformation of the ecosystems in the northern part of the United States. And the reason is the reason that does this is that the earthworm in North America didn't exist at the time of Columbus. They're all squished. So I'm using technical language here. Right. By the by the glaciers, the time of the ice age. And as I was explained to me by some of the earth, worm experts. I talked to earthworms don't have a lot of get up and go they don't move around much. And so they didn't very very slowly move north to recolonize, and they hadn't reached Chesapeake Bay they hadn't Pennsylvania. They hadn't reach new Montana all this area by the time of Columbus and win. And that the result all the plants in this area. Miss northern part of North America weren't used to having earthworms or to these tremendous soil engineers, and they take all the nutrients that are on the surface from leaf litter and so forth, and they stick it underground. And as a result when earth were introduced in spread by these European colonists. They started. Recycling. Nutrients in the way that gardeners are familiar with. And as a result of slow motion. Wave ecological disturbance as one set of plants couldn't tolerate earthworms is replaced by another in their areas in places like the far north of Minnesota that are still earthworm free. And there's in fact, Minnesota worm watches now Berta worm watches areas of western Massachusetts that are trying to fight back the tide. It's wonderful that the earthworm while the India while the native Americans and the Feth lers are combating and fighting and and remember when they first landed the maze. The corn those fields weren't fenced because they didn't have cattle didn't have to worry about that. All of that is happening as men are staring at each other, and the earthworm is very gradually transforming the landscape the other thing transferred, the landscaping I love this is the most intelligent animal. I've ever met the pig. The pig arrives at everything changes. Yes. The the Countess rival have lots of pigs. Pigs media escape and start swimming. Over everything. And I don't know if any of your listeners have ever been around place where wild pigs are, but they are tremendously clever creatures were enormously good at turning up the soil with is sort of shovel lake noses, and they just reek havoc in native fields. And of course, from the native point of view until the pigs arrived if you know dear came in or something like that. Well, they shot it for dinner. Right. You didn't mind wildlife coming in because it was it was something to eat when the pigs coming you shoot them than the colonists start objecting. And there's a enormous wave up and down east coast of conflicts over colonise animals, and there is where I live in Massachusetts. There was a big fight in the sixteen seventy.

North America Columbus jamestown Charles South America Chesapeake Bay United States John Smith Minnesota Penn Jia geological Massachusetts China Michelin Jamestown Manley Melford Crosby Columbian exchange Central America Brian brackish
"penn jia" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"We'll play music period of game about breakups breaking up with someone over overtaxed is so cold. Okay. The right way to do. It is in person on Valentine's Day. Let's meet our contestants. I appro- Cochrane. You're studying clinical psychology. And you're a successful matchmaker. Three introductions. You've put together have turned into weddings. Yes. Okay. So what's your secret to matching people being friends with people who are kind of desperate hope? Destig- ru when you ring in we'll hear this. Your opponent is Sarah petite McClure, you're a PHD student studying special education. So as a older PHD student you've said that you have a different set of challenges than your average classmate. What are some well? Trying to understand the Twenty-seven-year-old mindset sometimes a little bit challenging. But overall, it's it helps me stay in the know with. What's the hip trends right now? Okay. What's what are the hip translate? Now, there's a phrase that some young people are using at least in Syracuse that someone when you think they're attractive. They're called a snack, a Snapchat. I had never heard before. So that was that was a new one had to have it explained to me feel pretty old that does sound very temporary, though, I gotta say that sounds like trista swipe left and then your does. Sara when you ring in. We'll hear this. Remember ruined Sarah, whoever has more points after two games. We'll go to our final round. Your next game is a music parody cold breaking up Jonathan Colson take it away. We rewrote the post breakup song you oughta know by Alanis Morissette. Now the lyrics are about things where people who broke up. We're are breaking up just ring in what I'm saying about you ready. Yeah. Yeah. Here we go. I want you to. That they were a blues band. Named. After the guy who bangs on the drums, then there was Christine the she's married to John mcvie. They got divorced. These are not just rumor, and then there's also Stevie who ended things with Lindsay. It's like a soap opera for soft rock kin boomers. Sara Fleetwood MAC MAC is correct. The sheets that a frozen the flows. They just show a non grow in regions of high latitude. No. All those seals and bears and Wales have to move because the sea levels rising at least screwed. Yeah. This screwed and we're all so screwed. Rue the ice caps. What we're looking for. That's right. Now, if the caps are melting are they still caps just a question or are. They more blankets zoo. They're more blankets. There were blankets. Many ways fun Bertie game climate change apocalypse looks question. Here's your next clue. Here's the Queen. To remind you this phone kingdom of colony. It seems fair they revolt like in Ken. Egypt and Indy. You you you say. This feels personal the Commonwealth the United Kingdom Commonwealth. We're looking for the British empire would be, but yes, we'll pay fees to call them. Now, I. Absolutely. I'm with you. One hundred percent well said. Things seemed pre t- well in team twin t to. Then not quite as well until nine one. Don't you forget about me to go? But chip see I'm giving Yeltsin all my phone how now they can do is please those eastern bloc countries. This would make marks inland. Even more dour. Route the Soviet Union Soviet Union. That's right. The love that the shared wasn't spared from the dirty laundry. No divorce booed Nolde. Instead. A two door. King disagreed with the pope Quetta scope six weddings where workers head to head. He chopped up her head. Silence. Sarah Henry, the eighth. We need the end up oil and bolan. That's right. But we discussed we would also accept just and Berlin. Because she also broke. Also broke up technical so broke up. Yeah. Exactly. This is your last group. Well, did you? No s. That each land mass. Looks lack of puzzle piece. They once were connected in this. Most giant supercontinent tech tonic plates. Reu? Thank you. Thank you about through Penn. Jia jia. That's right..

Sara Fleetwood Sarah petite McClure Sarah Henry Jia jia trista King Soviet Union Soviet Union Cochrane Alanis Morissette Christine Valentine Sarah Syracuse Jonathan Colson United Kingdom Commonwealth Wales Snapchat Quetta Stevie
"penn jia" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"I wanna point out that you also do see examples, small examples of stalagmites forming in concrete structures, and this is something that you'll occasionally seep pointed out on some of these websites saying, how can you believe in the age of stalagmites? Because look, if you go to the parking deck, there's a little stalagmite. They're clearly the earth is only as old as this, this parking deck. Well, here's how what's going on concrete derives lag. Mice are sometimes observed in concrete structures in these again, are quite small and they four more rapidly the natural cave structures. They're by no means a Gotcha point for discrediting geologic science. I've never seen a parking garage to like what you need to get into this too lacked around. If you hang out in in some of the subterranean concrete zones around our own city of Atlanta, you'll encounter them rubber was your favorite parking garage to hang out in. I don't know. I do actually enjoy like a significantly creepy parking garage environment feel to actually the morlocks are gonna show up in any moment. Right. Well, I always think of like escape from New York and kind of seventies carpenter seventies eighties carpenter. When I when there's a good abandoned parking garage, it's gotta that kind of that echoey creepy -ness of the early scenes in escape from New York. Yeah. Yeah. But, but even then you're not gonna find any huge stalactites stalagmites. Now, as far as the the age of caves go, you get into much deeper time. We were just talking about those, you know, talking about the formations within, but just the the cave systems themselves consider mammoth cave, national park, major tourist attraction as far as caves go, geologists estimate that the oldest part of the sprawling cave, complex formed ten million years ago. And if you're in Australia and you happen to visit gentleman, caves, I believe I'm saying that right? Perhaps it's Jenolan I'm sure. Our Ossete listeners will correct me on this. Oh, I still I still can't live it down from when I said, what did I say? Ken Beira or something? Oh, yes, I think it's Canberra. Well, anyway, visit this particular cave. You will be visiting some caves that are thought to be three hundred and forty million years old. And there's a lot more here. We could talk about geologically. I mean, you can look to the formation of mountains rock layering through sedimentation, which we've touched on all ready. There's a reason we speak of geologic time in the earth is written in geologic time. Young earth views enforce human time or the time line of human civilization upon a thing that dwarfs are brief period of cultural ascendance. You know, one way you can actually make geologic time feel a little bit more intuitive. You can try to internalize it is visiting fossil beds. I know that was a feeling I one of the coolest things I've ever gotten to do. I've talked about on the show before was visiting the tr-. Alibi beds, Burgess shale, national park in in Canada, and which is Cambridge fossils trial bites everywhere anomaly Carris fossils and you're just walking around on them, but you get to see the massive vertical face of the shale that's made by sedimentary deposition over millions billions of years. That's broken off into all these flakes that you're walking around and you just realize like the the depth of time required to lay down the sediment, fossilized, all these creatures and then drive it up, make it into the side of a mountain near the top of the mountain, and then break it all off as it a roads into these beds along the mountainside. It's humbling. It's a humbling amount of time that you that is required to see this happen, and it's all extinct organisms to. Yeah, now this is great though. They brought up the the the fossils here because the next area I want to touch on asked to do with with with c.. Floor spreading and continental drift, and indeed the distribution of fossil species. This is a really interesting one. Yeah, and I feel it's it's particularly interesting because I feel on one hand most of us or at least dimly aware that the continents are not in the in the position they were. They were always in. I mean, if nothing else, it's been pointed out to you on a world map, how Africa and South America wants spooned or perhaps you've seen an epic animation detailing the breaking up of Penn Jia and the end of the super ocean, but wait a minute..

Burgess shale New York Ken Beira Canberra Australia Atlanta Penn Jia Africa South America Cambridge Canada forty million years ten million years one hand
"penn jia" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"Penn jia is bit nations decentralised jurisdiction platform using pan jia you can build voluntary nations agree contracts and resolve disputes with other citizens at access the services you need this is all vision of jurisdiction as a service a global market for governance services the jia arbitray shen tokunbo packed isn't a theory and based in act token that power was the panji a platform when you create to contract complete a contract or resolve a dispute on panja you receive nontradeable reputation tokens through lucy are eight i bought accumulating reputation tokens earned you tradeable pack tokens this ensures that you can't buy a good reputation or acquire it through popularity but if you own one you will be rewarded imagine a world where people can freely choose which voluntary nations and jurisdictions they want to be part of a world where voluntary nations offer a choice of services under their own laws and policies and compete for citizens in a free market the towards good governance you too can be part of the future of governance by joining the panji a token sale welcome to the internet of sovereignty welcome to panji are the crypto so in by the way if didn't know it the krypton show is only possible thanks to our partners partners like defence distributed uh check out the ghost gunnar with its recenue capabilities to make the 1911 and lock parts pretty cool machine it's even cooler now check it out and of course hillcountry helmand for all your roofing needs a dash dot org dash of porous the other cool crypto that uh has instance authorisation times two and a half minute transaction times uh and even has primarily concerned who and a half minute block time but instant transaction i'm sorry i'm sorry gents airplane orrick amman limit limit at will transaction block observation times yesterday uh and of course they've been very generous in helping this show do some charitable work of various.

Penn jia global market free market panji hillcountry helmand
"penn jia" Discussed on TV Avalanche

TV Avalanche

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"penn jia" Discussed on TV Avalanche

"That's got to be true that trump good every three the lime this line of dialogue with spoken i don't know which was worse being attacked by lions or discovering my sister is sleeping with my fiance true true number four a mute kamikaze bat flew to alaska to kill two lesbians scientists who froze to death in their laboratory while hutter huddled together and listening to don't look back in anger by oasis true true number five there are sabretoothed cats living on a mysterious island called penn jia true journal six a baseball team signs guerrilla to a contract because the the guerrilla has developed the ability to hit home runs true false that is the movie mr go which is moving from perea which is also tremendous at you should watch it dammit i was hoping it before they were all going to be true either throw in the one from you gotta watch mr go i wrote about like if you google it it'll come up and i made a bunch of gift from this thing at the booby is like ninety percent at cgi circus guerrilla heading home runs oh i've aiding the chips you put him accompany slack mart friend unaware of mr number seven so when says the line of dialogue so we're going after a crazy drugaddled venom dealer in the middle of a hurricane true never hate a pack of wolves break a murderer out of a maximum security prison true.

perea alaska google cgi circus ninety percent