23 Burst results for "Pen America"

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

01:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"To say. Yes to this event. I think that the the violences that we do to each other in a state that deploys. The kind of mass incarceration that ours does Is one of the great indictments against our species. It's one of the great indictments of our capacity for tenderness in our capacity for grace as a species that we do this to each other Certainly one of the great indictments of our nation's capacity for those things a i have been a part of action in a million different directions against those systems olive. It is not enough But this is this is the thing is really important to me and that i want to lend my voice in time to what sort of paltry power those things have. I would like to sort of lend to listen to this thank you. That was a great answer and just a great conversation. Yeah just thank you for doing this. Yeah thank you much. I appreciate your taking the time. yeah. I'm really excited about seventeen to this. Podcast episode was written hosted and produced by myself with guidance and support from program director. Cates meisner and manager bobby. Pollock thank you for listening. Hope to see you on november seventeenth..

Cates meisner Pollock program director bobby
Minneapolis teen who recorded viral George Floyd video to receive courage award

Glenn Beck

00:27 sec | Last month

Minneapolis teen who recorded viral George Floyd video to receive courage award

"And Darnell A. Fraser, The Minneapolis teenager who captured cellphone video of George Floyd's killing by police is receiving an award for courage from the literary and human rights Organization. Pen America If you think about a young woman You know, in a public in with a whole group of police officers there who has the presence of mind and the guts to start her camera rolling and say, I'm going to capture this. That's pen CEO

Pen America Darnell A. Fraser George Floyd CEO Minneapolis
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

03:34 min | Last month

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Reformist are applying pressure in support supportive, releasing more incarcerated people under heightened threat of contracting covid nineteen but do say that the average citizen concerned about public safety in response to these calls to action. Crisis Requires Collaborative visionary leadership that has the long term health of all communities top of mind. I think it comes back to the homelessness question in many respects, what services are being provided to people who are suffering. So I would say that we should be diverting resources away from traditional law enforcement methods and establishing pathways, connecting people who are suffering services and housing rather than with courts, and there are some models nationally Staten Island Hope Seattle lead that connects people with peer navigators and community based programs rather than bringing them into the court system. So we need to really think about investing in those programs similarly, we should be partnering with program shelters and. Getting in housing and supportive housing for people who would otherwise get wrapped up in the system, and then there are some really asinine policies that need to be revisited. That don't necessarily require additional resources. So I would encourage New York City to look critically at the prohibition on people with criminal records, returning home to their families and public housing, and finally I think that a huge amount needs to be moved from traditional law enforcement methods in to trauma informed trainings both for prosecutors and police. So. In April Governor Cuomo amended the state's recent bail reform law from January. Can you explain these changes and how prosecutors are taking into consideration the pandemic such as how social distancing cannot be practicing prisons before or if requesting bail. There are more than sixty district attorney's statewide, and they have different approaches to how they handle veil the changes to the bail reforms. Unfortunately, roll back some of the gains of the reforms earlier this year and I think it's very variable how jurisdictions are handling it. The good news is that we have seen a significant decrease in the population of people who are being detained at rikers island but the heart breaking news is that people are self attracting cove in nineteen in jails and prisons statewide and prosecutors and others could do far more to keep people out of detention, but it also requires. On the subject of defunding it requires a real investment in supports to ensure that people who do remain home in their communities are given the help that they need to make sure that they don recommit offenses don't hurt people in their communities are complying with the terms of their moods. I also to talk about an article that you have recently. which was the devastating consequences of leaving higher education out of prison reform, which he wrote with Viet Nixon who also happens to be one of our pen America rating for justice fellows. So this piece, you emphasize the.

rikers island Governor Cuomo Viet Nixon pen America Staten Island New York City Seattle
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

04:13 min | Last month

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Thank you so much for including in this conversation Nicolette, and thanks for all the work that you and your team are doing to elevate these critically important issues in New York. City nationally right now I think that the voice that you all are bringing has never been more important and I'm honored to be part of the conversation. I, started at the District Attorney's office right out of law school, and one of the reasons that I went to the DA's office was that while I was in law school childhood friend of mine was tragically murdered by her mentally ill brother. And I had the experience of watching a family struggle with being both. The. Victims of a horrible violent crime and simultaneously be connected to the person who had committed that terrible violent crime, and I saw the ways in which the prosecutor's office in particular field to support the family in both of those contexts. So I went to the DA's office Harry mindful of the incredible potential for supporting both crime victims an people who are going through the system because prosecutors, of course, touch both of those populations and well beyond ripples out into everyone who has relationships with four who come to the system and folks were victimized. That brought me to the DA's office where I ultimately handled. Violent, crime including domestic violence and homicide and through that work ultimately developed a course that brought assistant district attorneys inside of New York state prisons to study criminal justice alongside incarcerated students that was really eye opening for me to realize how detached myself and my colleagues have become from the consequences of our decision-making when it came to sentencing. And that was part of what propelled me to the work I expect the past two years doing at the Institute for Innovation in Prosecution at John Jay College. Criminal..

New York Nicolette prosecutor John Jay College Institute for Innovation Harry
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

02:41 min | 3 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Are intellectuals, their comics. They're funny. They're incredibly charming and they are wrestling fans and I think that's enough. I'll be back later. please. Make some noise or like pretend to make noise for the Lucas. Aching thank you. Thank you. Thank you for having. US, and thanks pop up. Word Soaks activate is this is a real. So you saying. was. Braveheart right. Are you like no? No. No. No No, no. No I am undertaker Spectacle number one, you know. ME. I mean, does it get like metaphor? I was determined not to ask questions I'm so glad you're here I. Hope You. You're going to do like a lecture on. Philosophy right right now. Dabble in San Philosophy of Lantau story the best of our ability we wrote this essay a couple of months ago about our cousin and is his anniversary of his death coming up pretty soon. So we want to share that because we feel like it touches on a lot of important stuff that POPs cupboards. Thank you I'm GonNa get out of your way take it away and everyone open up your hearts and your minds to the amazing wonderful Lucas. Brothers. And again, everyone out there listening We really appreciate you guys tuning into heroes. Tell our story to the best of our billy you know. Let's not listening in watching. Already I. Think it was like the radio but Yeah. We just we have a lot to talk about we grew up in a family with an incarcerated parents father went to prison. We were seven, six, two, six or seven it. It's fundamentally shaped our lives for better infowars and a you know we have a cousin friend of ours actually but more like a cousin, his name was Kaizen he also grew up fatherless and I'm sure I. Think some of might have been in and out of your prison you time so. That had an impact on our lives as well e at a guy last year in that prompted us to to write this that. You GonNa Start I'll start now. So it's A. Sunny Day Myrtle Avenue at Everton New Jersey summer. Slowly winding down at school starts in a few weeks most summer days on the block folks chilling their porches enjoying the sun in the latest neighborhood gossip, embarrassed Turk ammonia AC- like bone thugs all.

US wrestling Everton New Jersey billy
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"I know if we were in person, this is a moment. When perhaps you would invite us to take a breath. Even though this is a podcast recording. I am sitting the top of Manhattan in your sitting in Queens. I. Still want to welcome to lead us through. A closing breath. It's even harder when tears they're right there, but for everyone listening all over the country all over the world. Held together in the same space of art beauty in love and hope. I want us all to breathe in. That hope. That togetherness that unity across division. An altogether. Right now we'll breathe air. In slowly letting out. Full of gratefulness, full of love full of care. Thank you all. Thank you, robby full of listening. For the art. Of Community somebody words. To use in response to this incredible podcasts at our community put together. My name is Kate's Meissner the prison justice, Writing Program director at Penn America and I wanna take just a moment to thank a few people who helped put this together namely first and foremost. The person whose voice you just heard Robbie, pollock, who is the prison injustice writing program manager at Penn America in so thoughtfully? And artfully and beautifully stitch together all of the contributions. From our readers and writers musicians into the incredible listening experience, you heard today. We also have to thank our pen America Prison Writing Committee. Who Judges are awards every year, but a special sub committee helped curate the readings in this program. That includes Gloria J brought Marshall chess neck, Michael Giuliani Grace Carney Katie. Lasley Ryan de Matthews Amanda Miller Crystalline. And the are you saw on the slide show if you were watching with sourced from a couple of organizations, artists that connection rehabilitation through the arts and the confined. Of course, we would be remiss not to say a very loud and proud. Thank you to haymarket books for partnering with us on this podcast and to you for listening and lending your ears at a time. When people are calling for us to listen, and as doing at says to to use as a moment to slow it down, so we can really see what we're contending with and listen to the voice of of of other artists, and in this case, artists most directly impacted by. The justice system. And I'll end on saying if you're looking for places to get involved in translating this emotion into advocacy. I, it's all over the Internet certainly. But also temperature check newsletter, which focuses on Kobe nineteen impact on incarcerated people, but also expands beyond that to look more holistically the. In history were in, there are always action steps and advocacy efforts that you can participate in at the end of those newsletters that can be found at Penn Dot Org. Works Justice. In conversation hold each other up. That also like to thank our summer, interns broke mcilvaine and tally off for their tremendous effort, transcribing incubating the artwork seen in this listening event. And to Kenya, Emmanuel and Hamilton Berry for sharing their music with us throughout this listening experience Dole, prison, educators, teaching artists who go behind the wall and share, love and art. Thank you all and thank you for listening..

Penn America Penn Dot Org pen America Manhattan Queens Kenya robby Writing Program Ryan de Matthews program manager Grace Carney Katie Dole Robbie Kate Gloria J Amanda Miller Hamilton Berry Emmanuel Meissner pollock
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

04:53 min | 6 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Have. I was just A. BIZ! I. Would be sure. Who should side in crowned? And Week REX is moist. Was Eerie you. Must Be A. Something in. ME. Et is so scary. How important! To. You. Need to know me. But I'm afraid if you know. You might turn we. Just! Is Regardless. Grow was that. Must Be love. Hum You See. The. Is. All of this. Last. Touched by. Is What lead. You. For so low. Your friend even. For. This is. That it. Try To. Feel what you feel you. Dare down and destroy. Love. We May. Stole the cans. What is. was. A. Robbie.

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

01:59 min | 6 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"We are all aware of the charade. The cans on the shelf or straightened in hopes it will change the flavor of the contents. I yearn for the day. My pulse would stop and I could be. With my mom. What I didn't see happening. A purpose oldest organization in the kitchen. Products kept an uncapped more flavor to the unsalted and a stronger desire. To live. My name is Adam Faulkner I'm a poet in an educator and I'm honored to be reading the Brilliant Grace Notes by poet Matthew Mendoza. Chose to stand for this writer because I believe that the racial caste system that is mass incarceration in this country presents probably the greatest threat to American democracy, today. And I believe in creativity in education is practices of freedom in that everyone regardless of circumstance. But especially, those whose voices are being systematically silenced has a vital story to tell. and. I feel called to the work of amplifying those stories in whatever small ways I can, so it is an absolute honor, an honor to share this poem Matthew Thank you for the opportunity in. Thank you for your work. And when I read it I should say. That in this moment of hysteria. In Corona virus uncertainty where we're all swinging back and forth between slight normalcy in fear Doom, where we're all scared, anxious and worried about the people we love Matthews Poem Stopped Me Dead in my tracks. At a moment where everyone I know, love some of us for the first time are faced with real questions. Of their own mortality. Their.

Adam Faulkner Matthew Mendoza writer Matthews
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

02:24 min | 6 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Gloria? It has been a pleasure I. Appreciate your time your vision, your effort, your volunteerism, your education. I can't say it enough. Are there any final words that you want to add. We need to reform. The prosecutorial system will need to on hold. Police officers accountable. We need to read more about how we got in the situation. The first place and we need to go beyond the emotion of this moment to maintain our alliances. I've been here before. And I've seen things. Dwindle and go away and people make excuses that we have to have these drastic murders of people of African descent in order for white people and other non black people to believe in the oppression in the system, while we're in a country where people are here, because either their generation or generations before them came here because of oppression filled in other countries that look just like this. And yet they get here and get him Nesia about what oppression looks like. And this is troubling, so we need to understand that people know what oppression is. If they don't, they should read more and don't fall away when it becomes uncomfortable because I'm GONNA still be black than to? There were still. People. To really why people? I'm tired I. DON'T WANNA part you any anymore. I don't know what he really was guilty, but he had a gun. You know I'll be black even when you get tired so and we need to get the black middle class to stop hovering around the edges and jump into the fight, too many educated black people, too many people who have skin in this game. Who are pretending like they don't. Because of the privilege of Skate. So. So, that's why I just want people to. Look at this moment. Remember it, but this too shall pass, and then where will we be? Gloria Browne Marshall. Thank you for joining US Brooke mcilvaine. Thank you for your input and we really really appreciate it. have a wonderful night. Thank you. Thank, you thank you, thank you for all you do. You're listening to works of justice a podcast by pen America..

Gloria Browne Marshall US Brooke mcilvaine pen America Nesia
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

07:18 min | 6 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Pen America's prison injustice Writing Program Director and I am honored to turn this conversation over to such critical leadership in forwarding both a continued. And long overdue Gloria Browne Marshall. Thank you for being with US Today I. I feel like a weird sort of reverence for you know just for you in your presence in the world. Look at I saw you on CNN and. There, you are standing there, proud and beautiful and black. With the, African cloth behind you, and how was just like you go Gloria? I just have to say that I. Obviously I feel I felt really just. I Dunno stunned by your beauty and your awesomeness and. Yes I think. You've also signed on to be in addition to all your amazing work. In the world, you have contributed heavily as a member of the pen prison writing awards committee which. we feature a lot of work from on this podcast and on our website in our temperature. Check and. I would just WanNa? Know we're grateful for that. Welcome, thank you I. Thank you first for doing this. I mean I. I appreciate the opportunity to use different platforms to get the word out to put ideas into the marketplace of ideas, so I really appreciate this opportunity. Thanks again. So. It's really interesting for me. lately are. A lot of the work that we're putting in the world through our blog and podcast is focused on covid nineteen in prison. And its impact on both the writers we know, but also. Everyone in prison across the country. and Part of what we're seeing. Is this intersection of? Cova and the larger conversations about race in class disparities in this country. So one of one of the things I really wanted to ask you I've heard a phrase being floated around. Sort of characterizing our country is being in the middle of two pandemics both. covid nineteen and the pandemic of systemic racism in like I'd love to hear your thoughts in response to that statement. Will I believe we're into diseased state? One disease, being covid nineteen, the other chronic disease being racism. and. Racism has plagued this country from the root of its beginning in. The colony of Virginia. And we know last year was the four hundredth commemoration of the arrival of Twenty Africans into that colony in sixteen nineteen. And those laws put in place by the House of Burgess says that was also established in sixteen, Nineteen, coincidentally were. Put in place in order to The greed. Of those Englishman who wanted to have perpetual labor without paying for it. And, so those Africans with subjugated and oppressed by law and one of those laws was a law of sixteen sixty nine. which gave. The Englishman the right to kill an African without it being a felony. So we start thinking about how long this has been going on with the murder of people, African descent with impunity. It's been going on since the Virginia Colony. And so there's been progress made in every area of every American life, and that's why don't want people to sail. We've made no progress we have. We've made progress in politics in education. We made policy. We made progress in in. Corporate America in the Arts and Sciences. We've made progress in every area. Except criminal justice, and we're still dealing with the segregationist laws in the oppression that was put in place in the Jamestown settlement of the. Colony were still dealing with slavery type mentality within the criminal justice system in mass incarceration were still dealing with Jim Crow Segregation is justice from the nineteen hundreds were still dealing with murder with impunity. We're still dealing with this in, so it's so deeply embedded in this country that it takes something like this to shock the conscience of not just Americans, but around the world I have friends in Paris and London I had a Brazilian radio station and Television stations asking me about this people. In Canada, this is shocked the world. Because it's happening on two fronts. One is happening from the standpoint of. Just a horrific thing that take place there've been murders in other countries of people of color, but this country self up to be a shining light on the hill of democracy, so you don't set yourself out to be exceptional may talk about American exceptionalism, and then at the same time subjugate people press people murdered them in plain sight, and with such ease in arrogance is officer displayed. And this is something that didn't happen with just George Floyd and it didn't happen with Trayvon Martin. It didn't happen going all the way back to the nineteen sixties and the riots that took place in in Newark. New Jersey because of a black man being shot by police. It doesn't go to. Emmett till it goes all the way back deep into the root of colonial Virginia and so we have a lot of work to do. If we're going to be what we consider, quote, unquote, a civilized nation. but I'm concerned because even in the midst of a pandemic. Even in the midst of a pandemic, we couldn't even just be. Americans joined together in our misery. Against that common full Kovic now we couldn't even be a part of that. Even within the pandemic we are, you know subjugated to such oppressive horrific means this and so it's such a sad time. The disease is so rampant is chronic is ongoing and I. Don't think you know since this is America's original sin that in the subjugation of native Americans for the Land I. Don't think it will ever go away, but we can do better than this..

murder Gloria Browne Marshall Virginia Arts and Sciences America Pen America CNN Virginia Colony Program Director Cova Jamestown George Floyd Newark Emmett New Jersey Jim Crow Canada Burgess Trayvon Martin
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

06:41 min | 6 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"From George Wilkerson. An inmate AC being monitored and recorded so that you're up to the middle of the question. Do you WANNA start the second question obregon or you just pick up from where you were okay. Okay pertained to the second part of your One incident that particularly stands out there who have gotten feedback from several different sources about the book. Probably the most dramatic one was My my attorney So like before the book was completed. Just you know it took US years to bring a project to completion and You know we made my lawyers aware of the book. I think maybe at least two years before we finish probably to so from that time on you know they were just badgering me To try to discourage me from going through with the project they're worried about my case and how might negatively impact my appeal process but You know as someone who is genuine in this transformation process as a spiritual person. I really believed in our project and then the goal for the project. You know. It's not about money. It's about getting a specific message out there. Demonstrating that You know no matter how bad the crime no matter how bad the person may be perceived to be even if that were true about the people you know the prisoner they can change people can change I said you know we really wanted to get that element of the message out there. And so I went through the project anyway and now that it's been completed and published now hearing all these like great compliments from lawyers and they're just really encouraging me and Praising everyone's contributions and saying things about how brave they thought we were to do this project and so it's just been like a complete one eighty on their part and that to me Really taking means a lot to me to see that they could change their perception that their perceptions of us and what we're doing can change. I think like exactly what you're saying about your writing trying to really humanize Your experience and those are the people around. You reminded me a lot of like you. In addition to the book you've written a lot of really thoughtful first person essays in one of them win great for received a pen America award for memoir writing in the pieces about your neighbors in prison. Who were both dying of cancer? And just how your relationship with them really challenges you to think about Death and one of the things in the piece that really resonated with me especially lately as just your actions on a meaningful small moments can action with other people on can be and I can only imagine you know what death row is like but I definitely relate those little moments just filling me with hope especially in this time of isolation And so I was wondering if you could share some other sources of hope for you right now. Wow that's a great question Hope is such a big word. We throw around right. I thought about Totta light Despite the word and and just feeling just really explore right and what I've come up with just Is that hope is a pleasant feeling of expectation. So it's like a a reasonable expectation that a specific outcome will occur so goal oriented So spiritually You know I have some goals like try to live a moral life and be a better person and it's like you said the granular moments Each presents its own Its own obstacles and avenues to success and so as trying to live a life in here where culture is completely antagonistic toward doing the right thing. almost hopeless If if I'm trying to do it in my own power because I this was the attitude that I had. That led me to prison But being spiritual I knew I have access to a god who is stronger than I am. And so that gives me hope because God offers me offers to empower me to do things that I know that I should do that. But I have Then I am too weak to do on my own so that you know spiritually speaking. That's where I get my hope to do the right thing to just be a better person As it pertains to writing You know organizations like Penn and people like Tessie specifically give me hope because for Ryder. You know we want to get our stories out there We want to get our message out there and being a prisoner of so many practical obstacles to doing that like we don't have access to computers. We don't have access in here to typewriters I had for example One third in a poetry checkbook contests and so like part of the prize was publication so the the publisher the told me and this wasn't a prison prisoner writing contest. This was just a writer contests. They didn't know of them prison to actually won the conto so then when he found out was imprisoned publisher actually said. Look if you can't help promote the book then I'm not going to publish you. He's like I'm not a charity. I'm not here to just do good vs. I'M INTO BUSINESS FOR MONEY. So if you can't help promote and help us sell books then. I'm not going to publish chat blue so it didn't get published. Obviously because I can't promote the book and the way that he was demanding that I promoted in a sense of going to book readings and traveling around signing books and showing up just poetry and writers workshop. I can't do any of that But like when Penn offers writers You know publication in your anthology or people like Jessie come along really like are willing to take the bulk of the work under their own shoulders and do these things that we can't do that.

Penn publisher George Wilkerson US pen America attorney Jessie writer Ryder Tessie
George T. Wilkerson on Crimson Letters: Voices from Death Row

PEN America Works of Justice

04:49 min | 6 months ago

George T. Wilkerson on Crimson Letters: Voices from Death Row

"Hi torch. Thanks for joining us today. I wanted to start by just asking you how you are I know the conditions are really fraud in a lot of prisons during the pandemics. I'll have things ben for you. That's a good question I've actually been asking myself that question since the pandemic began so as a writer. You know that's a poem to China. Capture is all these different little pieces and maybe try to bring it together If you'd like to hear it would love to. You don't mind sharing okay. I call this Imprison during Tova Nineteen Myself. Isolating family. No longer visits me. We must keep everyone arms flat in the curve of yearning for connection with strap on masks before exiting fill many of US shelter in place. Instead we switch away from those who call for sneeze the consequences of getting sick as a constant topic of conversation. Everybody knows the terms. Medical inattention only had it or sentences and prison. It's like a love marriage. We disguised a few cleaning chemicals. Get feeling mellow yellow steady green bottles with blue window cleaner pink four so clear incitement. They become contraband. If inside ourselves camouflaged amid our sodas we try not to accidentally drink again. We stockpile wronging coffee batteries. Soap and fantasy money from our families drives up last. Perhaps two months meal takes longer and longer to reach is week. Sometimes if press most of us would admit the feeling increasingly lonely abandoned forgotten nevertheless we check the news all day praying to recognize the names of people victimized while buying toilet paper and then the pandemic began and change some things. I approve. The prison prohibited all visitors. Now my family couldn't visit even if they try next to prison. Clothes ARE BARSHOP. So many of us would like mangy savages. Then the prison issued uniform math. The All of US flimsy black fabric on which we can relax veneers of indifference. We had kittens flexed on our faces to reward for not writing. The prison started playing movies from Netflix. Every day then posted a memo to warn us any non compliance with corona virus restrictions. We'll be punished. That is to get too close to anyone now. It's pay ten dollar five. Plus weeks and the whole the prison is enforcing not just encouraging the social isolation to gauge the mandate spacing. We may stand apart extending our arms toward each other. Fingers may not touch that succeed. The right distance is long Gravy de. That was beautiful. Thank you so much for sharing I really resonated a bad thing just like you know the isolation and the sphere and that constant want to check the news I think is really overwhelming you also I really love the line about. They're trying to reward you not writing and playing net flicks to keep you distracted so glad. You're still finding time to write like that. Think it's important that your documented for sure. 'cause you know one thing. I've seen out there. It's like all this emphasis on the Consequences of all the social isolation. And I've heard a lot of specialists women news on NPR describing just the detrimental effects of just `isolation. And I was like. That's what prisoners go to all the time Even before this pandemic so I wanted to like you know. Create this sympathy between two reader outside of prison than like personnel out of prison and just show like all these things that people can resonate with actually just the everyday way of life in prison and the pandemic just made

Social Isolation United States Fraud Writer China Netflix NPR
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

03:47 min | 7 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Away as the writer of the Twenty Twenty Felix pollock prize in poetry a star of HBO's Deficit Down Carlos Property of to you. So thank you so much for for hosting for by maybe parlors. Thank you Dr Witherspoon cates. Everybody from Cudi Pen America Shutout to be bachelor for Alami honor of reading his His breathtaking work. This first poem is called a discourse on why inmates exit prison worse than when they went in that. You thought there was. No such thing is to kind. I write it into this poem without admitting. Kindness is a synonym for to close when it's naked syllables sap prison walls. Oh kindness lotus flower muddy waters. I can't call on your greening nature your bloom that fruits into song in the breath in a place rotting under unnatural light were a staff member. Who's friendly toward? Inmates is slurred a murder. Groupie asked if they hugged their thug today. Were they are disciplined from bracing? The Blues out of an inmate compassionate the self back into the self making him. A Tower of human those five seconds of what miracles amaze worth of good scenes back into a chest is the fence here dear reader. I remember when humanness lived inside my body like a community garden every visitor welcomed and nourished in. They're coming and going all those bright hues among us but God damn if our bodies haven't become borders I have let nap. We'd room and Rangel. What will no longer grow in the second poem by Bachelor is called apology in defeat. White boxers torn in nodded around broken taped together plastic hangers in a makeshift poll. Be can become a sign of surrender. I wave through my barnes brothers. We share a priest history of hatred between our brows form thin and slack lips as protests when force fed the stale bread of promised reform we have co mingled too long in the mangle of discarded bodies. Justice has made us. I swear I've worn the thick hide. That makes men tough to chew withstood. The razor wire gnashing of this prisons feasting it's decades marinade of my proud bones. I have made a skimpy meal feeding on Bitter Skins. I peel from the curdled. Mess of what persists the constant punishments in punishment? from eating defeat. This is the last poll nominee read from.

Twenty Twenty Felix Dr Witherspoon cates HBO writer Bachelor Rangel murder
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

01:54 min | 7 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"That oil on day one didn't they he then. They started their war in Iraq. And they've got paying like a motherfucker. There was only about the oil any way. That's the only thing this country care about it to all mighty dollar and war is big business and if we're at war which we most certainly are out of my strikes on a serve. My Country Tizzy very well. Doing these wartimes support out. Urban Militia Urban Street soldiers formerly in detention on the front lines. Red Hook Ban Staff. Please make APPs on the World Boogie Down Bronx Gun Hill Road Long Island. Just tell me. I'm serving at Yankee motherfucking to ante up in this piece a true patriots. A real patriot a Harriet Tubman. Have you clutching your pearls type? Patriots original Black Warrior Queen. Why a woman who runs the wolves and underground railroad type? Patriot low exit so much A. I had to do that because I can't really do that on chat. Okay thank you. Next up we have Carlos Gomez who will be reading the word of the Bachelor. The Bachelor is be CO founder of still water writers collective member of the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop and has won multiple awards from the Pen America annual prison writing contest. His poetry has been published and Columbia a Journal of Literature and Art Cream City. Review the law review and other journals. He was currently.

patriots Columbia a Journal of Literatu CO founder Harriet Tubman Red Hook Ban Staff Iraq Carlos Gomez Road Long Island Pen America Minnesota
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

12:55 min | 7 months ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"The searchlight series at eastern state penitentiary store excite in Philadelphia. I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like you send us a link or put it on a facebook page along with this review that makes lot We've uh here in Pennsylvania. There's a the policy is that all male going into the prison actually goes to Florida Florida. We know that because we work with people and Lavinia yes skin and then the scan goes to the person in prison and I don't see the original and if you're writing a a recommendation letter for instance. It doesn't matter that much more men when you write a a holiday card to somebody and you know what they're gonNA guys a scan of the card It it really really is Take something away honestly. Do you find that I'm not just. I'm aware of here in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. This is actually. Justin is calling him a line. Maybe we can talk a little bit more about this as well. A prisoner Connecticut Department of collection and he declined or exploited by please contact. Ttl Customer Services at eight five five what extent to agree to accept this call press zero. She refuses call. This call is from the correction facility and subject to monitoring and recording. Thank you for using. Gtl Justin how're you doing doing well? I'm here with cates. Justin are you able to hear what kind of a little closer to the screen? Thank you for joining US Justin. We're really really sincerely appreciate you taking the time and making the effort to call in opportunity. You Bet I'm gonNA mostly take the back seat and let you have a conversation. I'm going to be here my role this points. Kinda holding the speaker next the microphone jumping here and there but for the most part. I'm going to step out and let you in on your conversation about the work. You're doing together so split sticker right well. Actually I. The very first thing I wanted to do is invite you destined to read the first of the of the two pandemic poems that we published in temperature check series last week. I'm going to do a screen share afterwards after we talk a little bit and show our audience listening in and looking in what that looks like but I thought it would be great to just open with a little literature considering Were representing America today. Which is an organization if folks don't know at the intersection of Literature. Freedom of expression human rights only feels right to kick off with Palm. Okay yes sounds good I will say Sean. It is still relatively difficult for me to understand. I picked up where everything was being said but it is a little bit of a strain. Okay I'M GONNA do my best. I'm going to get the vitamin BIT here. Hope that's a little. That's a little better moving forward. Okay Yeah and if. I'm not sure if you're having a hard time understanding I hope not but I'm wearing a mask myself right now. So very clear for me we. We can hear you just fine. And we're glad that you have a masked aware this okay. Yeah sorry go ahead. No please go ahead okay. So the problem that she's talking about is titled Lockdown Language in the World that does not yet recognised total logic. Cage.

Justin Reveals Monson United States eastern state penitentiary searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly facebook Cates Meissner president and CEO America pen America Philadelphia Area Teaching Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute of Social Davids Liz Ryan Martinez Karsh Writers Vinnie
Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

PEN America Works of Justice

08:56 min | 7 months ago

Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

"I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like

Justin Reveals Monson United States Eastern State Penitentiary Searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly President And Ceo Pen America Facebook Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute Of Social Cates Meissner Philadelphia Area Teaching Davids Liz Ryan Uk High Foot Martinez Karsh Writers Matt Murphy
Dallas: McClatchy newspaper chain files for bankruptcy

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:31 min | 10 months ago

Dallas: McClatchy newspaper chain files for bankruptcy

"The owner of the fort worth star telegram files for bankruptcy saying it's got more than seven hundred million dollars in debt KRLD is out of the sky a talk to their business analyst about what it means for the newspaper industry McClatchy owns a thirty newspapers across the country it's the second biggest newspaper owner in the country the fort worth star telegram is it's only paper in Texas Carol the business analyst David Johnson says all newspapers been trying to figure out how to draw an audience when people will not wait until they're newspapers deliver the next morning to get their news this is been like an iceberg just sort of slowly moving every company recognizes they have a lot of exposure they've been trying to restructure and they've been trying to find relevancy this is a challenge for newspapers why do you need a newspaper why do you need the content they've got aggressively into digital the got a half million people that are paying for digital service may and they're trying to find some relevance Johnson says that quest for relevance has led to a push for more digital content he says that includes posting articles online the papers have also been focusing more on video and slide shows the newspapers have seen this coming for a long long time and the question is you know how do you stay alive in doing this the the the New York times the Wall Street journal The Washington Post have all been very successful in the online business but the question is what happens to these smaller these mid size and small town he says papers have also started working together on projects that are covered more widely of the star telegram worked out a deal with the Dallas morning news some time ago and they sure they sure journalists you know why I have a morning news add a star telegram guy both covering the ranger games but Johnson also says part of the problem is pensions a class she bought another chain of newspapers in two thousand six you know here's the rub though the bottle and sold a lot of newspapers over time they bought the star telegram in in six from knight Ridder and then they went in and try to cut costs and so they talk to the employees is a well we're going to give your retirement package we're gonna make it attractive for you to leave to cut down their overhead well all of a sudden you build up a big obligation for pensions back in January they also they were going to have to not pay some of those pensions for a while so would working out this bankruptcy one of the biggest obstacles was working out something with the pension benefit guaranty corporation because you can't just have people that you promised it alive time retirement the bankruptcy filing asks for sixty percent of the debt to be eliminated Johnson says those people receiving a pension maybe worried at that could lead to them getting smaller checks in some cases what the P. B. G. C. will allow them to do is go back and say well instead of paying a hundred percent you can pay of you know sixty percent of what you were what you had guaranteed yet that keeps the company going perhaps but what about that person who retired thinking they were gonna get X. amount of money other only getting sixty percent of you know those are the real casualties the client uses it received at fifty million dollars from a financing company to keep running during bankruptcy proceedings and if the court approves the deal the thirty papers will be turned over to the hedge fund it's also McClatchy's biggest creditor the nonprofit pen America says it works to defend free expression in America says that twenty percent of all newspapers in the United States of closed since two thousand four in print journalism has lost forty seven percent of its jobs newspapers of lost forty five eight billion dollars in ad revenue Alan sky newsradio ten eighty

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"You the. I think we're going to play audio from Ricardo and from a Quentin Jones. Now you can. Can you play them both. Okay so the peace I'm doing is called black blood. So black blood by Ricardo for around like a Pale skinned vampire looking and searching our hoods at night you gun down on our black boys and men that you see incite you have been for centuries but no apparent reasons. It doesn't matter what time it is or the four seasons. When would you racist people stop sitting are innocent black blood so much? Blood is flowing. Think as a flood. Oh I can imagine what Roosevelt on the back of that bus has been over sixty us and you steal. Discriminating against US Hilmi America. What are you GonNa do about all these senseless killings are you more concerned about all the shady Russian? Dylan's you have sodas on alternate blocks just for a few books not to mention how you drag bodies on the back. pick-up trucks plus clan bombed and burned a church killing four little black girls and over five decades later still no justice in our world track comparing the murders deaths reported in urban cities like Iraq. But you start false as wars and put us on the front lines in Iraq. Why try to protect us like bullshit you put on the wire but but you don't say shit about dropping a bomb and causing a Philadelphia? Fire actually demonstrate. You don't give a damn about our blood you shoot and kill us then drag our names through the mode. Oh you project. The 'em like you fear ball black man then when we perform for you we receive a perfect ten. Why the Hell Park? We're seeing pretend to support US and be our friend oriented no one day on well deep down inside. You don't want us to win growing up projects. I went out to white establishments back then and it used to be my gun but now they figure my Pan Dan. You have gotten away with centuries spilling our blackboard with impunity. Wonder what Y'all would do when we finally standing unity black blood. Okay recycled history in America. Okay by Ricardo for real. If you want to know the truth just look into my eyes like my Angelo user. Say Still I rise one of the reasons why some of us are still having nightmares to call it. The police keep soon as in the back behind behind. Mayors we as a people stand up and continue to fight on the soles. Our ancestors this is our inherent right. Why do we keep taking all of these injustices lying down? We came from kings and Queens. It was war crown people have went through hale for the past past four hundred years. They even built this country on they blow US wedding twos and the nineteen sixties my McCain spoke about having a dream he preached about Black and white folks together on the same eighteen. Just when we thought we were making some sort of progress they immediately sent in the class and the Memphis show. I regressed here. We are over fifty years late in the same I'm old boat. We need to lean. Gosh we can keep us afloat. The rebirth and didn't Jim Crow at disguise through masks and concentration prison. Industrial Complex is not a new slave plantation. Jason Bodas oppressing adequate healthcare discriminatory housing practices the name of history. Keith recycling repeat itself by discriminating against me and you people people keep telling us that we will get justice before the bents but in all true. That's merely an expensive Willie Lynch one cast member. And just mercy didn't realize the magnitude of the Alabama case Nice play went into back to stop and covers tearful face these these people keep lying saying justice equal but look around. You live miles of the same. Mostly qual this his in America recycling itself that dispense the black folks one of these days. We're going to wake up and so we know Joe. Recycle history in American burkhart Iran confined to a space designed to erase the last traces. You've been up to the world with my Senate. Dark Lost Austin be recommitted past twenty nested upon the minds of band finding not just accommodation is called in this concrete and I'm not talking runabout. Championship speaking temperamental overseas overseeing by this wasp led by proud display like that. Let us resist to the systematic violations of the divine patron of more fast. I refuse to let you fast. It'd be so does torture. That's disguised as justice and used as a tool to Franken slave dad. We'll only bake stall at the smeller. Your Seeping Fedotov the foot away from my head which rest on the coast lab with bricks from Thai count daily that utilize that which excuse me relevant some says hell on Earth get. It still gets worse in a bit of a night when I was trying to Florida harbor pain. I wanted to take a moment. I wanted to take a moment. First of all the thank you to each person who read to the voices we heard. Today our fellows met with some Vera Institute policy folks and when asked what can we do. They said tell the narrative. That's what changes minds. So that's what's happening tonight and just because it's heavy to be listening to this testimony. I wanted to invite my colleague. Robbie pollock prison justice. Writing Program Manager at Penn America Toledo said a little breathing exercise. If you'll indulge that. Thank you This is Entirely optional sometimes group collective exercises can feel. I really love the way we're like authentic dead. That's that's the resonance that we're going to do here but I'd like to invite us all to breathe in on a five count. We're going to do it three times. And when we exhale if you feel so moved please. Xl with the sound. Let that air come. Come out naturally with a sound if that's okay So we're going to do it in right now. My hand is going to be the guide. One two route three four five in out with his own And in two three four five I needed did that. I hope some of you to our final reader of the night is so well known in this field only has one line by. Oh that's the goal Christina already shouted him out. I hope you're ready to come to the Front Reginald. dwayne Betts is the author of the newly published collection of poems felon he has been a Guggenheim. NEA and most importantly in my opinion a pen America writing for justice fellow. Please welcome as we call them. dwayne BITs.

America Ricardo Front Reginald. dwayne Betts Iraq pen America Philadelphia Angelo Memphis Hell Park Roosevelt Alabama Quentin Jones Dylan Industrial Complex Willie Lynch Jason Bodas Jim Crow Queens Christina
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Next is Roshan Abraham. He's a journalist. Essayist I impel it. Who's writing has appeared in vice the Verge Pacific Standard the village voice and more Roshan reports on city policy including including criminal justice immigration and housing? Here's Russian easy to take this off or very complicated. Hey everybody how does it really enthusiastic. How's everyone doing? Yeah Yeah you don't have to perform enthusiasm if you feel. I'm like Authentic communication so or you could just told me after after if you're not feeling well Okay so for my Piece I I have been communicating. MM UNICATING with demand name Ricarda Farrell who's a Journalist incarcerated at Gus Harrison Correctional Facility in Michigan So I'm just GonNa read a little bit of an essay that I've been working on. That's in progress and and And then we're going to play a sound piece that's a poem or two poems. That Ricardo Recorded on the phone with me And then I think we have another piece by Quentin Jones WHO's also incarcerated at Gus Harrison so So the the beginning of this essay is kind of like I was talking to Ricardo in sort of Blake Trying to lake draft and essay around the theme of time and I kind of like we were kind of talking back and forth north and Trying to figure out how to talk about time so I was trying to Draft and essay that kind of touches touches on some of those themes and kind of build on. You know some of the conversation we had so I'm going to read a few paragraphs from Ricardo Farrell is sixty two years old and has been in prison since before I was born. He was locked up in nineteen in eighty one. I was born in nineteen eighty. Two being caged. He says has changed his sense of time. His memories of his youth in Detroit are bright right and fast pulsating with life. Everything has slowed now. Snail's pace each day. It seems each day. It seems it's like it's taking forever for that day to go by says of his time at the Gus Harrison Correctional Facility in Michigan. It's hard to describe the same thing over and over her. He said it's just sat. Farrell's a journalist whose work appears at Voice of Detroit among other independent outlets. Most of his family has passed on but he has a brother who is now forty one. They were born on the same day October twelfth but twenty years apart. Ricardo used his brother's hair when he was a toddler he was three years old when Ricardo went in now his brother has a son and a grandson Ricardo witnesses. These markers of time resigned to the different pace of the outside. The world is steady popping. He says it's not GonNa wait for Ricardo a few years ago I was reporting on a proposal. By the governor of New York to reduce the time time allotted for prison visitation during rally at City Hall. I met a woman whose father was locked up. Upstate we spoke on the phone a few days later and I asked her what the reduction visits meant to her. She paused and took a breath. Life is made up of moments and memories. She told me me I cherish the time. What was what was extracted from? This person's family was something unmeasurable the string of moments and relationships that make life the most important intimate thing we have time with one. Another is difficult it can be where harm lives where traumas incubated but it can also provide a space for healing from that harm. Where does the time go in my minds? I I picked. You're trapped in some dystopia and machine swirling in a citadel with cascading telescopic sets of rotating towers on a cliff at the end of everything this imagine is where the possibilities of lives or enclosed. They stretched across days and years silhouettes the west threatening end to end like caterpillars the visual the visualization of collective shared days loss. The possibilities are jammed. There between in chaotic industrial gears and creaking levers and in one of those endless labyrinthine rooms I imagine is a thread we can pull to unravel. These machines crashed these towers. Take us all home together. Putting time back into our world allows us to imagine a different world in in which this time was never stolen where the harm however wrong however terrible to us can be seen as a space where questions can emerge rather than end where we can forge new muscles to think about suffering trauma and healing where we can fulfil rather than defer the relationships. We wish we had with one another. It means to use a phrase spoken in the book of Joel to restore it to you. The years that the swarming locusts have eaten. How powerful would it be if this way of thinking was embedded into our ethos imagine a planet somewhere out in space where life has evolved much as ours? Did it's society. has its own starts and stops its own frictions and social ills but instead of siphoning out those who've harmed and do harm from the fabric of its society eighty. It's people all come is pain into knowledge on this world when problems arise the painful figures are seen as spots to be nurtured as laboratories race for healing and solutions. Imagine twenty thousand years of time woven back into society magin tens of millions of years woven back into society. Eh up of moments and memories what benefit would all the people of this world fine to having all those moments intact for eons along along with all the failures emotional lessons and transformative ideas they bring. This was a science fiction story. The twist would be that this species lived longer than the NAS and created a more heartfelt ecosystem than ours perhaps evolve society that from a distance. Now look after our own from some distant galactic heaven looking to guide US home but we are here on earth making decisions four and about each other. How much more would we? Would we be if we kept our moments together where they belong. Ricardo likes the idea that readers of his articles might not know whether he lives in the community or in prison. It means only physical form as he says. Words are a way to connect with other like minded people and live in live in the world where he belongs to take back however incrementally what the locus have eaten. We are told. We can't start over again or turn back the clock. What is lost is lost? But the yearning to do precisely that to reverse course turn-back-the-clock undue harm contains in it the energy to act two row remedy to build possibilities for future people. It is a powerful desire to want to reclaim loss time. We should want to return the years the locusts of stolen to replenish the earth moments and memories. That's all I'm GonNa read from the essay and Thank.

Ricardo Farrell Gus Harrison Correctional Faci Roshan Abraham Detroit Michigan Ricarda Farrell Gus Harrison US Snail City Hall Quentin Jones New York Joel Blake
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"We're this is to remind you that I loved you way back. You have rivers and a string of power lines. Titans gathered into formation live tender flesh and luminous pleasures. You always moving longing say because desire is full of endless distances an apartment building to boy loyd different shades of Brown son above acting his father players to fish arguing brown boy with good show by the parentheses of his shoulders. Broken Horse Please don't mistake notes for allergies. These are the breaks the summer where I learned of hunger and the absence of pain bridgewater order. That's like he pooped in Britain suburbs. Glimmers of future lives fastball Dixie. Maybe loose changed for seventy five cent. Kony's The a big home. He's pushing bags behind the skate. Park all the white paint peeling off the divider wall chain link fence. We talk back between our crack caving in the fairway the Brown in fact as my body in the tub to keep cool the water searching me like so many soft lights the general mind was hollow back. Then I did as I do now. It's got a patterns into the margins of my ribs. This was before. And maybe at the Corner West or your turn to go to the Maritime China became slang for the is believed before the three. AM streetlights palms crowded with Earth tones. Before I learned logic and before we should've read Hamlet Florida. We know who we are. Yeah we know not what we may be. Why learned to be in the middle of fried islands and dime bags? Whisper field trees the pavement pavement begging to catch my knees. Thank.

Kony Titans Brown loyd Britain Maritime China Florida
Harvard University student from Palestine denied US entry

Democracy Now

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Harvard University student from Palestine denied US entry

"A seventeen year old Palestinian student who is scheduled to start his freshman year at Harvard University was denied entry into the United States last week and had his visa revoked it's now a jolly told the Harvard crimson he was interrogated by immigration officials upon his arrival at Boston's local airport Logan airport on Friday they reportedly questioned his religious practices and searched his phone and computer revealing post by friends that were critical of US policy a jolly who wish to attend Harvard University on a full scholarship was ultimately sent back to his home in Lebanon pen America summer Lopez said in a statement quote the idea that a jolly should be prevented from taking his place at Harvard because of his own political speech would be alarming that he should be denied this opportunity based on the speech of others is downright lawless she said

Harvard University United States Boston Lopez Lebanon Pen America Seventeen Year
"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

12:30 min | 1 year ago

"pen america" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Law changes try to stay <music> out of the whole right when you can stand reading your own thoughts think about getting out of prison every day think about your mom wherever she is think about your brothers wherever they are lose another girlfriend get beaten up one one more time get another girlfriend? Wait for a visit wait for a letter wonder why the prison has started giving us as panties again. Try to think only about the next thing whatever that may be tried to hope. Try to breathe remember to breathe. Remind yourself to breathe pretend that you're really still alive.

Danny Trejo Reminisces About the Start of His Acting Career

PEN America Works of Justice

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Danny Trejo Reminisces About the Start of His Acting Career

"<music> you're listening to works of Justice podcast by pen America <music> yeah

Pen America