34 Burst results for "Penelope Penelope"

"penelope " Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:36 min | Last month

"penelope " Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"We are no longer conservatives. We are restorationists. This is the title of an article. I want to give credit. It's written by a fellow named John Gabriel, jail and John Gabriel, and published in ricochet, ricochet dot com, and it's a very short article, just a really a few paragraphs. But it kind of got me thinking, so I wanted to read from the article and comment on it. But John Gabriel begins by saying, essentially, who is a conservative? Quote conservatives of long struggle to define conservatism. Maybe it's a philosophy, maybe it's an attitude or a psychology. And then he quotes Lincoln. Lincoln was once asked about conservatism and Lincoln says somewhat Riley or whimsically, is it not adherence to the old and tried against the new and untried. So Lincoln here is making an argument that look if you've got a long body of empirical experience that shows that this custom this way of organizing society, this rule of thumb works well, why wouldn't you go with that over something where you have no idea if it's going to work? Why would you try something novel via novelty may seem appealing on the surface, but there's a good chance that that new approach will fail. And so what Lincoln is doing really is making the case for tradition.

Penelope Penelope Milan Odysseus Eureka Homer
"penelope " Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

06:42 min | 4 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Back to sound opinions. I'm Greg cot and he's Jim Durer goddes. And that is part of the Bohemian Rhapsody scene from the 1992 film Wayne's world. I mean, you hear the song you know right away. You think of that scene, right? It's like so associated with that moment. Well, we have been waiting for it. You know that, right? I mean, it was a little bit of Bill & Ted. But mostly winning. Yeah, and the role switch, you know? For a moment to moment. Sometimes he's weighing, you know? And that scene as well as countless others, directed by our guest today, Penelope spheres, a 30 years later, the movie is still extremely beloved as you can tell because of that goofy humor in Garth's pacer. And the love of the birth mobile, the love of music. Absolutely. Singing queen's Bohemian Rhapsody, as I said, completely associated with that movie. We had read that the scene almost didn't happen. So we had as Penelope, whether that was true. No, not at all. Good. I'd love to debunk these stories. Because the story. The story goes that you wanted Guns N' Roses. That's hilarious. You know why? That's hilarious because it is so opposite of true. Here's the thing. Guns N' Roses were supposed to be in decline two. And they were going to close the movie. And their manager pulled out at the last second, slash was down with it, actually was down with it. It was all going to happen, and they pulled out, and therefore I got mega death, okay? So I do Wayne's world as my next movie. Now, do you think that I'm going to go and ask Guns N' Roses to be in F and movie? I don't think so. And yeah, screw those dudes and actually lately I saw slash and he apologized that they didn't do it, but you know, life is what it is, but no, if somebody made that story up sounds like Mike or something. But no, I never want a Guns N' Roses in the movie. He wanted. Well, for the performance piece, you know, that Alice did. And they appeared in the second one. That I did not appear in. A vastly inferior scene. Yeah, nobody remembers that movie pinell. Nobody knows. There should not have been a Wayne's world too. No. Well, not so quick anyway, you know. All right, so was it your idea for Bohemian Rhapsody from the beginning? No, it wasn't my idea. And see, that's the thing about punk rockers. See, I told you I'm a punk rocker at heart. We tell the truth, okay? My flower and nothing up here. It was not my idea. It was Mike's idea, and it was written into the script when I got the script. And I shot it. I will say this, he wasn't real happy when I made him bang his head for 6 hours. And he did maintain that it wasn't funny, but the fact is he was being a good actor, and he followed the direction, and he did it, and it's the scene everybody remembers. It wouldn't work without the head banging. That's absolutely nice. Yeah, that was critical. Yeah. Absolutely. Definitely. The song is too long. You got to do something. I was like, 9 minutes long, you know? Did you relate to the song? Because, you know, the one thing that I think was extraordinary about that is that basically gave Queen a Second Life. I mean, Freddie Mercury was dying. The band was effectively a non entity for a number of years. On the charts. And that sent them that started a whole new round of queen appreciation and sales. I mean, it sold records. That's not the kind of song that you would put in there and saying, oh, people are going to instantly relate to this because that song really hadn't been part of the culture for a number of years. It was a 70s hit. So how did you how did you think that was going to work in that scene? This is a critical scene. You're setting the stage for this movie. To answer your first question, yes, I always love Queen. And I didn't even question that it would work in the film. I didn't think it would work as well as it did. That's for darn sure. Here's the thing about the movie and the music. It all came together in some sort of magical way where the planets were lined upright, the chemistry of the right people were together. Everybody was at the peak of their game. You know, it just, there's very seldom in life that things line up like that. Wayne's world was a magical moment. And this guy says to me, he goes, don't you think that just because you had that big hit with Wayne's world that every movie you do now is going to be a big hit like that and I thought you watched me, brother, but here's the thing he was right. It's the kind of thing. It only happens once in a lifetime, I think. And you know, I certainly don't take credit for the whole movie or for any of it, really. I mean, I was in the right place at the right time. My name is Wayne Campbell. I live in aurora, Illinois, which is a suburb of Chicago. Excellent. Other rumors about the movie, okay? A lot of people we talked to still think that movie was shot in aurora. Illinois, the subway. I feel so bad for them. They embrace it because they're wearing the Blackhawks jerseys when they're playing street hockey. So they think this is a Chicago movie. Now Myers has said, apparently, his suburban upbringing in Canada evoked this kind of a scene to him. Do you have a sense of why aurora was the spot where mythically he was going to be doing this show from? I remember them saying we have to just get something that is so typically suburban and what could it be? And there was a bunch of talk about it. Actually, the funniest thing was the writers and Mike were so concerned about the look of the house that Mike lived in. And I must have looked at 50 houses in the valley, you know? Out here not in aurora. And they all look alike. Exactly. Alike. And why just picked one? What the hell? I'll just take this one. And so everybody tries to find that house now. I think it's cool. It's actually a really, really big compliment that people care that much about the movie. And I know that there's like a website that shows where all the locations really were. And I'm proud that people think it was shot in aurora because that means, you know, we did a good job as filmmakers. There are a lot of memorable cameos in Wayne's world, Chris Farley, Alice Cooper, Ed O'Neill, but I want to take a minute to talk about meatloaf. He makes an

Wayne Greg cot Jim Durer Penelope spheres Guns N' Roses Bill & Ted Mike Garth Penelope aurora Freddie Mercury Alice Wayne Campbell Illinois Chicago Blackhawks Myers hockey Canada Chris Farley
"penelope " Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Considered different, but now I'm going to comfortable lifestyle and I can be myself. Everyone's hair should be blue because that's the best color. It looks so good. You know, like when I first showed the decline, the very first screening was that the Writers Guild and the lady stood up after the film was over and she said, how dare you glorify these heathens? Tipper Gore was her name actually. No, that was with the second film. And as a woman, Penelope, did you ever have any trouble connecting whether it's the hyper macho kiss or any of the punk bands? They just seemed awkward around women, you know, the many of those metal bands that you dealt with. Not saint lemmy. But you know, Aerosmith and kiss. Actually, it's funny you mentioned lemmy because I would say that in all I love lamby, okay? In all of the musicians I've ever dealt with, he's the only one that tried to strangle me literally. Wow. I know. We're laughing, but that sounds serious. Sounds like a compliment. He thought you were. I think that might be a compliment, yeah, but it was freaky because it took me up by surprise. I was just finished shooting. And somebody actually took a picture of it and that's why I'm for sure it happened because he grabbed me from behind and started strangling with his elbow around my neck and I don't know if this is love or hate, but it sure is freaky. The ace of spades the ace's faith look yeah but so you were dealing with so many sexually awkward

saint lemmy Tipper Gore Writers Guild Penelope lemmy Aerosmith
"penelope " Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

04:09 min | 4 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Welcome back to sound opinions. I'm Greg Todd here with Jim dearer goddess, and that's a little snippet of the theme song used for the 1992 film Wayne's world. Directed by our guest today, Penelope spheres. Now Penelope, she began her directing career filming shorts with the great Albert Brooks on Saturday Night Live. Many people don't even know that. Yeah, it's amazing. Little anecdote about her career. And after getting sort of burned out on that Hollywood scene, she started making independent documentaries, a game changer, the decline of western civilization, beginning in 1981. You know, the decline part one, Greg, is one of the all time great punk rock films. Entertaining for different reasons was part two, which looked at the developing hair metal scene. I didn't like it for the music, but Penelope caught a different version of The Rock dream very convincingly in that film. And then there's even a third decline of western civilization where she looks at gutter punk. I think that's more of a work of sociology and great kind of street journalism than it is music, but clearly to the core of her being this woman is a rock fan. She got a call back when, from Lorne Michaels, of SNL to direct the film version of what had been a successful skit, Wayne's world. Two guys, Mike Myers, Dana Carvey, sitting in the basement, pretending to be zonked out, heavy metal fans, right? How do you make this into a movie? People were kind of wary about that. But the 1992 film, I'm sorry. It's one of the all time classics in pop culture, certainly in rock and roll. Penelope, we are honored to have you on the director of Wayne's world and so much else. Welcome to sound opinions. Well, thank you very much. When you were making Wayne's world. All right. It's early on in your career. It's Mike Myers. First movie, did you ever think the decades later people would hold it in such a steam and want to be talking to you about it? As if it was Citizen Kane. No, no, I never it never occurred to me or any of us that it would actually hold up this long. It's been amazing. People still love it. It's crazy. What do you think it is? I mean, you know, Greg and I have hosted this show with two guys talking about music they love. Obviously, we have a fondness of thinking about two doofuses on the couch talking about music they love. How do you make them? The sketch, it was a Saturday Night Live sketch, right? And you turned it into a whole movie. I mean, did you think it had that kind of potential? That was the big fear that the studio paramount had was how are you going to make a movie out of that little sketch? And, you know, Bonnie and Terry Turner, the writers and Mike and Dana as well. I mean, we all pitched in to try to make it as a funny and rich and cool of a movie as possible. But we never thought it would make the money that it did. We never thought 25 years later, people would still be talking about it. We just wanted to get through to the end of the shoot, you know? I mean, not a huge budget, $14 million. It ends up making a 180 million and counting. Since then, and it continues to be shown to a capacity audience. I hope you're getting some of the residuals on that Penelope, by the way. I hope you're still getting paid for that. Well, here's the thing when paramount was going to do the movie. It didn't even remotely occur to them that it may have this kind of box office or staying power. So they were generous enough to give me a large percentage of it. And I'm actually really, really rich. That's refreshing because we talked to the spinal tap phone. Oh yeah. Didn't make a dime off of that movie. Is that right? The second greatest movie ever. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I almost directed that one too, but here's the thing. I feel very fortunate that, you know, we lucked out with the movie and that my agent was smart enough to say, hey, give her a percentage, and that paramount still sending the checks. It's like, I was raised in a trailer park, you know? I was like, I didn't have any money, and I didn't make any money until I was like 45 years old when I did Wayne's world. Well, you know, I get all these people saying, oh, what am I gonna do, man? I'm in the movie business and I can't make any money, and I'm like, you're 20 years old, come back when you're 45, dude. Patience and

Penelope Wayne Greg Todd Jim dearer Mike Myers Albert Brooks Greg Saturday Night Live Lorne Michaels Dana Carvey Saturday Night Live sketch Terry Turner SNL Citizen Kane Hollywood Bonnie Dana paramount Mike
‘Dune’ director out, KStew in and more Oscars surprises

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

‘Dune’ director out, KStew in and more Oscars surprises

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'The Power of the Dog' leads Oscar field with 12 nominations, followed by 'Dune' with 10

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

'The Power of the Dog' leads Oscar field with 12 nominations, followed by 'Dune' with 10

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Academy Academy Academy Academ Best Best Best Picture Picture King King King Richard Richard Best Best Best Actor Actor Act Smith Smith Smith Bardeen Bardeen Bardeen Benedict Benedict Cumberbatch Andrew Andrew Andrew Garfield Garfield Garfield Denzel Denzel Actress Actress Nicole Nicole Kidman Kidman Jessica Jessica Chastain Chastain Washington Denzel Washington Livia Livia Livia Colman Colma Penelope Penelope Jessica Chastain
"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

01:39 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"Of your favorite memories that maybe people might not know about of Wayne's world. I favorite memory is being at the village theater in west..

"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"Rather say goodbye to Hollywood than have Hollywood say goodbye to me. So fuck you. That's where I went. And one thing I love about you is you're so blunt and to the point and the time and you know, it's like just I feel like in life, like whether it's I'm talking to a guest or just in my normal life. Like, just say what you want to say. Stop beating around the bush, stop like. Sure, just say what you mean. Well, I always do. Yeah. All the time. They say they say, oh, we never have to wonder what Penelope is thinking because she just says it. And that's good. And that's the way that's the way it should be. Just like as I was saying about black sheep, I really feel it's the most underrated.

Hollywood bush Penelope
"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"Yeah, I was working as a waitress at Danny's and IHOP and even took a job working in a strip club, not as a stripper. Right. But as a waitress, I'm not. I quit because it was so creepy. But, I mean, I always, I never thought, oh, I'm going to be a successful film director. I never thought, oh, I'm going to make a bunch of money for thought that. And those two things were never really my goal. No. Yeah. Yeah. Go ahead, I'm sorry. I just watched the signs in the road. I like to say. And listen to people and picked up on little suggestions here. And no, I guess.

"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

03:14 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"In the wild west world of podcasting, there is one podcast that is authentic and genuine continues to stand tall in its originality. Based on a passion for his guest,.

"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:23 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

"I'm just going to be around all the time, watching all rehearsals. And I feel like that's so cool. So every time I'm rehearsing, I have Daniel look and so it was another great stimulus, you know, of and he was there for everybody. He was there. I mean, it's incredible. The amount of time on the education and he was just we go through a whole year. I don't know how long. Well, and I guess, I guess it makes sense that, you know, these are all sort of people in his mind. He should really know them very well, but I mean, that is an incredible musical number the way it turned out. I watched it again yesterday just to be fresh and man, that was great, but so back with Pedro again for I'm so excited. In 2013, I know that in this period, you were also starting to have a family, which you are certainly allowed to do, which is exciting and cool. And maybe working a little bit less often than you did before, but always very interesting stuff. I mean, I think had you ever done TV before assassination of Johnny Versace? That was interesting. So doing TV, real person, having to speak English with an Italian accent when you make of that. I loved every second of that. Again, when Brian called me, I thought, wow. I could give me 24 hours. I have to do things. I have to check with myself and see if I'm able to do this. If I see myself capable of playing this icon that everybody knows. And that is your station. And so unique such a unique personality. And also I have to call her and ask her if she agrees with me playing her. That was very important for me. And I did call her and as she said, if somebody is going to do it, I'm happy to do because I know you respect me and I really do. I love her, and I love John even if I never met him. I mean, I did it with all my respects and admiration. And I got so obsessed with the character because I watched so much real material to be able to play her,.

Johnny Versace Daniel Pedro Brian John
"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:55 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And I guess I'm just curious, what did it mean to you? I believe you were the first Spanish actress ever to win an Oscar. So aside from just personally being exciting and you had a funny, I think first line when you got up there was something like, has anyone ever fainted up here? A true fear in that moment, I thought, I don't know if I'm gonna pass out or really be able to say anything. Well, it was pretty pretty great. And I guess did you feel in your experience? Is that like a one night very cool thing and then life just goes on or did you find that it has had value in terms of, I mean, people knew who you were, of course, before that and they knew that you were very talented, but did it change anything? I think it helped in so many ways. First of all, it was such an honor and a dream. I didn't even allow myself to have that dream. But then maybe secretly, some part of myself was a dream, because I would have some images of myself at night when they turned off the lights. Maybe dreaming about that moment, but really like science fiction. That was not possible, somebody from my country, my country, it had not happened. So like you said before, the meaning that it had for me for my family for my Friends for all my colleagues, all the other actors in my country, and that's why I had the need to also speak in Spanish a little bit because I knew that so many people were really getting very happy for that moment. And so grateful I felt for every one of the opportunities that I've had until that moment. And also for the fact that half of the half of the time that my character was on screen, I was speaking Spanish, which was even more difficult or the fact that the first nomination was for vulgar, which was also in Spanish. And then a lot of meaning for me in terms of feeling even more grateful to the academy for that..

Oscar
"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:24 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Some party at the embassy and I broke a tooth. And I remember all the people that were calling their dentist to try to feed me at 12 at night. To repair that because I had to present and I really wanted to present for many reasons. But I had a feeling he was going to win. I remember screaming at me in a party. You have to relax. Because I was imagined I was panicking because how did that happen? And then I was able to find identities thanks to Melanie, who was at that point married with Antonio and I think even some of them came with me into the dentist room at 1 a.m. you were such a crazy crazy night. I wonder what would have happened if you hadn't found the dentist? Would you have would you have presented with that with a broken tooth? Is that for anything? Well, so I mentioned that you were starting to work more in America and in English language, movies. And very quickly, you know, people were excited about you here and casting you opposite some very big American movie stars. I'll mention a few of these titles, all the pretty horses it was 2000 blow and captain corelli's mandolin and vanilla sky were all 2001. Gotha 2003 Sahara 2003, I believe. But I wonder, you know, the way Pedro when he's talked about you starting in America, he's called that quote, I guess those years when you started up until volver a long period wandering in the wilderness close quote. He said that Hollywood had, quote, pigeonholed you in the image of empty beauty. Now, obviously, you are excellent in a lot of these movies, but they didn't click in the way that a lot of the movies you've made with Pedro did in terms of people with critics and even with audiences in some cases..

captain corelli Melanie Antonio America Gotha Sahara Pedro Hollywood
"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:36 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And then I went there to make that movie. I still didn't speak a lot of English, so some of those read through were really hard for me, because I don't like missing anything. And you know, it was like. Hiding in the bathroom to cry. Coming out, okay. Let's keep going. And I needed a lot of patience for those years and I guess also the people that I was working with also needed places because I my English was very basic at that time. Well, you've said the two things you knew how to say when you first came to LA where how are you? And I want to work with Johnny Depp. That is to my agent was always reminding me that I was saying that it was probably true that I was saying it. And that worked out, too. So a lot of these, I guess, people talk about, you have to put it out there, and then it doesn't always happen for most people, but it seems like almost every time it's happened for you. But before we get into live, well, the chronology of this is always a little complicated because I'm sure some things were shot before they came out and other things came out first and whatever, but in terms of the release, 97 was open your eyes, which later was remade as vanilla sky with you again. But that was 97. I think you want to Goya award for that. And then it was also that year, as you said, the opening 8 minutes of life flesh for Pedro, the first time of the 7 times that you worked together. And he said that he wrote that opening 8 minutes with you in mind, you are playing a teenage prostitute giving birth on a bus. And then you are not seen on screen again. But I guess just even if it was 8 minutes and maybe on screen and maybe one week of work or whatever for you, how did the experience of actually working with him compare to the imagined experience of what it would be like? It was exactly like I imagine intense tough, fun incredible connection, exactly what I dreamed the fear that I imagine that I was going to have. I had it, but he was always so nice to me from the beginning. He's always honest. I mean, if I don't take and he doesn't like it, today is the same thing. He would tell me he would tell me that I was good and tell me why. And this is my safety net with him. And from that shoot, yeah, 8 days or ten days of shooting, but it was really complicated. The character because I was very young and.

Goya award Johnny Depp LA Pedro
"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:49 min | 11 months ago

"penelope " Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And actually all my life I've been trying to do that role. Maybe someday I still will try to accomplish that dream. But I realized later that that's what I was doing there. Once I was exercising, which was really a key for me in my childhood because I had so much energy so that we really helped me to channel that energy in a very good and healthy way. And it was really good mentally for me not just physical. It was great discipline and it was I'm always grateful to my parents that they decided to put me like four times a week and that's called three or four hours a day. And then when I was around 13 14, when I had already, I mean, my father, but I'm a better max machine. And through that, I became a huge fan of cinema. And through that, I became really obsessed with almora's work. And that's why I started to study acting to look for an agent. There was a point where I had to choose between dancing and acting because to my own surprise when I went to my first few castings I got yes for an answer and I really didn't expect that. And then I started to work back to back to back from hamo hamon developer to all the movies that I started to do. Really, with no break. Well, I'm going to ask you about all of those early important ones. But let's first just I don't want to skip over. There's that I think for not many people is there actually a moment when you know what you want to, you know, you go into something and you come out of something totally different. So can you talk about as I understand it, you're 15 years old, you have to literally lie to get into tie me up tie me down and one of our movies in a theater. And you come out of it and what is different? So most movies I would watch at home better max because I had a copy my own copy of the membership for the video club. And that was my hobby. That's what I wanted to do. Not hanging out with my friends, this watch movies. But then this one for some reason I ended up in Madrid in a theater and I watched it there. And I remember it was like a total revolution for me, watching that film coming out of the theater. And I felt so, so inspired by what I saw that it was a huge motivation of let's try let's try to look for an agent and maybe someday I will be able to work with this man. And I've always been a big dreamer because I never had anybody around me in my family or friends or neighborhood. Nobody that could make a living out of something related to art, so it was like telling my family, I want to be an astronaut. It was really really hard for them to accept, but not because they didn't want me to just because they thought that I was I would probably fail and they didn't want me to suffer. But even like that, they.

hamo hamon almora Madrid
"penelope " Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"penelope " Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

"To think everyone has forgotten all about it. Made a lovely home here for the three of you so it would be foolish if you were to leave. Really said prince timothy standing up. Does that mean that we can carry on. Being princes asked prince ryan i think so said princess add a line but only if we can come and visit added princess penelope greed said prince timothy with a beaming smile for the next few hours princess. Add a line helped prince timothy water. The vegetables princess penelope assisted prince ryan in feeding the pig and the goat and princess florence and prince. Jack collected eggs that the chickens laid when it was time to return to their part of the castle. The three princes walked with the sisters back to the gap in the wall and watched them climb through. Will you come back tomorrow. Ask prince timothy. Oh yes said princess penelope and the next day to and the next day said princess at align and so the three princesses and the three princes became firm friends and although the sisters kept the three brothers of secret they never did break their promise about the purple carpet the and..

prince timothy prince ryan penelope greed princess florence princess penelope princess penelope prince Jack
"penelope " Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"penelope " Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

"Once upon a time. There were three princesses that was princess. Atta line who was very nearly five years old. Then that was princess penelope who was very nearly three years old and finally there was princess florence their baby sister the three princesses lived in an extremely old but very beautiful castle. It was so large that many parts of the castle when never even used and there were even some parts that were falling down. the king and queen didn't want the princesses to get lost or stumble upon a dangerous part of the castle and so they decided to do something about it. The corridors of the castle were covered by long carpets. that ran down there centers. All these carpets were royal purple and emblazoned with tiny golden crowns. The king and queen instructed the staff of the castle to pull up any carpet from the parts of the castle that were closed off or to damage to go into and to make sure that the new carpet was laid in any corridor in the main castle. That didn't have it. Now listen to me. Children said their mother the queen. Your dad and i have made a simple rule to show you where you can and cannot go in the castle. You can go down any corridor where there is royal carpet and into any room that the royal carpet runs to and nowhere else do you promise. The three princesses nodded or right. Very well off you go. And play said the queen so the three princesses went to play in the castle over the next few days. They followed the purple carpet. Too many corridors that they had never been down before and discovered many new rooms. There had been a room full of paintings of fish. Another where a little old lady worked making beautiful clocks and another that was lined with mirrors. It seemed that every day the purple carpet led them to somewhere new then one day they were following the carpet along a corridor lined with suits of armor as they reached the final suit. The carpets simply stopped and yet the corridor karen on. Is that the end as princess. Penelope yes the carpet doesn't seem to go any further answered princess atta line. Although the corridor keeps on going to think that we could look a little further asked princess penelope her foot hovering over the end of the carpet. I'll no we mustn't said princess adeline sternly. We did promise nece. Wherever's florence said penelope and surprise she's disappeared. The two remaining sisters looked around hearing around the suits of armor and generally scratching their heads in disbelief. Wait said princess anna line. I think i can hear her laughing. They follow the joyful sound to the corridor stonewall and discovered and narrow gap in the stonework. I think she's through here. Princess at line peered through the gap and cautiously spotted royal purple carpet on the other side wherever princess florence that gone. She hadn't broken her promise. It was a tiny squeeze but princess penelope and princess at a line managed to fit through favorite in a very dusty corridor and by the looks of the carpet. It was very old. The girls didn't know it but this part of the castle had long ago been blocked off and so the staff hadn't been able to get in here and remove the old carpet as the queen and king had asked but what was particularly curious. Was that there. Were no signs of princess. Florence asked princess penelope leftover princess. A line listened carefully right. I think they followed the purple carpet to a large hallway with a wide curving staircase the climbed upwards to where they were sure they could hear the giggles their sister up and up the stairs. They climbed until the carpet eventually finished at a heavy oak door when the princesses opened it the last thing they were expecting to see with the three boys bouncing on a giant bed with her little sister. Soon as the boys potted the girls. They flocked onto the bed and surprise. How said princess add a line with authority. May i ask. Are you the eldest boy who was barely older than she was hopped off the bed and bowed before her. I am prince. Timothy said the boy and these are my younger brothers prince ryan and print. Jack princess penelope looked at the three brothers up and down. Are you sure you're all princes. She said you're all a bit scruffy and the word to their clothes with patched and tatty mismatched in a little grubby prince. Timothy held his head high. We are indeed. We discovered this unwanted part of the cost so and we have made it our home and because we live in a call so we must therefore be princes. You live here all alone. Said princess atta line. The three princes nodded. Come let us show you said prince ryan. Taking princess penelope's hand. They took the princesses back down the staircase and along the purple carpet to a courtyard garden. Here the boys were growing vegetables and keeping chickens. There was even a plump pig and a shaggy goat. We've got everything we need. Here said prince timothy. You could stay with us if you like. Oh no said princess. Add a line. Doubt the king and our mum the queen wouldn't like that real princesses gasped prince ryan so really. This is your castle prince. Timothy sat down heavily on an upturned bucket. i suppose that means we call stay any longer. We'll have to stop being princes and go and find somewhere else to live he side. The three boys suddenly looked very glum. Perhaps said princess. Penelope perhaps not said princess at line. Nobody uses this part of the castle. In fact we're beginning.

princess penelope princess florence princess atta princess adeline nece Atta princess anna line prince ryan penelope Penelope Jack princess penelope Timothy Florence prince timothy
"penelope " Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"penelope " Discussed on Planet Money

"Okay and we're back. It's card if i'm here with allison traeger and mahir dais. I okay so as you heard in the episode. There is kind of this spooky eerie but really quite effective process right. So here's my first question in. What is guessing the weight of a cow similar to what happens when people are deciding whether to buy or sell a stock because you have a marketplace where all these different people are bidding on stocks based on how much they think it's worth and you do converge to this price and i think the big difference between the cow and the stock thing is that you know we can verify. The weight of the cow like it's noble and with stocks. What makes it much more interesting and fun is will wait a second. Do we really ever know it. Yeah right penelope the cow has an actual weight and that weight is not gonna change. Just because i guess the weight too high or i guess the weight too low but with stocks. It's the very guessing of the price that actually ends up setting the price. It's different so if i look at the price of a stock and i think it's low then i'll buy that stock at the low price and the very active buying the stock pushes up demand for it. Just a tiny bit and then that in turn pushes up the price of the stock and so in the stock market you've got thousands and thousands of people doing that over and over and that is what sets the price of a stock on the stock market. Exactly right there's a whole set of things. We can debate about any company and its future and that is what world trying to do in financial markets. So you've got all these people who are thinking about buying the stock because they think it's gonna go up. You got all these other people who are going to sell the stock because they think it's gonna go down and it arrives at something in the middle. Roughly yeah okay and how can this still work. If at least some of the people buying and selling a stock either don't know much about the company or just might not be very good at analyzing companies in general given that they're supposed to be investing based on how good the company is will so first thing the mistakes that people may cancel each other out right. The reason it's important for all of us is the price of that stock actually really matters for the world because people make decisions based on it not a savings decisions but you might go work for a company. Because you think it's gonna be a good company to work for you might buy companies products. Because they're doing well so these prices send signals into the world about what we should do. So the prices are correct. The market sending that money to the best places for the right price. Yeah and when you say that the price is correct. Allison you mean that. The price of the stock is a good reflection of how good the company is. How well you can expect it to perform in the future. But what if the price is higher than that or lower than that how does that distort the process so if a company is completely over undervalued then you know maybe gets too much or too little capital and it doesn't put it in the right place because there's a finite amount of investment in the world right. There's only so much money. People can invest. So you wanna make sure. It goes to the most worthy places. Okay so that is. One theory of how stock prices are set. A lot of people constantly guessing some guessing. High some guessing. Low some guesses better and more informed than other guesses but what they're guessing is how good the company is how well it's going to perform in the future. How much money. It's going to be able to make in the future but there is this other theory theory that says that what people are guessing when they invest in the stock market does not actually have much to do with how good the company is. It's a theory that the stock market is not like guessing the weight of a cow. It's more like a beauty contest and to test that theory. We've got another planet money experiment coming right up when class continues this message comes from. Npr sponsor ford introducing the mustang mach e. Here's the global brand director of electric vehicles. Jayson castro data on the challenge of creating an all electric. Suv that drives like a mustang. The normal challenge of making suv go fast is higher center gravity. The beauty of the battery electric vehicle platform. Is that all of. The weight was down low on the floor. Because that's where the batteries housed. And that's where the electric motors are to learn more about the new all electric pony in the mustang stable goto four dot com the indicator from planet. Money is your daily source for economic stories stories. The peel back this onion. We know as the us economy today on the show and the show. Dan show desperately seeking construction workers. Forget everything you thought you knew about the unemployment numbers ten minutes or less that is all it takes for us to explain what is going on with all those numbers. Listen and follow the indicator from npr. Everyone welcome back from recess. Please take your seats. You are now about to hear a planet money story from twenty eleven david kastenbaum. Adam davidson are going to test a theory about the stock market proposed in the nineteen thirties by the economist. John maynard keynes. Keynes said that a way to think about how the stock market works is to think of it. Like an unusual beauty contest. Now people who've read the masterful biography of canes by robert scandal ski. No that keynes's romantic interests were generally directed at men but in this case he imagined a beauty of women so the conduct. You imagine would work like this it was. It would be in a newspaper where you put six photos of different women and then you ask the newspaper readers to write in with their vote and this is the important part you get a prize if you pick the most popular face and the reason this is a good proxy for the stock market is thing think how the stock market works so you might go around and look at different companies and say boy i think coca cola really should be worth fifty dollars and boy i. I really like the chances of ge growing in the future. I think they're gonna be worth more in the future but the rational logical investor thinks about something else as well they think i have my view of how healthy these companies are but if the rest of the world has a more optimistic view they think these companies are going to do even better than i do. That is sort of a self fulfilling prophecy. I should invest based on what i myself think but what everyone else thinks and this issue of people casting their vote effectively spending their money in a market based not on what they themselves think is right but based on what they think other people think is right is what some people thought could lead to bubbles and mania 's and And many of the distortions that we've seen in the markets lately so canes was thinking about this in terms of beauty contest where he was pointing out that the rational logical thing to do is to try to pick the woman that you think everyone else is going to pick not necessarily the person you think is the prettiest in fact. The person who's the prettiest might not actually win here a read from what he wrote quote. It is not a case of choosing faces that to the best of one's judgment are really the prettiest nor even those that average opinion genuinely thinks the prettiest. We've reached the third degree where we devote our intelligence to anticipating what average opinion expects the average opinion to be and there are some i believe who practise the fourth fifth and higher degrees. He's just talking about some kind of a strange exponential psychological process. This is pietra rivoli. Who gave us the idea to test this out. She's a professor at the mcdonough school.

allison traeger mahir Jayson castro penelope david kastenbaum Adam davidson robert scandal Allison electric motors Npr John maynard keynes ford npr Keynes keynes Dan coca cola ge
"penelope " Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"penelope " Discussed on Planet Money

"County farm fair in new jersey. We met penelope the cow in the dairy tent. She was sitting quite happily on a bunch of hey kirstin. Kuzma was taking care of her. Can you just describe what she looks like. Yeah she's mostly black She has white legs and she has a white spot in the middle of her head. but she's big black. How where did you say i said. Holy cow without even realizing what. She's much bigger. She just stood up. She's walking out of the barn now. She's way bigger than i thought. When she was sitting down we took some pictures of you. Jacob standing next to the cow for scale and just for fun. We decided to ask people at the fair. How much thought. Penelope wait as it happened. It was kids day so there are a lot of kids are which was fine. You know they're experts. What's your name. Look how much do you think now. Ways six pounds. Had you come up with that number. Because i'm six years old. You guys want to guess how much this calloway's sixty hundred pounds six thousand nine not at all. I'm sympathetic looking at lp. I had no idea how much she wait. I didn't even know how to think about it that way. More than my car that you a less than my car. I don't even know how much my car more than a cow. I'm gonna say more than a cow. We found an older group of kids and yet they also guest on the low side but they had this bigger problem. This this really more worrying thing and it was a problem. That adults also seem to have and it was this the first kid said a number and then all the other kids said basically the same number numbers that were like too close to the i. It's like are incapable of guessing. Anything different names isa. How old are you. How much do you think that calloway's hill hundred pounds as gabriella. I'm ten and i think the cow weighs three hundred pounds. My name is Nine seven years old. And i think the cow weighs three hundred pounds. People are not that different from cows. We heard if we don't know something. We look for a leader even if the leader maybe doesn't know anything can be finished chewing and we took her over to be weighed. It's one thousand three hundred and fifty five pounds. One thousand three hundred and fifty five pounds. We walked penelope back to the dairy tent and then we went home the next day posted photos online. The cowan. you own me right. I was there to give some sense of perspective. We put you on the tractor scale. Just hundred and sixty five pounds. That's how much much way then. Our colleague courtroom buoy here put it all up online guest the weight of this cow and the idea was our hope. Was that lots and lots of people would guess because the fundamental question here. The thing we're trying to figure out is if you have a bunch of random people making their best guess at some. Do you get close to you. Know the truth. Do you get close to the right answer so we put it up and we waited for the results to come in. We left this up online for five days. Let people guests for five days are calling tallied it all up david. You and i came into the studio. We didn't know the results and bleak came into give us the numbers. First of all how many people guest so the number of people that guest seventeen thousand two hundred and five people seventeen thousand legit. That's good that's good. It's as if you got like a small town at to all guests. We took those guesses. Add them up and calculated the average. This was the big moment ready. One thousand two hundred eighty seven pounds. One thousand two hundred eighty seven. Penelope actually weighed one thousand three hundred and fifty five pretty close right. So that's two within like what's sixty ish pounds. That was pretty impressive. Yeah i mean they're only like five percent off. okay sure. The golden thing was one pound off. This isn't that but remember. This is just a bunch of random people looking at this little cow picture in their facebook feed on their iphone. And here's another amazing thing when we asked people to guess we also ask this other question we asked. Are you an expert. Have you ever worked with cows. Because remember paul thought experts might be better and three thousand. Some people answered yes to that question. Jacob wondered where they really really made sure these are just people clicking a button online so we emailed a bunch of them and we heard back. They did seem pretty expert. You know a lot of them were farmers one of them mentioned the absence of a visible utter actually a few of them in and apparently that tells you something about how old the cow is how much it weighs. So how did the experts do. Here's the answer. So the average guests for the experts was one thousand two hundred seventy two pounds worse. They were worse. It's amazing so case. So maybe that is wisdom of the crowds to be fair. The experts were only marginally worse but they did not beat the crowd. We told sir wicky about these results. He wasn't surprised in fact he writes in his book. Chasing the expert is a mistake. We should ask the crowd and the fact that the larger crowd got it to within five percent. He said that seems about right to him. When people do versions of this experiment asking people to guess the number of jelly beans ajar for instance. The crowd usually gets it Within three to five percent one of the things that's interesting about this is even though i've written a book and done this experiment number of times every time i do it in every time i hear the results. I'm like it's not gonna work this time. Because the idea is so counterintuitive. You know it's it's pretty extraordinary in that regard The power of this to actually let the group arrive at a really good decisions is it's eerie. There's something about it. I think it is it is. There's something magical about it. It seems magical. I think it's not magic..

Kuzma calloway penelope Penelope kirstin Jacob gabriella new jersey sir wicky david facebook
Penelope Jones, founder of My So-Called Career, on building a resilience toolkit

Journalism.co.uk podcast

05:08 min | 2 years ago

Penelope Jones, founder of My So-Called Career, on building a resilience toolkit

"Came along and forced us all into the kind of i of this storm in one way or another. So that's penelope joins founder of choice unqoute career we are faced with economic people digital disruption cost-saving redundancy a fast moving and shrinking job market increasingly. Was the banks -iety relation mental health issues. At hardly surprising with all of fat things have never ever felt so uncertain. Uncertainty is the apt word today. One of the key things. We will talk about wrestle with particularly in regards to our own career trajectory in terms of covid nineteen. It feels like anything could happen to our careers. The question is is it possible to prepare ourselves if our careers take a massive hit in the near future my favorite about uncertainty. It's from an utterly. Utterly awesome woman. Could julia. Julia is psychotherapist. As she has a recent book could this to pass. And honestly if i could make that one recommended reading for everyone who has to live through twenty twenty i would do it. It will be worth it. That say she says when we let go of certainty. We are the to hope. And i think. That's such a lovely way of reframing uncertainty from being something negative from being something terrifying from being something that happens to us that is imposed on us to actually being something positive something that actually might want to seek out. We seek out hope. Her reassures us hype gives us And actually thinking. There is a reframing where uncertainty is not all bad news that gives us a really nice foundation to start working for. I think this is a major point. Because when you're living in certain to you definitely become settled you might stop pushing yourself to bring out your full potential. Stop holding herself high standards you become comfortable. And maybe complacent embracing uncertainty to become stronger. Is an interesting concept. So let's start to think about something uncomfortable. It's not like embracing uncertainty means. Just take life as it comes and ride every punch that comes at you really. It means being resilient and the first task is to take some time to work through your definition of resilience. What does it mean to you to be resilient. While you mull over his a few definitions from on news or wind delegates it could be skill acquired through doing not something that's taught to come out of a horrible situation and realize that the world keeps spinning and life goes on. It could be to take on daunting work challenges. Despite fail panic of how that task might pan out. It could be maintaining your personal values in the face of adversity doing the right thing. It could be something deliberate like learning. What skills are needed to cope with. Future scenarios like stress testing gauging the strength of a system in adverse conditions for me. I think it's about seeing job through getting task over the line despite setbacks uneven some resistance against you so just take a few minutes reflect a few of those definitions and just in your mind come to terms with what resilience means to you. This next exercise this fast exercise is actually gonna be about. How can we create confidence in our zillions. How can we build our resilience muscle when we don't need it so it's strong and there for us when we do so my definition of resilience when i talk about it exit being able to deal with unforeseen when we use our resilience muscle we become more elastic. We are able to harness the energy of the things that throw us off balance and use that to bring those back so actually kind of just thinking. Exactly what sending you flying. That is what it's going to help you to bring you back so rather than thinking that you have to kind of wait to be thrown to the bottom of the cliff and then you have to find your way back up. It's actually how do i use the energy that knocked me down to help. Bring back up again. So it becomes kind of cyclical approach. One of my favorite elements of resilience is the every time we use our resilience adds to us story so one of the things. I really love to to think about If anyone is familiar with them can and it is the japanese art of mending broken pulse with beautiful golden alaska to ten them into something new inside the the time when he translated means awfully fixed not rejected. And so when. I think about our acts of resilience acts of resilience at the golden lacquer that we use to kind of rebuild up pieces reshape ourselves antenna salads into Something bigger something that is informed by all of the experiences about past rather than controlled or dominated by them.

Penelope Joins Julia Alaska
How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

CodeNewbie

05:59 min | 2 years ago

How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

"So you WanNa Post on Dev titled. Trained in your name is a hard unsolved problem and computer science. Can you tell us what this piece about? The thing is like the title of the Post is is very much like a play on a classic joke. Meam trope, which is kind of like. Is A hot until probe in computer science, which can go like either like the things that genuinely all that things that genuinely on and to me I think. It was a subject that became rapidly extremely important in my life as I went through recently I guess kind of still am in the process of changing my name to better reflect who I am and sort of just like all of the systems I bumped up against that were fighting me in any way to do that and really like being a accomplish sulphur engineer. Feeling like a lot of it should have been much easier than it was and really sort of coming to understand that a lot of it is less to do with software engineering writ lodge in multiple with sort of like how people think about information schemers. What was the impetus for writing this piece? Really? It was sort of my earn frustration more than anything else like sometimes. Sometimes when I'm writing will be a point. I'm trying to get across and it's like I have to really work at it to get the words onto paper. Like doesn't I dare I. Have It's? It's very big in Amorphous and it takes a lot of time, and this post was not like that. The text of this post fell out of me in the space of. Of about a day and a half, and it really was just like writing very quickly and fluently, and it's because I am transgender and I it because changing your name in the way, transgender people do is not such a common use case just like many computer systems I expected to be able to deal with it just one and it's like genuinely frustrating and disheartening to. To me to encounter that and I wanted to write about my experience and what I really saw after I published that really really resonated with a lot of people, and that was really nice to see. Yeah, I can't imagine how difficult that must be. Especially because you're in the position to fully understand what the flaws and decisions, people made to end up where we are. So, you read about your experience in particular restaurant when you made a reservation with your chosen name, and then the restaurant workers actually address you by your dead name shortly after you WanNa talk about that experience to me, this was like a really interesting example of like information systems, getting this wrong and not like the people involved so as best I can piece together from what happened. It's like one of those restaurants where you like a cell number, and then they like text you when your tables ready and then. Then you, come back, and they call out your name. And what had happened is like at left them my number and I'd said like my name is penelope. And then when they texted me, it was like Oh tables ready with no name in it whatsoever and then when I got there and told them I was there, they were like Oh. Do you mean and then they said my dead name to me and so like somewhere in that loop. My dead name had been associated with my phone number in. In such a way that even when I was giving my name to like the people in the place like they were being shown the old name in a few minutes later, right, what I sort of in fall off from that ineffectual is able to later determined to be true is that the system was cashing the name against the phone number and like either they didn't type in the name when I gave them my phone number, or it just overrated what they had said to it, and so like icon determine. Determine exactly what happened, but that is an actual site effective like these to identify as being linked in a way that is like actually like a really shop experience for me to have you know. How much do you think is inherently difficult or more sort of a blind spot with the way? Software is developed in terms of the demographics and what software developers are sort of carrying about most so the thing is we just bad this as an industry like Patrick. McKenzie wrote his fallacies computer program. Believe about. A blog posts several years ago and like most of the advice in it is still relevant today. Mike pursed is like a slightly different take on the same idea, which is the way that we build these information systems inherently make sumptious about ways that the world is that ton out not to be true, and so when I used, put my social engineering hat on, and really look at this icy like that most likely what's happening is people take a very simple view of the world about how people relate to names and include that into that systems, and then like that's just it right I mean for example like the assumption here that a person has a single name holds true for wide swathe. Swathe of the population, but is not true for me and is like for example, not true for lot of women who get married are impressive, changing the legal name or people who get divorced during process of changing legal name, right and other affected groups beyond and so like really to me, it's that we just haven't educated ourselves like as an industry on like many different kinds of human factors that actually we need to encode in our information scheme as even for the simplest of

Engineer Meam Mckenzie Mike Patrick
Kid-Friendly TV Show Recommendations

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

09:29 min | 2 years ago

Kid-Friendly TV Show Recommendations

"I think it's important to clarify. We're doing these recommendations are for very little kids and everything that we are talking about all of the recommendations on this episode our TV and I think there are parents of very young children and people who give advice to parents have very young children who tend to obsess over screen time and how much screen time a toddler should have look. These are unusual times and the first thing that I want to say before I even start doling out recommendations is just to remember that you're doing the best you can. You're doing fine if you need to put your toddler in front of a TV or a tablet and that is what needs to happen for you to stay sane for you to get your work done then so be it. Your kid is going to be fine. Your kid has you. That's what's important wanted to get that out there. I will also go so far. As to say as a person who obsessed about this didn't obsess about it goes back and forth the important part of the best you can is the you can part so if you are stuck on the fact well. The best is only two hours. It's the best that you can do. Given your circumstances your doing great exactly so. My first recommendation is something that my parents put in front of me. When I was very small child back in the seventies which has been fairly recently rebooted for new generations the electric company. The Electric Company is a educational children's program in the seventies it featured such wonderful luminaries as Rita Moreno. It has an extraordinarily charming kids show. That is really focused on education. But does it in such a warm and inviting and pleasant way so the original seventies electric company you can stream it via Amazon? It does cost money. You can find pretty lengthy excerpts of it on Youtube floating around and you know a lot of us who grew up in the seventies. We'll have you know like individual favorite moments from the electric company. I just remember that that was something that my parents really love to have on and around because though it was geared very very much too little kids and they say online. They say that it's geared toward five to nine but I think you can really go younger than that. My parents didn't go nuts watching it now. They recently rebooted the electric company from two thousand nine to twenty eleven. Those three seasons you can stream for free at PBS DOT ORG and As an incentive for parents who listen to this show and have not checked out the rebooted electric company one of the CAST members is William Jackson Harper. Who Played Chidi on the good place incentive to watch the new electric company Occasional guest spots and occasional music composition from one Lin. Manuel Miranda. I'LL AL. Obviously we could go back and forth. Comparing the quality of the two there is no way to compare something. You were nostalgic for as a child with something that is trying to duplicate that magic but that is a marvelous piece of educational programming. That is still entertaining. And that is right up there with stuff like Mister Rogers neighborhood and sesame street and all sorts of wonderful stuff that you can find on PBS kids. Electric Company is just a gorgeous piece of that puzzle. And I don't think it gets as much recognition as it should get especially compared to some of those other classic pieces of programming love it. Excellent Pack Loved Electric Company Berry. What is your first recommendation? We in our family when my oldest was younger and I was pregnant with my second son. It was really imperative for me to be sitting down lying down pretending that I didn't have a child for like two or three hours a day but I also had already watched so much Daniel Tiger which is wonderful and other. Pbs Kids thing. That probably taught me a lot about parenting but I wanted something that I also really liked from the creators of Wallace and GROMIT. Shaun the sheep which I have so many I mean I literally have photographs of both my husband and my then three year old watching. Shaun the sheep and both laughing at exactly the same amount because it is genuinely funny. It is the first thing that I think our family all liked the same amount where we really all were engaged in it in the same way. I you know you're not pretending to love you know Mom Tiger or whatever you're not pretending to be like Mom Tiger. I'm really actually mom. Tigers really haunted me over the years but I will say that Shaun. The sheep is both adorable in terms of its slapsticky laps. But it also looks gorgeous. So if you're not familiar with Wallace and gromit they created these these beautiful claymation sort of handmade aesthetic from our animations and Wallace and gromit. I also highly recommend but it's more of a sophisticated storyline. What's Great About Shaun? The sheep is that they are sort of snack. -able basically it is a brilliant sheep named Sean and the adventures of him and his farmer and his friends and it is genuinely funny. They're all of these little references. That are incredibly sophisticated without going over the head of your little ones. There's a kind of buster Keaton ask quality to it and I can watch them all the time. I really truly do not get sick of Shaun the sheep and my kids who are now as we said six nine still really love them. It's about that and maybe the British bake off are the only things that the entire family can agree on. If you've missed out on it please go back and watch it and you may find yourself watching it even without your children and where we find it. You can find it in a myriad of places. It is on Amazon prime. It is on Netflix. The Shaun the sheep extended universe of both movies and also the Wallace and gromit from the same animation studio are in many streaming places so if you just search Shaun the sheep you will find a gorgeous claymation that will make you. Giggle is a great pick and man. My kids now are nine thousand nine hundred sixteen and at no point in their lives. Has there been more than like a small handful of things that everyone in the family can enjoy at the same level at the exact same time so when you find one of those the love that you experience as a parent for that piece of entertainment is intense. I feel you on this one in a big way. Very very nice excellent. Pick Berry Hartman Steven. You'RE GONNA give us your second pick and This is not surprise. Me Buddy well. This one is specific to one of my kids particularly my older kid my son. Jona when he was little he obsessed over a cartoon that I watched as a kid called the wacky races and the wacky races were a very short lived. Hanna barbera cartoon aired in late. Nineteen sixty eight and a little bit in early sixty nine and then has kind of lived on in reruns. There's a DVD set that has like the complete collection of the wacky races. Hanna barbera cartoons are pretty primitive. You're talking about children's TV in the late sixties. You have some kind of squeaky gender stuff. There's like one female racer penelope pitstop. Who's like more concerned with her makeup than with racing? It has that name is amazing. Insert pitstop into my middle name. Very pitstop hardiman stuff hardiman The thing is though there's something about the way. This particular cartoon was structured where each episode of the show all of these goofy characters. They were the same characters. The plot couldn't be simpler. They're racing and at the end of each episode. One of the racers wins. There's a bad guy racer named Dick Dastardly. And his side kick Mutley. Who has that famous? Little wheezy laugh and my son who was obsessed with numbers kind of obsessed a certain amount of scorekeeping managed to latch into it. Not only as a piece of like fun cartoony entertainment but kind of latched onto it as like a statistician almost and really got obsessed with it. Even though there were only seventeen episodes he just watched them over and over and over again. Now the wacky races have existed in a couple of different forms. There's a wacky racist game for the we. The kids also played. This is also like electric company is one that got rebooted and it got rebooted a few years ago and once again if you're obsessed with the nineteen sixty eight version you're gonNA watch the version from twenty seventeen or two thousand eighteen and roll your eyes because it's not the exact entertainment that you grew up with but you look at the voice cast on this rebooted wacky races. It's Tom Kenny WHO's TV. Spongebob Jill Talley who's also voiced from. Spongebob she's also from Mister. Show like Tom. Kenny and Billy West. Who was stimpy. He was fry in Futurama. You have some really lovable voice. Cast working with this show. So lucky races isn't necessarily the top of very many people's list as far as like high quality children's programming but it was really important in my house and really had this nice kind of cross generational appeal where I got to feel nostalgia watching it and my kids hooked into it in ways that even I never did

Electric Company Shaun Wallace Amazon Loved Electric Company Berry Tom Kenny Hanna Barbera Mister Rogers Cast Youtube Rita Moreno Buster Keaton Daniel Tiger Netflix Jill Talley Manuel Miranda LIN Berry Hartman Hardiman William Jackson Harper
Blurred Lines of Parenting

Motherhood Sessions

06:29 min | 2 years ago

Blurred Lines of Parenting

"I'm talking with the fifty eight year old mother and her twenty seven year old daughter or calling them Rosa and penelope two years ago penelope had a baby on her own and has since moved in with her parents. Penelope relies on her mother to help take care of the baby but it hasn't been easy living under the same roof on the one hand. Penelope needs appreciates her mother's assistance at the same time. She's trying to assert her own independence and establish boundaries. Have you ever lived by yourself with your daughter outside of your mother's home now? So what's holding you back from moving out of your parent's house so if I were to move out at this very moment I am not confident that the first time my tire blows out. I'M NOT GONNA. Have you know five hundred dollars in the bank to address that issue would immediately becoming back to my my credit card or my family to be like? Hey can you help? I think it's really important to have a person to rely on. There's a day you'll come tired today year grouchy. There's a day you have the flu. There's the day that your child is a monster and after two hours you're about to explode and that everybody needs a backup and I've even told her. Try to make the upstairs like your little domain. There's three rooms you could have won. The baby has one and you could turn the other one into like a little living room. You don't WanNa be with us. Just hang out upstairs as if you were renting the second floor of an apartment. I mean you'd have to come downstairs to cook. 'cause there's no kitchen upstairs but other than that you know. We can put a door on the bottom of the stairs. Get you something to make it more private. She expressed that she kind of wasn't ready for that. But I just think it's silly. I think it's silly to be so tight that you can't breathe when there's another reasonable option or do you feel not ready for that like having a a more separate way of living in the same under the same roof. Yeah because to me. That's made permanent. Yes let's talk about it. It feels like you're exactly essentially that it feels to permanent that you're continuing. Oh we're going to keep furnishing this house to make you a separate as possible where I'm like. No I want to focus on. How do we keep making me as ready as possible to leave? This house is their attention. Because you need your mom's helping you enjoy her help but you also want to feel more independent. Exactly it's hard to know where to draw the line because I don't want to do everything on my own. I think she kind of has this dual have like a Co parent at times and then a mom and then also just. Sometimes I don't want you know. Don't want anything to do with her. As most children are at times with their parents so I get frustrated. I'll say something or I'll just a lot of times which is probably not the correct behavior. Just ignore her. For example I can just think of night before last. She went to dinner for her work. came home and the baby was still awake. Which unusual and it wasn't that late. It was a little after ten. Maybe ten thirty and she came in and she's like why is she still awake like because she's stays awake and she said okay. I have her and she got her but penelope she kind of looked like she might have been crying which is possible her eyes were little red rimmed and I was concerned about that so then she went upstairs and I waited. I don't know like five minutes. And then I went upstairs behind her to make sure she was okay and then when I went in the room I said is everything. Okay and she said get out of my room get out of my room like okay and then I came over and I like hugged Terry said Mom. I said get out of my room and that I left. That's a great example. That's a common dynamic. That sort of leaning on your parents for dependency and then pushing away from them to both learn how to feel like an adult yourself and take care of yourself but also sometimes projecting that rage onto your parent that you're angry. You're not more independent. You're angry need them. So she's right. I was upset when I came home. And there was all that stimulus. The baby was still awake. My mom was up. My father was up You know all of these people kind of there to greet me with whatever's going on I just wanted to you know. Take the baby go to bed kind of half my decompression and then when she saw that I was upset then. She cannot help but she always wants to say something. Whether it's what's wrong are you okay or give you a hug. Whatever it's just frustrating to me when I expressed that before of like hey. I don't like that when I'm upset. Maybe later asked me like. Hey was everything okay. That's not something you have to deal with if you're in your own space so you're in a process of calming down and you just don't want someone interrupt that process yes. You're not worried that you won't get there yourself. Yes so mom. Do you notice about your daughter that she likes chase. You need space so she tells me that she needs space she. She has told me that on numerous occasions. You say it with a with a little bit of a smile. Like what do you mean when you say she tells you that shade so yeah it was? Kinda GONNA go there. Yeah tell me so sir. From the time she was little she's always been Mike. My more sensitive child more easily upset by things as well as a young child. She was easily overwhelmed. I would use those words so then a two year old is a handful for any human being through and she works and she's very good at her job. She's got so many things going well for her but then she comes home and sometimes she crashes you sometimes she comes in and sometimes honestly she doesn't even say is it. Okay if I leave the baby downstairs. She leaves the baby and heads up the stairs. Well a lot of the Times. I'm just tired. I'll just had upstairs decompress. Take a shower half a minute to myself. So you don't ask the grandparents sometimes. Yes but sometimes

Penelope FLU Rosa Terry
Fashion History Now

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:42 min | 3 years ago

Fashion History Now

"So this week April. I thought we were Kinda start talking about fashion wink. We're on the tail end of the month of quote Unquote Fashion Week. We are currently witnessing all the Paris runway shows and I thought this would actually be a great opportunity to suggest a instagram. Follow to our listeners. At Robin Given our OB. I N. G. I. V. H. A. N. She's a fashion critic for the Washington Post and pass dressed guest that absolutely. She came on the show and our very first season to talk to us about the battle over cy which happened in nineteen seventy three and it was basically like a fashion show face off between French. Katori as an American designers. Yes so that was an amazing episode but she is an incredible critic. She's very thoughtful and insightful about her coverage of fashion that I think a lot of our listeners will really appreciate for instance today. She's posting about the Balenciaga show. And she's saying that. The show is thoughtful but she says quote. Thoughtful just stressful. It's very ominous. I think it's kind of a commentary on climate change. I haven't read much else about it. But she also has been writing about kind of the feminist ideologies that Inspire Maria Grazia. Carey's creations for Dr. And how you know that. The fashions and the runway she presents don't really reflect those feminists beliefs. They still reflect this kind of feminine ideal of a woman which is a little counter intuitive or counter to feminism for all women representing all women. That's something that's I guess. Problematic throughout fashion she also has commenting about Virgil Oslo off-white collection. She just doesn't get it. I don't know if you've seen that yet. But he was sending like half Parkas and half tool dresses down the runway. Yes and not only that but one of those tool dresses was actually ripped off. I think it was from givenchy. I don't know if Jeevan she but she ought. There's definitely been comparisons to victor and Ross tool creations and kind of cut out creations. Like it's definitely something that's definitely probably been done before. But I thought the fashion writer Tony Glenville who you could also follow on instagram. How To really insightful? Commentary about some of the collections? That have hit the runway today and he wrote that it's time fashion. Stop treating US too. Don't care close. You know kind of these clothes that we can't really wear in real life. He says you know when you start thinking. The future and designing fashion aware in the real world think about fashion to keep and cherish and fashion to make women look strong and confident. It's not taking the fun out of fashion. It's actually thinking on the subject of fashion as Global Business. And he goes on. That fashion is a creative force. An employer of millions repository of tradition. And Crass let's think about how it can survive in the future and then I wanted to kind of talk to you about this April because he ends with costume belongs in museums. Fashion belongs in our lives and I was curious what your thoughts are on about that. Do you agree with him? Well I mean I think. That's some problematic terminology in terms of exactly how we as fashion historian. Use those words right because all fashion is costume but all costume isn't necessarily fashion. Does that make any sense? Yeah and I think. He's trying to distinguish between this idea of like fashion as as costume as kind of like this performance. Art as a something. That isn't really representative of what we would wear in every day and specifically he was talking about the mosquitoes down by Jeremy Scott. I'm recently which he literally had. It was very much a let them eat cake. Marie-antoinette moment with like tons of Pan Yeas and women in the you know those huge waves reflective of late eighteenth century fashion but they literally came down the runway dressed cakes and like references to eighteenth century panelled gown so a lot of people probably aren't going to wear those clothes. I guess the argument would be if we're just creating fashion for. I guess this like a federal shock value to send it down the runway. Is it still worth it? Should we be doing that or should we be more conscious of the environment and creating fashion? That isn't actually meant to be put on bodies. Well I that actually kind of leads me into the the follow that I want to talk about. Because you said WHO's GonNa wear these things? Well perhaps this next segment of the fashion buying public. Which are drag Queens? So I can definitely see some of those drag Queens on Rupaul drag race adoring that mosquito collection and I would like to recommend to. Our listeners is to follow an instagram account. Called at Drag Bombs D. R. A. G. B. O. M. B. S. and this instagram account is hysterical is actually run by the brother of a former dressed guests. Terrace ain't James. Who CAME ON SEASON? One and talk to us about the intersection in history a sustainability in the fashion industry but her brother. Jordan. He's hilarious. He is obsessed with repulsed dragway. And He's also obsessed with lush products. The cosmetics Carney and so what he does he finds pictures of drag queens and then pairs them up with the lush product that they're outfit and they are hysterical. Some of them are so dead on and so perfect. I showed it to a couple of my friends one time and I tell everybody to follow this all the time. And they're like oh no he has to be the designer of the products and the drag queens are his inspiration but no no no. No that is not the case. He's just really really good at this. So if you WANNA put a giggle in your day follow Jordan on drag vase and I promise you it's GonNa show Ganic smile at your face. I know and I just speaking of. I've never seen this account so I just went to it. And it's Jordan the Raven Claw Lachey. A master bather and he says no drag. Queens harmed in the making of this account. It is pretty incredible. How spot on a lot of these comparisons are. Wow okay well check that out dress listeners. Instagram accounts for you to follow and check out some other things for you to watch them suggestions of some films. I would like to suggest that I just watched. Actually this past week I came across. It's actually a couple years old but I had not seen it. It's a documentary called my generation. That's streaming on Amazon. Have you heard or seen of that? April I have not but you better bet I'm GONNA put it on my list now. I really really liked it Because it is almost entirely comprised of archival footage and photographs. So there's no there's no inter spicing with interviews of people in the modern day there. They just take those voices from those interviews. It's narrated by Michael Caine. It's kind of like has generation and his experience in the nineteen sixties and he interviews. People like famed photographer. David Bailey models penelope tree Mary. Quant twiggy Vidal Sassoon. People interviewed there so integral to this period. And this this documentary. That's really about in the nineteen sixties it just reveals how integral fashion was to the experience of the nineteen sixties by all these interviews. So I highly suggest checking that

Instagram Queens Jordan Paris Washington Post Robin United States Vidal Sassoon N. G. I. V. H. A. Michael Caine David Bailey Maria Grazia Virgil Oslo Givenchy Jeevan Carey Jeremy Scott Ross Global Business
François Fillon goes on trial for embezzlement of public funds

BBC World Service

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

François Fillon goes on trial for embezzlement of public funds

"And the French politician Francoise feel a frontrunner in the last presidential election will stand trial for fraud today along with his wife prosecutors allege that Mr field listed his wife Penelope as a paid parliamentary assistant even though she never actually performs the job and that's the latest BBC

Francoise Fraud Mr Field Penelope BBC
Talking to the Dead

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:50 min | 3 years ago

Talking to the Dead

"Today we're talking about the seance communicating with the dead has been around for centuries United States just after the civil war when so many men lost on. The battlefields was so little attention to their identification left to be buried until the battle that had killed them had passed often buried in mass graves leaving family and loved ones with no idea what happened to their father. Son Brother husband the grieving American public search for answers in media and through seances across Europe following world. War One sounds flourished often led by celebrities like Sir Arthur conon on and doyle the author Sherlock Holmes but critic arose from the World Magic from roughly nineteen twenty to nineteen twenty. Six Harry Harry. Houdini made a part of his. Life's work to expose. Mediums in the seance but the magician wasn't always so intent on exposing those would communicate with the dead. The great magician had two women in his life his mother and his wife. They were the law of his life when his mother Cecilia. Steiner Weiss died of a stroke. Nineteen Thirteen Harry. Houdini sought out a medium that would allow him to speak with his beloved mother but for decades his axe x his own acts had included. Sounds as were the highest form of deception. When he attended a seance could identify the very tricks tricks adhered used in his own acts? He went on the warpath exposing the fraudulent gatherings. Houdini he's former. Education was slight his self education. Commence the magician had a great love of books and of research built a formidable personal library when in the nineteen twenties he strode into the public public arena to confront fraudulent mediums. He proceeded from home lined with books and manuscripts about their methods of deception. Visitors to the online line collection can view July thirty first nineteen twenty five letter in which we need describes his extensive library of letters and documents related to the spiritualism his attacks stem from both shameless self-promotion sincere commitment to the public photographs and the Digital Houdini collection and show his exposures a rich penelope of psychic fraud sleight riding spirit photographs fingerprinting a spirit and trump and mediums. Who would transmit voices through the musical instrument articles and images present? Houdini greatest challenge many any crandon. The Media Mona's Marjorie. A woman who fooled one established academic mind after another. She found her greatest champion in Sir Arthur CONAN doyle. Genie was never able to expose her as an outright fraud but he did block her progress. Her name was Minna Crandon but the world knew her as Marjorie a pseudonym adopted to protect her from publicity. She lived with her husband successful. Surge in Leroy Crandon on Boston's affluent Beacon Hill. It was there in their house online street in one thousand nine hundred twenty three that she purportedly discovered she had psychic power specifically the ability to levitated objects generator. Called noises. Materialized spirit forms warms. The phenomenon were controlled. She said by the spirit of her deceased brother. Walter who would speak through Mina in a a gruff decidedly unspiritual manner. His No nonsense conference liberally laced with profanities before long binders talents came him to the attention of researchers and she was closely studied on an off for an suing ten years and through examination of the claims and counterclaims counterclaims so the various researchers would require a book length essay. I'm not that ambitious instead what I'd like to do. Compare and contrast the accounts of the initial investigation as presented in two influential books science and Para Science by Brian a angles nineteen eighty-four mediums and mystics. And the occult by Melborn Christopher. Nine hundred seventy five with only occasional forays into other sources verses when necessary and the process. We may not learn anything conclusive about March but we will learn something about the hazards and frustrations nations of studying. The paranormal was Marjorie. A greater magician than Houdini. Or was she the real thing able to call up dead and hold for

Houdini Marjorie Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Harry Harry Minna Crandon Fraud Crandon Sir Arthur Conon Walter Mina Leroy Crandon Europe United States Steiner Weiss Melborn Christopher Cecilia Genie Sherlock Holmes Beacon Hill
Ruby Autoformatter! with Penelope Phippen

Ruby on Rails Podcast

09:53 min | 3 years ago

Ruby Autoformatter! with Penelope Phippen

"Been all. What is your developer? Origin Story That's a great question I guess I got started when I was a kid my birth. My parents have computer or computer adjacent jobs and I was sort of always fascinated so I started programming when I was I was very career young. I think I wrote my first Java program when I was age. Twelve and one of the things does mean is I've been using eclipse for more than half of my life which is always Funny to me but really it came from a instinct to sort of Tanka to really understand how computers walked. And that's that's sort of carrying me through My entire life really like what are the things is that I find myself like messing around with software in my hubby time. As much as you when I'm walking and that has been a really consistent throughout my life And so you're like where I am today. Like is really a product of having been fascinated by computers in my entire life and having sort of manipulated and what with them for a really really long time. I think you're so lucky because I got introduced to computers when I was in high school. My parents encouraged me to take computer science classes and so I felt it was lucky Dietz. Who get that experience early on but for you to know so early on that you enjoyed it and wanted to make a career of it is just something that I feel is still kind of rare in our industry free? Yeah it's I I don't know I find that most of the people I talk to you. like found owned computer science like much much later in their life so like even high school is sort of like relatively early rights are like I know some folks who didn't really look at programming at all until like the second or third. He is of the undergraduate degrees even like later in life career switched switched from a different profession through boot Camp Lasalle teaching or whatever it might be And so yeah like I like. Excuse me I in a sense. Consider myself to be very lucky that I like sort of have developed technical superpowers superpower's just from having been able to do it from a very very early age. That's great well. Our SPEC is a very love framework in the Ruby Community of course and so I would absolutely love to hear how you got involved. Yeah that's A. That's a great question. I'm so I got involved through aspect actually while I was studying full my computer. Science degree Sawyer Iowa's like alongside my degree like teaching myself ruby learning how to build rails applications because Like the community. Not at that time was sort of like just beginning to really exploited out onto the internet like I remember being Sawyer so fascinated by all of the conference Tokes That will sort of coming out of the community. And like the learning and teaching and sort of like niceness that was associated with that And so one day while I was working on rails APP and writing tests with us back doc I encountered a bug and I like looked into the source code of us back and what how how to fix it and sent a poor request request but along the way I was finding lots and lots of places in the SPEC Code base that could like we're meetable to factoring And so I spent maybe like a good six to eight weeks of my life just as a college student. I had loads of free time. I'm like just refer factoring The tunnels of aspect and I ended up sending them so many. Poor quests that essentially they will like. Hey we're going to give you a commitment because these greats and we would like we would like for you to keep doing this and stop bugging us like please please just merge these yourself And so I ended up basically just joining the cool team through like share application an off Wanting to make it better. So where did you gain that experience that you were able to look at the arse back out source code and be able to pinpoint pinpoint the possible re factories that you could do. Did you gain that from school or did you have other open source. Experience Neither I oh this is this is like this is a somewhat difficult question to you on Sir. But essentially essentially just sort of like an aesthetic for wanting to remove jeff location or things that were proving hot to change And so like actually back back at that point in time aspect had Code climate mounted in all of Repos and basically just sort of took it upon myself to just stop moving the code climate grades of the entire base like upwards towards those as really sort of using the insights code climate was providing To find those places and then sort of just thinking about house collapse things together or create new abstractions or whatever it might be right and like at the time Really Oh code. Climate was doing thing was running the flag and flame gems like rubies solo spaces and those just spot sort of like joop located Covered all oil like curd. That is extremely complex so like I was like. Oh yeah this. Totally is a three hundred line function with Grizzly two nested. If statements we can probably make that like like less nested and shorter rate and so like really it was it was an application of stuff I had being directly taught Through those aforementioned sort of like Ruby conference talks I had been watching so there was this like very sort of tight. feedback cycle between the things. I was learning and getting to apply them That was like a very unique experience. I think that was really interesting. I think that's great because even though that happened to you in college I mean we're GonNa get into Ruby format. It just seems to be a pattern throughout your career so aside from the sixty eight weeks that you contributed during your university time What contributions are you most proud of with our SPEC so basically I think perhaps the most interesting thing that happened to us? Back in my tenure I guess there are two things so one is when I joined the aspect team aspect was still on major Russian to And now it's on major three and I did a lot of the work along with the other team members at the time to actually like like deliver that and so I was sort of on the front lines of implementing some of the new keywords and doing method clean Alpina. Actually a big part of it was just deprecating code in a way that didn't break people's test suites which is what we use. The major version for so like aspect has a very strict adherence to semantic brushing and gut. Like when it is people's test suites you like literally cannot break them right like like breaking someone's suite would be like a sort of horrifying thing for aspect to do and so part of it. Frankly just what that people couldn't really detect to make sure that moving from two to three was a seamless as possible in terms. uh-huh of tangible stuff. People have actually probably seen I managed the sort of like rails compatibility of aspect through reversion five and up to version six point zero including implement implementing the compatibility for rail system test which replaced placed feature specs. Basically wholesale and like the system tasks are just like way better than feature specs F. O. were And so like I'm really proud of that one because it sort of took a standardized piece of work that was done by the rails team and specifically I lean you should tell and Sort of integrated with AAs back and that was a lot of fun because like it was done very collaboratively. It wasn't it just sort of me. In a lab that one was like reaching out to folks who have applications like test prototypes and see what upgrading onto those might look like and whether or not there are bugs and that sort of thing but yeah so like broadly. Speaking most of my tenure on our SPEC was either a fixing bugs in aspect all SPEC mocks or maintaining aspect rails through Russians five and up

Sawyer Developer Camp Lasalle Dietz Joop Iowa
Imelda Staunton on the New 'Downton Abbey' Film

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:36 min | 3 years ago

Imelda Staunton on the New 'Downton Abbey' Film

"Today today after making a name for herself on the West End Stage Imelda Staunton shot to international fame when she started in the Mike Leigh Drama Vera Drake in two thousand and four it earned her an academy award nomination for Best Actress. Imelda Staunton is also the winner of three Olivier Awards for best actress in a musical for her roles in into the woods sweeney any told and Gypsy in two thousand and sixteen. She's back on screens this weekend. Joining the cast of the feature film version of Downton Abbey she spoke to Monaco's has been Ryland for me joining it now because I'm not in the series and although my husband who plays Carson isn't the series or do feel. I've lived but I think that's that's very interesting to think. NCA- about. Should we want things to stay the same and yet I also think within the story that Julian fellowes has given the female characters. You know I've could a very interesting story line because I come into it but women questioning there. Should I be living in this big house with servants. What what what's happening with the world and yet the audience crave costs and someone steady. They want things to be steady and safe because we are going to hell in a handcart hot. Let's face it to cling onto something that has got tradition. If you like and that's why I dare say we're all obsessed with the royal family or just something that is stable because it's all over the place and I think it stability that people want and yet we have to sort of we have to move within that the big question of course is which tradition should we hold onto and which ones should we move on from and we all collectively need to make this decision and in a microcosm sort of way that's the the dilemma faced with many of the characters you'll your character wants to make a decision without giving anything away that would be quite untraditional it would be against the idea of what what people do you and there are other characters such as Maggie Smith who looks at this and says no things shoot remain how they've always been and it's it sort of feels like a wider dilemma that we just don't know which ones we should hold onto to know but in film terms that's tension and that's what you need to make a drama. There's no point of us will sit making a film that everything's fine or everything's terrible you have to the tension is like the tension between Maggie Smith Skirt and Penelope Wilton character which yes you think about it. She doesn't belong to the House and so her role throughout the series was almost almost and I'm a I'm quoting her now but she was the window from the audience into Downton again will is that right and she could question on behalf of us. You know what was going on on and I think you have to be malleable with all these traditions and you have to move all family of how to move with the Times with you will in Kate and and how it has to move on and I think Downton has embraced that the film you know the fans just desperate for the film and I think they'll be delighted with it but I think they'll be delighted with it because although it's a chocolate box and it's a fantasy they're serious points in the film and I think you know for what it is. I think people go uh no. I think that's that's quite true if the made the cooks assistant questions. Why are we having to do all this the king and Queen or why are we having to you know just just questioning just putting things out there. I think it will make people listen to more than just oh what we have tea and dinner served. Well absolutely it's. It's such a cozy film but also you know we were talking about traditions and in a way the film is about nostalgia isn't it. I found myself coming out of a wondering whether it really is a love letter. Tunis eligible naught because there are so many elements of the film that while very much of the time that he's being depicted here. It's also making it clear that time is moving on culture is moving on whether these people choose to understand it or not the the king and Queen that come to visit wouldn't have any idea about this secret secret gay club. That's happening without anyone's knowledge behind these on March doors you know there is an element of a coach is moving on even if these people are living all all alone in a happy little place in their own little bubble at the end of the film it did make me one east this and affectionate love letter to nostalgia all has more of a reminder that all things will eventually end even Downton Abbey the series the film perhaps the structure itself yeah. I think it's both I think it's it you can give and take away and I feel that you know Downton. Abbey was Sunday night fair and it's not political to cope with a big P. It's as you said it's cozy television and it's feel good and that's that's what this is. We must pretend as any different than the there were few little ingredients. It's in their little bit risky. You know and that's within its remit. I think it hits all those marks and yes you know anything about the old days. It's no style Jake and and Britain does that quite well. I Suppose Julian fellowes you know with Gosford Park for goodness sake all those years ago he knows how to do that. So you see you can push the boundaries so fall with film right Downton Abbey and I think he's done it and I think he's served the regular characters. I'm aware on the periphery of at the end of the regular characters are who the fans want to see and this is a film that has been made because of the demand of the popular you know how many people one hundred twenty million people watching it so he's given them what they want. I think Imelda Staunton they're one of many stars of the new feature film version of Downton Abbey Speaking to Ben Ryland Downton Abbey is out in cinemas

Downton Abbey Imelda Staunton Downton Ben Ryland Downton Abbey Julian Fellowes Maggie Smith Olivier Awards Abbey Mike Leigh NCA Tunis Ryland Carson Vera Drake Monaco Penelope Wilton Jake Britain Kate
EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

All Things Considered

02:36 min | 3 years ago

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

"Chemicals that might be dangerous to human health or might alter the environment are routinely tested on mice rats and other animals now though the chief of the environmental protection agency wants to change that as in here is no green filled voice reports he has ordered the EPA to dramatically reduce its use of animal testing one reporter showed up in a wood paneled room at the EPA's headquarters in Washington DC they were given a copy of an op ed it was from a college newspaper and it argued against needless research on animals the student who wrote it Andrew Wheeler is now the head of the EPA I wrote this article back in nineteen eighty seven I I didn't think we're that far away from banning animal testing then and I'm part of why I'm doing this today is because it's been thirty years and we haven't made enough progress on limiting animal testing as agency officials looked on he took up a pen and sign the Memel. his directive requires the EPA to reduce its requests for studies on chemicals like pesticides using live mammals by thirty percent in the next six years by twenty thirty five the EPA will be required to eliminate all routine safety studies using live mammals I really do think that with the lead time that we have in this sixteen years before you completely eliminate animal testing that we have enough time to come up with alternatives like tests on lab grown cells or computer models that could predict the chemicals affect he says the EPA will hold an annual conference on new methods and is funding researchers to help develop them sitting next to him were representatives of animal welfare groups like the Humane Society of the United States Kathleen Conley as its vice president of animal research issues I think this announcement is extremely important in a huge leap forward where a government agency is committing to an aggressive timeline two ends testing on mammals the move comes as the entire toxicology community has been moving towards alternatives Penelope Fenner crisp is a former top EPA official she says the EPA's pesticide program has recently made real progress in using new types of safety studies saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of lab animals still she says I'm always a little trouble with deadlines on efforts like this she says so far no one has developed new tasks for complex subtle health effects like ones that might hit animals reproductive systems and she says you can't necessarily dictate

EPA Reporter Andrew Wheeler Kathleen Conley Vice President Official Washington Humane Society Of United States Penelope Fenner Thirty Percent Sixteen Years Thirty Years Six Years
EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

Environment: NPR

02:39 min | 3 years ago

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

"Chemicals that might be dangerous to human health or might alter the environment are routinely tested on mice rats and other animals now though the chief of the Environmental Protection Agency wants to change that as NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reports he has ordered the EPA to dramatically reduce its use of animal testing when reporters showed up at a wood paneled room at the EPA's headquarters in Washington DC. They were given a copy of an op Ed. It was from a college newspaper and it argued against needless research on animals. The student who wrote it Andrew Wheeler is now the head of the EPA wrote this article back in nineteen eighty seven. I I didn't think we're that far away from banning animal testing then and I'm part of why I'm doing this today's because it's been thirty years and we haven't made enough off progress on eliminating animal testing as agency officials looked on he took up a pen and signed a memo his directive requires the EPA he eh to reduce its requests for studies on chemicals like pesticides using live mammals by thirty percent in the next six years by 2035. The EPA will be required to eliminate all routine safety studies using live mammals. I really do think that with the lead time that we have have in this sixteen years before we completely eliminate animal testing that we have enough time to come up with alternatives like tests on lab grown cells or or computer models that could predict chemical's effect. He says the EPA will hold an annual conference on new methods and funding researchers to help develop them sitting next to him where representatives of animal welfare groups like the Humane Society of the United States. Kathleen Conley is vice president of animal research tissues. I think this announcement is extremely important and I'll huge leap forward where a government agency is committing to an aggressive time line to end testing on mammals. The move comes as the entire toxicology community has been moving towards alternatives penelope. Fenner Chris is a former top. EPA official she says the EPA's as pesticide program has recently made real progress in using new types of safety studies saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of lab animals still she says I'm I'm always a little trouble with deadlines on efforts like this. She says so far. No one has developed new tests for complex subtle health effects like ones that might hit animal's reproductive systems and she says you can't necessarily dictate how fast that will happen no Greenfieldboyce N._p._R.

Environmental Protection Agenc Andrew Wheeler Kathleen Conley Nell Greenfieldboyce Washington Dc NPR Fenner Chris Vice President United States Humane Society Of Official Thirty Percent Sixteen Years Thirty Years Six Years
Two children dead in Ohio, 10 people injured when stolen police car crashes

Woody and Company

00:23 sec | 3 years ago

Two children dead in Ohio, 10 people injured when stolen police car crashes

"Two children are dead in Dayton after a man crashed a stolen police cruiser the children have now been identified this afternoon as two six year olds Eleanor make bride of Huber heights and Penelope jeffco of Dayton ten other people were also hurt when that stolen police vehicle crashed into other cars at the front of the Dayton metro library Raymond Walters junior is now being charged with

Dayton Eleanor Huber Heights Penelope Jeffco Dayton Metro Raymond Walters Two Six Year
Menstrual cups are as safe and leakproof as tampons and pads

BBC World Service

03:43 min | 3 years ago

Menstrual cups are as safe and leakproof as tampons and pads

"We often spoken about it publicly in the problems at the Dixie in the poor a world for women who are on that period and don't have access to pads or tampons well a relatively inexpensive and a potentially reusable plastic alternative called menstrual Cup as being declared to be after scientific survey safe reliable alternative pretty leak proof as well as the issue of how to deal with period flows a big one round the world and absorbent tampons or can be expensive hard to come by but the Cup which fits in the same way could be a good alternative to speak to the lead author of this report professor Penelope Phillips how would from the Liverpool school of tropical medicine who's that speaking to us while she's traveling thanks very much for joining us a professor first off we just give us an idea why do they make a good alternative and what's the make a good alternative they all are reliable safe and affordable and say one Cup can be bought and it can last up to ten years so although there is an actual cost of an average price of about twenty three dollars it will then lost and you and you need one Cup it will then last for about ten years so at the cost comparison is extremely good against disposable pads and tampons that can only be used once and they have to be thrown away right that that's a very interesting comparison I mean that's that's cost over time the initial cost is still quite high would you therefore be recommending that these be subsidized in some way handed out with with the idea that they become a good are they become more of more advantageous over time yes absolutely if there is an opportunity if there are charities philanthropy different programs that have the funding or I'm able to support for the initial costs of of the purchase or to provide them at a cost price then it will be affordable to even the most impoverished and as as an alternative as effective your your study seems to suggest yes so we looked at about forty three different studies from around the world also those studies that was a direct comparisons related to leakage this was only in that a small proportion for studies but leakage of blood and they performed as well if not better than temple Hey there full professors the less awareness of them because that's a crucial thing if they're a good idea more people should know about them what what's in play what are the motivations for these not being so well known about yes that said really tricky question to onsite Shipley I think it's because they're about a hundred ninety nine brands but mostly that relatively small scale please so they don't have big profit margin to be able to display them in all the different places in the world where people can easily see them and make them pop and because of that there's little to moms and because as the total amount is that from non H. and so at this that cycle a little not knowing about this option so that was one of the reasons for us to be interested in reviewing all the available to staff to dispel any myths related to safety what are the issue SO many thanks indeed for joining us professor Penelope Phillips how it from the Liverpool school of tropical medicine they also nine oh it's just as good as the alternative indie possibly better the

Dixie Ten Years One Cup Twenty Three Dollars
How Much Does This Cow Weigh?

Planet Money

07:59 min | 3 years ago

How Much Does This Cow Weigh?

"Golden was the kind of person who believes in experts, you know, people who had studied things people who knew stuff he figured they knew things that ordinary people just did not. I mean, of course, they did. Right, obviously elimidate golden goes to a country fair. This is about one hundred years ago in England. And there's this contest going on at the fair guests the way to the ox, Goldens, a scientist and statistician and he figures, hey, I can do an experiment here. Right. He's figures I'm going to take. Everyone's guesses take the average and compare that to the actual weight of the ox. We heard the story from James, sir, Wicky, he's an economics journalist. So he thought what you were gonna end up with was a really flawed guess because in his mind what you were doing was you were taking guesses of few smart people a few mediocre people. And then a lot of morons because he basically everywhere. Everywhere. So he figured the the the group's gas was going to be way way off the Mark the contest organizers gave golden the little slips of paper with everyone's guesses on them. He took them calculated. The average the average was eleven hundred ninety seven pounds and the ox the ox weighed eleven hundred and ninety eight pounds. So that in other words, the crowds judgment was essentially perfect one pound off one pound of this is super creepy. What's going on here? Is there? Some kind of like collective unconscious. Magic is like a ouija board or something. Right. But the idea that underlies this it is everywhere. The idea of the stock market, you know, thousands of random people buying and selling shares like when you hear that apple stock went up or the Dow plunged that's basically people guessing the weight of an ox, it's everywhere. Right. It's it's the price of oil. It's the price of orange juice all kinds of things that are really important to the world work exactly this way. But why should it work? Why should a bunch of random people a lot of whom have no idea what they're doing somehow magically produce an answer. That makes sense does this really work. And if it does why. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Jacob Goldstein. And I'm David Kessler inbound today on the show, Mr. golden, we redo your experiment. What's the Cas name, Penelope Penelope? Thanks for letting us. We you better. She's chewing one bound off come on. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from ZipRecruiter hiring used to be hard multiple job sites. Stacks of resumes. But today hiring can be easy. And you only have to go to one place to get it done. Ziprecruiter, ZipRecruiter, sins your job to over a hundred of the web's leading job boards. Then ZipRecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job. Try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash planet. Money. Now that my says has lost all its territory what happens to the people left behind. She chose to take. So that she should starting Syria on raw and what about their children? How it ends a new series on embedded. So we came up with a plan to repeat, Goldens experiment. Find a fair and a cow in a big scale to weigh cow. And then he grit in the grit, and then we were going to throw the question out to the crowd. Ask the world. How much does this cow way? We didn't want to just limit it to people at the fair. So we figured we'd take some pictures post them online and asked the whole world to guest. So we went out to county fair in Burlington county, New Jersey, we met Penelope the cow in the dairy tent. She was sitting on a bunch of. Hey juiston. Kuzmich was taking care of her. Can you just describe what she looks like? Yeah. She's mostly black. She has white legs. And she has a white spot in the middle of her head, but she big black cow. What did you say? So I said holy cow without even realizing saying she's much bigger. She just stood up. She's walking out of the barn now. And she's way bigger than I thought when she was sitting down. We took some pictures of you Jacob standing next to the cow for scale and just for finally decided to ask people at the fair how much they thought Penelope wait as it happen. It was kids days. So there are a lot of kids. Which was fine. You know, non-experts what's your name K? Look how much do you think? Now ways. Six pounds. How'd you come up with that number? 'cause I'm six years old. You guys want to guess how much this Calloway's sixty hundred pounds six thousand. Dear how much you weigh? Not at all. I'm sympathetic looking at L P. I had no idea how much she weighed. Like, I didn't even know how to think about it that way more than my car that you a less than my car. I don't even know how much my car was more than a cow. I wanna say more than a cow. We found an older group of kids and yet they also guest on the low side, but they had this bigger problem. This this really more worrying thing, and it was a problem that adults also seem to have. And it was this the first kid said a number, and then all the other kids said, basically, the same number numbers that were like too close to the I it's like they're incapable of guessing anything different. How old are you? I'm ten how much do you think that cow ways? He'll hundred pounds. My news Gabriella, I'm ten and I think the cow as three hundred pounds. My name is kid nine seven years old, and I think the cow weighs three hundred pounds. People are not that different from cows. We heard if we don't know something we look for a leader. Even if the leader, maybe doesn't know any kanobi finished chewing, and we took her over to be weighed. It's actually pretty unusual to one away cow and the scale they had of the fair was not for. What kind of scale is this? It's actually like a truck scales. What it's for same sauce scale use for big trucks and stuff, which we use it the way the tractors during the tractor pool for the work it'll work for a cow. Yup. Testing bam. You were obsessed paranoid. Arguably paranoid about keeping the result of this secret. You didn't want it to leak out? I guess Gan all of these people had gathered actually, can we can we clear commune seriously clear, everybody out except for just a minimum of people. Like, can we swear you? Okay. Just see everybody else. Everybody else over there. Here's sin walked Penelope up onto the scale. We watched this little digital display. Okay. It's one thousand three hundred and fifty five pounds. One thousand three hundred and fifty five pounds. We walked Penelope back to the dairy tent. And then we went home the next day. We posted photos online of the Cowan you may right. I was there to give some sense of perspective. We put you on the tractor scale. Yes. Hundred and sixty five pounds that much. That's how much I weigh then our colleague courtroom buoy here. Put it all up online guests the weight of this cow, and the ideal was our hope was that lots and lots of people would guess because the fundamental question here. The thing we're trying to figure out is if you have a bunch of random people making their best guests at something. Do you get close to you know, the truth? Do you get close to the right answer? So we put it up, and we waited for the results to come in. All right. It's been up for how long now two minutes comedy entries as fifteen inches reload. Reload. Here we go. Still fifteen still fifteen come on. Oh my God. That's all we're gonna get fifteen. We'll re tweet this.

Penelope Penelope Mr. Golden Jacob Goldstein Scientist England Goldens James David Kessler Burlington County Syria Wicky Kuzmich Apple Calloway Gabriella New Jersey Three Hundred Pounds Fifty Five Pounds
Emmanuel Macron faces the first real test of his presidency

Inside Europe

04:54 min | 4 years ago

Emmanuel Macron faces the first real test of his presidency

"On today's program Macron's concessions to Francis yellow vest protesters. Britain's Brexit chaos it's become so serious unconstitutionally challenging that the only way to deal with it seems to be to take it a bit of light entertainment. Indeed, it's become a me among journalists colleagues to post popcorn emojis on social media ahead of every negotiation renegotiation and cabinet reshuffle. Where ready for the show bring it all exactly also on the show human rights groups, slam Italy's latest crackdown and migrants the Austro-Hungarian tradition of ballroom dancing alive and well and the Czech Republic. Bay stories and more coming up on inside Europe after a month of income. Recently, violent and increasingly popular protests in France president Emmanuel Macron made on Monday, what many commentators described as a last ditch attempt to appease the yellow vest. Protesters in thirteen minutes address from the Eliza palace. The French president offered kind of mad coupo- compassion for the many millions and France who are struggling to make ends meet and he offered a serious of measures to relieve their hardship. In paris. John Lawrenson reports. Poces fuzzy the start of what was the most important speech of menu macrumors presidency. So fo wanna poem which dependent his survival as president the government's handling a protest 'bout by new fuel taxes supposed to impact global warming. Started by calling the protesters, Nazis, the prime minister said they would never surrender the first presidential address offering to create a committee to look into different ways of tackling climate change hardened the vast resolve after another day of violence in Paris. The government said it was delaying the new fuel tax then day later, it said it was scrapping it for this year. But it was too late. The protests had gathered too much steam, it wasn't going to be stopped so easily. So on Monday, the president of this the cover your sneak of Malta's, sorta OPA more did business. The celery of a worker on the minimum wage will rise by one hundred years month from the start of nineteen. Without this costing employers. Single euro overtime will be exempted from Texan social security contributions from the beginning of twenty nineteen and so people can feel an immediate improvement in the lot. I ask all employers who are able to do so to pay their employees in New Year's bonus. Which will also be zapped from Texan social security contributions in four retired people living in less than two thousand years a month. We hereby cancer the rise in social security contributions scheduled for next year. Is it enough many yellow vests went on the French media to say, no it wasn't? Should both give put on the kid gloves. This time I think he'd been properly briefed this time. So that he'd behave more respectfully, which he hasn't done up till now he apologized, but I think it's more smoke and mirrors than anything else. He's now really frightened that France will rise up, and he'll lose his place at the top opinion. Polls have shown a twelve point decrease in support for the Joan since this last presidential address, the fifty three percents of French people still support them, even though they do not have anything like a clear program that amounts ranging from reintroduction of the wealth taxable by macro and opposition to the UN migrants rights charter that FRANZ just signed Jim shell petits one of France's leading radio and TV political commentators. What macaroni announced cost the already deeply in debt. Fringe state ten billion euros. It is he says a comprehensive victory with which they should be happy to settle. Politicking politic is Sherry the other facets have given us a political upheaval. They have changed the nature of political debate on the political balance of power in the country. The other have broken Emmanuel Macron they have broken his momentum his career and his youth a Monday night. He was no longer forty years old. He's aged ten years. But now that they have one is a legitimate for them to keep blocking roads stopping business from perating and calling for demonstrations every Saturday sums, I is terrific Penelope. We are said macro at an historic moment through dialogue respect and commitment. We shall succeed. He said, and indeed if this extraordinary range of concessions moving any trade union movement is one for decades does not put an end to the Elvis movement is difficult to imagine..

Emmanuel Macron France Paris Government Czech Republic Europe Eliza Palace Britain John Lawrenson Macrumors President Trump Jim Shell Italy Sherry Prime Minister