35 Burst results for "Pena"

Yankees, Mets move training camps to New York, Cuomo says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:13 min | Last month

Yankees, Mets move training camps to New York, Cuomo says

"The twenty twenty baseball season still hasn't started yet but the Mets and Yankees are coming home a little sooner than expected the teams have moved training camp to New York this after Major League Baseball close down all training facilities in Florida because of a spike in corona virus cases there are baseball fans are anxious to hear this sound at Citi field in Yankee Stadium including Elvis borough of Washington Heights we're really waiting for at least to see on TV when they will be is still up in the air but governor Cuomo says one thing is for sure after talking to the Yankees the Mets at spring training will be here in New York this season instead of Florida the Yankees will be at Yankee Stadium the Mets will be at Citi field for spring training after a stressful start of the year Davis adventure of younger says the return of baseball is needed more than ever eighteen BTC IT good enough for the fans Houston Jose Pena of Paterson New Jersey says it's also a smart play by the teams when you look at the corona virus stats in the sunshine state you know with the problem of Florida hello right now the situation so is that a they do here is small safe areas Randy is ten ten wins at the baseball field at Henson park in north corona queens

Mets New York Florida Yankee Stadium Washington Heights Yankees Citi Field Baseball Jose Pena Paterson New Jersey Randy Henson Park Major League Governor Cuomo Davis Houston
Minnesota advocates for immigrants' rights cheer Supreme Court DACA rulin

Chad Hartman

00:35 sec | Last month

Minnesota advocates for immigrants' rights cheer Supreme Court DACA rulin

"A major relief that's out local immigration advocates are reacting to the U. S. supreme court's decision to uphold daca the deferred action for childhood arrivals Pena higher is executive director of the immigrant law center in Minnesota is such an amazing welcome decision and the right decision four still many daca recipients or their family members and our communities who rely so heavily on these individuals I'm especially in this time for essential work and and really the leaders in our community higher says they're about five thousand daca recipients in

Pena Executive Director Minnesota
Seattle sports stars, including Russell Wilson, to host ESPYs remotely

News, Traffic and Weather

02:11 min | Last month

Seattle sports stars, including Russell Wilson, to host ESPYs remotely

"It will be a Seattle flavor for Sunday night's virtual espys combos bill Ford says the war Joe will honor new heroes and offer a message of hope during challenging times from the global pandemic to a worldwide protest over racial injustice twenty twenty has been a different unforgettable year because of covert nineteen instead of a five thousand person audience in Los Angeles for the first time ESPN sports awards show will have the three co host in remote settings the trio all happen to play and live in Seattle I am also wills I'm super animator Pena the espys there's a night to celebrate hope courage strength and resilience the storm sue bird and rains Megan Rapinoe our partners and share a house which makes it easier for television crews setting up service perseverance the moments that inspire and the power of sports to unite the dynamic duo will get a chance to show off their sense of humor which they've been honing in their own quarantine podcast called a touch more Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson is set up an SP red carpet in his home singer wife an expecting mom Sierra will likely make an appearance Wilson tells ABC's Good Morning America we're gonna have some special moments over the years the espys a poke fun and highlighted amazing athletic achievements they're also a platform for important messages like we witnessed in two thousand eighteen from Dwyane Wade the late Kobe Bryant and lebron James use our Florence and renounce all violence the racial profiling has to stop Russell Wilson and other African American athletes not afraid to lead a movement for social change right now it's a no brainer for us to really emphasize the significance of what's going on around the world chores chores and the espys will honor heroes galore including former boxing champion Kim Kleinfeld who became a nursing Canada's battle against corona virus she received the Pat Tillman award for service the espys error at six o'clock Seattle time Sunday on ESPN I'm bill Schwartz come on news

Dwyane Wade Pat Tillman Corona Lebron James Espn Bill Ford Bill Schwartz Canada Kim Kleinfeld Florence Kobe Bryant JOE ABC Sierra Russell Wilson Seahawks Megan Rapinoe Pena Seattle Los Angeles
Mr. Peanut is dead

America Trends

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Mr. Peanut is dead

"Mr peanut is trending did you see this number one on Twitter and everyone said what what's going on well apparently is the news of his death the cartoon characters demise comes in the form of a Superbowl commercials this is a bit of a preview Twitter is confirming Mr peanut is died at the ripe age of a hundred fourths after sacrificing himself to save Wesley snipes our condolences are pouring in goodnight sweet prince wrote to MPs second one mark and Dave the airbag masters open or closed shell funeral here's how it all went down I know you like no you don't maybe you'll be alright maybe I believe her anyway Mr parole more stuff on Twitter Mr Pena died as he lived in his own time and laughing and shelf full of money from article monster than not munching cannibal and now he roasted peanuts hello my goodness

Mr Peanut Twitter Dave Mr Pena Wesley
"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

13:45 min | 3 months ago

"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"And we're back all right on the second half they call spruce we do our favorite segment our signature saying the good the bad and the WF Jiffy Yang. Would you please lay down the ground rules? The rules of engagement as we say yes. We will So this is our round table segment where we invite our guest tonight. We participate ourselves to discuss a particular topic three different ways. The first way is the good the positive the warm fuzzy. The is the negative of that topic. the bad. You know the things that make us feel You know less than right and make us angry or sad or a little desperate about that particular topic but then finally the third and sometimes the most interesting around the deputy f. It's really more about the lingering questions. We still have things puzzling about that topic or that. We're still reflecting on and given the nature of this episode and the incredible documentary series that renting oversaw we actually thought that it'd be kind of interesting cake a very broad angle topic and say let's have ray talk about the good the bad and the he F- of being Asian Americans. That's easy only cover about one hundred year. Yeah wow but it'll it'll be interesting because I think that there are a lot of ways in which one can answer each of these rounds and I think given the perspective you have. It'll be very interesting to hear what you have to say. So we'll just have you do at this time. I think in the interest of time and and also your unique tease now and we'll begin with the good. So Rene we share with us. What your tickets on the good of being Asian Americans and before before he jumped and actually I might add. We debated this little bit right. We said we're going to do being Asian American or being Asian Americans and Phil noted that there's a bit of a subtlety right that when you actually talk about this from the from the plural noun as posted the adjective. It's a bit of a different read. It feels like it's talking about something different real so yeah well. I think there's when you say Asian when you say Asian American. I think we're thinking more in terms of an adjective but when you think of Asian Americans. There's a collective sense of community of belonging to something more and what what what what does that mean right. It was the good the bad. And W Jeff of being part of this label Asian Americans and so in honor of the title of the series of this epoch series. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA challenge. Yeah Yeah I like that idea of the plural the collective. Because I think that's the great thing about being Asian American. I mean it's always I always feel sorry for people who don't have a specific identity. It's like I mean we have each other. You know we have all these organizations and with our organ and like everytime Asian Americans do anything whether it's like putting on a rally or you know a meaning whatever it's always over food and drink we'll do that but Asian Americans like really do that. It's like we even see each other less. We'RE GOING TO BE EATING OR DRINKING. Except for those people would get rid. They don't drink but there is like the sense of you know we have each other. It's really great. I've sometimes I I have friends who are not connected to like a specific. You know like they're not LGBT or they're not a certain kind of nationality or whatever and they're not oppressed group and they don't have their people so they have everybody else. I guess the White House and the Senate just my way of I guess you know justifying my existence. Miserable existence hardly miserable. But I think you're right in some ways right and I actually feel. I mean when you say people who don't have a quote community. I mean we'll have some sort of community but in in terms of the specifics of the kind of community that we're creating because Asian Americas is is an invention to a certain extent right it's an act of creation and and political thinking by a group that in many cases doesn't necessarily have intrinsic reason to to cluster a collaborate form community. I think that's one of the things most interesting about it. And I say this is somebody who has migrated from New York to Los Angeles right or New York to California where it's different right and you've made you kind of made that journey to write or even just the East Coast in general right you know. Let's say Boston or other cities on the east coast coming from there to here in Los Angeles. It's so different in New York. For instance you can talk about Asian Pacific American heritage month and get blank stares left and right you can still get that sort of a California sometimes do but here at least like there are. There's enough of a critical mass of people such that it makes sense to use some of these terms and To assume that they'll be something to do to somewhere to go a place to connect with during the entirety of the month of May more or less and that's not the case in many other places and I agree absolutely. I think that that's another great thing about being Asian American more likely. You Land Somewhere. You can find your people. And they'll open their arms for. I mean when I landed I grew up here and I went back to the East Coast for college but then I moved to New York after college. And you know it's like within a week. I was having dinner with coach. Amaze with Urine Bill Coaching Alma. Of course you're invited everybody to have dinner with them but it's with anybody can go but there are billing aries. I think in every town and I know that like young filmmakers. They come from wherever they come they come to L. A. And they contact me or they contact grace sir. You know the contact wanted to the visual communications or they'll contact center for Asian American media. I mean there's always a you know there's always the pod in any city. Sometimes it's the big pod like Los Angeles you know. Sometimes it's a little one like Atlanta or Houston. I guess those aren't really little. They're pretty big. But I think you can always find your people. I don't disagree with that. I feel like it's it. It's more like whether you look or whether you you sort of find by just walking around and stumbling over stuff is a little bit different. But that said there's no question that that that feeling of belonging has been such a huge part of my adult life and it is absolutely reason I am proud to be among asian-americans when I'm when I'm when I'm with my people when I'm with you guys. I want to go back to something you said about the maybe this sort of east coast west coast or whatever like California. Because I'm because I grew up I grew up. I'm west coast through and through right. I grew up on this on this side of the coat of the country. And would you say that I mean would you say that being Asian American is more more or less meaningful like a outside of California or these places? I don't know I just don't understand like the Here's what I okay. Here's what I know. The people in say like New York for Asian American and they embrace this Asian American identity. It because they because they gotta because the because it's because they're you know it's it's It's like a different kind of a assault on the identity of being Asian American and I don't know like I might get some flak for saying this but I feel like East Coast Asian. Sometimes they're like the most the angriest fishing Hawaiian Asian Asians. I think that's the different because a lot of Asians on the east coast are from here anyway. So they're not really from there except for I that actually there are a lot of new generation that yeah I mean? So here's what I'd say. I think the West Coast had more more extensively developed Po second-generation communities than the East Coast. And that makes a difference. I think also On the West Coast This sort of that sense of pan. Asian commonality has maybe had a little bit more time to take root on the east coast. You still have a lot of people who are you. Know a generation away if even a generation away from immigration and so the term Asian American doesn't necessarily mean as much as like Chinese American Koreans and create American Indian American etc. But I I will say of the angry part. That could just be New York people even time to. I mean I know the one thing I noticed about moving back as people in New York are never leave their office. Before seven o'clock I mean never and then here it's like everybody's gone by six or seven o'clock so we have more time to have community west coast because we have to be traffic That's right yeah. Yeah we're in our cars but let's let's be real things are going to be different now. I kind of feel like whatever comes out of this. I think the whole notion that time is a social construct has become a little bit more abby A reality all right. So let's move on to the second round which is a little tougher. What's bad what is the bad of being Asian Americans and this is like maybe a tough one but I do think I mean there are certainly things that spring to mind to me. Oh yeah now at again. I'm like my generation. I'm not young anymore so I grew up. I can remember so many times in my life even when I was like you know into like being an Asian American filmmaker and activist and thinking God. I wish our white it would just be so easy. You know it'd be easier to raise money. I mean it would just be easier to have a career. I could just make fun movies. You know I wouldn't feel compelled to make movies about you know social problems and because I make movies when something pisses me off and if you're Asian American if you're a person of color you know something's always going to Piss you off because it's so much injustice so I yeah I think about that. I used to think about that a lot. Now I think because things are changing because it's just it's cooled the Asian American now even though the racists like the Kong flew Chinese virus people. Don't think so. I think it's I feel that way. I don't feel that way anymore because you know a long time ago. Actually I think from the Times Asian started coming here but I know in my experience as a filmmaker. We just decided while we're excluded were pushed out so we're going to create your own institutions. We'll create our own genre and that's really come to fruition. So you see like with the big budget you know crazy rich. Asians and Master OF NONE. Mindy cabling in her new show and fresh off the boat and all these. You know huge things that are happening in the mainstream but you also see it with alternative spaces with documentaries. Independent films We we started. It was actually Lille Chang and Grace Lee were the call them the parents of eight Dr Asian American documentary network. And that was started to just be this. You know. Force the mentors for younger Asian American documentary. Filmmakers advocate for the whole field and within it was formed in two thousand sixteen. When you know a lot of things reformed the it was actually before trump was elected but really gained steam after trump's election and just within a few years know we have hundreds and hundreds of members. I mean it's really amazing. I know I'm supposed to talk about the shitty stuff but Out of all the the shit show always comes. You know the garden..

East Coast New York West Coast Hawaiian Asian Asians California Los Angeles ray Americas trump Rene Boston White House Phil W Jeff assault Atlanta Senate Lille Chang Grace Lee Po
"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

06:42 min | 3 months ago

"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"And at a very young age. I think she was two. Her family is immigrated a second time to Chicago and she at one point her when she was just still a kid. Her father sat down and said we have a secret. You can't tell anybody where undocumented and he told her you know if people find out me and your mother can be deported back to Korea. You'll have to be sent back to Brazil where you were born and your little brother who was born in. Chicago would just ended up in foster care I mean. Can you imagine a kid being told that and so she just grew up afraid terrified that the family would be broken apart. And she actually. She had a mentor. She was very talented musician. Pianist and her mentor introduced her. To Dick Durbin the senator from Illinois and he and Orrin Hatch surprise surprise Republicans. Senator cosponsored the I dream act so I had no idea before I started this project. That an Asian American in was the inspiration for the Dream Act. I didn't either and I think really speaks to something which I have thought about. Even as you talked about the the prior installments. You know the Italian Americans Etcetera Etcetera Etcetera which by extracting out the singular stories or the perceived similar stories of a single race or ethnicity. It includes the ways in which we are interwoven in other people's stories and that must be frustrating to a certain extent right. I mean it's hard enough to actually tall hundred fifty years of our history. But then when you think about it. One Hundred Years of our history occurred along with one hundred years of everybody else's and I guess when you when you look back at this worth work. What are some of the things that you wish? You could more deeply into but just didn't have the space time or resources for well. I think because of the nature of a series like this usually I make you know like one story ninety minutes long so we had to pack a lot more characters into each hour So I think looking at you know trying to trace like anyone of these people with their families just expand on their stories. I would've loved to have done that. But we really hope that somebody will take the stories and run with it and you know. Make one hour or feature length documentary or A scripted film about any one of these stories was the one of the early immigrants we looked at is there were these Muslim silk traders who immigrated in the late eighteen hundreds and because of anti miscegenation laws they married African American women in Harlem Detroit New Orleans where they settled and this one person we looked at MC Saad Ali who settled in New Orleans. Married a woman from trae named L. A. Blackman and had a family and one of his kids are do Ali and we couldn't get to do story just ran out of time for but Bardu. Ali became like a big band leader in Harlem in New York because the family had followed the great migration from the South Up to New York and he was. I think it was the big bandleader for Chick Webb. He discovered elephants Gerald and then he came to Los Angeles and he was the manager for Red Fox. The comedian great story. So somebody's gotTa do that. It's really cool. I think that because of the way words schooled in the way is this just the way that Asian American histories todd. We don't get any of this right. I mean it's just we think people think that Asian American history begins like thirty years ago or something like you know. It's it's a but it's chock full of these really interesting great stories that The people can make an entire feature film out of you know I also think about how when people make period feature films and television shows were like Asian Americans are always like left out. Lift out of people. Think it's so white would be in that in this time period but like I think it goes to show like Asians were all up in that space. And they're all there's plenty of stories to be told we should populate these universes right well even more recent stuff I mean I. I always seen these films about alternative independent lefty films about like the Berkeley Strike or the San Francisco State Strike Search. And you never see an Asian face but I knew because I knew people. I knew asian-americans were there and were big part these strikes but they just didn't you know I thought either. They've turned the camera way or all. The Asian Americans are on the cutting room floor. I mean but we that was gray. Slee directed one of the episode the episode with the San Francisco State Strike and she actually found footage and photos of the Asian Americans. Who Were there? And who were like at the center of the strike but we really had to dig for evidence that we existed at the time. All right well. This is a good time for us to take a break but when we return we'll do our signature segment the good the bad and the WF so stick around. We'll be right back but we're still here and we're going strong. It's.

MC Saad Ali Chicago San Francisco senator Dick Durbin Chick Webb Italian Americans New Orleans Slee New York Harlem Korea Brazil Illinois Orrin Hatch Bardu Red Fox Los Angeles L. A. Blackman Berkeley
"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

13:37 min | 3 months ago

"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"I think that the that's one of those things that even those of us who have gone through you know Solid Education SORT OF CIVIC oriented education learn social studies and history and middle school and high school and then gone on to even take courses in ethnic studies in college or ethnic studies at Jason type stuff. Certain colleges don't quite have ethnic studies major yet as we know. But these aren't the things that actually get highlighted right the role of of Asian Americans in something as central as the blood. You know this sort of the the blood birthright of being American the native the native citizenship being a sort of preserved right in this country isn't sending that really gets taught in the context of our history and yet it's a critical part of our history. Not Just for Asian Americans with for all Americans and it's one that's super threatened right now right now we literally have people in charge of this nation who want strip that away so yes. We shouldn't talk about. I teach Asian American studies at UCLA. And it's embarrassing. How little I knew. I'm being when I went back. I mean don't tell anybody with my colleagues because Dr Ahead filmaker would you expect but I mean you know. People are worried now about naturalization and I kept on thinking well that's a new thing but in fact South Asians back in the nineteen twenties were who had citizenship here were denaturalized. I mean they were because of the got sing tin case by God sing. Tin Was an immigrant from India and he was actually a World War One veteran I mean he fought he served for the US military in World War One so he was given citizenship for. Maybe four days or something like that. But then they reversed it because he was Indian Dan so he also went to the US Supreme Court and the only thing he can argue back then was while. I'm I'm white because I'm Caucasian because I guess that's the region or whatever and the Supreme Court decided. Yeah you're Caucasian but you're not white but you sure ain't white not white so no no no. You can't have citizenship. So he was naturalized. And then all the South Asians with citizenship were then de-naturalize and when you're denaturalized. You don't only lose the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Like your property you lost your property. I mean it was. Just you know as heartbreaking the case of cutting thin is it's so interesting because it's like it confirms very like on the Supreme Court level. Whiteness is like why disease it's racist such a construct in that in the in the most sort of You know those like constitutional way that they've like defined it. You know what I mean like. You're definitely not white. We need to confirm that like you're not the common man's definition of white. Yes I think what's What's also a deeper structure aspect of? This is that speaks to the uncomfortable role that as I have played throughout history And especially in the present day right that we have been seen in some ways as a kind of like The stopgap other right uh-huh our yeah the wedge or the fill in or you know the standings for various things I I'm thinking here of the earliest immigrants. The United States as a Chinese United States specifically and Japanese as well it were brought here in part because there was a need for labor after After black slaves were free right so there was this sudden. Shortfall of people to do heartbreaking work at very low pay and they decided that it was cheaper instead of to hire black people to actually import people from across oceans right and that instantly set up a narrative for us to be seen as kind of the replacement minority and overtime. We've we've had this kind of pushing pull in terms of where we belong. How adjacent perhaps to whiteness and blackness. We belong or whether we belong here at all right because that's as we began this conversation. Talking about a cyclic thing where it seems like American decides. We don't belong so I you know one of the things I think about. This documentary series is how well that that subtext kind of plays out in in the way that the narrative has been framed. And when you're trying to do one hundred and fifty years of history you have to actually will. You can't tell all of it. It's really not in real time. So how did you decide what to include and whatnot? They're just so much right. You've got yeah you've got five episodes. And then the and the whole of Asian America. Yes so so. What do you do and as you know? Country Music got thirteen hours. Five hours hundred Fifty Years American history. How many how many hours did baseball in the civil war? I well Vietnam workout seventeen or something like that. But I mean that's that's fine a deserved it. But you know countries excessive. Yeah it's because it's television from the very beginning. I mean the generally these kinds of history series. They start at the dawn of time or when the first Asian American came here. Something like that but because it's television and you have to have you know. Keep an audience engaged. I said now. Let's start when there's pictures and moving images if possible moving images because it's visual storytelling. And I didn't want to go into museum just pan around paintings you know or do like re-creations that we'd have no budget for and we do like Schlocky re-creations so and to me it's you know even if you just look at one hundred years of Asian American history. It's jam packed so I said let's just start when there's pictures and also hopefully where there's people still alive. Who either you know late. Eighteen hundreds still alive who was there but maybe descendants of people who were part of shaping that history or assist that history or people who have a direct connection to it I also didn't want you know. Just all the talking heads. To be scholars asian-american historians are great. And actually our historians really great because of them have a connection to the history themselves. I mean like Eric Elite or Gordon Chang near the families came in the eighteen hundreds. I mean they're multi generational so they're really invested in the story but I wanted to also include family members descendants people. I don't think history has to be from the top down. History is really told by you. Know it's told by all of us. It's passed down by all of our mothers and fathers grandparents so that that was. That was another decision. The other thing is low for most of maybe like the first one hundred years or whatever. Asian Americans were mostly just Chinese Japanese and Filipino. So that dominates a lot of the arrows in Asian American history. But now you've got dozens and dozens and dozens of different nationalities Asian Americans are just really diverse. We wanted to get a sense of that diversity. But then we knew that it's not gonNa be possible but we at least wanted to cover the main groups so maybe you could talk a little bit about some of the things you do cover in the series right so you can't cover everything. I know that you drill down into some really interesting stories Oh Yeah let's see. Let me think about some stories that are I mean the one thing in episode one. Which is the early history that was directed by Leo Chang the filmmaker and he actually started episode with the story of Filipinos which I think people would expect. I think people would expect out. It's going to be Chinese Japanese story from the eighteen. Hundreds early nineteen hundreds but he started with the story of a young Filipino kid. At that time he was like you know. I eleven or twelve or something who was brought to the Saint Louis. World's fair in one thousand nine hundred four with over a thousand other Filipinos to be displayed in the human zoo mean this was in the middle of the. Us had colonized the Philippines and to justify the colonization. They were putting forward. This idea that you know that there are so called. Little Brown brothers. They're savages and and they need us to govern them so this world's fair display was kind of like that justification and there was this whole all these anthropological exhibits that were supporting this idea of eugenics and racial hierarchy and You know all the scientific racism at the time but this kid and terro actually turn the experience around and he used it to learn English. Find a way to make money and he ended up getting married to another Filipina woman who was on display. They had the US born child because of Watkin Mark Child was a US citizen and he was able to go back and forth between the US in the Philippines and now one branch of his family who we talked to in in Maryland with. They live in Maryland and they still. They were eager up from the Pontiac region. They are still real like proponents of Of the heritage and the culture and and they were I mean a lot of people look at the Filipinos who were displayed as victims but his granddaughter. Who We talked to me was really insistent. She said No. You got to look at the Philippines. Were not stupid so you really have to look at their agency of how they they took that experience took you know what was happening to them and they turned it around so So that was the beginning but the I mean the if you take immigration xenophobia for example some one thing the historian Eric Harley said and it kind of blew my mind when she framed it this way she said you know. Asian Americans were the first undocumented immigrants and I knew about the Chinese exclusion act but I never quite made that connection and in fact. Yeah Asian Americans were the first undocumented immigrants but this this one really moving story was Kinda young you who? It's actually the mother of Jessica Yu the filmmaker the director and Connie's grandparent's her grandfather was born in the US because his father had been a a Chinese immigrant railroad worker so he looked grandfather was born in the US. The Grandmother was an immigrant and after the grandfather died suddenly at a young age they had been in China on a visit and when her grandmother and all the kids tried they returned to the US. The grandmother was kept on Angel Island and she was told a widow. So now you no longer have legal status and she was kept on Angel Island for fifteen and a half months and she had all these young kids. Us born kids. She was separated from her kids and she would have to like Connie's mother would have to go to Angel Island and try to wave to her from a window and I kept on thinking about you know the detention camps on the southern border and the family separation. Today so what's the the the continuity of xenophopia the continuity of the dehumanisation of people of color is just so striking. But then you fast forward to one of the were recent stories the first dream her the young immigrant who who inspired the Dream Act was her a Korean immigrant to recently..

United States US Supreme Court Angel Island Philippines UCLA Asian America middle school Eric Harley baseball Jason Maryland China Jessica Yu Connie Dan Tin Country Music Vietnam
Filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña talks 'Asian Americans'

They Call Us Bruce

04:33 min | 3 months ago

Filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña talks 'Asian Americans'

"Teach Asian American studies at UCLA. And it's embarrassing. How little I knew. I'm being when I went back. I mean don't tell anybody with my colleagues because Dr Ahead filmaker would you expect but I mean you know. People are worried now about naturalization and I kept on thinking well that's a new thing but in fact South Asians back in the nineteen twenties were who had citizenship here were denaturalized. I mean they were because of the got sing tin case by God sing. Tin Was an immigrant from India and he was actually a World War One veteran I mean he fought he served for the US military in World War One so he was given citizenship for. Maybe four days or something like that. But then they reversed it because he was Indian Dan so he also went to the US Supreme Court and the only thing he can argue back then was while. I'm I'm white because I'm Caucasian because I guess that's the region or whatever and the Supreme Court decided. Yeah you're Caucasian but you're not white but you sure ain't white not white so no no no. You can't have citizenship. So he was naturalized. And then all the South Asians with citizenship were then de-naturalize and when you're denaturalized. You don't only lose the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Like your property you lost your property. I mean it was. Just you know as heartbreaking the case of cutting thin is it's so interesting because it's like it confirms very like on the Supreme Court level. Whiteness is like why disease it's racist such a construct in that in the in the most sort of You know those like constitutional way that they've like defined it. You know what I mean like. You're definitely not white. We need to confirm that like you're not the common man's definition of white. Yes I think what's What's also a deeper structure aspect of? This is that speaks to the uncomfortable role that as I have played throughout history And especially in the present day right that we have been seen in some ways as a kind of like The stopgap other right uh-huh our yeah the wedge or the fill in or you know the standings for various things I I'm thinking here of the earliest immigrants. The United States as a Chinese United States specifically and Japanese as well it were brought here in part because there was a need for labor after After black slaves were free right so there was this sudden. Shortfall of people to do heartbreaking work at very low pay and they decided that it was cheaper instead of to hire black people to actually import people from across oceans right and that instantly set up a narrative for us to be seen as kind of the replacement minority and overtime. We've we've had this kind of pushing pull in terms of where we belong. How adjacent perhaps to whiteness and blackness. We belong or whether we belong here at all right because that's as we began this conversation. Talking about a cyclic thing where it seems like American decides. We don't belong so I you know one of the things I think about. This documentary series is how well that that subtext kind of plays out in in the way that the narrative has been framed. And when you're trying to do one hundred and fifty years of history you have to actually will. You can't tell all of it. It's really not in real time. So how did you decide what to include and whatnot? They're just so much right. You've got yeah you've got five episodes. And then the and the whole of Asian America. Yes so so. What do you do and as you know? Country Music got thirteen hours. Five hours hundred Fifty Years American history. How many how many hours did baseball in the civil war? I well Vietnam workout seventeen or something like that. But I mean that's that's fine a deserved it. But you know countries excessive.

Us Supreme Court DAN United States Ucla TIN Baseball Vietnam Country Music Asian America India
"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

12:59 min | 3 months ago

"pena" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they. Call US Bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm feel you and Jeff Yang and here we are again bringing you prime quality content in the era of Corona virus. And we have with us today. A very special guest. Somebody wanted to talk to for quite a while. In fact I actually think we reached out to you to do an episode. While you were in Japan. We were not able to late with little late the time bad but now we're on the same state the same city and in our respective houses. And that's why we're the lighted have with US rented Taj Pinna film director producer. Welcome thank you icon and one of my personal heroes. So yeah and a friend and we should say the a series producer of a an ethics series epic documentary series coming out on PBS. Very shortly called Asian Americans we that. Yeah simple straight. To the point we spend a lot of time trying to figure out a title. But we always say we're that what what were the alternate maybe less generic titles out this series. My favorite was invasive species Hornets. Now's the murder that if we were to form like a softball league I would love. I love our team to be the murder horns yeah nobody wanted invasive species for some reason so why and it's actually a very evocative term one which I'm sure Kind of relevant to the state of Asian American today increasingly feels like that's how people see us. Yeah so some people would get the title right away drawing kind of the wrong audience. I imagine but let's talk about the series. How did how to begin because this is a big deal? This is something which I think goes deeper and broader than any other attempt to document the history and the presence of our our community and culture. Ever well you know. It's something that we've been wanting to do for a long time at Lonnie. Dang who's like the Godmother of Documentary Asian American documentary? Filmmaking actually did ancestors in America she wanted it to be a series. That was never a full series. I mean there are different attempts. I even wrote. I think it was in the one thousand nine hundred eighty nine a whole treatment on Asian American history that we could just never get off the ground so around two thousand thirteen Jeff Bieber from Weeda. That's the flagship. Pbs Station that the they all the Ken Burns stuff and he approached me. And Don Young from the Center for Asian American Media and said you know he had done Latino Americans in Italian Americans and I think Jewish-americans and he said well. Do you WANNA do Asian Americans and we said. Yeah we've been wanting to so we got off the ground. It feels like it's really timely for this to be happening now. That certainly was not planned right. It's like Oh we're going to do this and release it right in the middle of a moment to win these states last summer the broadcast states. It's it's it's weird because well I mean you could have dropped this series at any time. I mean a heritage month of course is great but any year a doug ministries like this has always been sort of like necessary in in in you know like welcome but just given the circumstances. I feel like especially now watching it Watching the series another preview. I you know it just feels like wow. This is covering history. is very important. Asian American history but we are right now living some very important Asian American history that someone else is going to make a documentary about down the line you know so. It's so weird to see this. I think because so much of it is so relevant to what's going on right now but it keeps on happening over history. I mean one thing when in part of the series episode five we revisit the Vincent Chin case and via tend to win the novelist. Said you know when Vincent Chin that murder happened. Asian Americans weren't shocked because it was something new because they knew it was something old it an old story and when we looked at that history I mean even before this whole corona virus crises. It was like we kept on saying. Is this now? You know because if you look at all the fault lines of race and Immigration and xenophobia you look at all those fault lines they erupt. You know in times of crises and war to erupt did You know the McCarthy period is erupted. Nine eleven in erupted now the recession. That's in Chen. It erupted and so it was bound to happen at some point. It just happened. You know right now this year you know. It's not just that it happens randomly or even cyclically. There's a certain sense in which in looking back at this history one of the things that seems pretty apparent is that this kind of xenophobia. This kind of Anti Asian backlash in particular happens right when it feels like Asian Americans are becoming more prominent more successful more visible in some fashion. And certainly we talk. We've talked about this a couple times. Nowadays N- episodes it really does feel like while we were far from solving all problems and all of our our issues through representation ability. There was a bit of a moment right you the A row Christians. Fresh off the boat there was a whole world of things that seem like they were finally happening. I A little bit and then boom here we are once again being told that we are the invasive species the myrtle but you can look at it you know. Another way is set. Means were more empowered to defend ourselves and we are. We're more empowered to defend ourselves. I mean I watched tiger tail and then I see time leading the wash the hate campaign to you know. Bring attention to the all the anti-asian hate that's going on now. So He's got that platform people know who he is. And I mean it kind of burst our bubble because all these things like you said. We're we're really on this role but at the same time it just. We just have more visibility now. I mean I've been saying this. I've said this multiple times last couple of weeks since we've been recording all these episodes in in quarantine but I think what's going on right now with Asian Americans in this country it goes to show that You know you can work towards Having some level of success and visibility representation and all that but I feel like all that is very tenuous and conditional and I mean the powers us right but I feel like if you're looking for sort of some sort of validation from outside outside voices to say that we've arrived or where you know. We have a some level of success in privileged. Like that stuff is that can be pulled out from US. Mike that right and so I mean. We saw this coming like three months ago. Right so marker race. Yeah yeah is it ever J.J. and so but I do agree that like we are positioned now to you know. Be in a place where we can. We can raise our voices a little bit louder and stand up little bit taller and say like fuck all this man. Let's say that I mean it's it's it goes back to and we. Everyone has their moment right. Not everyone is on the same page about how to react to these things for me. Like I WANNA take it back to Vincent in case that's something I didn't know about until I was like it was almost twenty years effort happened. I learned about it because of your film who kills it's Chin. I still maintain. It's like one of the most influential pieces of media I've ever seen in my life because not because I was shocked about learning about the case. Of course I was but because it felt so like I felt it I felt how Like learning about it made me realize like like made me feel all the things that. I felt my whole life like way like you know I made been made to feel like I didn't belong in. This country had been threatened with violence before called names or whatever and like is that recognition. You know what I mean and seeing that sort of Play out in a way that I never but that no one had ever showed me before that. I think that's that's right there. You know I think like the Detroit. Asian Americans had never been really political during that time and I think a lot of them on the surface thought. Yeah I'm I've made it. I'm the model minority. I have a good job and I'm accepted. And but I think people underneath really know what's going on because they've lived it and with something like the Vincent in case happens is just Kinda hits them in the face and they have to respond so no. It's it's always been. I mean when we were doing this history one hundred fifty years of Asian American history and I know when we delivered our shows the suits at PBS. Were kind of they said. Oh this is not what we're suspended expecting. I think I think it was. You know this this idea that Asian Americans are a model minority is run so deep so I think people look at Asian Americans and expect while they're going to be like the Italian Americans German Americans but just with black hair you now. Just they've you know as immigrants they face them adversity. They pull themselves up by their bootstraps. And then you know they are paying. They build these big buildings or they succeed But the marker of race which is what we're talking about you know that does not go away and that's America. That is the rot in America and has been since the beginning and it is everything. We're seeing now. Anti-asian hate the fact that you know. People of color particularly African. Americans Latinos Native Americans Pacific Islanders. I mean the statistic was was it seventy percent. The Corona virus cases are in those groups. I mean it was like crazy statistic. But it shouldn't surprise. I guess any of US. Because that is those inequalities the racism. You know that's always been there. That's the those fault lines is. What would you say that the expectation was that it was going to be a little bit more of like an Asian American hagiography like this? Is You know how far we've come. These are a notable individuals the personalities who we celebrate that sort of thing. No they just didn't know about this history at all. I think a lot of Asian Americans because I make films like who killed Vincent Chin and a lot of Asian Americans themselves will say oh how come you're not telling the success stories in autumn. You're always talking about problems and I would say it's like you win. A union like the Filipinos who started the grape strike and helped launch the United Farm Workers Cesar Chavez in the sixties. You win a union. That's a success story to me. I mean if you look down the line I mean sure one can mark who in the late eighteen hundreds Chinese restaurant worker? He was a US citizen because he was born here. He gets you know. He has denied re entry into United States. Because he's Chinese. This was the middle of Chinese exclusion. And so he goes to the Supreme Court and he goes to the Supreme Court wins and from that point on anybody who's born in this country even if you're parents are undocumented immigrants like my friend parents if you're born in this country you have birthright citizenship. That's my parents are citizens.

US Vincent Chin Documentary Asian American murder Center for Asian American Medi America Vincent Americans Pacific Islanders Jeff Yang producer Asia America Bruce Japan Supreme Court Pbs Station Taj Pinna Ken Burns United Farm Workers Jeff Bieber
Innovation and the Clich

LensWork

09:35 min | 3 months ago

Innovation and the Clich

"Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing

John Cage Rachmaninoff Avant Garde Youtube Baseball Eugene Dong Lens Work Publishing Editor Jerry Nari Soul Brooks Jensen John Paul Capela Negro Juwan Steve Mccurry John Sexton Pena Dominic Rouse Bruce Marne Mcgraw
How Is Hung Handsome Howard Doing During the COVID-19 Quarantine?

The Howard Stern Show

02:11 min | 4 months ago

How Is Hung Handsome Howard Doing During the COVID-19 Quarantine?

"Say good morning to hung handsome. Howard are you. Are you a hunkering down in your house? Like me Howard food. I got it made man. I just got back from Italy. It was beautiful. Dude God Top that's talion private great life and you don't Howard. Yeah I get such a kick out of talking to you because you know I'm sitting here with a very small Pena's I'm sitting with this face and I'm washing my hands twenty times a day in wiping off door handles with lysol wipes and aren't you doing that. No no no. I'm not. I just did the corona challenge on talk looking things in public for likes. I'm going viral right now. I'm like so lucky in. I don't worry about anything. I'M NOT GONNA GET CORONA virus. See this is the difference between us. Everything goes well for you I. I'm stockpiling supplies like bottled water. Freeze dried food and bleach. What about you may? I'm stockpiling supplies. Too I got weed Lou robbers. I got a whole inventory. I've never fucked so much during this vires. You're seeing people. This is what I mean rob. Yeah Hung Hamson Howard lives the exact opposite life as me by living a life. That could kill one but nothing ever kills him. He doesn't care you know I'm Howard. I'm wrecking my hands. Washing them over and over all day long. Yeah I'm wrecking my hands too. So you're washing hands like crazy. Also no no no. I've been shredding guitar all day. Thank God they had such a good self image and healthy upbringing. I didn't waste a moment in my life and I learned to be a masterful guitar player when I was young. You see I wasted my youth you you really really you. You learned virtuoso here. I'll play you something. This is Eddie. Van Halen's enjoy. Wow this if I had been handsome and I would also be playing eruption

Hamson Howard Pena Van Halen Italy Eddie
Clap Because We Care is now global

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Clap Because We Care is now global

"Clap because we care is a global thing now this is how they do it in Renfrew in Scotland and on the London Bridge a big salute to healthcare workers in that country but they are doing something a bit different now in Long Island City is there a playing taps every night after the seven PM on Twitter Naomi Pena says so many souls we need to honor some because we care the silence daily for all those new Yorkers

Renfrew Scotland London Bridge Long Island City Naomi Pena
Tri-state region reports biggest one-day rise in COVID-19 deaths

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:18 sec | 4 months ago

Tri-state region reports biggest one-day rise in COVID-19 deaths

"Pain there were more than a thousand deaths from covert nineteen in the tri state region alone in the last twenty four hours choice Pena said social distancing must continue we think we're leveling off because of the social distancing we don't wanna stop now let's keep going he said the viability of hospitals depends on it Erin cutters he ABC news New

Pena Erin ABC
New York, New Jersey, Connecticut see largest single-day coronavirus death increase

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

New York, New Jersey, Connecticut see largest single-day coronavirus death increase

"New York New Jersey and Connecticut each announced their highest single day death tolls yet collectively more than a thousand deaths there are signs the virus is slowing but the number of critically ill patients is still rising if we are leveling off for leveling off at a point where the medical resources are stretched beyond capacity Dr Eric Choi Pena at Northwell health we're all working as hard as we can to get things done and this is not something that that is sustainable hospitals have to hang on longer while the public keeps practicing behaviors that reduce spread

New Jersey Connecticut Dr Eric Choi Pena New York Northwell
Houston Fire Department hit hard by the coronavirus

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Houston Fire Department hit hard by the coronavirus

"Houston Houston fire fire chief chief Sam Sam Pena Pena says says his his department department has has been been able able to to switch switch round round ships ships and and personnel personnel to to ensure all stations are open even as more firefighters getting tested for covered nineteen of those a hundred seventy three in quarantine tested forty forty nine twelve have come back positive for covert nineteen two of those have since recovered

Sam Sam Pena Pena Houston
Kangaroo caught eating toilet paper in campground bathroom

Balance of Nature

00:26 sec | 5 months ago

Kangaroo caught eating toilet paper in campground bathroom

"Well one Australia campground is having a toilet paper shortage but it has nothing to do with corona virus a camper film the kangaroo eating toilet paper paper out of a restroom in a campground in will Pena pound in South Australia apparently it's not the first time it's happened as the cameraman says the camp managers told them they're planning on putting up a fence to keep the kangaroos from feasting on the toilet paper

South Australia Australia
‘Fantasy Island’ Clips Reveal the Potentially Dangerous Rules of the Island

Big Boy

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

‘Fantasy Island’ Clips Reveal the Potentially Dangerous Rules of the Island

"Real quick I got to tell you about a new movie that is coming out fantasy island I know it sounds one way but trust me this movie is going to scare you so bad I was just watching the trailer but is starring Michael Pena and Lucy Hale and it is this suspense thriller about an island where your fantasies come true but at a price now from the producer of truth or dare which I thought was so good fantasy island opens tomorrow it is read a PD thirty but is so scary and creepy it makes me not want to have my own fantasies but trust me have such a good time go see fantasy island it is out this

Michael Pena Lucy Hale Producer
Alfonso Ribeiro twists our brains on golf

Fore Play

12:01 min | 6 months ago

Alfonso Ribeiro twists our brains on golf

"All right folks are joined by a very special guest. Alfonso Ribeiro Big Time Golf Guy so you just walked into Barcelo. Hq I Kind of impressions walking into Barstool checking on her office. All new. I mean the last time to Barstool it was like a it was literally did not look like this. How about we go there? We just going to be pleasant. It was It was an office been was like just not really new new. Feels like a little bit of a facade like this nice and like state of the art and it's not really us just put snow it it did you listen. Everybody needs to go to work and feel like they're going to a nice place. Okay you know what I mean you can talk about whatever you want. It's gotta you'll nice going to work today. What he's saying is the last place was a dump and couldn't believe that he was brought there and that that he likes plays a lot more? I'M GONNA go with the last part of that. Okay because speaking to work got a couple of things going on a couple of things on funniest video absolutely how you know so like the greatest Family show in American television history. Right like its thirtieth season iconic for the Shell my fifth season as the host. And like what's better than watching people do really dumb stuff stuff hurt themselves but what Asta laugh at them by sending us the video so you get the approval of them to laugh at them and and we get to laugh over and over and over again. And I get to go to work and I actually one of the things that I'll do is so I typically have to do the voice overs for all the videos at that net. Need my voice over. Okay okay but I won't watch any of the ones that I don't have to do voice over on so that when I'm actually at the taping and I enjoy them for the first time you're right at the tapings aping and I'm like this way. It's like it feels less like work right. You go to go and it was like wow didn't see that one and can laugh and have a great time so I actually enjoy the taping and as much as the audience gets to do you ever slip up like Oh shit. It's just a good at that because kids so I've learned how not to allow that slip to come out. I always say I know my audience and when I'm when I'm there I'm pretty good at making sure that because we have some kids in the audience. I've become America's Dad. There have to be very responsible. It's amazing my gallstone hasn't made it onto that show yet. It just put it out with. Just keep sending US videos. We'll get it on you get one with a wedge in its everyone's laugh back actually on on Sunday eh the. At and T. I actually wanted to see whether someone got one of my swings on video. 'cause it absolutely would make it onto my show where where it was on. The fourteenth holds a par-five long par five and I'm trying to like possibly see whether I can get there in two so I'm really really digging into one and my right foot completely slips out onto downswing I'm talking airborne it's completely gone right and I still hit the ball but I was on one leg almost down on the ground and I actually hit the ball. So the two the pros and the group because my pro was Kevin Na right and the other the pro is j b Holmes and both of them were like in they were shell shocked because they were like okay. Are you all right. And I'm like and I'm walking gingerly because I'm like I don't know if I'm alright yet Then they go. How did you make contact right like? How did you literally literally you were falling down and you still hit the ball on an ethnic? I like that things eh but it really was. I said to everybody the gallery. WHO's watching anybody? Get that on tape tape. So you're good player. You're scratch. Is that right well. They had me as a three okay. So so you've played golf in some in some big circles right so you're Alphonso Ribeiro your but at the at and T. Pablo pro-am pro-am it's it's TV it's legitimate PJ toward crowds. What's kind of your nerve level on the first tee? You're on the seventeen. Maybe more conic shot. What's your nerve you know? There's probably only one shot at Pebble Beach that I am fearful of It's the second shot on eight right light. That is the only shot where you're like. Okay I don't have this. This is GonNa talk to me about it and we follow him about it and play the whole Goddamn golf course. You know it's a train wreck where we can't bring one hundred none of us for playing in a couple of weeks for the US Open. He's trying little fairy on a in Richmond right flying on a on the fly right behind the flag as for Mr Berry missed. The net. Green is great work. It was great because and I was on my way to triple digits so of course I'm walk through seven holes. Okay you knew where this round was. Nobody's lying along the best part of that is your only through seven holes right this aide whole and you haven't even gotten to the teeth of the golf course you know. That's the easy part of the grass. You get one two three four or five. You're like Ooh and you're doing like if I par in I can shoot ninety uh-huh and you're not going to say the only confident walk. I had all day was walking up to the Green on eight. I had my shoulders up is in my head was held high and I felt good but the rest of the day absolutely you know we had a twenty five mile. An hour rose wind no going from left to right right into the water. Yeah not good. So it's one of those shots where you're like. Okay where am I aiming. That's far let's into I can play it from the left rough. Can't play that from the Pacific. No right you know I was I was left. What's what's the dichotomy like with if the pros and you've got you know the guys played different? teases it awkward at all. No it's it's I'll say this like they're I'm sure there are groups and I've heard many stories the of playing in groups where because it's too amateurs into prose where guys really are not enjoying playing with those amateurs and there are guys on tour who alike I am not playing the. At and T.. I can't stand it like it's just playing with the amateurs but like this group that we had this year which was my self with with Kevin A- and then it was Michael Pena with a guy named Martin trainer. Right and Michael the opinion I are pretty much the same for even though he was getting seven shots. I was getting three but we when we play at home. We are about the same so when you play with guys. We're actually indecent golfers right. Then it's not bad because he's not like all right. Let's go look for his ball. Not that right. The flow of the game feels like it's just a normal for some going out to play and it's not so bad for them. Because I even sent cavanaugh a text message yesterday kind Hannah saying you know a dude. Thanks for an amazing week. We made the cut. We finished nineteenth right like out of one hundred and fifty six teams. That was awesome. He was in there grinding. Like trying to get the team to to to make the cut and you know it was just a really really enjoyable week and he was like dude. Thank you for being the way you were because you knew when to talk and make it light but you also knew when to leave me alone right. Let me have of my space when I needed it and I'm good at that like I'm the dude in the group who's like we're not talking to him some people don't that'll that I'm not going to be the one to tip it. Everyone feels they look at Jon Rahm by the way sitting at dinner. Just don't go near him. L. People for one degrees. That's his nickname like but you know but that's what I was doing you know. That's but that's what happens when it's guys who know how to play golf right who play golf and been in that circumstance stands. This is my fifth year the. At and T.. I've been up at the American Century Tournament now for maybe fourteen fifteen years I get it like I get how to play golf in front of people. It doesn't affect me right like you asking the question earlier like does it like. Does it affect you. Like going to that I T- I have no nerves. Did it affect you. I the first time I absolutely. Yeah but now it's like maybe maybe after like the fourth or fifth time playing in one of those like bigger tournaments after that I was like I. Nobody cares correct right like we all have this thing in our minds that like. I'm going to go embarrass myself. I'm like no not you know why because I'm so much better than the audience sitting there watching me play golf that they're impressed even if I hit a bad. That shot hit that bad shot right so I'd look at it like oh well they don't care whether I play well or not. I care whether I play well or not. Well well I know that if I'm in the moment and I'm actually all messed up about it but I'm not gonNA play. Well right I gotta get into the same space where I've had some of my best rounds and all of my best rounds of been when I'm like. Yeah whatever you gotTa Find Your Happy Place Right just like you're not caring right. The moment you care is the moment you get tents the moment your tents is the worst Gulf swing right. So I've certainly got myself to where I can just kind of be in the moment I want you know. Pick a target small targets right. No no no. Don't hit over there to the right. No pick a target hit the target. Don't worry about anything else. You're not gonna hit it there anyway. But at least you're gonNA you're GonNa make a good solid swing with the right effort by familiar with the exact opposite approach of that on the TV. You got a couple of groups backed doc. You know and you're standing in for wherever you think that they care a lot about how your shot goes right. You're standing the biggest fair way in the world and you're just like all right there's OB forty yards left. You can't it'll be and meanwhile correct just pick a small targets a giant fairway even a decent drive. You'll have a good approach. NOPE bodies a train wreck. You don't know how does golf club you're thinking. Oh Oh my God I saw. Nobody cares their phone there and watch it right. Well I I became friendly with Justin rose and he has a putting guru right who works with okay and this. This guy gave our whole little group when when we were all together Some information is called C.. Burn right and I was like okay. Okay well it's a putting thing where if you put a ball on the ground and if you move that ball quickly you're going to see what looks like a burn of a ball on the grass right and I was like what is that like why he goes. Your brain doesn't understand no or don't write. It only understands what it saying doing. So don't hit it left. Your brain heard hit it left right so there's no don't yeah it doesn't it doesn't recognize. Don't right it only recognizes do. Yeah so people say. Don't move your head you're moving your head right. What this guy is saying is his see the burn? If you see the burn you didn't move your head. It has to be an active positive. Thought not a negative thought because there's is no way that your brain understands the negative thought. Why do you always hit it in the water when you look at water if you have to hit the ball over the water like all right? Don't hit it into water. You're the water. Your brain doesn't understand. Don't you have to just don't even worry about the water. See the target and hated at your target. So it's a mental exercise absolutely but it but it becomes a physical thing because see the burn. You didn't move your. I can't tell you over

Golf Alphonso Ribeiro United States Kevin Na Michael Pena America Pebble Beach Asta Justin Rose Richmond Gulf Jon Rahm Pacific Holmes Cavanaugh Kevin A Mr Berry T. Pablo Hannah Martin
New York City startup turns food waste into fertilizer

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 6 months ago

New York City startup turns food waste into fertilizer

"A New York City. Startup is using potato peels apple cores and rotten tomatoes to help. Farmers grow fresh fruits and vegetables. We take produce waste from food distributors food processors. Anything that can't go to to a food bank or farm to Nia Pena's the founder and CEO of renewable the company Converts Food Waste Into Organic Fertilizer Pellets. That can abused by indoor hydroponic farms. She says when dissolved in water the pellets make the nutrients immediately available to the plant. Really kind of mimicking being biological nutrient systems outdoors. So she says the technology can help make it easier to grow organic food indoors. In urban areas where fresh local food is often scarce and it helps the climate it keeps food out of landfills where it would otherwise decompose and release methane a potent greenhouse gas. And it could reduce the need for synthetic fertilizers which create a lot of carbon pollution. When they're manufactured so far. The company has facilities in New York City and Rochester New York and plans to expand the west coast. Pena hopes to eventually help cities across the country. Use their food scraps to grow. Local organic food

Nia Pena New York City Founder And Ceo New York Rochester
14 more U.S. troops diagnosed with brain injuries

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 6 months ago

14 more U.S. troops diagnosed with brain injuries

"Pena rising number of US troops suffered traumatic brain injuries after around January eighth attack on a US base in Iraq WTOP is national security correspondent JJ green has the very latest the new number sixty four fourteen more than they were on Wednesday today the Pentagon announced they were fifty cases an increase of sixteen from the week before so the thirty new cases this week many of them have returned to duty but many questions are circulating about how the injuries took place sources tell WTOP those injured were in close proximity to a ballistic missile explosion the Pentagon's continuing to look into the situation which may take awhile and joint chiefs chairman general mark Millie says we'll continue to monitor them the rest of their lives and provide whatever treatment is

Pena Pentagon Mark Millie United States Iraq Jj Green Chairman
FDA approves first treatment for kids with peanut allergy

WBBM Evening News

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

FDA approves first treatment for kids with peanut allergy

"May be some New Hope for children with peanut allergies CBS's Nora o'donnell the FDA has approved the first treatment to treat the allergy which can be deadly it's called health for zero kids swallow Pena patter at first in tiny then increasingly larger doses training their bodies to tolerate peanuts now it's not a cure but doctors say it could be a life

CBS FDA Nora O'donnell Pena
FDA approves first peanut allergy treatment

Rob Pratte

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

FDA approves first peanut allergy treatment

"There may be some New Hope for children with peanut allergies CBS's Nora o'donnell the FDA has approved the first treatment to treat the allergy which can be deadly it's called how for ZF can swallow Pena powdered first in tiny then increasingly larger doses training their bodies to tolerate peanuts now it's not a cure the doctors say it could be a life

CBS FDA Pena Nora O'donnell
"pena" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

10:34 min | 6 months ago

"pena" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"Don't WanNa make any sacrifices advises now back to the wool bazeley wreck. I had no plan B. Until I was sixty years old I spent one hundred and twenty five percent of every fucking dollar wherever made if I made a million spent a million to fifty if I may ten million spent twelve and a half million okay. One year one hundred million and I spent one hundred twenty five minutes. Okay at sixty my wife and I sat down and he says I think we should downsize and you know stop all that and I had a lot of stuff. Okay okay Most of which I didn't use a lot houses and Shit we never went to and I don't believe in Plan B because if you have a plan B. I mean you use it when what I used to say to the kids. They walk in the firm and I would say if you're trying to become a million dollar producer and trying to learn if you look at the fuck it help wanted section right now for a part time any extra. Get the fuck out now. You've no chance of succeeding. I want you to put your back to the fucking wall. Make the consequences of failure so dire unthinkable. Can you give you some no choice. But to succeed is missing from so many people these days right. They want the exit from the half in half out that the plan B.. Fuck Plan B right. They can't be uh-huh Cortez came in the world but I do burn the ship and ships. Right why no choice but to hack out and exists always fuck. The Indians got arrows. Buck Attia right right. Same thing goes right when they came to the UK. The second time Caesar. Augustus burned the ships. is we're going to conquer the picks which were the Scots WE'RE GONNA die here one of the other and As it turned out they did not convert the Scots. And they build Hadrian's wall across US between Scotland and England which remnants of it are still there but the kids don't want to Jack Welch better than I because when I hear these questions about balanced life life I go fucking beserk to know. There's there's life choices have consequences. Jack says which I agree. That's a nice way of saying but there's no balanced life. You're either all in all you're not when you in your six days. A really seeking says how many hours a week did you work hundred fifteen two hundred twenty two. You even distinguishing work and not work or just you just just walk there's there's a guy This is the old painewebber which became painewebber longtime. Well he he told he told our children Children don't like hearing this. We used to have the security guard. Guards come in and drag your father out after four or five days a living at his desk bathing in the in the washroom and having a secretary go get him clean underwear and clean shirts and our kids talk shit. I lived in my office of ten years straight. I lived in my office and the I still. I don't consider it work. I'm still fifty sixty hours a week and I haven't had thirty five years and but if you're not doing something you like it there right. It's a bit allows next door to me I. I don't distinguish between work as my pleasure. My pleasure is my work and success to me is timing about money's more about just like being right and I love the idea of figuring shit out. I'm almost happiest when I'm struck. My highest value is to try something not get it right right away and half the work hot and then figure this shit out and it's no better cracking the code after something doesn't work the first minute and be great if it does but usually it doesn't right. I love that it feeling of like a failing and succeeding. Well I mean. Success is on a razor's edge a failure. Ross Perot told me that many years ago He's gone away and out in the last few months. He's an amazing guy. Yeah early version a little guy but early version of trump. By the way in a sense that he was straight talking didn't charisma. He lacked the charisma of trump. We were at the Houston many years ago. And we're standing at the bar and Houston and used to be the place. The Meat Market for hookers. High high priced hookers. We were in Houston Texas. Okay Okay and Ross used to drink SAS PAROLA. I'm not even sure what that is. Some sort of like root beer yeah Too Tall Slinky looking girls were saying a short. You want to buy a drink and everybody in the bar knew it was. Ross Perot accept. These is to bimbos okay and you can't say Bimbo anymore. It's unbelievable. I can say Bono and so he pulled his wallet out of his back pocket. He had an old function while and he dropped it on the floor and then he put his foot on it. Whenever I'm feeling short I stand in my wallet? And I'm fucking eight veto direct. But he was a real real personality. Amazing he eds. maisy became the largest shareholder. General Motors. Fuck you only lasted a few months there because he said they were so mismanaged with idiot. Too much straight talk talk right. He's a straight talk. I mean in some ways he was a lot like trump and some in this sort of very different in terms of his communication style but he did have his own flair through him that when he spoke he spoke he spoke sense. It just makes common sense. I remember that I remember watching him in the campaign debates and you know what he did great the first woman something just establish now the ability to speak directly to the people through things like twitter social be so trump has mastered the art of circumventing the traditional media which is as you said liberally biased. Talk massively the believe Bison also these their own narrative anti-establishment takeover trump was able to cut through that bullshit using social media. Ross Perot couldn't some lows probably WII couldn't get his fog this is my -pinion no no well I mean and he's still got twenty three percent of the vote he's a spoiler. Yep Yep and he spoiled Bush one's second-term step one step two step almost to be folks on the few not the man. No one okay focused on few not many and the the You've got to be all in total commitment And at all costs there is no plan B and the and the not last but not least based on the fact that you're not gonNA succeed. The first time rarely do succeed the first time the big believe it could be the fifth time the twenty fifth time called failing elegantly learn learn a failing business. Much succeed right yeah. I wasn't too good at failing elegantly up the first time either failed miserably the first one. Yeah and the Considered a roll up guy and but the first world trade. Nineteen eighty-one was a colossal failure. Which is what the London Stock Exchange I try to? All fifteen energy edgy companies together and it was the The week before Princess Di met Married Prince Charles and it just collapsed. The all the support is voting for an aftermarket didn't exist so then I came back Of three and a half years later With a big success in more or less. That's what I'm remembered for but I remember paying the bills the professional fees that I had that I couldn't afford to pay For the next two and a half years that I contemplated walking away from but I wanted to pay him but took me two and a half years in the so the kids today Don't WanNa feel that pain you know You know I've had the privilege of working with some of the Lakers. I've had the privilege of working with Olympic the athletes And one of the kids says I'm GonNa go the Olympics. Do what to sit on the bench. Get a gold medal. I mean If I just make it they're sent accomplished. Yeah well fuck that it's like now. The kids run marathons a for the experience they want to finish. I rent my first marathon. I ran three hours. I my first marathon and now they run a five six seven hours. I can walk it and six and a half hours. I mean it's unbelievable for the experience variance in the. If that's all the experience you want out of life to being able to roll and seven or eight hour marathon. I mean metaphorically speaking you ought to take a gun like this and do it right. Don't fuck it up but it yourself your mouth put you somebody. Kids blow the side of the face of the can't even blow the is that right. It's very dangerous. It's a bad way to commit suicide. Because you're you can't go here because you might recall she up the skull right or lawyer says Metaphor Metaphor for. You're speaking of anyone to do that here. That'll be known everybody deserves. They have a life. Everyone deserves to be alive. I sort of video which is fucking classic. Obviously the Florida thing. What was that? I couldn't understand all the words. What exactly happened this kid? I went and grabbed one. I didn't I couldn't understand this. hoppy understand understand. He was a kid from South America who was there on a journalism scholarship at the University of Florida and I'm in the QNA part. And I'm their free free and there's about three hundred and fifty four hundred people and it came to him and they passed them the Mike and he said Mr Pena. I've done my research. And he basically said what I've done I didn't do. Oh okay so I finished a question I got up from my barstool. I sit on for Q.. And A. and I walked towards him and I went and I pulled the microwave from mm-hmm now if there weren't so many cameras I would've questions head right there but a lot of cameras. Everybody's gotTa Fuck iphone now. Dangerous and good old days. You could do whatever we want and so oh I took it away from him and then what they didn't show as pandemonium broke out right they actually cut away from that for some and the there was two or three three little guys that were with him and there was three hundred fifty guys that wanted them out right okay and some of these guys were big and so the police came in and Much of the credit they said you know sir. We have no control. If you just step outside the classroom out there the open ground you talk because you know what we we have to shut this thing down in Georgia and so I did. I stepped outside and I finished the QNA outside too. You know the people that stayed and ask questions but he said clearly that that All the things I have accomplished That I didn't but but That was a basis for doing now. His basis was that He thought that I went public in my financial core was based based on in New York. But it was based in London. 'cause I went to London in the early eighties so I was public on the London. Stock Exchange not the New York York Stock Exchange. Got It okay and. He didn't connect those dots..

Ross Perot Houston London trump Jack Welch London Stock Exchange producer Augustus Olympics UK gold medal Buck Attia General Motors Cortez twitter Prince Charles Caesar Lakers secretary
"pena" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

02:17 min | 6 months ago

"pena" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"Email before I Came over here From a twenty two year old recently graduated from University of Washington Aerospace Engineer. He did his first deal. One point five million bucks. It closed yesterday evening. I had dinner or a drink with him the night before and I said you gotTa do the takeaway close. I said time to fuck off and walk through the door and close news pro- Cross my fingers. That if he does it right he's GonNa blow up in his face okay and email. He says I did the hard close Mr Pena and it worked. He melted at the table or tell them. Don't let the door hit you in the ASS on the way out asshole and so I mean I often often that saddle. We just did that last week with someone that was like saying. No no no no Mike Technical. Fuck off thirty seconds later okay. Final do correct unbelievable. Yeah but today And my kids my I call everybody kid because I'm old enough to be grandfather. Father my kids that have used yourself. Say It's good I I've never used it. I'm a hammer closer. I'm not a finance closer. I either beat you to death at the table. I've seen the sun go down and come up at a coffee table. Use It because it's not magic. It's just it's the truth about persuasion so I find the greatest salesman in the world. You'd have stated but if you say Oh shit fuck it exactly. That's why I'm so good at what I do is basic truths about selling for that matter running business basic core truth that just run through it. Let me Gosh. I don't WANNA I don't Wanna you're beyond like steps for success but just if you can really break it down like if you're the average kid out that kid but what was keeping give me a cappella. What's the plan? I mean I laser. The laser beam focus. They focus one focused on the few not many focus on the menu meaning Most of the kids that are most adults have got four or five projects none of which are worth a shit okay and so. They're trying to make them all work because they're afraid to walk away away because they spent too much time develop in it. The great thing about the Internet is the results are instantaneous. Yet kids work on APPS and programs And enright code not for an hour a week a month but years and they get no results..

Mr Pena Mike Technical University of Washington Aeros salesman
"pena" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

07:59 min | 10 months ago

"pena" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"And say oh you know I I follow Ryan and Reina's this great stuff on on these updates and stuff and I just you know I want to do that I I also don't recommend copying someone else's approach because that's that's their personality that's their thought leadership that's their ideas so it's not to say you can't be inspired by it but just make sure that when you go into it and you want to add value for yourself that's going to add value to your to your community that you take that approach and you think about you know I'm what's what's I'm trying to think of like what is a just a completely non sexy thing that someone could do as a profession awesome scooping up manure I I don't know but let's just say that that's you're sitting there trying to get the word out there about the importance of scooping up manure what you're not gonna start with just saying you know hey everybody I scoop up newer and I scooped up like twenty pounds of it today you you're GonNa talk about like what are the why do you have to do this why do people why should people care of it right what do you need to know that that you don't even know about scooping up and I don't know anything about it I know it stinks but you know like what does that what does the it's a terrible analogy it's but but no I I I want people to think about like what are they passionate about in the work that they do and how oh are they going to share that with other people in a way that hasn't been done before because if they can do that then they're gonNA break through the noise and I it's it's easy you're said than done but you have to find your knees your passion and something that you know if people start asking you questions about you're going to be excited to enhancer it and if you're just putting some without their because it's what someone that is similar to you is doing but you don't have that genuine passion it's GonNa come across when people maybe engaged with you you're going to be that passionate about engaging back because just like not something that's top of mind because I mean when I got started with some of this market being stuff the thing for me was I spent a lot of time learning about getting better at storytelling than I did at like watching more social media marketing people right like I read like Stephen King's on writing and you know what I mean and it actually those types of things gave me ideas because because I feel like some of the best people out there that are representing themselves or their companies well I have really good storytelling capabilities right yeah you're you're like the you mentioned it that way because that reminded me of You know I think how I how I think differently and how I implement what I do on my personal social accounts into thinking about how we can leverage some of these learnings from for business so you know an example this in I think back to two thousand fifteen twenty sixteen there was this heightened awareness around snapchat at the time potentially for businesses even and and you know this citing new creative platform that has been around for a while and obviously the younger generation is using it to kind of back and forth message other than storytelling piece became and you could tell stories on this and I started to leverage it it was totally for entertainment but I thought it was so fascinating how you can create a story of your day and then add in you know fun little you know gifts or whatever's going on attack animations even just the way that you capture the content could be told in a very unique way and you know I I became like this this snapchat influencer time for a minute and I had people from all over the world following me I was posted it was listed on blogs top snap cheddars and all this stuff and I used it not to get to that any of that status stuff because I was like this is going to be this is going to be sucked in by some of these other your platforms we need to know how to create stories to your point how to tell meaningful stories and also do this in a way that the audience that might be on snapchat ABC's stories from other people they're going to have this expectation of this creative new way to tell stories and so sure enough as we know instagram then now implemented stories into their platform they did it in a much better way it actually leverage the the the existing profile platforms and they'll since then every single social network has storytelling except for Lincoln but we can do stories so you know this goes into even some current social networks now that I'm doing the same the thing with where I'm really interested in in some creative abilities of it but yeah I think it's been a complete example of learn by doing and and you know oh I'm using it in my personal life but easily ties it in my professional life every single day because I mean here here a lot of you know people that are popular and in marketing from the Seth Godin Gary v's all these different people they talk about branding brandings everything brand has everything brain is everything but is that in your opinion and that's what I think I hear you saying so you can correct me if I'm wrong but it's like it's but how do you get a sense of what that brand is in these debris in the people the actual human connection you have with that product or service and I don't think you can connect with a Nike swoosh but you can connect with the Nike store Orey right yeah and so I think you're right it's it's a challenging answer because it's not a one-size-fits-all you know another way to look at this and I think this is actually Something I got from Seth actually in one of his Fox's is you ultimately in an organization you have to find your purple cow moment and and so you know you you drive drive down the road and you see a cow you you've seen one you've seen them all it's like all the contents out there about brands and companies and everything like it all looks the same and so you don't stop just keep going you know but if you're driving on the road and you see a purple cow you haven't seen that before not only don't WanNa Style and take pictures take selfish I want to jump on the Allah whatever and all my friends right right right they're not going to believe me unless I show them this I'm gonNA share this image share this so you have to figure out what that is and so for some organizations if the company culture is right that's that's what you're purple cow is if you can really if there's something really compelling and unique about the people that are doing the work behind the scenes that behind the scenes is really going to show organizations that would want to partner with that organization or people that want to purchase that item for this company to see just the true passion the authenticity and the dry for that to make that product a thing for the match for example I it's it's but now it's less about the people in the organization even though we're very mission driven and it's more about the patients it's more about the donors so it's about the impact about the impact and really knowing their story you're more compelled to do something on your end because you wanna be able to impact people like them that that are going through what they're going through or you want to be you want to feel good about yourself because you're able to donate one day and save someone's life so it's it's not a one size fits all but you have to take that assessment figure like you know for lack of a better term are purple cow is the patient that has their life saved by a complete stranger who did a selfless act two years ago and now we're able to show the world the two of them meeting for the first time time having like there's a part of them that's a part of each of them inside them and that's a you know a connection they're never gonNA lose ever in their life and so that is the purple cow moment is the best moment that we have in our organization whenever we can get that we are all about it and every single time we have that happen donor recipient meeting they're always different and it's beautiful I love that because I think I think there's a difference.

Ryan Reina twenty pounds two years one day
"pena" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

11:47 min | 10 months ago

"pena" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Developing impactful products and building engaged teams and now here's your host Kurt Schmidt Ryan thank you for joining me on the show today it's going out there that that's him else want the real him to be the be the what that goes out there because I know it will be received that way it'll be more authentic versus a deer in the headlights you know and so I'm trying to bring out that in other people and I I don't know if I'd call it talent but I I'm usually successful getting them to sound like themselves and to other there's whether their leaders or colleagues and it seems to be working so I'm slowly I you know I don't mind being the face of the brand but I'm trying to have maybe the inspiration of the brand getting other people to have that voice of what the brand is always find it interesting when I'm talking with not just other sooners but people who work in product management or these other types of things where they're very self conscious about sharing their stuff right now and get it like I understand like some people are like no I wanNA keep my instagram on private and do this and any other thing but I do have folks that come to me and say like oh I couldn't do what you're doing thing with the show and and this and that even though I mean it sounds like fun or whatever you know and you know I too like you I try to coach them around owned just put yourself out there and see what happens it's funny I tell the story I probably told that too many times in this podcast gonNa tell it anyways is like when I first launched the show I got all these notes people congratulating me and I'm like I didn't win a prize you know like I didn't I just made I just stuck a stupid microphone in my face and started talking Schmidt right but then my wife catering like congratulating because you put yourself out there and he's like oh I didn't all I see doing something that so many other people can never imagine doing yeah or maybe just can't get over themselves enough to do something right right so how have you coached other people like so let's say I'm listening to show Ryan and I'm like you know I probably could beef up my presence may be unlinked in a little bit personally maybe maybe I'm in sales or marketing but maybe maybe I'm just a lead developer lead designer and I wanted to I want to be more of a thought leader yeah you know we're we're should I start right that's a really good question I do get this question asked a lot I honestly do so so the first thing I like to sort of level set with them and and while there they may be coming to me with that ask which is a good first step I'll usually kind of backtrack a little bit and say first and foremost you have to really ona what you're comfortable with and what you're not comfortable with yeah you might have to step out of your car for its own a little bit like you said you know you had a stick Mike in your face and just do it you know but but you know if you knew that this is something that you're not comfortable with at that moment time but you're willing to to try it and just get started then that's I think a lot of people sort of ignore that like I'm not comfortable with this but I guess need to do this because everyone else is doing this or maybe on social media because everyone else's on social media and started doing in doing into it but they don't realize they're not this is not authentic to them it doesn't come naturally to them it's likely not going to look authentic to the people that are receiving right he's not gonNA look natural to them so you need a I just like call that out if that's the case that's totally fine I'm usually not going to tell people like eating to be all these social networks because they're the most popular social networks out there let's I you know think about linked in what's going to be the best for what you're trying to accomplish and then when they get into the other tip that I'll tell them is you know you typically will want to go.

Kurt Schmidt Ryan
"pena" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"pena" Discussed on KGO 810

"I have a nephew with pena analogy and it's actually deadly like literally if you please a round pena preparation even not even if you've a and affleck's of shock i mean it's likely he can't breathe he's going to die yet nut allergy is seemed to be the most serious the real this thing is so i get why people are upset about it because it's not funny that people can die living and so when we make light of it people start not believing that people have really have these i've heard people say oh i don't really believe they have a pena allergy be bnf because some people may be don't like something in them lie about having already but the people who have allergies it's the real deal it's very very serious if lifethreatening again code are lifethreatening my mom whatever got stung by a bee and now she has the b allergy and she has to have the app upenn 'cause if she gets done by can't brief well well after you take your kids if he bolivia carries if you think that people are every act live or if oh you're not okay so you're right but but i'm curiously they actually did make light of it or if i mean i don't know i kinda want wanna see it to see if it i know i'm gonna out after they see the movie yes very are they seen puram or are they seem paddington to own also i can remove either saying well then he got to take missy peter abbott okay i'll do that but southern good idea i i love going to kids movies with my kids i'm actually that weirdos like a clear way the fun i will go into the kids movies now that i'm older see if you would ask me when i was 25 i would've been ion nazi at dhahran jokes in there for the parents here.

affleck pena bolivia missy peter abbott
"pena" Discussed on Jesse, Jordan, GO!

Jesse, Jordan, GO!

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"pena" Discussed on Jesse, Jordan, GO!

"Pena hanoi well no they non you'll mid merely though love with me then me barely though no ma'am on opening monologue thumb the legal yoga and ballet bafonni ms annoy you played the coffee known on the rookie in on one one more none of that dan benetton had day yes man amen but then a muddy bed airline lay new bombay did you both famed morkel being powell who your wounded smith lazily the ban it all by may oh man that being and linked one god man mahdi amana eamon bailey mom he may have dog well.

Pena hanoi dan benetton bombay powell smith
"pena" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"pena" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"Now what it is a fight it's made out of peanut butter lodged with touch with pena that basically peanut butter with the consistency on you by a buyer out chan a much buying anything with the word pena aired the term peanut butter let's see pretzel turtles love turtles by yeah by caramel corn by is straight i guess let's see fudged straightforward shine sell it's a little too much let's see an saltin tafi cookies basically it's just i i don't know how you described offi with chocolate yeah by crowd up something on top sherpa absolute by us pena brittle sell sell i like it but i don't like what it does to my teeth so it's not it's got that given collateral damage to my teeth it's got to be great and it's just good so it's not good enough it's he was at a by todd yes truffles by uh so here's one of my absolute favorite s i mean i could i could eat this until i die seriously as puppy chow lopukhov by good call sell la each out the right about that chocolate pretzels so these are the eminem's pressed onto the top impressed down into a partially melted her she's kiss on top of a pretzel diety good i it'll reindeer faces or something yeah yeah you can do yeah you can buy two two two two let's do a few more of these because this is just this is i mean all these are pretty much have up prep remit brittle sell sell again i love pepper my love meant but it's the same problem it did what it does to my teeth at just bothers me now uh how about pena clusters by audio those are my favorite travel specifically i consider those trip christmas candy favorite let's see.

pena eminem todd christmas
"pena" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"pena" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"People probably accused of mean of doing so because when it comes to racism or sexism people don't want to be challenged on those issues they consider it being sermonisers right there's really no way to talk about malefemale issues from a female perspective in a way that's supposed to be funny and enlightening without some people saying i don't this is this is preaching right like how do you talk about any right well i would say that the most artful people and this is dangerous because all of it is polarising but the most artful creators anywhere in entertainment can somehow cross that gulf without all of these things i'm talking about uh sort of distorting right message pena just not only ghostbusters yes and you're allowed also not like sarah and not like me with that or not like colin kaepernick and have it not be anything to do with with race it but i'm just saying i find it interesting how those layers get all muddled and stuff and and become either or either you like ghostbusters or your sexists and really quickly this reminded me as a fight we got in a discussion we got him with resell l about when the bills higher kathryn smith and he an dini's canals said as white men we cannot object to this hiring because people will say it's because we're sexist we cannot we are the only thing we can say is wow this is so great and i said hold on i get where you're coming from but you have no reason to object to it you know nothing about her and you know nothing about the job so why would you unless it's because she's a woman right right so that's where it comes in i not that you can't complain or that has a right straight male i get that it is tough sometimes it's not like ghostbusters or to complain about women are grace or whatever it is but if it's very clear that there is no other reason for your complaint then the person is black or woman or whatever.

pena sarah kathryn smith dini colin kaepernick
"pena" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

Hollywood Babble-On

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"pena" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

"Thank you thank you my pena's appreciate your applause thank you are you fucking really for years has lived a life man that i decided it was done having fun and i got married so it was all who who who should go with a date so you brought some money and then yeah swung it kind of have to guys who go show up solo with those events there's there's sort of ostracised are kind of looked at his ski balls in sort of losers so but i was always in a relationship with another swinger when i was involved in the lifestyle see your date and somebody was like i like that kind of shift to the strange yeah that was kind of it becomes part of your sex life is you have sex with each other and then occasionally you go out and you partake of of other partners and that's part of the excitement holy fuck dude like heavily we've never had this cameras or never has crazy and you've stopped i give you could manage to hook that up why would you ever stop is after a while i mean it's very exciting after but after awhile it's sort of becomes like anything else you kind of get used to it and it's like okay i've done that and then i started looking for something else macbook love yes and family and address my life when the different direction i kid i couldn't imagine being a dad and having a kid and raising a family and also partake in the lifestyle some people do and that's fine with it it just didn't seem i didn't have time or or the energy quite frankly.

pena
"pena" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

Inappropriate Earl

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"pena" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

"For the first time i'm gonna lie on the floor and meditate why armed conducting an interview are you still working out twice a day uh i started taking hot yoga to help me deal with several personal crisis in my life here the i lost about uh 25 pounds side to cut back on jewish and it helps you oh yeah i mean you definitely loose way to in hot night of as helps you mine oh yeah yeah it's the complete opposite energy of uh rose battle in i love rose battle but an rose battles not uh i froze bell is aware kelo and it'd be um pena nieto acts to metallica i mean it's not exactly you know that the show if you're not in peak mental condition right you know his is constant end salts and singers and yet be on your toes and full time for our wacky leftfield roast joke about yongchol uh so yoga was gray like uh you know just it's for your mind and everyone's kulik in other celebrities at this place i go to and they're like we're all on same like uh level like the known cycle my god the skies a celebrity he should get up front it's a that celebrity gets there late is in the back corner so i like that about it's refreshing yeah glitter who wants to set the front of the class since i've never understood that also at first and take the bag corner i mean i is still but i kinda like the pressure being upfront yoga end up but that's the great thing about yoga is no one really gives a shit about what europe to its they're there for themselves insight that was light them yeah we winning that i mean like.

bell kelo pena nieto europe 25 pounds
"pena" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"pena" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pena show what are you what are you you know you me literally put it in a nutshell all right because it was such a subculture such uh an underground thing that if you're into it you're listening to him tjx on she kaylynn no the power moves show to ryerson every saturday afternoon then as the evening progresses once mastermind moved over to power when a weight and had his mix shown and then you listening to him that was probably the that was the first time we broken into commercial radio it was all college radio because then after that around 10 o'clock to in thirty listen to motion the master plan show if you weren't plugged into those college stations and if you were able to catch michael williams unwrap city you know once a day or once a week even when it was sold in the city than there was nothing trying to back them was known as the screw face capital one of those little what was that lubbers records delays to a certain degree of is that what that in reference to you search this going to herself selfhatred chaos put it really well in the song title call crab bucket and really it is if we both grew up in the same city how can you be better than me at what were both trying to do you know and if you get lucky enough to break out of the city into new york into into the us or the uk europe the loved changes even if the love was there in the first place which it probably wasn't it changes to a um a jealousy in an envi how did that in patrick confidence has an artist back it actually made me stronger hazare will i get off on i grew up playing sports hockey since i was six soccer since i was six and captain most of the teams i played for so you got to get used to being aided cheer can you a competitive absolutely i want to play a track off your record the underground tapes right now when i was a new land again we had access to to wrap city in red city alone this was all we.

Pena michael williams new york us uk hazare soccer lubbers hockey
"pena" Discussed on IOT Podcast

IOT Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"pena" Discussed on IOT Podcast

"Also track those but they they're not running the specific algorithms in basically i really liked this set up i noticed they had an activity tracking pena at when i tested out in that was not good it did not track that accurately i tried the sleep pena in that was okay but i think i would try it again measured against my fit because sleep tracking has gotten a lot better than the last time i tested this and they had a prescription linkup ocean peanut that trapped motion and i put that at a pill bottled make sure i was taking my medicine every day and that was actually really handy because it would send a notification if i hadn't taken it by a certain time read so i don't know it's a good deal at ninety nine a much better do agrifood tunein nine this is not a primed this a direct verges deal for another yes in italy from sensor other sense s e n dot dot esi for it not to be confused with the hello sense that went out of business made a sleep monitor or the sense of who atrocity monitor it actually saying going out of business reminds me so why do you think this is discounted i hate to undo inglorious at it's going out of business but at the same time i minutes they're still active on their accounts they're doing well i really don't know and one of the things i really liked about them they don't sell the data they explicitly say you're data's your data you can deleted from our servers at a time it you're done with the you know cetera so that lethal thought ahead and in terms of that from i think that goes back from day one yes i think it's part of their they are french at by other favorite french company is net at mojo in they don't share your data so you know if you want to build a french smart home.

pena italy
"pena" Discussed on Rebuild

Rebuild

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"pena" Discussed on Rebuild

"Could you know tubman eke stall clinton years has shown yield at tall could you got a junior senior double yet threaded a truck and the giuliani door judiciaires has shown your store morgan creek narra double digit growth that abu dhabi someone's guy in a he's doing a solo session pena nieto their tweet the website thought it was item will now you're screener she group decided on an underground again a pair of what it took kindle when o'connor two democrat sharpened again all riverside galare preamble to start skeletal hours operative stunned not not able draghi chemical dixon etc we're gonna have a lot of progress are we begin with ninety there you go you are seen alive but toubon while on your cornish cut in the radac cutting w decision but i will in the law for sewage crashing never madonna cut in that beautiful so everybody wants loyal between subordinate your iphone damani when start restructuring arranged result of the bubble the political cuckold them with mike homeowners kind to you even autonomous get a book about exotic that are on national device ago the maura fuchsia i did a either taiyo now hold on to hide emotions cut deputy adequately to convalesce look convalesced okada summer she waldo utah chocolate otherwise though should though like hamas took up the you know it's to wash out there talk some otherwise kabuji hunosa by what a hamas namely north woman never soil together uh sean but were worth of unequal thunder gulch yoga master lukoil unguarded will occur her challenge even usually.

kindle o'connor hamas clinton giuliani morgan creek pena nieto mike convalesced okada