25 Burst results for "Pekka"

Predators Goaltender Pekka Rinne Retiring After 15 Seasons

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Predators Goaltender Pekka Rinne Retiring After 15 Seasons

"Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne a has announced his retirement after fifteen NHL seasons the Finnish native says the decision wasn't easy but the right one at the right time the two thousand eighteen Vezina trophy winner earned a five nothing win over the hurricanes in his last start on may tenth it was his sixtieth career shutout and tied him with John Brasso for nineteenth and the NHL's win list with three sixty nine Renee played his entire career with Nashville after being selected in the eighth round of the two thousand and four draft he compiled a two point four three goals against average and nine seventeen save percentage I'm Dave Ferrie

Vezina Pekka Rinne NHL John Brasso Hurricanes Renee Nashville Dave Ferrie
"pekka" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:51 min | 5 months ago

"pekka" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Pekka. Here's good news. Even with high unemployment, there is still a need for hundreds of thousands of cybersecurity professionals in the U. S right now, and my computer career is training people to help meet the demand. It experience no problem. Take the free career evaluation. Today at my computer career dot e d You start your new life as an I T pro and as little as four months, grants covering up to 53% of the costs are available to those who qualify. It's not rocket science. It's my computer career dot e. D u Hey, it's Bethany Frankel. And I am thrilled to announce that my podcast just be with Bethany Frankel is back and bigger than ever with new conversation with disruptors like Matthew McConaughey think that day is when he goes. I was a good father to him. I raised to have the confidence to go. I'm going on way I'm breaking out. Kelly Ripa. Nobody handed me anything and I fought really hard for everything I had. And so many more. Listen to just be with Bethany Frankel on the I Heart radio app or wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Dave Heinz. And now here's this week's I Heart radio countdown of the top trending songs. We start off again this week, with all time low, still hanging onto the number five spot with once in a lifetime, one time to get to kill me. Same news for Weezer. They are also holding steady two weeks now at Number four for all my favorite songs, My favorite song US Grow and Mhm. I don't know what's wrong with me. A nice tinge of optimism again hanging out in number three. Of course I'm talking about a J r and way less sad because you love it. Don't you love it? No, I ain't.

BONUS - How to Grow Your Podcast with Colin Gray

Podcasting Q&A

04:09 min | 1 year ago

BONUS - How to Grow Your Podcast with Colin Gray

"This bonus episode. I'm talking to one of my good friends. Colin gray of the podcast host dot com collins been writing about podcasting for over ten years. He's the creator of the popular editing software allah too and he recently published a book called podcast growth colin. Thank you so much for joining me on the show. Hey album thanks for having me on great to be here yeah. It's great to have you. yes it start. I just read the book. I love it. There's tons of actionable insights on how to grow your podcast audience. I guess i just like to hear why you and matt decided to write a book. Yeah actually i should give credit where credit student. Matthew put way more into this than i did so should really be here in the resume and lindsay harris real as well so hammond lindsay really lead on this and i contributed to so yeah i have to thank them for the reason we came up with the idea was really as we wanted to. We wanted to get something out there in the world. That was the next level podcasting so we the biggest question we always get launch. I'm sure that's the same with you as well album. Like people come along and see. How do i get my podcast out there in the world and ended disappear into the ether. And you you barely hear from them again. A next you know the podcast is defunct fallen off this fall by the wayside. This was really our attempt to answer that next question which people always struggle with which is how do i then make achieve those aims. I always wanted to you know how to make it work for me to grow that audience and i agree with advice out there. We have a lot on our website as well. But we really. We found that when we are working with people. When we're coaching people through takes just growth as a funny thing because it's long long-term espec- especially with podcasting. It takes a little bit every day. A lubbock every week a little bit on a regular basis is not one big thing. It's a little bit ongoing for a long term which makes it work. And that's really. The premise behind the book was the idea of just putting in as many different tasks many different activities as many different tactics. That can take anything from few minutes up a couple of hours but most of them are really short and actionable so that was kind of the idea behind it really to try and give everyone there one place to come to get as many different growth tactics the as as possible really will the book is broken like you said into dozens and dozens of these actionable tips and you explicitly right in the beginning. Say nobody should be trying to do everything in this book. Yeah so many tactics and it's very easy to see them and maybe get overwhelmed. I think he should do everyone. But really what you should be doing is flipping through and finding which of these i mean. Honestly they're going to end up being for you experiments. Do you want to try to see if it will resonate with your audience. Yeah absolutely and yeah. There's there's lots of different types as well so absolutely you could go in the way i see it working. Probably based as somebody picks up they have a flick through the pekka chapter. Possibly that seems to resonate with them. So something like. I am helping yourself by helping others or have we got here. We've got like user surveys of social media of communities that can thing so pick one of them even and actually just work through each of the tasks in that chapter one a week. And i think what a week we really well because it means that you've just got you've got your podcast making tame attack on an extra fifteen twenty minutes and you can do one of these growth tactics and start to grow and i think if you we we're we're not fans of hyperbole over the podcast kind of guarantee anything but if there's anything. I can guarantee if one of these tactics every week rebel year last by the end of that year your audience will be unrecognizable in terms of size and engagement and everything. So yeah i think. That's the intention dined.

Colin Gray Lindsay Harris Hammond Lindsay Collins Colin Matthew Matt Lubbock
"pekka" Discussed on What Up Patna

What Up Patna

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"pekka" Discussed on What Up Patna

"Of vega man remember the guy from street fighter vega bylanes to the girl was off one of the guys from the he was in that movie of american me. I said no way like he really was same. Guy is yet. The guy who threw threw over in metal metal. I say he was only phallic. This house watching. I wanted to watch the out takes of like who i want to watch the sun devil. Who taught him how to fall. Like that can look like nothing like twice. The good guy said he was like he's he's like i was in the painter over. Yeah but i mean i mean. We went to talk right away. It's only like check but that's cool to what's what's up to us out there. This is the microphone on the podcast. Slash mega man throw past show. What a partner with the year. We got the parents in the building as us. And we're going to celebrate a little bit before we start to show because the main man don't brought us some gifts platinum patterns out there are punished. Sorry i'm drinking a bang bang. Bang it up homie. I'm abania later. Oh what a punishable command. Full thick silky silky is on is beautiful mic. Check light on the mother. Fuck week night and yeah we have a four. Pack mega man brought a little special. Tell them exactly the pack size. I mean that's kinda rude. He bought this for twelve ninety. Nine mom is like leaving the the the price on the fucking christie. Each drink can present it so you never ever go to mix your mom mexican. Mom took up the price. You forgot to take up the price stupid offered against pekka guys got. It's probably worth about thirty bucks now. You made them reveal. His price is nothing. But how much time is worth sixty bucks like now and a half big anytime anytime gonna get to go in the closet with the lights. On or off the team wolf she clauses.

pekka partner christie
Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the four Pekka cinnabon and Sioux tribes in Montana recently completed a large intertribal transfer of Bison Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. The forty buffalo were rounded up into semi trailers. In Wolf Point Montana they're headed to new homes with sixteen different tribes as far away as the United Nation in Wisconsin and Ludik tribe of Old Harbor Alaska. Urban Carlson is president of the intertribal Buffalo Council which facilitated the transfer. He says, the animals were part of a surplus population at Yellowstone National Park and would otherwise have been slaughtered today. Is Real. Gratifying. Just to be able to get some animals out of there, and then out to Chives, the Buffalo spent a year in quarantine on the fort pack reservation to ensure their disease free. Johnny Bear Cub, stiff arm has the Tribes Buffalo Program. She says, this transfer was a long time coming. We have drum group out here and they'll sing the songs they'll sing. Songs to send the Buffalo safely to their new homes, they travel safe and receive blessings. And say goodbye to enforce and we'll send them on their way. For National Native News I'm. Savannah Mark. A new art degree programs being offered to students at the University of Alaska Southeast, which is part of a larger vision that's been in the works for years to establish a north. West Coast Arts Hub Kate. Elizabeth Jenkins has more. The new degree program is a partnership between the University of Alaska, southeast Sealaska Heritage, Institute, and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa. Fe. New Mexico the agreements were signed a few years ago, but it's taken some time to line everything up Cari groove in the our director at Sealaska Heritage Institute says there's a lot of room for growth. We are mealy great. Now that exists in the first place, the program is a two year degree with a focus on north west coast indigenous art. As part of the new program students are required to take an intro course into relevant native languages. Then their hands on our classes to choose from some of the courses have been offered before by the university and some are brand new for instance and claimed Weaver Lily hope is teaching an online class about career development as an artist students enrolled in the program, we'll have the option to transfer credits to the University of New Mexico if they want to pursue a bachelor's degree. Groove and things kind of comprehensive academic offering is long overdue. She says, many people are familiar with the region's form line design, but the associate's program is a way to gain deeper understanding in a way that. Associates degree provides a starting point for that journey with Cova Nineteen. Some of the courses will be offered online in some will still happen in person in accordance with universities pandemic plan, and in the future students will be able to experience some of these classes on a brand new campus. SEALASKA heritage has already started breaking ground on a six thousand square foot facility in downtown Juneau. The campus is slated to be completed sometime next year I'm Elizabeth, Jenkins. Powell's are being held virtually this Labor Day due to the cove in nineteen pandemic the online social distance Powell facebook group has been helping connect vendors, dancers, and singers for the last six months over the weekend. Dancers took part in contests uploading their videos to be judged and win prizes. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Tribes Buffalo Program Buffalo Intertribal Buffalo Council Elizabeth Jenkins University Of Alaska Southeast Wolf Point Montana Antonio Gonzales New Mexico University Of New Mexico Sealaska Heritage Antonio Gonzalez United Nation Urban Carlson Sealaska Heritage Institute Yellowstone National Park University Of Alaska Wisconsin Bison Wyoming Johnny Bear Cub Savannah Mark
Recipe edition: Adrian Martin's Classic Carbonara

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Recipe edition: Adrian Martin's Classic Carbonara

"Hi I'm Adrienne Martin and I'm from wildflower restaurant in Camden. My favorite goto recipe is a classic Carbonara. Whenever I'm really really stuck on I have ten minutes free in the evening time. This is the recipe. I'll make so the classic normany is Gone Chali which is pig's cheek. What we do with Gwen? Charlie's we dice it up. We put it into a dry pan. Dry Pan fry it until we get it nice and crispy in the meantime while that's happening. You put on a pot of water bringing up to the boil spaghetti and their on. Let it cook away so once. Spaghetti HITS THE WATER. You have about eight to ten minutes to finish this whole dish so this is why. It's like one of those dishes. That's quite easy to kind of pull together nice and quick so spaghetti's in the Guantanamo is frying nicey. If you can't get your hands on going to you can just use regular smoked bacon. We ought in a clove of garlic. Don't even bother to smash it on your board straight into the pond and let it kind of perfume and flavor that Crispy Bacon in there. Once this happens we get an egg so base one egg per person so I normally cook for two. Probably eat for to myself to be honest with you. So we have to eggs cracked into a boat. And the cheese. That's traditionally used a classic. Urban Meyer is Pekka Reno Cheese. So into a micro playing great in some of that cheese into the egg whisk it together with a fork and then what you do is at this stage once you have that finished. Your Pasta should be almost ready. Check it have a little taste of it. Make sure that it's cooked almost fully through and what we do is take what your tongues across into the Bacon Spaghetti. Take some of the water which is well because it's picking up the sauce in the baking pan. We want to stop the frying process so that water will stop the frying process completely. Take it off the heat and finally you're going to live. She get ready to serve it straight away. So this is the last thing you have to do is get the egg and cheese that you've mixed header folded through the Spaghetti on the Bacon and finally finish it with cracked black pepper. Serve it up straightaway. Great a little bit more pet green overtop nego. Classic carbonare

Urban Meyer Adrienne Martin Camden Gwen Charlie
Wayne Marshall Discusses His Short Story Collection Shirl

Published...Or Not

10:17 min | 1 year ago

Wayne Marshall Discusses His Short Story Collection Shirl

"That you've been getting some great reviews rarely been rating than they In the press. But could you tell us a little bit more about the pathway from the awards at Josh mentioned. It's not quite as simple as just getting shortlisted. How did you get to this moment to die? Sure so the shortlisting was a whirlwind anthony. We'll stay with me for the rest of my life. I think Contacted by agents and publishes the very same day of the announcement which was fantastic announcement on on the announcement receiving emails frog messages on twitter. It was and and if you hate from a Christian Fish Chen or any of the other rod has its time experience so At that point I only had a thirty seven thousand word manuscript. It always influenced to actually Melanie Chang head submitted. A similar word can't install Ebay had had success. There was a Willa Center event where she spark and that was the moment that actually decided to submit the thing in the first place. It wasn't really on my right up at that point so it shows that a warden spas other artists to get input Stuff into the wool absolutely and so through that process affirm press came aboard and wanted to publish the book but it was still too short so the idea is that you would try to get the collection out as soon as possible. Bang that it was still you know the APLA shortlisting was still very much out there. So I had unwritten one story in the previous year and when I saw him with a fan press. The deal was four stories in four months which was terrifying and exhilarating the same time a deadline. Exactly it just shows you yes. So I managed to produce the full stories Are went for some. I didn't have time to doubt the material doubt the premises so I went with some stuff that I otherwise wouldn't have gone with had a bit of a list of ideas. I I did a deed but a few of the stories that had around for maybe three years but hadn't quite moved along with them or just forced myself to write first drafts. And it's down in the something to work with whereas before I just thought that ought not gonna work so there are two stories and it looked quite metaphysics which I played around with that conned of fiction nonfiction mash up a little awareness about their own existence. Yes side Some things that were on the journey to rotting show that awed decided it was time to put in such as I went through cancer In the in the early stages of the book which was an impetus to writing the book in the first place. And how did that for you up to to write. What has led to this stunning book? Yeah sure it freed me up in the sense that I thought none of these stories I would be published that you know it was very very seek That were just diagnosed and it took a year Eh. Going through all that until the second stint of came to water out again and I was doing came on Friday Friday mornings and I'd get up and write for two hours beforehand forehand and it was stuff just to amuse me. There was no industry. No hearing about concept about published that was turns out that that was exactly what I needed. It's so true silver lining from a very dark clad so with the stories and I. I can't believe how you do this. Every time we get to the end of the the story I had a hell. Did he do that now. I'm going to look at one section of prize from you've got people in the front of your book who've praised the collection who've read it in advance of publication GonNa Ray the nines to whine Makola Nikola generals in Reina. Neil all very influential influential writers an Australia authors but I actually want to zero in on John Rosen's because she starts in a way that you'd think the maybe this doesn't sound so vain she finishes cries. I'm going to read this APP. General sense is on Wine Marshall's collection show these stories of a strident men in small towns and pull suburbs stories of sport drinking fighting and love sands awful right that she puts but there's a big battle here but these are stories. Tall was SAIMAA chart. Wit a meticulous craft that even as you're reading about a limitation Class A man in love with a kangaroo a mermaid on a fishing trip. You're asking yourself why did did this really happen. Wine Marshall is a worthy successor to his town might pay to carry. That's prize. It went a writer of gorgeous imagination endearing experimentation ikin compassion and chill is one of the best books of Australian stories. You'll rate wow and autograph with her on that assessment. I'm not gonNA make anymore. The raiders. Fortunate can't that listeners. Fortunately can't say that here but there are other prize in however automob- beyond that prize tries to the craft. You mentioned before how it freed you up to right. I'm GonNa quite something. It sounds like a real mouthful from aristotle. approachable impossibility is preferable to an impossible probability. I I had to write that. Deng's always mix it up but in wine Mashall's world old. You start with the everyday will that we think we Then you give it a bizarre twist and you you make us believe it. And that's what I my. By the time you get to the end and status with his arresting ending. We took hand-held that he does that. So do you start with the bizarre edition or the ordinary reward and let it emerge. Yes so it's normally. It will come to me in a bizarre image or concept. They're usually quite concept driven stories so we start not like that and I guess I've always had that Oban. I'd been working on writing for ten years before I started having success with these stories and I could come up with an initial initial idea well enough but I think what was holding you back as well is. This seems to me now. Like a Secondary Act of imagination. Where you get the blood D- But the grounding the will building the making real which is absolutely essential on not so much into say straight out surrealism where it's just go let craziness? I want. Want to feel absolutely real and so. That's the big task beyond the initial idea. And that takes a lot of drafting and all that. So I'm probable impossibility impossibility. You believe. This could happen but you know it's impossible in the back up. Yes you do that. So it's the balance of the two and finding what you call a secondary incidental storyline more like. I guess it would come back to will building the Secondary Act of imagination. You've gotta fill that. Would you've go to populate it you've got to fill it with all the details not too many. That it bogs down and working in short stories. You've got a zipper too long. But I wanted to feel real fo for raiders but real to me too I want these stories to feel absolutely real. Even though they're crazy like I know I'm going to go to a specific example here and it's it's the story that's inspired the cover of show and a man has fallen in love with the kangaroo route. How on Earth do you make that real that that sort of the bizarre things you wouldn't put it in a literary collection of short? Say How do you make that believable including that the kangaroos wearing accounting jumping. I think it's the stuff like the cotton jump and the party pause and the name of the beer and the name of specific replies that gives it that you can feel that house and that place and the two men that popular that story. I think this is real reality to those guys. And that's where I grew up. That's my culture and so drew on all of that again beyond the crazy idea to fill it with with realistic Dato and to just dropped often draft and draft until it felt real it does feel very real one of the things I really liked about. It was the kangaroo. Never reacts in the way you expect now take something personally and some there does that so you give it a three dimensional character a kangaroo. Yeah but you don't buy that. We all got along with each. I really like I think you. Would you call that an. I probably want to bring this up in terms of defining does the Jonah but would you call it magic realism of fantastic realism here. I'm a bit be careful with the magic realism stuff. Because it has a specific origin and a specific cultural lineage being in South America and the magic realists to come out of there so that the second one fantastic realism. It's really you know. Version of magic. Yeah improbable things happen everyday. Well I think I'm coming more and more to the understanding that I my entire style comes out of the young culture that I grew up in. I grew up at a suburban Melbourne with people. Ah stood around telling toll stories full exaggeration and huma and color and be twists. And I've just realized that informs my style so much that sums up beautifully and it shows and all your work now you have a Melbourne launched last week at the hill of content bookstore in Melba. You've got a bacchus marsh. Could you tell us the data. Yes I do. So we have a launch of the Pekka Smash Lobby this Saturday at twelve thirty. And it's GonNa be really special because they've supported may for so long mm-hmm and they gave me and another friend of mine. Jim Tully Mila the lessons to do things like create the pay to carry short story award which we in running for four years. It's just small ward. That is now national and really personal imprimature. Hasn't yes and hate us as the winning stories and to talk to someone like to carry even Chrissy. Molly's Alley's huge so. Tom Employs at the back of Smash Library this Saturday at at twelve thirty at twelve. Thirty four thirty. Yes yes exactly yes thank. You're very much wind Marshall on your congratulations on your debut. Collection of short stories show is the title published by FM. Prison back to you

Raiders Marshall Melbourne Twitter Ebay Melanie Chang Willa Center Josh Wine Marshall Pekka Smash Lobby Makola Nikola Jim Tully Mila South America Writer John Rosen Chrissy Bacchus Marsh Oban Deng
Rinne scores empty-net goal as Predators beat Blackhawks

Steve Cochran

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Rinne scores empty-net goal as Predators beat Blackhawks

"Center with Nashville scored an empty net goal to take a four to labor just for good measure fifteen seconds later predators goaltender Pekka Rinne a fired the puck down the ice in into the empty net the first goal of his career our Xfinity X. five Blackhawks support read a the twelve goalie in NHL history to score a goal and the preds beat the Blackhawks five

Nashville Pekka Rinne Preds Blackhawks NHL
"pekka" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Book now and save at Holiday Inn express dot com terms apply these days the lightning radio network intermission report here's Greg when Ellie well for the Tampa Bay Lightning you wanted to get an early lead in this game and that's what they did at the end of one a leading the preds one nothing thanks to goal by Victor Hedman that occurred at seven forty six the first part is a big time slapshot the flak did offer press player past Pekka Rinne a stamp goes in Johnson picking up these cysts that's been the difference in this game at national though outshooting Tampa Bay thirteen three certainly they have their moments in under vast left he was very good in the first period so no doubt the light enough to make some minor adjustments moving forward but we'll take a one nothing lead at the end of one in a building where you've struggled to win games every single time terrible lawn certainly has I'm sure some thoughts on that first purity standing by with Dave Mishkin Kaylee Charles online radio one news you about six minutes left in the period killing our commenting how well the leading we're getting out of their own and they were protecting the front of the net well I think they protect the front of the net well even in those closing minutes but much more trouble down the stretch of getting out of the defensive zone what adjustments that they need to make to get back to what we were saying earlier in the wall and he obviously work say to be up on Nelson of road period but with that said it's almost like we got caught into their style what they want to they want to bog down there very committed to their one three one the neutral zone and we just didn't commit to playing the puck correctly and it just slowed us down or I thought earlier we had a much better start so I think that'll be the adjustment I can slow down into the kind.

Ellie preds Victor Hedman Pekka Rinne Johnson Tampa Bay Holiday Inn Greg Dave Mishkin Kaylee Charles six minutes
Crying Over Spilt Milk? Americas Largest Dairy Producer Files for Bankruptcy

Business Wars Daily

03:35 min | 2 years ago

Crying Over Spilt Milk? Americas Largest Dairy Producer Files for Bankruptcy

"From one. Three I'm David Brown and this is business worse daily on this Wednesday November twentieth for anyone over with the age of thirty. The idea that milk is an industry could be in trouble once seemed unthinkable as well the notion that we might not need gas to fuel our cars or coal to run our power our plants goodness. How will they get things done? Well in the past milk wasn't so much choice as a commodity of basic household necessity. But things change in these days. These things are changing. Fundamentally witness last week's bankruptcy filing by Dean Foods America's largest producer of cow's milk and other dairy products the ninety four or your old company was founded by Samuel e Dean and Intrepid Entrepreneur who purchased the illinois-based Pekka Taneeka evaporated Milk Company in Nineteen Twenty Five. The business business grew and changed over the decades today. It owns fifty eight brands including dairy pure milk. land-o-lakes butter true move flavored milk's in friendly's ice cream now the once multibillion dollar conglomerate is struggling to stay alive with sales and profits down its stock has declined eighty percent over the last year. The company filed now for bankruptcy protection on November twelve and is exploring a sale to dairy farmers of America. That organization is a Kansas based cooperative of more than fourteen thousand dairy every farmers many of which are deemed suppliers. Dean foods blames shifting tastes for its current predicament. Quite simply Americans aren't drinking nearly as much milk as we used to. Since nineteen seventy five milk consumption has fallen by forty percent in recent years. You can pin some of the blame on the rapid rise of plant based MILKS folks from Soy to almond banana to Oat milk. Sales of plant based milk shot up nine percent last year. According to the plant based Foods Association at the same time sales of cow's milk fell six percent indeed dean foods may be kicking itself for getting rid of one of its most profitable divisions in twenty twelve. Oh saying it wanted to focus more on its core dairy business. Dean spun off White Wave. One of the biggest producers of soy and other Plant Milks the French Yogurt Company then owned bought White Way. For ten billion in two thousand seventeen in a seemingly prescient move dean must have had second thoughts about forsaking the fast growing plant the milk market just last year. It took a majority stake in Boulder Colorado Flax Milk Company. Good Karma too little too late however and competition from plant. Milk isn't in Dean Foods. Only problem healthy alternatives to cow's milk have exploded more and more of us are drinking sparkling water Bucci's teas and organic juices not dimension simply plain old water. That's hurting milk sales so to the decline of lowly breakfast cereal. no-one pours milk on the energy bar. They eat during their morning commute. You'd either so there's that and then there is. Almost an entirely separate trend. Big retailers like Costco and Walmart are deciding. They need to control their own food. Supplies supplies for cost reasons and also for transparency into their supply chains last year Walmart one of Dean's biggest customers built. Its own milk processing plant in Indiana according to CNN Walmart can now supply five hundred of its thirty seven hundred stores with its own cheaper milk no longer as good a customer Walmart now poses a threat. Dean foods has secured eight hundred fifty million dollars in what's called debtor-in-possession financing that funding will allow it to meet its pension allegations and

Dean Foods Dean Foods America Milk Company Samuel E Dean Plant Based Foods Association Boulder Colorado Flax Milk Com Walmart David Brown Kansas Costco French Yogurt Company Pekka Taneeka Intrepid Entrepreneur Indiana White Wave CNN White Way Producer Milk
"pekka" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on WGN Radio

"One predators goalie Pekka Rinne I said this after his team shut out of black ops three nothing on October twenty ninth so I was always the forums for me personally it was one of the one of the easier yeah the black ox beat him back with interest in a seven to thrash you the predators last night when a soft fourteen shots only stop ten he was pulled of the second period robin letter made thirty six saves on the night hawks about scored five more goals in their last three straight games hawks and saber cited the UC Chris bones for game five thirty Gianna tried to face off at six on WGN and WGN radio dot com can the bears make it two in a row well the good give a shot tonight in prime time in LA against the rams bears after four game losing skid with a victory last Sunday against the lions on the injury front the bears running back David Montgomery is questionable with ankle he'll be a game time decision trade Burton goes to injured reserve in a move made yesterday apple being concept pre and post game coverage the pregame starting at four o'clock on WGN well the cowboys in alliance coming up from Detroit later this morning the whole car start our coverage at eleven thirty here on WGN because western rolled a forty five six victory behind a great performance by freshman running back Kevin hall it is first career start he ran for a school record tying four touchdowns and two hundred twenty yards against UMass to a talk by law is out for the year after injuring his hip in Alabama's thirty eight seven win over Mississippi state yesterday elsewhere in the big ten and locally in college football number two Ohio state how to records fifty six to twenty one number twenty Iowa beats number eight Minnesota twenty three nineteen that game in Iowa city the golfers first loss of the season they moved a nine and one number fourteen was got to be depressed at thirty seven twenty one number nine Penn state of radiant of thirty four twenty seven fifty right Michigan tech down Michigan state forty four ten and number sixteen Notre Dame over number twenty three navy fifty two to twenty bulls had another lead going into the fourth quarter but they could not hold all the fault of the nets one seventeen one eleven yesterday bolsos Milwaukee coming up tomorrow on the whole the Blackhawks northwestern Wildcats in white Sox baseball any major WGN sports WGN traffic.

Milwaukee WGN Blackhawks Michigan Iowa Ohio football Mississippi rams saber Pekka Rinne baseball Wildcats Gianna Minnesota Alabama UMass Kevin hall Detroit cowboys
"pekka" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Com your news silent witness to fight crime here's the west this crime took all of about two seconds it was Sunday may fifth two thousand nineteen at about three in the afternoon beer cave creek road and greenway parkway Phoenix police sergeant Jamie Raab jobs as a guy walked into the chevron and reached right behind the counter and just helps himself to cigarettes he just grabs a couple Pekka cigarettes and tries to walk out the employee confronted the guys he tried to walk back out the door the suspect push the clerk really hard and caused him to lose his balance elevating a shoplifting to robbery sarja roughshod says the surveillance pics are crystal clear his clothing has had his tee shirt his build will make him easy to identify if somebody knows them next a cold case from March twenty sixth nineteen seventy nine so even if you weren't living here then you may have heard something that could help police sergeant rock child says forty four year old Robert Clemens was murdered after apparently surprising some burglars at Shane's bar near grand and Indian school we know that he was the manager the owner of the bar and we're told that he was in early that day to get breakfast some strawberries when a worker showed up you knew something was wrong and called police the scene was described as an obvious burglary had taken place Levin's body was found in a locked cooler the fire department was able to gain access into the cooler where victim was found and he had been shot several times you'll find links with pictures and more details about these cases that KTAR dot com.

shoplifting Robert Clemens Shane Indian school burglary Levin Phoenix Jamie Raab Pekka robbery forty four year two seconds
"pekka" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Like there used to be a big Pekka has them. Yeah. Like you have not even your rich. Like I you'd go like I've Electric's ity, my house, back in the day, I have plumbing a motor powered carriage. Yes. That's right. I don't have to be pulled around by meal, or when I was a kid got, dammit there. We had things we had, like, oh, you have a black and white. We have a color TV, like okay. Definable richness. You know what I mean? In a big screen faith us. Great dollar item, the ten thousand twelve oh. It was easy with my, my junior, high was super easy was Levi. Schwinn huffy, tough skins. So the have nots had huffy, maybe a Raleigh or huffy and you had super. Are tough skins and these guys had cool Levi, and the head of schwinn. It was easy. Also even stuff like vacations like poor people can go to Hawaii. Now. I don't mean destitute. I just mean anyone can plan a Hawaiian vacation, no way where you going anywhere versus people going to Hawaii or Aspen or something like that. So it was, and then it is certain point someone would have like a cell phone in their car like a mobile flown in their car. And there's no way you would have that Dan Tanna has that he's, he's a rich. He's a rich private dick, fine. Now I just feel like. Here's how you got to define who's rich and who's not rich I oh, you have an iphone, which one a seven. Okay. Poor man also. Well, yeah. I mean, I don't use my phone for anything but making calls I could have the first gen iphone wouldn't wouldn't make a difference. But. What the TV's the phones the world we are conditioning. Yeah. Air conditioning and Southwest Airlines uses it being rich patient load and taxes there. When hate you promise and used to kind of weird, but people used to look up to you. Now, they come on money. I thought of another one, and this has to have been done before weddings in a tent. Oh, we've done backyard wet. Well, no weddings and attend. You think of tenting loom, but some of those are very chic Ono the one. Yeah. TJ count. You have another one. Sorry, another one. He's asking for. All right. I have a I have a piece to play you. I don't know. We gave Mike Lynch all that stuff. We did a brea few week and a half ago or whatever. He pulled one clip from unprepared that I kind of remember getting the ball. But I don't remember if it was funny or not. So I told mex- padded listen to it other win. Lynch Puhl something it's usually good. And max patta. Listen to it said it was good said it was poignant, right? Mex- pan. Not provoking, thought provoking. Wow. All right. So we'll do that lamp Anneli will be here in couple, I will play that clip. Let me hit Ben online, and then we'll play something that's thought provoked now again, I have little to no memory of.

Dan Tanna Mike Lynch Schwinn Levi Hawaii Pekka Southwest Airlines max patta Raleigh Ben Aspen brea
"pekka" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Yeah. I don't Kate be sunk Alaron Lynn HP Kate Michigan. They already know that we bought it. I'm coming straight out the rich guy family down in New Orleans where you from you say you out here. Johnson. You probably never been called sipping liquor his hail. Pekka pre roll young else and never down on Pakistan, pay the suspect, the pedigree Bala heavily phony, homie. Feted crack at scope. I smash collect Pasco my flow from by phone. Everything. Try this guarantee split to five joint down. I got plan I'm saying we I try. Hang. Folks, trying. To me if if. Ezra pound to push that was selling something. Speaking out getting mad. Keeps. Shoop. Bad. She killed a number. Wish he. Much. So my temple the now like these. Try this guarantee with to five day. I got off playing. I'm saying we I try. We try. We say we try..

Kate Michigan New Orleans Lynn HP Pakistan Bala Ezra Johnson five day
"pekka" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And infra Pekka Collins this week is Caccia pours account ski at county when your bosses George Soros known for his big bets. It's probably safe to say, you better know what you're doing. That's absolutely, right. And the family office of George Soros has had a lot of changes in recent years. They've turned over CIO's kind of like, no other and joining us to talk more about Soros fund management is Cathy Burton, Bloomberg news reporter here in New York Kevi. Let's talk about this. The Wall Street Journal had a story this week that talked a lot about what we've been writing about for a while all the little changes that have been going on at Soro's in the weeds bit by bit. There have been so many changes that put them all together. And they they wrote about their general kind of disgruntle. Delman at the firm be let's talk a little bit about that. What's going on there? Well, first off we should say that Soros promoted a new CIO as you said they've had about a zillion the last decade and the latest one is a little bit different than all the other ones. She first of all, it's woman. Her name is Don Fitzpatrick. And also, she's the first person who has been the CIO who's not really a traitor. She is and I'm told she doesn't really like this description, but she's really more of an alligator someone who allocates resources among different traders. And so they named her as a CIO because the very nature of source from management has changed because now most of the money it manages is for George sources, Flint therapy and not for the family, and before when it was the family's money. They love to make huge huge bets. And now because they're. Money for a philanthropy. They want everything to be steady and no big risk taking. And so that's been a very big difference. At the firm there's been so much turnover previously. There was a lot of turnover because George didn't want anyone there who wasn't making a ton of money. And so he would get very very disappointed when people would have sort of mediocre returns that was the past now that they're investing for for philanthropy things of calmed down some a little bit. But the problem is that this most recent CIO hasn't really made very much money her first year. She did. Okay. She was up nine percent, but the past the previous regime, she probably would not have survived very long. That is correct. Or that's our sense anyway. And it's important to note that there's turnover every time every time any institution gets a new a new head. They bring in their people. They bring in the people they trust the get rid of the people that don't trust. And and that was no different here. So when Don joined I think they got rid of they got rid of more than fifty percent of the portfolio managers have been there. And that's obviously causing a lot of grief inside the firm and people that have lost their jobs as a result. And don. Fitzpatrick acknowledged that in the journal story, she says we cleaned house a bit I get that doesn't feel good to some people, and we don't take those decisions lightly, but she's trying to execute a new vision, here suppose, and also what she's done is taken a lot more money in house, and that's also caused a huge problem on Wall Street because Soros gave tons and tons of money to other hedge funds to manage it. Just how much money is that? So they have even now after they've pulled three and a half billion dollars from hedge funds. They still have ten billion dollars outside of source fund management. That's managed by hedge fund managers. So people get really angry with they think they have this big chunk of money from Sorus, and then they pull it away from them. I'm trying to figure out who's in charge is it's George Soros or the Fitzpatrick, no joy, Georgia's has really been less and less involved in the money management part of the business over the years. Every once in a while he'll come back, and he'll do something. But now he's eighty eight years old, and he seems less interested than before. And there's also been a general scaling back of the presence of the family, right? There's he's got two sons that are also investors Robert and Jonathan yes. But each of them now have their own family office, and they're not really involved in source management anymore. Not happen re- relatively recently. Yes. In the past few years. So how are they investing? Now. How's that changed the strategy? Well, Soros fund management was the preeminent macro manager that met and they've made huge bets on currencies commodities bonds. And now Don has decided that that strategy hasn't really worked very well recently. And she's right about that a lot of people haven't been able to make money, and so she's decided not to do any macaroni vesting anymore. Not happen to I don't know within the last six months, and that's pretty interesting because that was the legacy of source from management, and she said, no, we're not going to do that anymore. In fact, they brought in a team of outsiders who ran their own hedge fund brought them in house to run macro. And then shortly thereafter, got rid of that team. So it's she seems to be not entirely. They don't seem to have a very clear vision on what they want us for macro to what? Well, they have been making a few more investments. In quantum investing using computers. They've also been doing more venture and few other longer term. But like P E type investments. Well, thank you so much Cathy for all your insight into Soro's and all the drama going on there. Thank you got you. That's Cathy Burton, Bloomberg news reporter in New York. And just a hint of Bloomberg finance Apollo draws fury from investors,.

George Soros CIO Don Fitzpatrick Cathy Burton Bloomberg Soro The Wall Street Journal reporter Pekka Collins New York Kevi Caccia New York Sorus Georgia Robert Apollo Jonathan ten billion dollars eighty eight years
"pekka" Discussed on Hello Internet

Hello Internet

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Hello Internet

"And I know you you find out of them very interesting, and you know, the terminology. I don't, but what I do know is that this has problems and there are three or four fundamental problems. It goes so fast. There are so many comments like piling up that a rolling past that if I see something someone says the I want to respond to Brady, what's your favorite color. So from EP guy asked me that question. So I will at sage EP cry. And say blue. But by the time of done that the original question is way way going it was forty comments ago before I can taught blue because one hunt and Pekka so people who see Brady say at CGP grey blue. And there's no idea what the answer is. And there's no way to find out what I'm aunt honoring unless you climb back up the ladder. Find the original CG comment with question was so when people start having Bantu in discussion, there's no connection between the comments and this just a whole bunch of rubbish inbetween. Also when you at someone it only becomes like highlighted, an obviously it's an at for the person receiving it like, so if someone asks me, I'll see a big red at Brady Haran and someone will say, hey, you doing today. But for everyone else that just seeing that is normal text, and it makes for really messy reading experience, and you don't know who's talking to who. And what the talking about its let walking into a crowded room where everyone's shouting at each other. And you don't know who's talking to who. And what the talking about that made an absolute dog's dinner of and I hope they're going to fix it. Because at the moment, it's really hard to use. Am I wrong? I know. Thank you wrong. But I think you have identified a fundamentally unfixable problem about live chat systems and four live chat systems. I think YouTube should frankly not even really support the whole concept of a threaded discussion in a live chat system. This is just not going to happen. I don't think this is the way live chat systems can possibly work because there's always going to be too much motion. I think we have just under a thousand people at the height of the premier, and it gets a lot of people listening live, and you know, some portion of them are chatting, and it becomes a fast storm of words, very quickly. What you will watching a lot of the time went you. What was it like to wash not even be trying to engage with any of the people just as like a spectator with these popcorn was a lot. We have mentioned on on the show many times that when I read. I said vocalise..

Brady Haran YouTube Pekka
Remembering versatile musician Andre Previn

The Frame

06:17 min | 3 years ago

Remembering versatile musician Andre Previn

"People who have been attending concerts by the L A fill for a while. No the name Andre Previn. He led the orchestra from nineteen eighty five to nineteen Eighty-nine before as a Pekka Solomon took over as its music director. But Previn who died in New York today at the age of eighty nine did far more than carry a baton like Leonard Bernstein to whom Previn has been favorably compared Previn wrote movie scores played piano and composed both operas and Broadway. Musicals I asked Dockery wolf, the classical music editor at the New York Times to weigh in on Previn eclectic musical career only really kind of Leonard Bernstein comes to mind as a sort of parallel in terms of one of these these mid-century Americans who as sort of classical music, achieved this unbelievably wide audience, the recordings and the rise of jazz musical theatre. Film. I mean, everything kind of sort of collided, and maybe sort of explosion coming out of the US. And there were a couple of people who had the versatility and the talent. And president was definitely one of them. I wanna play Andre Previn plane piano for a piece called just in time. Let's listen to it. So how did his work in jazz and film scoring make him a different conductor when he was with the baton the read on him. And I agree with was that. There was always I kind of amazing sense of spontaneity and rhythm and a lot of poise. And I mean, he did wonderful recordings of French music. I mean, and this was not necessarily that was jazzy per se. But I think that there must have been think taste for rhythmic flair and for certain spirit and vitality throughout the recordings that he made as a conductor of the music pearly times. There's a great little piece in the New York Times. Obituary says eh senior in high school he was called in to help with holiday in Mexico and MGM musical that starred Walter Pidgeon, and in which Fidel Castro was an extra sounds as if Andre Previn from a very early. Early age had a lot of talent. And that talent was recognized talk about his early career. And you know, when he was recognized as something of a prodigy. I mean, he was really studying music from very very early age. And when they left Berlin to escape the, Nazis, they were first in Paris. And then he was in LA and through all of that was advancing by leaps and bounds as a performer, and I think quickly the composer. And he could just even wanna be prodigies could just do anything. And I mean that gave a certain sense of him being. I mean, this was a read on Leonard Bernstein as well that he was a bit of a dilatot that he could do everything pause ably and often way more so defined himself in competition with Leonard Bernstein, or was it more that he saw his career trajectory and thought that there was a good model to follow their. I think that was the sense that I've always had. I mean, I don't know that they were in sort of direct competition, and you're inside was very New York based and I mean had made his first Mark and musical theater, and then was doing way more conducting kind of on the European continent, though, Previn obviously ended up at the Monday symphony early in his career. So they overlapped, but Previn was a creature of Hollywood. And I mean and located there and Bernstein was more New York. I think like a lot of music directors. He occasionally found himself in conflict with people with whom he was working. He had a falling out with Ernest Fleischmann at the LA philharmonic. And I'm wondering if you think back and his legacy in the podium as a conductor. What was he most remembered for and what we're his skills leading an orchestra. Yeah. I mean, my sense. I mean having never seen him as a conductor. I mean, I think the sense was he was excellent musician and had a real kind of taste for the repertoire, I mean. Given that he was a composer. I mean, he wasn't sort of famous for fostering, new music, and I think that there was a sense of certainly in LA of wanting to broaden the lineup by bringing us a pet as a principal guest. Whether or not that was intended to send a signal that it was sort of time for him to go. I don't know. I mean, I think probably politically it was a bit of a mess. But I think that there were certainly things that he was leaving out or things that I mean other emphases that Fleishman wanted, and, but I think that he was always extremely well respected at the podium and the recordings attest to this. They're extremely vibrance. And by kind of extremely polished. So Andre Previn was the music director or principal conductor for about a half dozen orchestras. He composed a variety of film scores including one for Elmer gantry. He was a jazz pianist, he wrote operas, can you think of any? Temporary of his living today who could cover such a broad spectrum of musical performance and styles and leadership roles. I don't think that it exists. I mean, these different strands of music have in a way become a little more professionalized over the past couple of decades. And while there's a lot of collaboration between them people. Stay I think in their lanes a little bit more. I mean, this came up last year when we here at the times were talking about it was a centennary of Bernstein's birth. And we were thinking about parallels today and people we might even want to have comment on that. And it is awfully hard to think about people of younger generation who are having that kind of career, but they weren't so many people even in the heyday of Bernstein and prevent I mean, they were always exceptional

Andre Previn Leonard Bernstein Previn New York New York Times Director LA Pekka Solomon Dockery Wolf United States Ernest Fleischmann Fidel Castro MGM Walter Pidgeon President Trump La Philharmonic Editor Mexico Elmer Gantry Berlin
"pekka" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

This Week In Marvel

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

"One six the other forest is drawn by other artists, including pasta who I also love wills drew, my favorite handshake in marvel comics history. It is X factor sixty seven I think, and it is a story. It's the end of the original x factor team, which is like cyclops and the original X men, they became X-factor. The x factor team is on the moon, and they are going after apocalypse. It's really the end of this arc. They're going to get a new team really soon of the all the experts are just about to get rebooted. And so they go to the moon. They get help from the in humans and cyclops and black bolt. They like there's page or panel of the two of them. They look like majestic Godmen, and they grab each other's arms. Like this muscles exploding like in my head. It's fireworks. Masculinity and smell the musk, and it is incredible musk. Yeah. It is one of my favorite panels of all time. I think about that like such energy in something. So simple. Not is what will does. So well, he produces energy in every single panel. So very excited for that. And there's lots more info, which Tucker, you're the one to give it to us. Yeah. It was really really exciting sit down and chat with rob. I mean, I'd never spoken before. So I didn't really know what to expect. But he's just like the most excited like charismatic speaker about these things you can just tell how much he loves it. And really how excited he is to come back to the house of ideas to to the story and issue number one will become to your local comic shop in April. So so much happening in all of marvel mutant dumb. So. Yeah, it was a great to sit down and talk to him Pekka. Well, let's hear your chat with rob life L right now. Hi, rob. This is Tucker markets from marvel dot com..

rob Tucker Pekka Godmen
"pekka" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Lip missing Trump gets craft. Scratch tickets. Broccoli. Retinue player happened. This is more. Mike. Hustle. Take account Jack gas the White House. Black candy. SLA and g. Seattle. Try this guarantee square to. Dale, I got playing I'm saying. Yeah. Yeah. Kate. Linda HP Kate mission. Again, they already know that we bought them coming straight out. The I got family down in New Orleans where you from probably never weapon. Just never been called liquor. Does hail. Pekka pro-euro young down. The same. Okay. The suspect the pedigree, a phony homie. Pasco smashed out. My flow Sunday bikini, folks. Try this guarantee square too. Down. I got off playing. I'm saying we I. Function..

Kate mission Trump Linda HP Pekka New Orleans White House Seattle Dale Mike Pasco Jack
"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"So I came home from school, and I turned it on just randomly and the classical music channel was on. And the tannoy was playing Bruckner fault symphony. The children's. No. But I I was aware of classical music at that point. Nope, barely interested. I was more into Papuan recognize hokey in poetry. I read poetry since since I was very little that was a little hard to defend among the. Other beautiful. Must harbor, but anyway, so I heard the symphony from like halfway to the end. And it completely mesmerized me. I remember the tactile feeling very well. I was lying on a carpet in the living room. And I remember the color of the carpet. I remember height failed to lie on it and hear that symphony. And once it was over I waited until I heard what he was. And then I went to my, mama. I said look I want an LP of this. That's all I want, and she was a bit sort of a really Brooklyn fourth symphony as it. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's really cool. So she went and bought it. I still have that LP, and I've tried playing it last year and and solely on his crutches because I played it so much. It's almost there's more noise than music, but that was one of the initial strong impulses. And I thought this thing called classical music. Is really powerful and coup. When idea with this material either writing it conducting it undis- grateful. And at this point in my life. Also realized how much is about sheer luck fluke. And so you have to have the right ambles at the right time, and you have to have the opportunity to learn. And to study you have to have the teachers and you have to have. Community that can support you which makes me first of all feel very lucky and privileged. And also makes me feel very sad about the fact that asks the music and art spot in most countries in public schools, I mean state schools in this country. How the resources have been decimated. How little there is left for especially poor orchids. This makes me very sad. Because just think how many Mozart's might be they're growing up in some challenged part of central LA or some jealous part of London. But that incredible potential talent will never see the light of day. So that is something that I've been thinking a lot about an my remaining active years in this business. I'm trying to go more into education giving back to the system that has been so very good to me as a Pekka Salonen. Thank you very much. Did like you. My thanks to Esa Pekka Salonen. And Robert bound you've been listening to a special edition of the globalist. It was produced by your lingo fan and edited by Cassie Galvin. We're back at the same time tomorrow. I'm Ben Ryland. Thank you for joining us. Ups has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different over nine hundred of the shop is mines and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. No one is more. No one knows more and find Find out out how. how we can help you contact us at UBS dot com.

Mozart Esa Pekka Salonen LP Pekka Salonen Cassie Galvin Ben Ryland UBS dot Brooklyn LA Robert London
"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"So that doesn't change, and I wonder about your your taste as it changed from when you're a student, and when you're a young man, a younger man as a pecker, I read something you wrote about trying to escape the survivor of the bourgeois composer, and the people that maybe -joyed that music and having an affinity with their kind of gloss modernism and Avon God ISM has that changed is mellowed the right word, I think it's almost like a biological progression. That when you're young you have to kill your father's, and you have to question everything the previous generation and the previous generations ever achieved unfold. So I went through that quite radically. I must say, I hated everything. And I thought we should dismantle all cultural structures over houses inventory. Extras theaters and build new ones out of those bits of base. So how did the Finnish culture deal with a royalist like myself? They gave me a three year artists scholarship, which kind of shot me up. I thought okay. That is taking care of me. But I think this is normal. I think everyone goes through this on some level. It must be a biological thing. Also that you have to question some of the decisions norms of your predecessors in order for the species to live on and prosper when I think about where we are do day globally. Speaking mean, my generation Greeley has paled, and I feel very shamed. We haven't been able to solve one single major problem. So the natural reaction by the younger generation would be to completely disagree with my generation. I don't know it. It's it's a painful subject. You attracted to performing and interpreting composes that you feel some affinity with Stravinsky, and Wagner and people that have gone through transformation many transformations themselves that keeps changing a little bit. When I was younger. I I was very suspicious Wagner extremists. And that was not based on proper analysis of why that was so suspicious because I thought he was a Nazi. But of course, I my thinking wasn't cleared because of course, his musical used by the Nazis as the sort of German expression. But it was wasn't strictly speaking Wagner fault because he was long gone before the Nazi propaganda machine started working. So I totally revised my opinion of Wagner, and I had this experience. It's funny. How it happens? We're talking two thousand. Three of four. I got a phone call from the head of the Perez opera. The late great rewrote Motiur. And he said, I think it's time for you to conduct Theresa and he's older in your life. And I said what are talking about Wagner? You mean Wagner? His it's time. So I started looking at it. And I thought yeah. It is time. And then we went to Bill the the video artist and we had lunch with him. And I said so Bill would you do a video for Dresen is all said, what are you talking about Wagner that old dead white German Nazi as you had that not the guy? So something happened. And it was interesting because all three of us. We're at the same kind of junction in life where this material all of a sudden started to make sense and more than that. I was actually changed profoundly Wagner music has taunted to be looking at drug. I find it very hard to live without it. And I'm thinking about constantly, and so it's a long stretch from my young days when I just dismissed him. Okay piece. Oh shit. Does it end of story? And now, it's very different and next year. The ring cycle in Finland. Yes. No small undertaking. That's full. That's forgive the pun, full circle. From how you were before with China. I thought. Since the last five years I've been thinking if I like to see some kind of a performer conductor. I have to do the ring before it's too late. And I don't want to be lying on my deathbed being deeply unhappy about the fact that I never conducted the ring. So I thought okay now, I'll do it while I still gone, and it's nice to do it. In Finland with my people at speaking, my language, and and hanging out with my friends. How is it doing doing things in different locations? You'll diary is a non more busy one Asia and oversee your work in Los Angeles in London all over the world to the things sound different tune different places. Do you know how they're going to sound?.

Wagner Finland Bill Asia Greeley Stravinsky Dresen Theresa China Los Angeles London five years three year
"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"You made a choice you made danger your profession, and we're grateful and you've done a great job on. It's okay. If you if you hurt yourself. And somehow tightrope walkers are the greatest artists because they can make a mistake only ones that was the wisdom by nature. It doesn't quite have to be like that. But I I like the idea of danger in classical music, which is not much talked about. But the fact that people sometimes have to doing credibly difficult demanding things where the absolute focuses needed and years of practice and training, and then they do it. And it's very exciting. What happens when two virtuosi meet each other? You you've worked and you've written for yoyo Ma. Is it feel different to ripe for for someone specifically as to without your applause machines down and be confronted with empty page. Is it a lesson empty page and you're doing specifically for one performer? I for. I find it very difficult actually write music generally without knowing who going to play which orchestra is going to reform it who is going to conduct. I like the more personal connection. And with people whom I have known for very long time. It becomes extra fascinating. Because I quite often think okay. I'll take that person little bit outside her his comfort zone and see. What happens? Of course, these people at your many of the other people have written are incredibly. Virtuosity skilled talented people. So it takes a lot to push them to go. Big companies. It's very hard to push them on the edge. But, but in some cases, something extraordinary happens, at least might view when somebody who's usually just completely on top of everything is actually facing something which is almost impossible. And I liked not excitement that comes out of that moment of extraordinary, focus. I don't like torture. Don't get me wrong. And this is not a power thing. It's it has nothing to do with it. If I were interested in power, I wouldn't be dealing with classical music. This is just like toys power in comparison to rebound. But I like that sort of dynamic that a composer is not someone who thinks in the abstract composer is somebody who writes for people to perform for people. So that the human communication element. Always. I wonder if the the fact that loss of the canon is. Was written in the past. Does that make it abstract? We listen to the music as note, we listen to music, a huge welling, emotional storytelling thing. But there is an abstraction to it. Because it is old does that make any difference on it doesn't actually because if you think of other fields theater, especially texts written by not only Shakespeare, but the Greeks Sophocles, they're totally current. They just need a little bit of updating and sometimes not even that same thing with composers like Botham bid orphan Mozart. Okay. The style and the technique in the the tools of expansion. Our time typical so house abilities expresses this himself has to do with the cultural and political situation in northern Europe and more specifically in Finland around nineteen hundred however, what the music is about is. It's completely contemporary and timeless. I e us how we feel. What is important? You know, the big themes loved death. Hatred excitement sex. Like, very fundamental human aspects of the human life and psych..

Europe Finland Botham Shakespeare
"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"It'd be part of it is actually to to have that luxury car or the sportscar the. Aston Martino McLaren, and you know, that it can do almost anything, and you also know that it can drive off the cliff quite easily. So we have to know to some degree. What are you doing? As a personality type. I enjoy being in the sort of risk zone close to the edge. Not too close. Because inhabiting that part of the world is I find very stimulating. Will you still in control? But belly I guess, I'm not typical thrill-seeker in this way, adrenaline junkie, whatever the colloquial is. But that's the fun part. One of many actually does that Barrett's health out in composition as well. To want to include everything are you good at editing act excess in your own in your work. I'm not a vastly different person. When I write music. Okay. It's a very different kind of activities slow and it's lonely, and whereas conducting his public interest is social and filled with adrenaline people actually clapping when you turn up at work. Helps doesn't happen in composer's life, a friend of mine was actually suggesting that she makes a little robot that claps whenever I into my studio. And then there would be a little sound loop of applause in people's shouting problems. Actually, we we all could use that kind of thing. Even when I've write music I like to push people into a zone, which is not maybe their comfort zone because it energy also happens quite often right there right at that border. You'll maybe slightly beyond it. It's not an artistic goal per se. But sometimes if I'm after Batticaloa kind of expansion, but the kind of excitement, but declerk kind of physicality, which is very important to me music. I consciously right something which is really difficult and demanding in the sheer physical sense of the word. I like the concept of virtuosity anyway for me, the virtual is great explorers. But cotton Amundsen who went to the south bolan didn't quite come back. But they they went there, and they did it. So that we don't have to. Matt curtis. Oh, boy, krill. The protein, but that's the idea that when we observe a virtuoso at work or virtual orchestra or so let's do something like that in the concert hall. We can kind of live that danger, and that adrenaline there is a moment in now, I'm going to start talking about niche it so this morning's Gulf spent but. So we can do this. We can do this thing and as a series. So there's a chapter in also sprouts at a two-stroke where a tight rope Walker falls and injures himself and is dying. Sorta toaster goes through through as will. You know, what that's fine..

Aston Martino McLaren Walker Batticaloa Gulf Barrett Matt curtis Amundsen bolan
"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"We our equipment is in how perfect this resolution is on your screen as this thing doesn't happen on his you're they're sharing with other people and kind of feeling each other's energy. And this something of the religious Bill. Something of the by natural the supernatural about those sorts of moments. You've been with the London hthe Omonia for thirty years you'll turning up and being the conductor for that first performance with some of those. Musicians was an unexpected thing that turned out to be an unexpected treat. How do you approach new sets of musicians we'll dance happens between the two review in order to gain that trust are you conscious of having to do certain things will not having to do certain things. Linda at this point in my life and career I've seen several generations of young musicians joining the orchestra's I conducted. And I must say it's the most fascinating process. How a young player becomes part of the collective and how they learn to play the way the collective plays. And again, I witnessed this many times. And I'm very aware. However, I don't quite know how it works. It's some kind of those Moses, and it's certainly a nonverbal kind of exchange of data a new player comes into into the orchestra. He or she kind of senses the physicality around. How people up if the musicians a string player how people aren't using their bows how they move together. What kind of I contact they're having and what kind of sound is coming from around. And of course, he or she learns also how the relates the beat of the conductor what kind of dynamic there is between the conductor and the orchestra, but very little of this is actually being said out loud. It's something you sends. It's like a. You know, some fish have this sensory organ on their signs, which can sense the tiniest differences in the water pressure. And that allows the macaroni swimming formation, for instance. And we don't quite know who makes the decision in the show of macro, swims in the ocean, swimming, poofy formation and when a predator terms up the curl into ball. And we don't quite know how that decision making process works, but it's a bit likeness different orchestra where you sense your immediate surroundings. And you kind of align yourself through that sensor that everybody has what we don't quite know yet what it is. It's the seventh or eighth cents. And I'm sure that this is not metaphysics. It's just something that our physics and biology doesn't yet know, but we'll soon and in that show of macro, you the head fish, or are you the are you the killer while coming out from the deep. I agree. The metaphor has its limits because the the macro alone have the conductor type. And yet they function perfectly. Well, but the fact about top level orchestras is also that they have these incredible cohesion, and they really have this kind of internal magnets that pull everything together and unexperienced doctor lets them do this without disturbing. And then when the collected works perfectly as one then you just kind of gently nudge, it this way or that way, not always gently, but and not not always nudging either. But it's I guess this is clearly my morning metaphors. Now, it's a bit like writing holes when days a hurdle an inexperienced jokey kind of kicks the heels into the sides of the horse, and it's unnecessary because the holes knows perfectly well how to jump and when to jump and how to jump over that hurdle. However, what the host needs his confidence the holes needs to feel that you are related. You are supporting the idea of jumping. And you won't get in the way conducting when the conductor is experienced enough and good enough is like that you just give your players confidence in and they do it. There's a lot of very friendly. Right. Positive videos and podcasts and many people soaking about your work as a composer as a conductor one of your soloists. Maybe we'll certainly one of the musicians in the fella Monia said that she thought that he thought you there orchestra musicians was like a false car. You're driving it aggressively round some mountain Benz to see what the caller would do how much truth in there as we're in the morning of metaphors. I have to make a confession. I which is that I'm a crap driver. Reline and cause an me don't work well together. However, of course, part of the fun of conducting..

London hthe Omonia Monia Moses Linda thirty years
"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pekka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Alpine roads his composing style sits in unusual sweet spot between the adult God heroes of his youth to growing fascination with high romanticism of unfortunately for us. He's a man through talks in epigrams. I think you very much fuel time this morning. I wanted to start by asking you what it is to be a conductor union took footer. Are you a communicator you a bridge between the audience and the musicians there's no simple definition of the role of the conductor. It's not mysterious. It's all sort of based on rational physics, but I like to use a metaphor sometimes of a head waiter. So the composer is the chef the composer puts it all together in the kitchen and the head waiters role and responsibilities to make sure that the plate arrives at the table of the customer timely in a perfect shape at the perfect temperature so on, but we don't deal with the actual content. And I think that's important for everyone to realize because this culture, we live in today is so. Focused on performance and quite often. It's completely forgotten that somebody has actually written the material that these people are performing. So there's something between all of those things. And I wonder what's your fill. It glamorous great on the podium. There is something that you might shy away from this. I've a feeling you might. But there is something theatrical about necessarily you're the center of attention, at least for the orchestra. And so our eyes are on you. What's that fill that being that it's very different to being in a studio or on a train scribbling notes for composition. Was it Philip to be up on that podium with Batum in your hand? It's very odd to describe how it feels. But it's wonderful does so many highly unusual.

epigrams Philip Batum