4 Burst results for "Peggy Kern"

"peggy kern" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:07 min | Last month

"peggy kern" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Me so that you can get notified every time. I go live on stereo issue there. There's a whole new emerging field of positive education as well that has various pillars. So if you tackle the vegetation positive psychologists positive education because a lot of education does seem kind of negative right now. It really does. Which do you like better humanistic education or positive education positive. Somehow maybe humanistic just be like human education. That actually makes me laugh but there is something to that word. I mean obviously loved the word human again. It was like one of her main ideas to me like human education like there is something inhuman about our educational system right now happening. Maybe we need positive humanistic education like. Let's get all the words education's good because there's also a sense that our current educational system is a little bit negative. It's a little bit like conformist. It's preparing kids for to konami. That really has not existed for decades and like their other things like that that you can look at about our current system. Well it's incredible you become like this champion of creativity imagination intuition and it really is like a whole different access than a lot of our current schools are teaching at. So what is that movement looking like like. What is that energy. So you've got like seeligman and then you've got like what does it look like writ large and and who are the major figures in addition to you that are trying to push things in more human direction so they have big positive education conferences. Thousand thousand people from over the world you know. Come to these conferences But i if i can get shout outs. Peggy kern over in australia is Leading the way of positive education in australia. It's for some reason. England all in australia in addition to the us or the ones that are most interested in positive education and virtually all trillion england educators. Come to these conferences. So that's really big over there But there are certain schools like even philadelphia. Shipley school is is leading the way In terms of the entire schools based on a positive education model so there are schools. That have the so And there i name schools in australia. That are that are doing. This is very interesting to me. Scott that you cite international sources. Because i have this sense. That's been building over the last number of years that american culture and thus a lot of our schools are really really Mechanical hyper competitive in a particular way like kinda built to like kind of crush like a bunch of people through a gate that can only accept like like sub like very small proportion of them. And that we're all kind of trained this way. There's like a real sort of competitive. Savagery to like a lot of like the american system and that extends from our educational institutions to our economy which in our economies like most savage winner. Take all thing you know in human history at at this point and so when you talk about people who are working positive education like you're like oh the aussies k. And i'm just like oh you know come on. America like we like america genuinely needs like a massive expansion of humanity. I mean that's so. We'll put i wanted you to be president again. I'm going to repeat that again. I'm just going to repeat that again. That would have been such an amazing A no but expansion of humanity is absolutely what we need. But if i if i mean just go even further to more concrete proposals because i really do believe in bringing data i believe in evidence. I don't I don't wanna make arguments you know if you try to build something on on just ideology for instance. That's like building something on a know a sandcastle you know like you need it to have Evidence based just to a certain degree and you have to be flexible to update the evidence in light of new information so I think that these falling He basic human needs are things we need to learn more than education system and they have a really strong evidence base in positive psychology and humanistic psychology for them. So need for connection. Okay that's a big one in our school system right now Kids are profoundly lonely of course right now being virtual that's even Even worse and then you have a need for a safety and that can include feeling as though your environment is the secure attachment here environment attachment. A theory comes into play here. It's important to have a secure attachment to. You're not just your parents but we don't often talk about the necessity of having a secure attachment to your teachers. You know like who's who's talking about that and what that means is that you feel like you know they have your back if you fail. If you fall down you know that you can trust. There's trust in your environment. We have a real trust crisis right now in america with each other the next one in my revise hierarchy of needs is the need for self esteem but i specifically talk about healthy self-esteem versus narcissism we do see a lot of Narcissism around you know in the in the current generation would say that the current generation of kids get mad at me. A lot of its social media. Man i mean there's a real you know i mean you literally have numbers attached to. How many people like you actually exactly. But that's different so narcissism is you know how do you think your your better than others but just a healthy self esteem is that you just think you're worthy and i do think we have a A crisis of people feeling as though there are a lot of people do not genuinely feel like they are worthy. And you made the argument in scientific american article. This is tied to the way. We're treating people through things like the economy or or the lack of universal basic income. It was one of the points in my campaign was like look if you had universal basic income and you could look at your child and say your country loves you your country values you and you're gonna be all right and we're invest in you like you know and and Someone who's run organizations. I've made this argument is like you can always tell if an organization's investing in you and if it's not it takes you approximately two days to figure out if an organization and sometimes yeah it's like right by the day you're like okay like i see what's going on here and this is one reason why wouldn't organizations put on these. Frankly kind like sometimes sort of overdone or ridiculous like trainings or boot camps or in like and whatnot no matter how like frankly like dumb it is it actually still shows like a form of investment. Like they're trying. They're willing to spend company time. I'd like you know like whatever the the training rig moral is that's actually an excellent sign in the scheme of things even though some of those things are you know little Ham handed so right now. Our country in my opinion is not investing in people in a genuine way and people are kind of picking up on it. And then it's like. Do you feel like you are worth something. You can put on a brave face but then like when you press on it like a lot of people are are struggling with it. I couldn't agree more. I couldn't agree more And we're not We're not listening to each other's Suffering you know. We're we're kind of putting your own suffering and a lot of ways as an not always. We're not realizing that a lot of other people are really going through a lot of the same kind of suffering even if it takes a different form yes it can need. The basic need is unfulfilled. And i think it'd be wonderful if it could rally around the common humanity of the basic needs that are being unfulfilled versus Making everything into a coalition thing where you know are suffering is so different you would never understand I i just want to move towards a world. Where we we try to understand. That these are universal. Identify that it'd be very hard for anyone to argue against. Like look like shouldn't each of us have a feeling of connectedness and safety and esteem and so so the values you're identifying right now are something of a recasting of maslow's hierarchy of needs in your latest book which i believe is called transcend. Is that right. This book came out fairly recently. I want to say last year. Oh look what i know of for those of you have the video that a copy of the book to hear. What's this doing here. Go ahead and read us the subtitle scott. The new science of the new signs of self actualization. Let's continue past The need for esteem.

Scott australia last year Peggy kern England Thousand thousand people england scott Shipley school approximately two days one reason each philadelphia one of the points one of her main ideas aussies seeligman Ham decades lot of people
"peggy kern" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

05:25 min | 7 months ago

"peggy kern" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"You know? You Know I. Don't know off top of my head, but it's got more than thirty. We have panels, we call masterclass breakouts we have keynote speakers, leap list here, lonely radio, some of the names of people that are speaking you know Sir Anthony. Seldon. He's one of the founders of I pen and the Vice Chancellor of the University of Buckingham, and you haven't heard him speak he's both entertaining and incredibly knowledgeable and one of the Most Compassionate people I've ever met in my life. so He's worth it are I pen global chair Simon Murray is on there. He's rally while respected. The industry he used to be the headmaster of a school that is implemented a positive education towel Ben Shahar. We'll be speaking for those who know that name he's one of the fathers of he is for those of you know, Sean Acre Ben Shahar Har was the professor that Sean Acre was the assistant with the top the happiness class at Harvard he'll be speaking at a session Lee waters who we've had on this podcast several times is phenomenal will be speaking Angela Duckworth as I said. Steve Levin all done some tremendous things with girls and we'll be speaking you know who he is. Of course Caroline Miller will be speaking you'll the scarf ob speaking and Johnston the head of Pisa, Positive Schools Network in Australia I can't remember what the initials stand for a Dr Abdulah Cram who is working with Dubai on implementing positive education they'll all be speaking and then there's a breakout from the schools to masterclasses one is led by Peggy Kern so that should be very interesting the other. One is led by Matthew White and some other folks from Geelong David bought and other Louis Timon folks from a Geelong in Australia. Who's got one of the most successful positive education implementations across schools, and you know it's just really it is the WHO's who in positive education positive psychology and you know anytime you can hear Mardi speak it's always an education so I it's just totally something that if you don't know what positive education has, you want to learn more about it it's great. If you know what it is and you WANNA learn more indepth or hear from some of these people about what they're doing their successes, their failures there's just not a better platform for it. I know that as soon as the last I, pen conference ended your team started working on planning this. So obviously, twenty twenty didn't turn out to be what you expect when you started planning in two thousand eighteen. So what kind of challenges did you face and say like we have to move this from physical conference to an online space? Well we made that decision very early on. It's really it's impossible to say you have a conference about wellbeing and asked people to make a decision about are they going to rally pandemic or not? We're going to put you to see how much you believing wellbeing. Yeah. So we were supposed to have this conference. You know with the spring early spring this past year in person in Mexico but the folks at Tech Malania University pivoted quite well and have actually taken the lead on planning this in conjunction with another conference that they typically host, which is their wellbeing three sixty that also could not take place in a physical environment. So really as part of the pivot, though it became really clear that we didn't have to. Charge for this, this is something that we it really became less about content although it's incredibly rich in content. And more about how can we use this opportunity to expose as many people as possible to this and that's where free.

Simon Murray Sean Acre Ben Shahar Har Positive Schools Network Ben Shahar Seldon Sir Anthony Australia Steve Levin Sean Acre University of Buckingham Geelong Caroline Miller Vice Chancellor Geelong David Dr Abdulah Cram Angela Duckworth Tech Malania University Mardi Harvard Peggy Kern
"peggy kern" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"peggy kern" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Wanted to mention event we had this last weekend. You know, we we get complaints about the VA medical center sometimes. And and it's usually veterans who didn't get what they wanted. So they're upset, but the fact is that Peggy Kerns has been leading that organization for the last three years and just doing a fantastic job. And she retired after thirty six years, and by golly, we're going to miss her an awful lot. It was a great retirement ceremony. And it was it was great because here here. Her husband was there. And he's retiring they're going on a cruise. They're going to get out there and enjoy life, but she's not going away. She's actually sitting on a board here in town is going to be helping veterans and she's going to be doing volunteer work. So just my hat's off to Peggy Kerns. I just want to thank her publicly for for everything. She's done for the veterans. She's done a lot to make that VA medical center. A whole lot better. Here's to great lady. I really appreciate all that all the effort that Peggy has put in her outreach and collaborating with private sector. I think is second to none. She really has reached out, and I believe will continue to I think do great things in the private sector, absolutely self. I wanted to mention something else. We did this land. We did not last week the week before. I think it was the last time I was on Evan Russia's on all right breach director, and he is just taking the bull by the horns and he's moving on. He wants and EVS in every corner of the state that he can possibly get to. And we teamed up it's all about partnerships. Right. And so he teamed up with a senior private senior group that does outreach into the rural communities, and so he and their outreach person just took a trip and went to Beatty goldfield, I think it's goldfield north abating and and tone apo- met with community leaders met with veterans just did a an amazing job of getting out there and let him know end EVS is here to support them. And I think we have improved upon that greatly in the last few years and making sure that the veterans out in the rural community know, exactly what they are. Entitled to and now next week. He in that same person or going up to Kellyanne Tepa Pinaka peo- ch-. So we're trying to get out the rural community. So if you're listening online or on Facebook, wherever you're listening from please if you haven't seen end EVS in your community, make sure you contact us. Heck you can call my office seven oh, two four eight six three eight three zero. Let us know. We'll make arrangements to get to your community because that's what it's all about rural. Veterans are not connected enough to their benefits, and we need to make that. Sure. Do. And again, we are on live today where at.

Peggy Kerns VA medical center Beatty goldfield Kellyanne Tepa Pinaka Facebook Evan Russia director thirty six years three years
"peggy kern" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"peggy kern" Discussed on Good Life Project

"You very quickly get into discussions about people who have what i call stupid grit to they have the wrong goals for the wrong reasons with the wrong kinds of outcomes that hurt themselves and other people so you can think about osama bin laden's an adolf hitler's and other kinds of people who've head goals big goals that there were persistent in pursuing they'd a passion for them but that's not good grit so what i realized is i talk about a different kind of grit that i call authentic grit and to me grit is only good when it's used for the right reasons in the right context but then one step beyond that is it all in inspires other people to play bigger and want to be better so i call it authentic ritz the passionate pursuit of hard goals at all and inspire other people to take positive risk go outside of the comfort zone an live their best lives and so i have good kinds of grit in bad kinds of grit in that's i think what most people are excited by in my book is that i have categories and definitions that help you wrap your arms around why is grit not always good so i've spent a lot of time thinking about this writing about it talking about it and when i was in australia in march um a big positives apology researcher peggy kern said made the university of melbourne that she could really behind into my ideas because she felt like it fits systems theory because when the change occurs the system changes for the better so when the goals accomplished behaviors pursued everybody is battered n one of the stories i have in my book i think encapsulated is a guy named kevin downs who's in iraq war veteran who was blown up in humvee in two thousand five i think six people were in the humvee with him five of them died he lived.

osama bin laden adolf hitler peggy kern kevin downs australia researcher university of melbourne iraq