20 Burst results for "Peirce"

"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

You Can Heal Your Life

04:12 min | 3 months ago

"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

"In rate of weight loss by age group and the reason is that that age fact is caused by a decrease in estrogen. Both men and women men actually Everyone converts testosterone into estrogen. Men actually have more of it than women. Interestingly most people don't know that And it goes down over the lifespan in everyone at estrogen works by facilitating the effectiveness of insulin to process all of this Process junky food. That people are eating and as your estrogen goes down. Basically you don't get away with it anymore. You can't afford to eat those foods anymore. And so when they're taken out of your diet suddenly it levels the playing field and we see fifty and sixty and seventy and eighty year olds losing weight the same way that twenty and thirty year olds do in our cohort. It's incredible that's big. That's really big. So because i know lots of people like in their fifties and sixties that are struggling with that right now also for sure. So i have one other question is what do you see as the biggest challenge for people and bright light eating you know. I think the biggest challenge is self compassion. Because you know as soon as you introduce a bright line framework the part of that wants to get it right do it. Right be perfect Keep it under. Control gets activated right and that sort of manager type part of us loves bright line eating because it's really clear the structure is really clear and apart feels like you know it could just be gotten right already but then when it's not perfect or you know we fall down to get back up again. I think developing the habit of self compassion and really just seeking the lesson. becomes really critical. And so we we focus a lot on resuming and bright line eating and the notion of us of good resume being very gentle and very sort of mindful of the natural ups and downs and sine wave. That we're all on in life and that it's it's you know we're not called line eating be perfect. Were called to be unstoppable and so what people find a bright line eating is. It's actually quite a personal growth journey. The process itself builds a lot of resilience and a lot of self esteem. But at first people find it hard because they often come in with like they. They've heard usually from other people. How well it works. They've seen at work in their friends and they get really excited and that sort of perfectionist part gets activated often. So it's the sort of reframe of like. Oh yeah no. You're not called to be perfect but you you are called to be unstoppable. That's awesome. I love it. Is there any final thing. You want to leave us with susan entirely else. I just want people to know how great you and hay house are. I have an amazing agent. And all righty coach helps me write my books and she you know has published a ton of new york times bestselling books herself and worked with all these people and they're always stunned at how he made and supportive of my creative endeavors. You are at a house. Because it 'til me. They hadn't worked with a house before but they work with all the other big publishers and they they're just incredulous. At how much liberty you give me to For example the pick pick the title of my own book decide decide her really like or don't like the cover is going to be out by buck. You know sort of the agency about what goes inside. Its pages and you're just such a such a humane publisher. And just so great to work with and i don't know if people realize that it's like there's really picked out there in the publishing world so i just i love what you're about at house and i'm just so proud to be you know in the house family. We're happy to have you. Susan and thank you so much. Thank you read..

susan new york times buck Susan
"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

You Can Heal Your Life

08:19 min | 3 months ago

"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

"Little bit about that. Yeah totally so you know. For the average person out there whose carrying around extra pounds and is frustrated and trying to get them off And i'm gonna just gonna put a flag out here. Read ask me with the answer about age and like people who are like women who are postmenopausal and all that jazz but how does the brain blog weight loss. Just sort of in general. What's happening is that people are are settled with three things right now. They're saddled with insatiable hunger. This is not the hunger that we're all familiar with that makes sense like. Hey my tummy's rumbling seventy eight and a while and i better eat some fuel to like keep going with my day. This is like i just finished dinner. But i still feel like i need a something. Something and i'm going to the cupboard for a bag of chips or i'm going to the freezer for a pint of ice cream and i'm gonna sit on the couch and keep eating. Its insatiable hunger meaning. It's not satisfied by eating and a lot of people identify with that kind of hunger. These days they're eating enough food and then still wanting more and that hunger is caused by something called leptin. Resistance leaped in the hormone. That's supposed to circle back to your brain and say you've had enough food is time to stop eating And the heavier you are the more leptin in fact you do have circulating in your blood but your brain can't see it. It's blocked and it's being blocked by the consequences of all this sugar and flour. That people are eating sugar flour. Raise insulin levels shoulder on flower raise inflammation and sugar and flour raise triglycerides and those are the three things that are blocking leptin at the brain so in bright line eating we take the sugar and flour out of the diet Those just heavily heavily processed foods and at all of a sudden people start to regain their normal qseof hunger and society. So that's the first one. The second one has to do with cravings which is caused by dopamine down relation. That's the classic addiction issue and it's the same down regulation that we see an alcoholism and Heroin addiction all the addictions food addiction sugar and flour addiction. causes it as well and then the third way. The brain is blocking weight losses with something that i call the willpower gap which is basically Especially in modern life I don't know if you noticed. You don't seem like you have an addictive bone in your body. Are you not really an addictive guy. You very addictive. No yup and do you know that like a lot of people are like you. But there's a continuum like It's actually like one third one third one third one third of the populations like you. They're just not adaptable. Like are you one of those people who could have Let's say a cigarette at a party and then not become a smoker or drink coffee sometimes or that kind of thing for sure the move well because i do like. I have like like espresso. Probably like you know once a month. But i do have habits so like i drink green tea every morning. Like that kind of stuff like so. It's a but if i don't have the green tea i don't like craven but i do have habits like ants habits but not addictions. I love it so a third of the population is like you. Actually a third of the populations like me highly adaptable More impulsive than average and You know but just highly adaptable right. And then a third of the population is in in between moderate but but irrespective of addictive susceptibility There's this other thing called the willpower gap and you'd be suspect to this to or subject to Do you notice lake yourself getting fatigued at the end of the day or after a lot of work or something like that and then maybe giving into temptation more or having a hard time making decisions or feeling. I'm trying to think of where else you would. you would know. That would be. Because like if i'm the one thing i'll say is like if i'm tired and like at the end of the day or anything then like i do have like craving. Let's say for like a beer or something to relax Like if i'm not tired. Then i don't really have that but if i am and it's been a tiring day then i'll go man. I should have a beer. You know like that. So i get that part so that might be at that. Those of us who tried like manage our food really relate to this notion called the willpower gap so it turns out that willpower is governed by this little this little area of the brain called the anterior cingulate. Cortex if you put your for your fingertip on your third eye rate between your two is on a little up on your forehead. It's maybe like you know two inches back from there in the brain right behind the prefrontal cortex and this little seat in the brain actually governs a whole host of things. Though the one that's critical for our conversation here is raining in temptations which a german study that came out several years ago showed that were resisting temptations. An aggregate of four hours a day shocking. The law is a lie. The biggest one is for food What did they say about like having sex with someone at the office was like also really high on the list of walking out of work leaving was also really high. Anyway it was kind of a funny article So rating in temptations regulating our emotional reactions like not blowing up at people or saying inappropriate things based on emotions. Like if you're in traffic not you know behaving inappropriately when people are making me mad and traffic that's also governed regulating your emotions regulating your task. Performance like making sure that you're not making mistakes if you're working in an excel spreadsheet or something that's there and making decisions which Now keep in mind is also Checking email is making decisions right deleted. Reply put it in a folder. You gotta make all these decisions if you're in your email inbox or checking your phone really like seeing text messages coming in having to decide if you're going to reply well this part of the brain gets fatigued after just fifteen minutes of intensive use and so for those of us who are trying to grapple with our eating it turns out that doing it on the basis of willpower is the surest way to fail. So what brian. Eating does is it. Automates you're eating and handles it. In the same way that teeth brushing is usually handled by most people most people execute teeth brushing with like it or not whether they're tired or not whether they're traveling or not Just been at a party or not. It doesn't matter. And we we. We recruit that part of the brain that executes these automatic behaviors sequences in service of eating breakfast lunch and dinner. That feel good for us. That are healthy. That are exactly what we want to be eating And we just rolled out off like a like an automatic program and It's it's the way we succeed. Told me to you about aids so i'm going to do that. I wanna one other okay perfect. Yeah so people find that. They have a hard time harder time losing weight as they age. This is men and women as well. But you know in the fifties sixties. They find it harder to lose weight than they did earlier in life. We've analyzed data and this is over thousands upon thousands and thousands of people and we find no significant difference.

craven brian aids
"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

You Can Heal Your Life

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

"Let alone three times Clinically significant weight loss. That's over fifteen percent of their body weight so I mean i could keep going here the just another. This is flashy one There was a study in two thousand fifteen that was published in the american journal of public health. That's one bright line. Eating was just just getting going. And they track people over time and showed that the prob the annual probability of just a marginally obese person not a very obese person marginally obese like a bmi of thirty to thirty five of their probability of attaining normal bmi in one year was one two hundred ten for men and one in one hundred and twenty four for women and for a woman who enrolls in the right lane eating boot camp with a bmi of thirty to thirty five their probability of being in a right size body within one year as one in three. So yeah forty one times more successful and In aggregate fifty five times more successful if you combine all obese categories so fifty five times more successful than the than the sum total of people doing anything else south than bright lining. Yeah so can you give everyone a little overview of what bright line eating is for those who haven't heard of it which i'm sure most of the people on here haven't heard of it yet so yeah totally. It's it's an approach. You know. I'll just say i should probably back up and tell people where i come from has kind of the the is that i look on this problem Through just don't really make sense unless you kind of know where i come from. I come from a background of drug addiction and recovery so I started doing drugs. When i was fourteen and start dropped out of high school and Was a pretty serious drug addict for my teenage years Crystal meth cocaine crack cocaine. When i was nineteen my resume was i was a high school. Dropout and addict and a prostitute and basically Went from tricking back to the crack house. And back out again. And that was my life And i got clean and sober. When i was twenty. And so i'm now twenty six years clean and sober Which is the biggest grace and miracle in my life. I know a lotta people who bought him out as hard as i did. Don't ever get that mercy of just getting to live clean In their life but After i got clean and sober i Packed on a bunch of weight and within a year knew that my food addiction gotten as bad as my drug addiction was it was it was hopeless. I could not stop Abusing myself a food. And i was just i was going through drive. Throughs and staying up at eating pints of ice cream and Basically just just rehashing my drug addiction all over again with food addiction. But you know food. Addiction is not drug addiction in the sense that you can kinda function as a food addict. And meanwhile i was getting as in community college you know. Swinging through taco powell go onto campus and crushing it at my classes And then transferred to uc. Berkeley did really well. There and ended up like you talked about getting my phd in brain and cognitive sciences and becoming a professor and so i started studying this phenomenon of addiction in the brain and food addiction ultimately was way harder to quit. It really was way harder to recover from an. That's what my next book called. Resume is going to be about is about really the ins and outs of addiction and relapse with food addiction and why food addiction is the hardest but anyway all that background read helps people understand where i come from. I come. I come from an addiction framework to me. What i'm curious about. Is you know of all these people walking around with all this extra weight to lose. Where's food addiction in that picture. And is it really that helpful to say. Oh you have to eat all foods in moderation like we don't tell a three pack a day smoker. That what they really need to do is moderate their nicotine consumption. And you know yet. We have data that show that Sugar and flour sugar in particular is way more addictive than nicotine like way. It's it's up there with heroin and cocaine. On many different measures including the degree to which it causes dopamine down regulation in the nucleus accumbens. Which is the hallmark of addiction So anyway bright line eating just as look for some of us the one piece of pizza experiment. It just never goes well like we told you know so. That's the alcoholic having one drink a one hundred or zero one piece of pizza. Similar it is. It is 'cause it's been it's bad then it's you know then it's a beer on then it's you know nachos and that you know and it's just yet it is actually easier. We've found it. We have data on this to to eat none than to try to moderate it. So bright line eating is a program built around bright lines for food and the bright lines are no sugar. No flower eating only meals not grazing or snacking and then and then managing the quantities as well those are the four bright lines and the quantity peace read is actually so the people did not we have them like way their food so that they eat enough because people who think they're trying to lose weight they just don't ever eat enough so people are stunned by how much food we make them. Put on that scale. Go a little more like i said you do this. And and we've been around each other a lot over the last four or five years. And i see you eat and it's not like you're starving percent island that plate. Yeah but good food. So that's what bright line eating is and what's interesting. Is you know we have data showing that over just eight weeks cravings on hunger both go down as people are losing that weight that i talked about keeping it off their peace and serenity with food increases eight percent of people over a week's are saying they're peace and serenity with food has increased dramatically They're saying that they're confident that they're going to reach and maintain their goals and You know on average we get people down to go away like no other program documented on her. So it's interesting. How much easier it is actually to just just think of yourself as someone who's just quit you just throw up a bright line for it and you just don't have it anymore. It's like quitting smoking. It's not easy at first and then it gets. It gets pretty doable. Yeah that's that's so true and have used just like you're saying if you're a smoker one cigarette you're probably gonna have more than one but if you have zero after a certain amount of time you probably don't even wanted anymore. I've never was a smoker. So i don't know but it seems easier that way i'll read i. I don't think you know this about me. I don't most people don't know this about me. I don't share those publicly very often. A few years ago i try. I picked up a cigarette again. After many years of being a nonsmoker. And i put myself through such hell. I was a pack a day smoker again instantly instantly outside in the snow hiding from my kids and having a shower before i could crawl into bed at night and it was horrible. It was horrible. I haven't had a cigarette again in two and a half years or something. It's it's hell like these addictions. Are there no joke. No joke for sure. And one of the themes or the central parts that you talk about and bright line eating as how your brain blocks weight loss. So can you.

taco powell american journal of public hea uc Berkeley
"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

You Can Heal Your Life

07:04 min | 3 months ago

"peirce" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

"In a mazing person. She's helped so many people with this bright line eating books. Susan can you believe it's been four years since you release the bright line. Eating book at first came out in two thousand seventeen and there's been thirty four hundred and thirty four reviews on amazon. Most of them five star reviews. You've helped hundreds of thousands of people around the world. And i know one thing for sure one of the reasons for the great success because you didn't just write the book you use the bright line eating method in your own life. I do to be with you so good to be with you. Yeah i think it was. What was it march. Twenty second two thousand seventeen. And i don't know if you know this but that was the best day of my life march twenty march twenty second two thousand seventeen. The day the book came out. We did a Your team at hey house threw a big party in new york city and we invited our community and so we packed this venue in new york city and i prepared Really diligently prepared kind of an academic talk called the science of sustainable weight loss past present and future and when i stepped out on stage to deliver that address everybody stood up and started giving me this standing ovation at it just. They didn't think they want to sit down. And i was. I was just so moved and touched and the the people who came that day and the feeling on our team having this book finally out in the world. i'll never forget. It was the best day of my life. Now that it's out there in the world and spreading all over and the paperbacks gonna be coming out so even more people can get it you. You've obviously sense that day when you stood on the stage ine the it was the beginning of. I mean you had people doing already had an online course and different things like that. But the beginning of the book which brought it to even more people What are some of the stories that you've heard from people of how it's affected affected their lives. Like could you share a couple with you. i know yeah thousands of but just like Pick a couple that kinda illustrate bright line eating has meant to people share. You know. I think of tony wade and find them on. Social media t. o. n. y. w. a. d. e. He lives in fairfield california. And i think it is heaviest. He was he was well above four hundred pounds well above four hundred pounds. He bought the book and he just started doing what it says. And he just started dropping weight rapidly and he's now living at galway in his bright body. And tony is hilarious. He's really really funny. And so when you follow him on social media it's just delightful because he's just such a stitch and he writes songs like so bright line eating stuff online. And you know it's all the you know. I don't want to say the typical things but like you know all of his health conditions of cleared up you know. He never thought that he would be a right size buddy. I think what happened to tony. Is someone at work. Who was Not as heavy as he was And and younger than he was heart attack and It just sort of rattled him and he thought i really got to do something and A friend of his gave him the book and At first responders checked out from the library like he started brightly naming for free and then he's like and then he and then he got the book for himself then he started buying it for other people and then he did the online course and you know and the rest is history. There's there's just so many but it's it's incredibly gratifying. To watch how bright line eating really completely transforms. Lives like just changes them completely. In one of the things that's unique about bright line eating them and we'll talk a little bit about You know what it is and all that sort of thing and in a second. But you've been doing a lot of research about With the people and to prove like this this all works scientifically because your background is your your professor and a brain scientist and and that sort of thing so the research matters to you so it's not just you saying this kind of works good but you're actually doing a whole bunch of research to prove it. Is that true. It is true it is true and we publish you know in peer reviewed scientific journals and we present at at academic conferences obesity. Week and the american society for nutrition and all of these conferences. And yeah we do have research showing that bright line eating actually for real for real works are our paper. Published in the journal of nutrition and weight loss showed that compared to every other program that has any published data at all. That's a what what they call a telehealth program which means online right Which is more and more important than us especially in the age of covert you know. More and more people want to access their services healthcare there whatever online So we looked at we comb through the data The the The research findings and we just compared bright line eating too Every other program that had anything published on them at all and bright light people who do the bright leaning bootcamp lose. So we're between three times and seventeen times more weight than people doing any other program. That's not three percent and seventeen percent. That's three times more weight and seventeen times more weight than that's that was the range of How much more effective. And then we have other data that are published showing two year. Follow up outcomes showing that on average. No one has regained the way they lose in the eight week boot camp. And as a matter of fact on average people have continued to lose and then maintain that and among the lifers those people who like just kind of stay in our annual continuation program Bright lifers are maintaining three times clinically significant weight loss click clinically significant weight. Loss's five percent of your body weight and that's the sort of benchmark for i just what has health benefits and so forth and to my knowledge. There's no commercial weight loss program. Showing on average a cohort of people maintaining clinically significant weight loss. Two years out after a program..

tony wade new york city tony Susan amazon american society for nutrition fairfield galway journal of nutrition and weigh heart attack california obesity
"peirce" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

01:40 min | 6 months ago

"peirce" Discussed on Unchained

"And it sort of feels like we're standing around one particular story in particular that a lot of people have been talking about, which is the launch of Uni, which is the coin that a centralized exchange swap. After the airdrop of that coin, a lot of crypto lawyers were saying that you need was almost certainly a security and I wondered if you agree with that and if so this kind of goes back to the. Kind of T. V. C. Project versus one that is a community launched one whether you thought that its competitor Sushi which kind of is more of community coin or starter that way is also a security or if it's not simply because he she swapped. Was Not created by an entity located in a specific jurisdiction. Well I'm not going to speak about any particular instance. Again these things all have to be looked at on their facts and circumstances, and so I I can't say anything specific about it other than again to to urge people to think carefully about the intersection with the securities laws even when they're doing things that they might think are well outside of the securities laws and in please come talk to us as you're thinking about how to do things. That I make this. We often come talk to me, but come talk to our thin hub are folks on staff who work on these issues all the time, and they can help you think through some of the ramification ramifications without giving you legal advice. But they can help you think about what kind of questions to ask. So that's what I would urge to do. Dot. com the CRYPTO SUPER APP that lets you buy,.

Dot.
"peirce" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:19 min | 7 months ago

"peirce" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"What does it do? What does a mother do? When in that flash of a moment? The only thing she can see is her daughter's beautiful. And then. The vision of her daughter's face morphs and becomes contorted. Contorted with excruciating horror. Pain and fear as the fiery hot bullets from the police shooting her Peirce, her flesh. Bullets from police with depraved hearts tearing into the body of an innocent black woman. What does mother do when in that? Very moment. Her Heart. Is amputated. What does the mother do when there are no immediate answers or solutions to the persistent question? Why did the police kill? What does the mother do was she doesn't.

Peirce
"peirce" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"peirce" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Balcony her ex boyfriend Gareth Peirce house who was arrested and charged with murder has been accused of strangling her before that fatal fall from the southern California Toyota dealer traffic center we make it easy there's a wreck on the one ten our lord that god the maybe didn't send it to your sixty images sixty out sorry about that route on the sixty west Bennett valley where there is a crash or the big rig is blocking the carpool lane expect the delay from the two fifteen ninety one interchange and Rancho Cucamonga still working to ten west a car kneeling in that crash in the three left figure drive is just jammed solid from day creek can't find these guys want to buy into returning super woman super lawyer dot com Jeff ball with an update on the fight but there always stuff going on one industry all right good news good news really big news Dallas stop if you read this way southbound five at seven ten the teacher was that self evident all lanes have been re opened now here you go if you're on the south Golden State out coming out of Glendale around Los felis itself it's going to get real slow entry the still interchange but any time that we got the whole freeway shut down all lanes are but advises they would everywhere because the alternatives in other words going east January sixty to the south seventh at the south five they got very busy but again south five at the seven ten all lanes have been reopened entered an inactive is super woman super lawyer dot com Jeff bokeh admire this guy have to reckon riverside ninety one west bend a magnolia that one of the right lanes okay fine this guy helps get you there faster hi robin banks the Lakers faced a tough Boston Celtics team at staples center yesterday.

murder Bennett valley Rancho Cucamonga Glendale Lakers staples center Gareth Peirce California Toyota Dallas Los felis Jeff bokeh Boston Celtics
"peirce" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"peirce" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Gareth Peirce house faces first degree burglary and special circumstances of allegations of lying in wait and this all goes back to you Amy Hardwick who is the former ex fiancee of comedian drew Carey she was killed over the weekend at her home on it was a fall from the balcony in there trying to determine now what she pushed did she fall what what exactly led to it she actually when she fell she didn't die right away she died at the hospital from blunt force trauma to the head and upper torso but now she had tried to get restraining orders against Gareth Peirce house and I guess one had expired and they recently saw each other and that sort of like if it appeared he gone away for awhile but then they sites other that might have kinda rekindled his obsession I guess with her and maybe that's what they think started this again yeah you can tell when someone's going after you there's not there's very little the police can do even when you report them because they always say even if you've got a restraining order until they violated the violated and via again when they violated by killing someone then okay now we can do something about it crazy let's take a break and we will come back and continue on with the handle on the news let's check in with Jennifer a state senator from Berkeley has introduced a bill to let government use vacant homes for affordable housing it houses in for closure the bill would give people living there decades to buy the home for reduced price next local governments and non profits would get a chance to buy it to convert it to.

burglary Amy Hardwick Jennifer Berkeley Gareth Peirce drew Carey senator
Los Angeles: Family Therapist Murdered in Hollywood Hills, Former Boyfriend Arrested

Orlando's Morning News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles: Family Therapist Murdered in Hollywood Hills, Former Boyfriend Arrested

"Once and only the death of the ex fiancee of comedian drew Carey is now a murder investigation doctor Amy Hardwick a family therapist fell from a third floor balcony at her dad to her death early Saturday morning police arrested Hardwick's former boyfriend forty one year old Gareth Peirce house neighbors say this is not the norm in what is usually a quiet neighborhood shocking really quiet as you can tell others we do this every night there's nobody ever out so yeah even the police are saying is nothing ever happens on this blog so really surprising are we had a restraining

Amy Hardwick Drew Carey Murder Gareth Peirce House
"peirce" Discussed on Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"peirce" Discussed on Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

"Laura's great to be here last week. You proposed three year safe harbor period for token sales. Describe what that means and how the safe harbor period would work. The purpose of the safe harbor is to give projects three years to get from the point. Where they're ready to distribute their tokens to the point. Where those tokens or out in the hands of enough people to constitute a decentralized network or they're up and running and functioning as tokens and a functioning network and so it essentially gives you a three year hiatus from the securities laws during that period to allow you to do the transition. And so what problem? Are you trying to solve with this proposal? The problem that I've noticed is that Token projects that want to get up and running. WanNa do a distribution and they worry about doing a distribution of any sort. Because they worry it's going to look like securities offering and so they. There are a lot of folks who are just not doing their offerings here in the US or they're really hesitating about how how to move forward because they're very worried about potential SEC enforcement action and in your speech you talked about how the SEC may have conflated the token with the investment contract. Would he mean by that? Well it seems like when we talk about Offerings in this space. We often talk about the token as if it's the security and so really what it is. The token is being wrapped in an investment contract in some cases is being wrapped an investment contract in. It's being sold the people with along with the notion that There's going to be this group that's going to build the and then you're token is going to rise in value. Promise that people are getting but it's it's really important to remember that the token itself I can't be the security because then you could never have a functioning network where the token were being used as the coin of the realm on that network because it would always be a security would always have to transact be transacted just like any security would have to be would be transferred from one person to the next so if we go back to the Howie case for example those people were buying a piece of an Orange Grove and they were also buying the management efforts of others when they when they bought those pieces of the Orange Grove but the the plots in the Orange Grove weren't the securities and the oranges worth of securities. It was that whole contract wrapped together. That was the security. So there's one compliant route that has been taken by a couple of different teams. Which is the reggae plus offering otherwise known as the MINI IPO? Why do you not think this option is sufficient again? I you know I. I want people to have as many options as possible. And if that's an option that works for works well for people. I think that's great. I was excited to see that. There were offerings moving through the reggae plus route. What I wonder about is. How do you get from the point? Where you have done a reggae plus offering. And then you WANNA get. Those tokens more widely distributed and being used in a network and not having to travel the way that securities would have to travel from one person to another. That's what I don't understand and that's what I'm trying to solve for. Oh so I think now. There's something I misunderstood. So the reggae plus offering would be the first step in this sale and then the safe harbor period would be the three year period after that. Would you certainly could use a reggae plus offering to do the first The first piece of it or you could raise venture capital and you could do development phasing phases using venture capital money. And then you could do your token offering or you could do a token offering from the get-go I mean you'd have to be fairly far along because you've gotta have a code That's that's up and running that you can put up in that you can show people so it's not like you can just throw up a white paper but you you might have gotten your money. In the first instance through some other channel so to qualify for the safe harbor the first condition that a token development he must meet is to make a good faith effort for the token network to reach network maturity. And you define that as either decentralisation or token functionality within three years after the first sale how do you define to centralized or you know token functionality? Well again I mean. These are the same concepts that have have been very difficult for people to grapple with my. My hope is that after three years. It's going to be much more obvious that a token as actually functioning in a network or that a network is widespread enough. That enough people are using it that there are enough that they're enough nodes at that point that it's GonNa be obvious it's decentralized so I just think the question becomes a much less gray area after three years and again I should know that. This is a draft proposal. It's just me putting it out and I'm really putting out with the idea that people will come in. They'll give us feedback and say yeah. This works this doesn't work and I think one of the initial pieces of feedback that I've heard as people are still wanting more guidance about what decentralized is gonNA look like even after three years. I just think it's going to be much more obvious. Once you've had that three year period to see you don't have any kind of like Metrics or thresholds in mind already. I don't have the community offered any 'cause I I noticed that you solicited in your speech input. Have you use it still pretty early days? So I it's it's less than a week so I've gotten some feedback But I haven't gotten Specific feedback on what those parameters should be. You know we have some guidance out from the staff which I imagine people could look too but I'd like it to be a simpler question than trying to run through forty different factors so You know certainly certainly I welcome input on that on that concept but I really do think it will be so much easier to tell that. You're you're on one side of the line or the other after you've had three years of really trying to push it out into people's hands the hands of people who want to actually use the token one other part. That intrigued me. Was you said that being theoretically susceptible to fifty one percent attack would not keep a network from meeting that to centralize threshold and then you said quote. Norwood the participation of the team and a network alteration achieved through a predetermined procedure in the source code that involves other network participants prevent a team from determining that the network is just centralized. And I know that sentences a little bit difficult to Parse In a verbal format by when I read it. What came to mind? Was something like the hard work that a theorem instituted after the Dow attack. Is Martin. What you had in mind. What I had in mind is that you know if you set out your if you set out the way that you the way that the code will work and how. It could be forked if if participants in the network decided to change it. It's not going to kick you out. The fact that the the the team that initiated the network is participating on the same terms as everyone else in making those decisions is not. GonNa kick you out of of the safe harbor okay. It's not going to kick you out. It's not going to kick you out of being decentralized I should say or in of of being able to to qualify as a non security and that's because of this phrase here were you said that that alteration involves other network participants meaning. You know it's it's not just the team developing the token but then also for instance maybe like miners users. Who are behind that decision. Is that what you meant by that? It is so what I'm trying to say is if you're the if you're the initial team and you retain the right to unilaterally make changes then it looks pretty centralized but if you're part of the team and you're just one piece of the team just like one piece of the network just like anyone else. It looks a lot more decentralized to me so you don't have to pull back and say I'm not going to be involved in the network anymore at all. You can be involved on the same terms as other people and I am. And when I'm when I look at that I would still look at it and say it's decentralized in a moment we'll discuss more about the conditions of commissioner purses.

Orange Grove SEC Laura US commissioner Howie Dow Martin
SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce on Her Safe Harbor Proposal

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

09:22 min | 1 year ago

SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce on Her Safe Harbor Proposal

"Last week. You proposed three year safe harbor period for token sales. Describe what that means and how the safe harbor period would work. The purpose of the safe harbor is to give projects three years to get from the point. Where they're ready to distribute their tokens to the point. Where those tokens or out in the hands of enough people to constitute a decentralized network or they're up and running and functioning as tokens and a functioning network and so it essentially gives you a three year hiatus from the securities laws during that period to allow you to do the transition. And so what problem? Are you trying to solve with this proposal? The problem that I've noticed is that Token projects that want to get up and running. WanNa do a distribution and they worry about doing a distribution of any sort. Because they worry it's going to look like securities offering and so they. There are a lot of folks who are just not doing their offerings here in the US or they're really hesitating about how how to move forward because they're very worried about potential SEC enforcement action and in your speech you talked about how the SEC may have conflated the token with the investment contract. Would he mean by that? Well it seems like when we talk about Offerings in this space. We often talk about the token as if it's the security and so really what it is. The token is being wrapped in an investment contract in some cases is being wrapped an investment contract in. It's being sold the people with along with the notion that There's going to be this group that's going to build the and then you're token is going to rise in value. Promise that people are getting but it's it's really important to remember that the token itself I can't be the security because then you could never have a functioning network where the token were being used as the coin of the realm on that network because it would always be a security would always have to transact be transacted just like any security would have to be would be transferred from one person to the next so if we go back to the Howie case for example those people were buying a piece of an Orange Grove and they were also buying the management efforts of others when they when they bought those pieces of the Orange Grove but the the plots in the Orange Grove weren't the securities and the oranges worth of securities. It was that whole contract wrapped together. That was the security. So there's one compliant route that has been taken by a couple of different teams. Which is the reggae plus offering otherwise known as the MINI IPO? Why do you not think this option is sufficient again? I you know I. I want people to have as many options as possible. And if that's an option that works for works well for people. I think that's great. I was excited to see that. There were offerings moving through the reggae plus route. What I wonder about is. How do you get from the point? Where you have done a reggae plus offering. And then you WANNA get. Those tokens more widely distributed and being used in a network and not having to travel the way that securities would have to travel from one person to another. That's what I don't understand and that's what I'm trying to solve for. Oh so I think now. There's something I misunderstood. So the reggae plus offering would be the first step in this sale and then the safe harbor period would be the three year period after that. Would you certainly could use a reggae plus offering to do the first The first piece of it or you could raise venture capital and you could do development phasing phases using venture capital money. And then you could do your token offering or you could do a token offering from the get-go I mean you'd have to be fairly far along because you've gotta have a code That's that's up and running that you can put up in that you can show people so it's not like you can just throw up a white paper but you you might have gotten your money. In the first instance through some other channel so to qualify for the safe harbor the first condition that a token development he must meet is to make a good faith effort for the token network to reach network maturity. And you define that as either decentralisation or token functionality within three years after the first sale how do you define to centralized or you know token functionality? Well again I mean. These are the same concepts that have have been very difficult for people to grapple with my. My hope is that after three years. It's going to be much more obvious that a token as actually functioning in a network or that a network is widespread enough. That enough people are using it that there are enough that they're enough nodes at that point that it's GonNa be obvious it's decentralized so I just think the question becomes a much less gray area after three years and again I should know that. This is a draft proposal. It's just me putting it out and I'm really putting out with the idea that people will come in. They'll give us feedback and say yeah. This works this doesn't work and I think one of the initial pieces of feedback that I've heard as people are still wanting more guidance about what decentralized is gonNA look like even after three years. I just think it's going to be much more obvious. Once you've had that three year period to see you don't have any kind of like Metrics or thresholds in mind already. I don't have the community offered any 'cause I I noticed that you solicited in your speech input. Have you use it still pretty early days? So I it's it's less than a week so I've gotten some feedback But I haven't gotten Specific feedback on what those parameters should be. You know we have some guidance out from the staff which I imagine people could look too but I'd like it to be a simpler question than trying to run through forty different factors so You know certainly certainly I welcome input on that on that concept but I really do think it will be so much easier to tell that. You're you're on one side of the line or the other after you've had three years of really trying to push it out into people's hands the hands of people who want to actually use the token one other part. That intrigued me. Was you said that being theoretically susceptible to fifty one percent attack would not keep a network from meeting that to centralize threshold and then you said quote. Norwood the participation of the team and a network alteration achieved through a predetermined procedure in the source code that involves other network participants prevent a team from determining that the network is just centralized. And I know that sentences a little bit difficult to Parse In a verbal format by when I read it. What came to mind? Was something like the hard work that a theorem instituted after the Dow attack. Is Martin. What you had in mind. What I had in mind is that you know if you set out your if you set out the way that you the way that the code will work and how. It could be forked if if participants in the network decided to change it. It's not going to kick you out. The fact that the the the team that initiated the network is participating on the same terms as everyone else in making those decisions is not. GonNa kick you out of of the safe harbor okay. It's not going to kick you out. It's not going to kick you out of being decentralized I should say or in of of being able to to qualify as a non security and that's because of this phrase here were you said that that alteration involves other network participants meaning. You know it's it's not just the team developing the token but then also for instance maybe like miners users. Who are behind that decision. Is that what you meant by that? It is so what I'm trying to say is if you're the if you're the initial team and you retain the right to unilaterally make changes then it looks pretty centralized but if you're part of the team and you're just one piece of the team just like one piece of the network just like anyone else. It looks a lot more decentralized to me so you don't have to pull back and say I'm not going to be involved in the network anymore at all. You can be involved on the same terms as other people and I am. And when I'm when I look at that I would still look at it and say it's

Orange Grove SEC United States Howie DOW Martin
"peirce" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Me. Okay. Seems to me that are Indianapolis Colts were heavy into the defensive side was that the plane coming in to to be this heavy in terms of defensive players the draft choices. Most certainly the plan of Chris Ballard. Yeah. Certainly have the competition level, and that defense has really been a big focus friend ever since he overcooked this whole rebuilt back in twenty seven team. But I think mostly it was all about getting more logic disallowing Bieber flute there to set the for Nader to be more creative. This fall. You're play really really good quarterbacks this year. I think it was a big emphasis just to improve the debt and improve the athleticism on that side of the ball. Well, they start with rock. Yes. In a cornerback at a temple. That was another issue. You mentioned you know, guys who can rush the quarterback put pressure on these elite guys they're going to play Joson needs some people. If that's your plan, you need some lockdown guys, and they really liked this guy. They do they love us competitiveness. There was a lot of talk about the trading back again with that thirty four pick on Friday night. I was the second pick in the second round. And they just couldn't say no to rock, you, you know, they had several trade calls, but they feel like he gives them the band band type of colon, which is not necessarily something. We saw them do a whole lot of last year. But I think it's where they won't be up to all of all of that in twenty nine thousand nine when you're playing the likes ROY Mahal, Philip rivers breeze, and you can go on and on about the quarterbacks on the schedule. Interesting note on rocky sin. He is a two-time high school state wrestling champions in Georgia. Right here right about an NFL corner. But yeah, he he's got certainly a bit of a one on one mindset in his background, and we'll see out translates to the NFL. Well it also addresses. What we the I say is talked about on the show before net. Is you need to be multi sport a heavily? But that notwithstanding to your point about quickness athleticism second pick that they had been Bonna goo for TCU outside linebacker Peirce Campbell wide receiver from Ohio State and Bobby oca- reiki from Stanford outside linebacker or athletic types of guys you're talking about oh without a doubt. Yeah. They let's start bed, but don't TCU. He said a combine record for broad jump. Amongst all the fence of linemen in the history of the combine he also had the best vertical jump of any defensive lineman. This year. I was gonna play linebacker in Indianapolis. So that's a bit of a change. Then you go to Paris Campbell. I think some big ten fancier locally will certainly remember him just for leave. You. He ran the fastest forty gallons of any receiver the Combi fairy fair explosive player of the bomb hands. And then Bobby oak Rica out of Stanford, either guy very long on you know, that that was a treat that the colts really liked with Darius winter last year. So we'll Chris Ballard that I've learned now in covering three drafts premium on ethnic ability, high character guys team, captain think big along those lines and mash that elite athletic ability and really more testing traits along with that high character, he's gonna probably be very inclined to put put you on his draft board and see if this coaching staff can can coach up Joe stays in. Join me earlier talked about Paris Campbell in the idea of putting. Campbell in and T Y Hilton on the same side of the ball and just turning no speed burners loose Frank Reich. Gotta be salivate tonight. Thinking about that in the thing about Campbell. When you watch the Idaho state, you know, yeah, he made some plays vertically. But for the most part, it was a lot of high-percentage right underneath type of throws. And then you let him do what he does best and that's run away from people. I think that an element that has been missing from the colts yards after catch right to have such a great player vertically. But it's a lot of just some of the yards to the air. It's not these little five yard dump that turned into a fifty sixty yard plastic the staff at caught my eye about Campbell. I believe he had like three catches this year over forty yard thanks to of the three or catches that he made behind the line of. And the other one was like a dump that went maybe three you're the air. And he took it, you know, sixty seventy yards. So again, this is a guy that you can give him the ball with high percentage type of throws or even hand off and just let let into the rest Kevin Bolinger this in ten seventy the fan dot com. I encourage you to read his great work. We're gonna come back and talk much more about the draft in the colts will also squeeze in all conversation about the Pacers..

Paris Campbell colts Indianapolis Chris Ballard Colts Peirce Campbell Bieber NFL ROY Mahal Stanford Nader Joson TCU Philip rivers breeze Kevin Bolinger Bobby oak Rica Frank Reich Idaho Ohio Bobby oca
"peirce" Discussed on Chicks in the Office

Chicks in the Office

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on Chicks in the Office

"And she lost the million right in the beginning. So I don't even know what happened. Yeah. I gotta watch that. But the mass air was just one that you had to watch. Everybody was watching. I will be choosing dealer. No deal over the head. I had I had Eric Nardini to like texting me about the show. It was great. It's a fun show too. I feel like it's a fun show to watch with people because you can all try and guess who who the people are. Yeah. But I I don't know if it's one of those shows that's going to get a Brunell. Let's I oh, I don't know. We'll see. It's very popular. I'm rec-. Yeah. Unless they changed the format, maybe. I might add it might towards then they need to have like a a winning and losing aspect. Yeah. I don't know what they're gonna do when they got when it's cut down to four people and have these huge long shows or they're going to sing multiple songs. Exactly. That's what I'm saying. Yeah. I don't know. I don't really I guess, but I feel like the peacock was is Donny Osmond. He's an older guy. But had a good voice the unicorn, I was pretty set Chris on Paris Hilton too. I feel like Saturday night be famous to on the show. No, Peirce Olson would total on the show. Hank did say he was like the I'll give credit to Hank. He's the one who said parasol. No, she came out. And was like I always wanted to be a singer. I was like itself says probably and she was like, and I actually started saying oh God. Probably she was like, I'm really rich and people, you know, thought I couldn't say. So yeah, did see my car. I feel like that was her the monster people. I was torn because Twitter was like it could be Tori, spelling though, too true. True Dettori spelling want to be a singer. I probably probably who doesn't want to be right. Doc could be your rich growing up. Where is a good definitely attempt to be at some point. I Twitter had me convinced that the monster was maybe Jamie Foxx, but then somebody said t pain, and I was like how it's totally teepee. They could be pain t pain's a great like. So that could be one and then the deer. I have no idea. I have no idea. I saw was hard on Peyton man. He pulled real McAfee also live to people thought it was grunk. But I don't think it's wrong. I got there's definitely a couple Peyton Manning. Because if it was gronk, I think Camille would put up that she was watching the mass singer. But not say it was like she would put a story of the deer. Like, oh, the show, you know, true. And then who's left the lion? The lions a model. I just don't know the line has to be a model with fantastic voice because she's tall and skinny, and it could I mean, it could be famous singer. I I feel like it was a model. Somebody said somebody said Jenner is like no KENDALL. Jenner candy. I don't think she can either. We would've known that already. Yeah. Yeah. We'll keep an keep our eyes. I'm locked in. I can't wait to see us unveil next week. I'm gonna dive deep into the spoilers trying to figure it out. I feel like these are kept under serious protection. Yeah. I know I've tried to find it and I'm still trying. Yeah. Haven't found it yet. But we'll see. I can. Ju. The land. And he..

Hank Donny Osmond Jenner candy Peyton Manning Eric Nardini Twitter Brunell Peirce Olson McAfee Jamie Foxx Doc Camille Paris Hilton Chris Tori
Why Do We Sing in the Shower?

BrainStuff

04:09 min | 2 years ago

Why Do We Sing in the Shower?

"Hey, Matt I have yet to ride one of those birds scooters 'cause I hate those things that does not surprise me at all Joel. But you know, I've been getting Instagram adds to give me to become a bird charger to join that gig economy. Oh, that's right. Just like Hoover folks are getting targeted to start side hustles to make an extra buck or even to try to make a career out of it. But should you? Do it not all side hustles created equally exactly every week? We dive into practical money topics like this on our podcast. Listen subscribe to our show on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Just search for how to money. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren vocal bomb. And I think we can all admit that. We've pulled a Peirce bueller once or twice while lathered up in the shower, everyone, sometimes grabs a handy bottle of shampoo was an improv microphone and busts out a tune or two there's just something completely satisfying about singing in the shower. Even celebrities do it, according to people magazine after Jack black likes to belt out Led Zeppelin and Wycliffe Sean digs a little Bruce Springsteen. Everyone's a rockstar in the bathroom, whether you have a voice like Aretha Franklin or couldn't carry a melody if it had a handle, but have you ever wondered about this non some of us wouldn't sing in public? If someone paid us will sing in the shower without embarrassment. Believe it or not there is a scientific explanation behind our soapy musical stylings first. Let's look at why we're relaxed enough in the shower to bust into song. I think about it. You don't sing when you're sad unless you're singing, the blues, maybe for many people shower time is the only time they're alone all day, you're in a warm small safe in. Environment. You're comfortable enough to be in the buff stress. Literally washes off of you when you relax, your brain releases dopamine, which can give your creative juices, a jump start warm waters rushing over you. And now, you're relaxed and feeling good. It turns out that singing makes you feel even better singing because of the breeding that you put into it gets more oxygen into the blood. This gives you better circulation which in turn improves, your body and mood, and because you have to breathe a little deeper to belt out a song. You get some of the same relaxation and mind clearing benefits as meditation. Another neat thing is that when you're singing, you can't really think about your problems more stress relief. But the best thing about sending in the shower, the acoustics you couldn't ask for a better sound system than a bathroom because bathroom tiles, don't absorb sound. Your voice bounces back and forth around the room before fading away. And because the shower is a small space. It boosts your voice and even adds a little base making your singing sound more powerful. The sound bouncing also. As your vocal styling, a reverse effect, which mixer voice hang in the air longer and evens out variations in your singing, think of it as a primitive auto tune. It makes you sound better than you normally would which is a confidence boost we don't sing in the shower simply because we have that song. Stuck in our heads. You know, the one it turns out, we do it for many reasons. Stress relief happiness, great acoustics or maybe just because we like to hear our own voices. No matter what the reason keep it up. It's good for you. And if you've never tried it put the song and put on your own private concert. Today's episode was written by Deborah Ronca and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other rock and topics are home planet has two forks dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every

Matt Aretha Franklin Jack Black Apple Dopamine Robert Lamb Bruce Springsteen Joel Joe Mccormick Wycliffe Sean Deborah Ronca Tyler Clang
"peirce" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"CNBC and portable poll every day. Paul Paul Peirce yuppie. I would put out there today would be. Your giant fan? Would you rather? See the giants win all the rest of their games or lose all the rest of their games in this twenty eighteen what do you think the Paul would say, I don't know? That's why I'm curious. Now, if you win all the rest of your games, you would think you'd get in at nine and seven as a wildcard. So let's just we have to make the assumption. They made the playoffs. Right. Okay. Would you rather? See him win all their games and make the playoffs or lose all their games. And finally turn the page and then be in a better position for the number one. If I'm to assume that they're going to win the rest of their games and make the playoffs. I want them to win the rest of their games that make the playoffs doesn't that? Just hold. Because maybe my my quarterback now is going to find his rhythm, man. He's gonna find a trust with his offense of line. And they're going to be able to run the ball. And the defense is going to get healthy and get sacks and turnovers and all that other stuff. I mean to do what Odell Beckham junior's hoping that they do while. It's a very good thing to have in your heart to feel like you can do it the let's be honest. The odds are astronomical. Yes. Yeah. So you got the bucks this week at home in the buccaneers or a team. They I hate they put up over five hundred yards offense last week only scored three points sucks. I mean, they're a team that gain, of course, score points, but a lot of yards. The offense is pretty good defenses. Terrible. But it's a winnable game. The buccaneers is a winnable game. I think so all right. So at what point do you start to believe that Odell Beckham junior isn't crazy in the job? Agents could do it. I I need to see them beat the eagles and the bears. All right. So yeah. Knows the next two games. So he's got they got to win those three. That will be four in a row. And now all of a sudden you're you got the Redskins titans Colson Cowboys fan. Yeah. If you can if you could win four in a row with and you start to believe at that point. I would think so. Yeah. Because now, I don't think I don't think they beat the eagles. I don't think they beat the bears when either one of those games. So I think the dream dies when they go down to Philadelphia personally. Right. But I mean, if they if it just starts to roll in that direction, and they start looking better and better and better that'd be something else. And it's not like you don't have the chiefs on here. You don't have the Rams on here. You don't have the saints on here. You know, there's not like a team that's on the schedule right now where you go. That's an automatic loss. There's no way they're going to be able to beat that team. True. So that's probably why that's probably what Pat Shurmur is selling this team right now. That's what Odell Beckham junior is this supposedly they're selling the team. Right. You what I'm selling the team? You know what? I'm sounds go out there and player ass off one snap one quarter one game. That's what I'm selling the team, right? I hear you. I guess that's the way got to go about it can look at these big chunks. They don't worry about anything else. Except for the next thing that is on your schedule. And that's the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. You can't worry about anything else. Because you don't know again, you never know what the team is like at your playing what kind of condition they're going to be in your let's say you got the bears in two weeks and Trubisky gets hurt. Now. All of a sudden what? Now, the whole thing changes, all but. Yeah. Are you still where are you on Mitch Trubisky? Do you think this guy because I I don't know like so the Vikings play the bears this Sunday night. It's a huge game. The Packers losing. I mean, this is this is a big one for the NFC north. And I still don't know what to think of him. I mean, I'm impressed by their offense. I am because they put up points, and they moved the ball, and they'd gets created with Matt Nagy. I just don't know my supposed to be scared of Mitch Trubisky runs around. Boy, he could get out of there. His he's so much better than athlete than I thought. He was. Yeah. And his running ability is pretty significant, and he has had a number of games here over the last few weeks where at least now it looks like he understands what Matt Nagy wants from them. This is a huge game for both of these teams this game for cousins because cousins is there now to win a game like this, right? Remember, this is a game that the I took you to last year. And then I came. Yup. And Minnesota won the game. Right. They did because of the way that John FOX and his staff handled their rookie quarterback, Mitch Trubisky. This is a different offense. It's a different player with a different coach against your team. That has a new quarterback that supposedly the better of the two quarterbacks that went in their one last year in case keenum, right? I mean, the Vikings are really going to make some noise this year convince me they can compete with the Rams and saints, and they got to put up a hell of a performance in this game. They got to go in there. And they got it. This got to be like a statement situation for them, you know, Trubisky got more touchdown passes. At this point in time of year than any quarterback in the history of the Chicago Bears. Pretty impressive got nineteen touchdown passes. Right now, he's on his pace for over thirty. And that would be the greatest single season. A Chicago bear quarterback has ever had speaking of touchdown passes and records and all that. So Patrick Mahomes was in the news again yesterday because I guess the likes catch up a lot more than the normal person likes ketchup. This was really bothering Joe beningo by the way on Joe and Evan yesterday. This was the topic the couldn't so they're interviewing John Hayman. And he can't get his his eyes off of the NFL network because they were talking about Patrick Mahomes in Ketchum, so like Haymond would finish an answer on Manny Machado Soviet could maybe be. Right. They might be in on this guy that might be in on that guy. Maybe it will sign this guy. And then. Br brought John I'm sorry. I just Patrick Mahomes likes ketchup who freaking.

Mitch Trubisky Odell Beckham Paul Paul Peirce Patrick Mahomes Vikings eagles Matt Nagy buccaneers CNBC giants Tampa Bay Buccaneers Chicago Bears Joe beningo Rams Pat Shurmur Redskins Chicago NFC Packers John Hayman
"peirce" Discussed on The Pitch

The Pitch

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on The Pitch

"Comes through design and I love I, I love the the diversity of this industry. It's a lot of women owned businesses and entrepreneurs, and it's very, very diverse. And we feel like we're helping this industry become better digital marketers, and I love supporting this industry. So it's Chilean. I think there potentially is a conflict. I think the Peirce by us. That's one of my problems. Pierce base is a marketplace for booking space for meetings, parties, etc. And jillions already invested there. I think for the same as because we're not going to high, the burn is too high, and the revenues are really, really. They're too low. High low. Okay. Well, I can. I can show you the growth on literally, and that's what I always worry when someone says, we're forecasting this big guy and yet were here, right? Yeah. And I worry that I think you're super smart, and so you're, I'm not a, I'm just concerned. Thank you so much. Yeah. Julie leaves the room without any investment, but the investors are still caught up in Julie's energetic pinch. Oh my goodness. Wow. Whatever it is that the this is like round number three. There's a lot of money and I think you could make priming the argument that, yeah, marketplace to take a lot of money, but I think it actually takes more money than she's raising. I think she was a valley company and Charles, correct me if I'm wrong, you'd be twenty thirty forty million in and you'd be pumping way more cash in and trying to get this thing much much bigger and faster. It takes long time to get things going. But I think I just like there were too many moving pieces. I think more complicated more two years. She hasn't quite figured out the business. I don't think it's that. I think they just don't have enough sales traction that. Because the moment isn't quite correct. Well, it seems like say no one size, so it can't be transactional. To looking at photos, but that's what Pinterest is. Yes, I three hundred thousand photos and then and so I got Wichita prove value to adding to the yes to their pros on the platform. Clinch. She's a thought leader and event planners like they had these event pro meetings where it's like meetings for just like, you know, and they follow the thought leaders like hers to invest in her. Perfect situation where you have the.

Julie Peirce Pinterest Wichita Charles two years
"peirce" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"All right good deal wednesday then we'll talk next i gotta go gotta take a map i'm tired are you tired man i'll sleep when the seasons over no excuses i'm so tired i'm gonna take a nap so badly like i got home houses just crazy that's the other thing i've been gone so much that i'm so used to being alone that like people drive me crazy now like i came home last night i like almost an executive attack last night trying to write and kids just like the kids are being kids they're awesome i love them but like my god when you're not used to being around people suddenly being around people again like weird that's why it's going to be good that your twelve miles away from civilization wait to be alone again can't wait to get to san antonio and just be alone tell the listeners what they need to do well i do you wanna watch us fifty thousand times on video you can do that today that's noon hour five o'clock hour tomorrow we're on all the time you're on at noon i'm gonna noon till you i'm on it like twelve thirty but anyway what peirce is getting to and you can eat up is cbs sports hq is freaking fantastic way to keep up with everything sports daily go heggie it's a free twenty four seventh streaming sports information channel scores news highlights for the tournament and all of your favorite sports like i said earlier majorly i'm looking forward to this major league but usually we don't get major league baseball until like the sunday of the final four or the monday sunday is the first opening day basically.

san antonio peirce baseball executive
"peirce" Discussed on Marty and McGee

Marty and McGee

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on Marty and McGee

"Berg reds you know we were so i was a member of the peirce berg kawana 's okay and bones was my best buddy grown up he was how about this for a name that dairy queen kings i mean you talk about queen king the dairy queen king from was man they were terrible the dairy queen kings all my boys listening y'all know you were terrible i'm just i'm just telling it like it is well my our team was it was the the the dollars and the reason they were the dollars is because it was sponsored by family dollar it was an accounting firm and so it was it was like four dudes names like last names so like their accounting firm was whatever it all i know is there initials were dot and be so it was the meal the dl tb dollars that sounds like a government agency yeah it was but it really was it was like four like really long names and to this day i have no idea what was but you couldn't put it on jersey so the knows do yeah it was so he's i like the fact that anytime lateness on the show he's feeding the he's feeding the animals cabinet is on the line kevin kevin all the computer screen says is buying cattle and tball what's up gentleman i gotta tell you this when i when i heard you guys talking about de ball and cows.

Berg peirce berg kawana dot
"peirce" Discussed on African Tech Round-up

African Tech Round-up

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on African Tech Round-up

"I think the started community in africa's the one of the things we notice is that not enough indigenous african people on a cap table not enough of them are actually get an equity in these up so when you look at these socalled startups being successful in africa in our company again in a my my cofounders and indigenous african person of mr christopher mop indera and in our team of developers are indigenous african folks so in in all those decied rounds and new investment this being done in our company you know there are local indigenous people who are participating in the equity of the companies and even sitting down with our attorneys and in the states they say you know there's issues that make it a little more difficult to determine how the vesting works because of the top and satian and other companies come countries in how this done but when these companies are saying that they're in african in africa doing business we really want to know how much equity do our our people in these local countries have in these these startups and we need to make sure that that's something that that we're evaluate and someone was doing well and are their amazing indesit be one of the criteria is being amazing is how much of this is actually connected to wealth building locally in africa not taking wealth as we've seen for last five hundred years so finally made me let's talk about africa's biggest company naas peirce which has a problematic link a solid straight line goes are saying to list and savory financial dealings in the apartheid era.

africa naas peirce mr christopher mop five hundred years
"peirce" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:43 min | 4 years ago

"peirce" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"So let's hear bubbles on the show by some bs pray for hallways around raqi because he soaked and lacquer and shoulder on garbage juice they're just tractor to woman i end up getting a stong all the time i hate peas what's the most forcoq part about having a having a crew and trailing you all the time besides what you mentioned earlier ricky that they're taping if you happen to do something illegal welli think it's the fact that you know they'll cause caused problems just to you know make more exciting they'll come over to us and say mr ladies down the road they're shooting his mouth off vote you guys and it's not even drouinandrickyogle flying down there you know slapping round or whatever just for the can get it on tape so they cause a lot of the problems just for ratings i guess plus we're not getting paid 'cause julian screw that all of them saw long still working on the contracts okay not been seven years so maybe we'll get paid one of these days can bubbles you you the trailer park in a had converted shatah somewhat converted shed how did you end up with that living situation an how do you like it i love it i love living in the shadow of lived there since i was little guy belonged joints grandmother among my peirce took off all meal you sorta ended up hanging out in there was some cats and then i just started putting things in there that i was choir in an eventual made it into a lovely place no snow normal shed either i mean you a bathroom and satellite tv on all its scana pimped doubt as they say you know satellite tv in nor and i think people are missing out that don't live in chad'syou don't get a lot ladies at ceiling thaddeuslong it my fair share rickynaga didn't know law i mean heavy david bubbles a couple times yes i've taken some ladies out on the town you know they don't generally liked to get covered in cat hair all you know if i bring them back they generally deiflauda cat hair on their sweaters and whatnot not usually the end above the the later you're talking about it you brought back to the shed much spiderman that movie that was that wasn't really a date no wasn't days i not supposed to get a bill after days why didn't know.

raqi peirce ricky julian david seven years