35 Burst results for "Peggy"

"peggy" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

06:38 min | 6 d ago

"peggy" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"That would depend on when in the process you ask me, like now, since I just finished a book, I'm like, yeah, no, it's fine. But yeah, I'm pretty tortured all the way around, but I think to a degree, I can see after trying to find my books ever. I think you've written 8. After 8 books, I do recognize that feeling of sort of panic or self loathing or the need to play spelling bee for an hour and a half instead of right. Is kind of part of the process. You are not a machine, you know? You can't just sit down and write and have that work perfectly all the time and never just expect yourself to be right there every minute every day. It's not that I don't feel that anymore. I still feel it, but there's part of me that can also step outside of it and say, this is the part when you feel that. I mean, I used to say, I remember actually talking to, I think I was talking probably to our mutual friend Doug McRae when I was writing girls and sex and saying, I can't do this. I have to think of them. There's always a point where I think I'm going to do a different book and stuff. I'm going to throw this one out and I'm going to tell them I'm not going to do this one. I'm going to write one on Fitz topic or you're like, I can't do that. And he said, don't you always feel this way when you write a book? Every book, don't you get to the point where you think you absolutely can't do it, it's not going to happen, and you need to write something else. And I said, but this time I mean it. This time it's really true. This time it's never going to happen. But I do recognize that that's part of the process. And that's another place where you have to, I mean, I think writing takes such profound trust, even as it also takes or exacts from you, complete doubt, and I always think about Anne Lamont's book bird by bird, her iconic book I'm writing. She talks about a radio station called KF KD, K fucked, that plays in every writer's head, and one speaker is like saying you're the best. You can do this. And the other one is like a hit parade of self doubt. And you have to shut both of those. You've got to turn the volume down on both of them. In order to eke out a coherent paragraph, that really landed with me. I think that's really true. It relates back to something that's in unraveling, you've mentioned this concept of creative mortification. Yeah. Maybe you can explain what that is. I thought that was amazing. Isn't that the best? It's Rhonda ghetto, who's a professor, a psychologist who works in creativity. And for years, I had this Linda berry cartoon up on my wall. I probably told we moved to our new house that where she's, you know, she talks about the two questions. Is this good and does this suck? And when those come in and how those sort of start undermining your creativity, how when you're a kid, you're just like crazy. You just create stuff. And then at some point, you ask these two questions. And Ron bogdo talks about how, at a certain point, everybody usually is an elementary school. Somebody judges you too harshly. Somebody critiques you too harshly. On whatever it is, your cello playing, you're drawing your sports, whatever that creative act is big or small. And it's called creative mortification. And you're mortified and that's the same root as dying, right? And you never pick up that pencil again. You never pick up your bow again, you put your cleats away. So trying to transcend our own creative mortification, whether it's because you're writing, you're doing something professionally, or just doing something, what they call little seek creativity. And I think for me, one of the real values in doing this project of going from, you know, sharing a sheep to processing and carting well to spending it to dying it to making a sweater. Was about relearning and re appreciating and re enjoying creativity and being an amateur and being having that beginner's mind because when you write for a living and when you really make my living writing, there is not, I don't have a backup. This is what I do. And, you know, to a degree that puts a kind of pressure on me to do things do them well, do them on time, all of that. But it also means that you're always thinking about the marketplace. You're always thinking about whether you're going to get paid, you're always worried about whether things are going to sell. And that can erode some of the just pure joy that was the reason you got into doing this in the first place. So I felt like it helped me rethink and recapture. Some of that beauty of just being like, you know what? The result of this really doesn't matter. It's the joy I'm taking in doing it along the way. And that was just glorious. When do you get to the end? I don't know if this will prove true with unraveling. But when you get to the end of some of these other books, it feels like you're identified as an expert in these areas. And part of that feels also like a commercial part of it too, where you might be able to do speaking gigs and people will have you come talk about it, and that's a sort of mandate of doing something like that. But do you feel comfortable as the expert when you get to the end of the process? I so love that you asked me that because I actually, you know, ish, but I really consciously, when I started as a writer, thought about my voice as being anti expert. I partly became a writer and not an academic. English major. And I thought about going to graduate school. But first of all, my boyfriend at the time tripped the GREs and got a perfect score. So I was like, well, I'm not doing that. I hate steroids just. And secondly, I was really interested in feminist critique of academia. And the whole idea was dismantling authority, dismantling expertise, all this. But it was all done in the language of authority and expertise, so it was completely accessible unless you had that education. I thought there's something wrong with this. This is not, I mean, how can you dismantle authority in language that excludes everybody? So I thought, you know, I don't want to do that. I want to be somebody who writes conversationally. I mean, I really write very much like I talk and really accessibly. And so I had this notion, though again, there's a way that that in itself is sort of a feminine trap that women tend to resist expertise. Whereas men take it on fairly readily. And I don't mean to undeservedly. Well, I don't mean to be that great. But that's one of the interests of that tutorials, right? On the opinion page, there's been an underrepresentation of women. And I could see this in myself. I used to have a boyfriend who was another journalist.

Doug McRae Anne Lamont Rhonda ghetto Linda berry Ron bogdo Fitz
"peggy" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

01:56 min | 6 d ago

"peggy" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Aaron lammer. Hey max Aaron. Hey. Hey, you guys, we got that good Internet right now. We got the bad news before. Let's talk real fast. Let's get through it. Let's do it. Let's do it. We got that good Internet. We might never have Internet ever again. If this is our last transmission, who's on the show this week. On the show this week, my guest is Peggy orenstein. A lot of people know Peggy orange teen, but if you don't, she's a longtime magazine writer, multiple bestselling author. She's reported on pretty much everything onto the sun, but particularly she's written bestselling books about teenagers, including one called girls and sex, one called boys and sex, one called Cinderella ate my daughter, but she's also written two memoirs, an earlier one called waiting for daisy, which was about her journey to becoming a mother, and the other, which is just out literally just came out called unraveling, which is about how in the early days of the pandemic she decided to go through the entire process from scratch of knitting a single sweater. And she started with sharing the sheep and then she dies the wool. She spins the wool, she does the actual knitting, and in the process, a lot of things come up personal and global about how our clothes are made, and it's a great book, and I wanted to talk to you about that and we haven't had around before, so all the other things we haven't talked about really enjoyed it. Sounds fascinating. I'm just gonna blast right to the ending here 'cause I don't know if max and Evan could actually hear me. I'm not gonna lie, I couldn't hear anything that Evans said until he said it's a really good book and it was great to talk to her. And I believe that to be true. I heard the sheep part, also, we're not gonna retape this. We don't have any more time. The show is brought to you in partnership with vox media to help us make the show. Thanks to them. And now here's Evan with Peggy ornstein. Peggy, welcome to the show. Thank

Aaron lammer max Aaron Peggy orenstein Peggy orange Evan max Evans vox media Peggy ornstein Peggy
Arizona county certifies election after judge's order

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Arizona county certifies election after judge's order

"A judge's order has pushed a rural county in Arizona to certify its election results after weeks of resistance. The cochise county board of supervisors voted Thursday to certify their election results following the orders of judge Casey mcginley, who told the supervisors to convene within 90 minutes and certify the results by the end of the day, the same board had to abandon plans to hand count every ballot. Supervisors Peggy Judd and Tom Crosby argued they weren't satisfied that the ballot counting machines had been properly certified, while state and federal officials said they were. The ruling comes after lawsuits by Arizona's Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a local voter and a group of retirees. Hobbes warned that she might have had to certify statewide results without the numbers from cochise county, whose 47,000 votes went overwhelmingly to Republicans, supervisor and English, the lone Democrat, urged the judge not to wait, saying she thought Crosby was trying to stage a quote SmackDown between the Secretary of State and election deniers. I'm Jennifer King

Cochise County Board Of Superv Casey Mcginley Peggy Judd Tom Crosby Arizona Katie Hobbs Hobbes Cochise County Crosby Jennifer King
Carl Jackson: Republicans Who Support RFMA 'Don't Get It'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Carl Jackson: Republicans Who Support RFMA 'Don't Get It'

"Is it respect for marriage act? Listen, I called these people these 12 senators that had signed on rhinos. I'm changing that. I don't like using the term rhinos. I didn't use it years ago and I reverted back to it out of frustration, forgive me. I don't want to do that. I don't want to intentionally be disrespectful, but I will call them Republicans that simply don't get it. I believe there are people that get it and I believe there are people that don't. And I believe that a lot of these moderate so called are more liberal leaning Republicans simply don't get what's at stake. And I think that's why a lot of people have disdain for Trump as well as what I'm getting ready to talk about. Tracy and Peggy, I see you out there don't go anywhere. The number to call in one 806 5 5 mic, we're gonna get into a lot of stories today, but I'm gonna tell you this right now because typically we like to switch this up every hour and we will, but I'm gonna tell you right now every battle that we're facing except for spiritual battles. Those spiritual battles, it should be done. You know, amongst your, you know, with your relationship with God and your spiritual community. And in prayer, but every battle that we're facing, the cultural battle, the free speech battle, this ballot battle, everything comes back to the ballot battle, and it's something that we have to engage in. We can't

Donald Trump Peggy Tracy
Arizona county's plan to hand-count ballots blocked by judge

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Arizona county's plan to hand-count ballots blocked by judge

"Another county planned to hand count every ballot has been blocked in a ruling that's expected to be appealed In Arizona a pima county superior court judge issued a ruling that blocked a plan in cochise county to hand count every ballot instead of just the small sample required by state law to ensure the counting machines are accurate Republican officials ordered the count after making unfounded claims that vote counting machines were untrustworthy supervisor Peggy Judd said many of her constituents believed it was important after an all day hearing Friday the judge agreed with opponents including the county's elected Republican attorney and the election director for Arizona's Secretary of State who both testified that a full hand count of early ballots is illegal under Arizona election law a group called the Arizona alliance for retired Americans and the county's own elections director both argued that the last minute change could cause chaos and potentially delay certification of the election results Judge Casey mcginley says the county board of supervisors overstepped its legal authority I'm Jennifer King

Pima County Superior Court Peggy Judd Arizona Cochise County Arizona Alliance For Retired A Judge Casey Mcginley Board Of Supervisors Jennifer King
Reading and math scores fell sharply during pandemic, data show

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Reading and math scores fell sharply during pandemic, data show

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting data shows reading and math scores for young students fell sharply during the pandemic These results are suffering Doctor Peggy Carr is commissioner of the national center for education statistics a branch of the U.S. education department She's talking about a new federal study comparing student achievement for the nation's 9 year olds before the pandemic and in 2022 Overall average math scores dropped 7 points An average reading scores declined 5 points in that time And while the study found widespread declines for 9 year olds there were disparities Black students experience a shopper decline in test scores in their white counterpart Federal officials say this is the first nationally representative study showing how two years of school shutdowns and remote learning impacted

Mike Gracia Peggy Carr U.S. Education Department National Center For Education
Jerry Allison, drummer for Buddy Holly, dead at 82

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Jerry Allison, drummer for Buddy Holly, dead at 82

"Drummer Jerry Allison of Buddy Holly and the crickets has died at the age of 82 I'm Archie's are a letter with a look at his life That's the opening to the song Peggy Sue Jerry Allison's drumming inspired countless musicians and he ended up marrying the real Peggy Sue Allison realized that percussion was not restricted to drums on the song every day he's hitting his knees with his hands on not fade away he's playing a cardboard box After Buddy Holly's death in 1959 the crickets continued as a band backing the Everly brothers and Waylon Jennings

Jerry Allison Peggy Sue Jerry Allison Buddy Holly Peggy Sue Allison Archie Everly Brothers Waylon Jennings
"peggy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"peggy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"By a young muse named Mercedes. Join us all month long for fascinating stories of women who are drivers of creativity, inspiration, and artistic expression. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is will manica. This month we're talking about muses. Women who were drivers of creativity and inspiration. Today we're talking about a legendary pop and jazz singer. She was known for her renditions of songs like fever and big spender. And her independent style inspired miss piggy, the Muppet. Let's talk about Peggy Lee. Peggy Lee was born Norma Dolores egg strum in Jamestown, North Dakota. She grew up during The Great Depression. Norma's mother died when she was four and her father remarried. Norma's stepmother repeatedly physically abused her. During such a difficult childhood, Norma often found comfort in music. She was constantly singing and listening to the radio. By the time she was a teenager, Norma had started singing on the radio herself. She had her own 15 minute weekly show that aired in valley city North Dakota. At 17, Norma was hired by the local radio station in Fargo. The program director Ken Kennedy gave her a new stage name, Peggy Lee. And he started paying her a dollar 50 per show. After a few years singing on local radio stations and fronting small bands, Peggy decided to try her luck in Hollywood. She drove to California and began singing at the dollhouse, a well-known restaurant in Palm Springs. The crowds at the dollhouse were usually noisy. But instead of trying to sing louder, Peggy would lower her voice, quieter and quieter with each song. The result captivated audiences and led Peggy to develop what would become her signature singing style. In 1941, Benny Goodman hired Peggy to sing for his band, the Benny Goodman orchestra. In the years they worked together, Peggy expanded her musical expertise. She started writing lyrics for songs and learned from other musical greats like Billie Holiday. She later described her time with the Benny Goodman orchestra as a wonderful circus every night. Peggy's time working with Benny Goodman brought her national prominence. In 1943, Peggy retreated from public life and married Dave barber, a member of Benny Goodman's orchestra. She gave birth to her only child, a daughter, later that year. But Peggy didn't stay out of the spotlight for long. Two years later, she joined Capitol Records as a solo artist. Her songs kept topping the charts, and soon she was a regular on late night television. She began experimenting with genre, blending jazz, pop, and Latin music. Peggy and Dave's marriage ended in 1951. In an interview decades later with the national inquirer, she said, it is always very difficult for a man to be married to a career girl. She's the one who gets all the attention. Regardless, Peggy always thought of Dave as her greatest musical collaborator and the love of her life. Throughout the 1950s, Peggy's fame grew. She collaborated on the score and soundtrack for Disney's lady and the tramp. And she voiced four of the characters. In 1955, her role in the movie Pete Kelly's blues earned her a best supporting actress Academy Award nomination. All the while she kept writing and recording music. She was the first woman to have top ten hits in three different decades. The 1940s, 50s, and 60s. By the 19 70s, Peggy was a household name. And that's when she became a Muppet. Sort of. In 1974, a puppet designer named Bonnie Erickson was looking for inspiration for a new character. It was for a TV special that Jim Henson was producing. Bonnie thought of Peggy Lee Bonnie's own mother had grown up in North Dakota, listening to Peggy on the radio. Bonnie saw Peggy as a very independent woman, just like the puppet she'd created. So she named the puppet miss piggy Lee. It was a joke, and an homage. In her television debut, the puppet miss piggy Lee was a minor side character. When the Muppet show premiered in 1976, piggy Lee moved into the spotlight. A dazzling blond with a dog obsession for Kermit the frog. Bonnie worried that Peggy Lee would take offense to the character, so she dropped the last name, and miss piggy was born. As miss piggy rose in prominence on the Muppet stage, Peggy was slowing down. By the late 1970s, she was living with the host of health problems, including diabetes, an inner ear disorder, and temporary blindness. But her ailing health didn't stop her. Even after having a double bypass heart surgery in 1985, she continued performing. She added a jeweled cane to her ensemble and saying sitting down. Peggy Lee died in 2002 at the age of 81. Over the course of her career, she helped write more than 200 songs. Made more than 700 recordings, and published more than 50 albums. Her legacy and small part also lives on through miss piggy. All.

Peggy Norma Peggy Lee Benny Goodman Jenny Kaplan Norma Dolores North Dakota Ken Kennedy piggy Lee Benny Goodman orchestra Dave barber valley city national inquirer Jamestown fever Pete Kelly Fargo Billie Holiday Palm Springs Depression
The Rise of the Unprotected

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:39 sec | 6 months ago

The Rise of the Unprotected

"Peggy Dunham wrote a column in 2016 called the rise of the unprotected. And unless you go among them, and I mean, travel with your fellow Americans in the way the Selena zito does and Brett does when he's out on the road and I do it when I'm out on the road. Unless you do that, you're not going to get it. You're just not. If you haven't driven 12 hours on a freeway anywhere and stopped in a few rest areas and listened, or gone to the local diner and just listen, talk to some cops and some people and some teachers and the San Diego bureaucrats are putting masks on kids. They have not been listening. You're just going to be clueless.

Peggy Dunham Selena Zito Brett San Diego
How the Media Elite Discounted Trump Voters

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:14 min | 6 months ago

How the Media Elite Discounted Trump Voters

"Is a column today in The New York Times by Brett Stevens on what he was wrong. Most wrong about Trump voters. And I believe it's because Manhattan beltway media elites don't have any connection with America's middle class. And I mean, everybody on every public course everywhere, 9 out of ten are going to come from America's great middle class. You agree with my proposition. I agree. And Catholic schools, you're going to run into all kinds of people, even embarrassed in Georgia, even at Kennedy and worn Ohio. They're going to have a cross section because that's what Catholic schools are. Agree? Agreed. So Brett today says, I just didn't get Trump voters. It's the second admission against interest. The first was by Peggy noonan. I don't know if you've had a chance to read it yet, but I think it's a very important admission by Brett about what America media elite have gotten wrong about Trump voters. Have you read it yet? I read it. I did. What did you think about it? Well, I think he's right. I think there was a lot of folks who missed all of that. And as it was happening in 2016, there was just a discounting of a whole kind of section of the population.

Brett Stevens Donald Trump America The New York Times Manhattan Brett Peggy Noonan Kennedy Georgia Ohio
David Gergen on Running the Nixon Speech Writing Team

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:47 sec | 9 months ago

David Gergen on Running the Nixon Speech Writing Team

"You know, when you came back, when you came back in the speech writing process when I was a young lawyer, it was staffed around. I remember the chief justice of the United States at that time in associate council, arguing with Peggy noonan. That was a murderous row of speechwriters over which we had Bill sapphire and Ray Price and Pat Buchanan. And Nixon. Yeah, and then John McLaughlin came in for a lead in the game with Nixon, but he was around for a while. Ben Stein. It was a terrific group. It was about 50 people. If you look at speechwriting and their sports staff and then the research staff and then we also headed the letters and so correspondent section. So it was about 50 people there. And I ran that for a while.

Associate Council Bill Sapphire Peggy Noonan Nixon Ray Price Pat Buchanan John Mclaughlin Ben Stein United States
Are All Reagan Presidential Foundation Board Members Reaganites?

Mark Levin

02:07 min | 10 months ago

Are All Reagan Presidential Foundation Board Members Reaganites?

"It looks like mostly the board Of the Reagan foundation Which I feel a very close affinity to our Friends and surrogates and confidants of the chairman Fred Ryan to make sure he has no challenges And your little fare early on he was staff assistant at the pregnant president Reagan in the office of presidential advance Where of course he would have met his friend Fred Ryan Just giving you some examples Let's see here We have John lonsdale cofounder managing partner 8 VC a U.S. based venture capital firm which manages $4 billion Something is strange here mister producer Why all these individuals these investors these finance guys there aren't many reaganites on the Reagan border directors ladies and gentlemen and McLaughlin core locus is Steve Forbes is Then you have Susan McCall businesswoman former diplomat and philanthropist She served as the U.S. ambassador to the republic of Austria under whom And is currently president of S and R capital investments We have Rupert Murdoch and Lachlan Murdoch those are two reaganites Peggy noonan really a reaganite name only Ted Olson used to be an old buddy of mine but he's crossed the railroad tracks Gerald parsky chairman of aurora capital Jim Patterson chairman chief executive officer for sole owner of the Patterson group Canada's third largest privately held company I know that was here oregano

Fred Ryan Reagan Foundation John Lonsdale President Reagan Susan Mccall VC Steve Forbes U.S. Lachlan Murdoch Republic Of Austria Mclaughlin Reagan Rupert Murdoch Peggy Noonan Gerald Parsky Ted Olson Aurora Capital Jim Patterson Patterson Group Canada
"peggy" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"So 60% never have. And when I would talk to girls when I was doing girls and sex, they would say, well, I have a boyfriend to do that. And that's the same guy who's like rummaging around like he's looking for a set of keys. Exactly. He doesn't know what he's doing. They've never had an orgasm. And the boys, they would never say I'm not gonna masturbate because I have a girlfriend to do that. No, they would not. And when I still hear my married friend, well, my Friends, but are women I meet out. Well, no, I don't need to vibrate or I don't. I have a partner. That's why your books are so groundbreaking and important reads, I think, for everyone, men, women, parents, adults, children, everybody, to realize that this is still where we're at and there's a lot there's so many more places to go right now with this conversation, but it's so important that we just kid ourselves and what we want. What actually feels good to us, which seems like, you know, I always tell you, it's fun homework. It's like a good thing, like sex is about pleasure. Can we put the fun back into sex, but no one's gonna be able to teach you that. I mean, one of the things I think was someday my prince will come and so will I. Who is my big, like, I really believe that. He's gonna ride up on this white horse, and he's gonna show me everything about my body because I was certain, like I knew nothing. And that never happened. I wasn't one of those women that just oh I hadn't got, you know, no, I didn't come at all until I took it into my own hands. Well, or you are lucky if you happen as a woman to meet a partner that is collaborative and open in that way. You're lucky and then you discover a lot, but it's kind of happenstance. And then also with these ages, it's so interesting that to choose from 16 to 22, like they're not there yet. Many of them are not going to be there yet. So hopefully we see now people reading this book and hearing your messages that they realize like, oh yeah, it's incentive to even start younger talking to kids, but meeting them also where they're at, because we want those adults out there. We want them to move into the world. As you know, caring, loving partners, egalitarian reciprocal, other kind of stuff. And you know, I used to say with girls all the time that I just didn't want their early experiences to be something they had to get over. Yeah. And I still very strongly believe that. And I don't know that guys early experiences are sometimes they are, sometimes they're things they have to get over for sure. Yes, we hear that. But I also don't want to I want their earliest experiences not only to be ones in which they don't cause harm, but that are actually pleasurable reciprocal. Sustaining, you know, they deserve that too. We all deserve it. Well, thank you so much. Peggy ornstein for your work for your book, this is such an important work that you're doing talking to them and because I think the way you write it and the way you really are getting into their minds and the brains and their lives of kids all diverse sector of boys in this book and girls in the other book is such an eye opener. And I had never really read anything else like this work before. So when I first met girls and then boys and I think it just, it's a great service, and I.

Peggy ornstein
"peggy" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"Ornstein is the author of New York Times bestsellers boys and sex, girls and sex, Cinderella ate my daughter and waiting for daisy, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and afar, Peggy has also written for such publications as the Los Angeles Times The Washington Post the Atlantic and The New Yorker and her TED Talk what young women believe about their own sexual pleasure has been viewed over 5.6 million times. Find more a Peggy ornstein at Peggy ornstein dot com or on Twitter at Peggy ornstein or Instagram at PJ orenstein. What was the biggest obstacle for you to like talking boys about sex? Rather than girls. I mean, honestly, I think it was my own bias. I wrote about girls for 25 years. I heard about girls in my room for 25 years and boys. People would say, well, you should do a book about boys now after girls and sex came out and I just sort of like, well, I think that somebody else's job. But I also realized that I'd been in kind of the trenches of young people in sex and social life at that point for like 5 years. And I knew the terrain really well. And so I thought, well, I don't know, maybe I could do it. And I started talking to boys and then the me too movement came along and suddenly the scope of sexual misconduct became apparent, and there was a mandate to reduce sexual violence, but it also felt like a moment that was an opportunity to engage boys. Maybe for the first time in these conversations about sex and intimacy and masculinity and gender dynamics, but my big fear and my big bias was that they wouldn't say anything that I would have like whole transcripts that consisted of nope, you know exactly, right? That they don't have a reputation for chattiness. No, exactly. So the biggest surprise I think of even more than like any specific conclusion in the book was just how much they wanted to talk. How eager they were to talk and how really honest and blunt they were. Because nobody ever asked them, they don't have models of it and their culture with their parents, they're involved in this, like, the bro culture, which you talk a lot about. Yeah. And when me too happened, I was like, and everyone's like, oh, men, men, men, toxic masculinity, and I feel so bad for these young boys. And all boys, really, 'cause they're like, we never learned any of this. So I love to hear that when you sat down, they actually did want to open up the truth is that nobody does ask boys. And nobody's listening to them. And that they are wrestling with these issues now. I think it was a very opportune moment to do a book like this because I don't know. I mean, one of the things that was really interesting with the boys was how they were wrestling with ideas that I think maybe 5 or ten years ago they wouldn't have even been considering. Well, that's a thing. Timing, right? And so being able to catch them as a new generation was considering these ideas. And the whole toxic masculinity thing I always somebody wrote to me the other day and said, why do I always put it in quotes? And I said, well, because I don't really like to use that phrase. I don't think when you're talking to boys that it serves us very well in trying to help bring them in and help them understand and help them to examine themselves and go forward in the best way they can. So I started using sociologists use this term precarious masculinity. And I think that's a lot better because I think it's still evocative of what gets triggered for guys in certain situations that makes them act in ways that are not advantage of them or their partners. It's kind of less hostile. Yeah, but that's a thing. It's also hostile, so it's like they're like, well, that's really scary. When they're starting to hear about it, I don't want to be that guy, but now what do I do? And I also disconnect. You don't think you're up for that guy. So the thing that I was interested in was sort of the contradictions people live with. So with girls it was sort of about all these new expectations that we had of girls about standing out about shining bright, while also still hanging onto these old assumptions that we hadn't really dispensed with of being pleasing, defining yourself through your body, all these other ideas. Defining yourself from the outside in. And with guys, they're now living with contradictions and these new ideas and old ideas layered on top of each other. And that was kind of what interested me to examine. So, you know, they saw themselves as progressive a lot of them. They thought, you know, girls were deserving of their place in the classroom. They weren't saying like girls couldn't do my girls can't be president. That was all gone. They thought girls could be leaders. All that. But yet when I would ask them like, what's the ideal guy? They would still start channeling 1955. Right. And it would still be about dominance aggression, athleticism, wealth, sexual conquest, and the body count being the kind of measure of the man and using partners disposable regardless of how you feel about that regardless of how they feel about that. And emotional suppression. All those things that they call it the man box or whatever you want to call it, that simultaneously disconnect boys will talk to me all the time about training themselves not to feel or putting a wall up and the only thing they were allowed were happiness and anger, that kind of thing. And we know that there can be real rewards of embodying or embracing those rigid norms. So it turns out you can be president by embracing those norms. Exactly. Right? Yes. So there are models that show boys that you can be very successful with that. But it comes at a huge cost. And we know that guys who cling more to those norms are, yes, they're more likely to harass assault, bully, but they're also more likely to be the victims of violence. They're more likely to be in car accidents to binge drink to be depressed to die by suicide to have fewer Friends to be lonely. I mean, it's not a pretty picture. No. A lot of conversations started with, I've never talked to anybody about this before, or saying at the end that it was cathartic or it was like therapy or it feels like someone would say, so what are we going to have another interview? And some of them are interviewed. But it also hurts my heart. Where do they go now? I want to go back to them shutting down emotionally because I think that's so interesting and it's about you say it's about age 5 or 6, something happens. It could be even younger, like even pre memory, but they're like, you have to repress these emotions. You can't, it's not okay to feel. Can you explain the repetition of them saying like, yeah, what the experience was for them at those ages. They kind of explain to you the shutting down they kind of remembered it. So yeah, they would talk about building a wall. They would talk about being trained not to feel. They talk about a lot of messages from their fathers. And what was interesting about that was that, you know, yeah, there were some guys who said, my dad told me to man up, not be a little bitch. You know that kind of thing. But that wasn't most of them for most of them. I would say my dad wasn't sexist. My dad wasn't homophobic. I didn't learn that, you know, they used the phrase talks that they all knew that phrase toxic masculinity from him. But I did learn to stunt inside of masculinity because he was not a guy who talk about emotions. He was more of a sign walk away kind of a guy than the guy who kind of guy who had asked to what was going on. And so I learned not to have those conversations from him, so there was the subtler ways that they would learn that too, and not just from their dads. You know, there's research when you say pre memory. There's research that shows that mothers speak with less emotional range and use less emotional language with their infant boys than with their infant girls. And they over attribute their boys responses as in infants to anger, and there's a classic study that shows adults watch a video of an infant being startled by a Jack in the box. And if they're told in advance that the baby is a boy, whether or not that's true, baby's wearing a diaper. We don't have the baby. They are more likely to attribute the baby's response to the Jack in the box as anger, as opposed to fear or surprise, or anything else..

Peggy ornstein Los Angeles Times The Washingt TED Talk PJ orenstein Ornstein The New York Times Magazine wrestling The New Yorker Instagram Peggy daisy New York Times Atlantic Twitter Jack
"peggy" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"The conversation around sex. So where do men get their earliest messages around sex and intimacy? Why do they talk about banging, pounding, hitting it? Like, they're at a construction site, and how does this conditioning affect your sex life? No matter your gender, Peggy orenstein is the author of several iconic books on teens and sex, but on today's fan favorite episode. She joins me to talk about boys and sex a fascinating account of young men as a navigate hookups, porn, and relationships has told by the boys she interviewed. In this episode, you'll learn how even in the shadow of me too, boys are still confused about having mutually fulfilling sex while still being a man. Listen, when it comes to masculinity, Peggy is an expert. She explains why she doesn't love the term toxic masculinity. She recognizes that men get a confusing message, be dominant, but don't be too aggressive. Reporting from the front lines of bro culture, Peggy reveals the sex conundrum that men so often find themselves in and ways we can all evolve to have relationships that are more interesting, more erotic and more emotionally intelligent. Intentions with Emily for each episode, join me in setting an intention for the show. I do it, I encourage you to do the same. My intention is to help all of you, no matter your gender, learn about boys and the messages they're given about sex so we can all have less misunderstandings more compassion and communication and legitimately hotter connection..

Peggy orenstein Peggy Emily
"peggy" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"And led to large training industry success stories. He's been there and done that and his occurrence will help you find an achieved that extraordinary success you seek in your life so why wait reach out and see what robert can do for you today. Just email at robert at extra ordinary people dot com robert at extraordinary people dot com and start living the extraordinary life. you've earned Does your company have a clear vision. You have the right people in the right seats. Are you consistently getting the results you want. And enjoying the journey if not consider e. s. the entrepreneurial operating system. Eos is a set of simple concepts and practical tools used by more than one hundred thousand companies around the world to clarify simplify an achieve. Their vision schedule your free ninety minute meeting with an implementer at e. s. worldwide dot com. Today that's eos worldwide dot com. And we're back back. Where back. Peggy as we wrap up today What's your message for our folks. You know we have a an audience of primarily of executives and entrepreneurs both male and female How can we support you. How can people back in touch with you if they need to be. Or if you're open to that what's going on in your life right. Now that you're excited about. I am really halvari across social media. I think influencers have done an amazing job of selling brand stories about a lot of things that are. I'm gonna call sexy hair care. Skin care beauty fashion jewelry. And i think that's amazing. I love that part. However i think there's also an upper to leverage social media since how other types of brands choice like this sister rise worldwide. Light so. I think it's the idea of like how does help brands. Tell good brand stories across social media and obviously peggy natively n. a. e. l. y. dot life. I like to talk to those brands. Find out what the brand story is and help them. And i guess that i think is really important is that i just encourage any of your listeners if they are innate married or committed relationships to really make sure that they're getting those relationships all the attention and love deserves. Imagine you know. Sometimes when somebody in your life passes away. We have a new central. I need to hold mike shelving longer and need to tell people i love them. I need to make time to people for sometimes. We'll be learning a marriage for a very long time. They lose sight of that and they think that comfortable sweater is always going to be there and sometimes it. It doesn't it goes away. And i recently after twenty five years and i just wanna occurred other people that when they had twenty year marker that thirty year merck thinks. Get difficult to really give it. Everything you've got. Take that person back out on dayton and treat them as if they were if it was your first year of marriage over again. Wow as somebody who was once accused of taking my wife for granted and feeling the burn of how true that was. I could see that with mixed. Well you're always so good at wrapping up these wonderful meetings that we have with these not so famous achievers. So i'm gonna turn begs over to you to wrap things up today. Well what i what. I found peggy is at this sisters. Rising is is really is formed around Roman catholic nuns around the world. Right why the guess who. They're not getting any funding from. Oh of course not where those guys are busy doing. Other things like ever amazing things so fly. The rest of us need to rally around their work. Well and i can tell you. Watching the fiscal church as women became priests and bishops. It changed the whole nature of the church. And so it's certainly reasonable that those fighting the rearguard battle would have something to fear because when that happens when when roman catholic women become clergy. It will change the face of the church and this is an example of it in so sometimes you know it's not even necessary to take the institution you just get the work done. That's going to be the title of my next worth. Just getting the work done get it done. Get it done absolutely absolutely. It's it's been a real pleasure. Peggy getting to meet you and To hear the wonderful things in thank you so much for introducing me to sisters rising worldwide and to all of our listeners will be back next week with another guest that is Perhaps not so famous but definitely an achiever. Peggy thank you. What a delight getting to know you and and You're you got to be one of my favorite dogs with a bone. And i apologize. I just so beating myself up. That might connection was terrible. When i was moving around here for you because you deserved better than i deserve. Better be able to give your audience a better connection. So i am so sorry about that but when the podcast comes out i will share it and take full blame for that part. That was not the standard that you guys deserve. Excuse for doing it again. Peggy okay yeah thought. I'll do it again at that time. I've i'll pay for all all the best to you At sending much respect.

halvari mike shelving Peggy robert merck dayton peggy
"peggy" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Achievers. Weekly conversations with some of the world's most amazing but not so famous achievers what they did and how they did it and what you can learn from their journey with your house will chris and robert white. Hey guys while we're welcoming back. Well chris from his arduous journey to the Late being leaf paper in vermont. And we're welcoming a new friend. Peggy aflou already there should be a great session. Well hello peggy asset. Where where are you. Where are you peggy. And where are you going. I am in chicago. And i just came back from a very interesting networking events. So you're all wound up with new ideas and new friendships and all of that stuff. Yes they probably fascinating. There were fifteen people at the table. And i was the only woman so i always think it's interesting. Yes that would be interesting. Maybe we'll talk a little bit about bad about being a woman entrepreneur multiple times in your life. I'm gonna talk just quickly about myself here. And you know that reminds me of that joke about narcissist. They say well. I've talked about myself long enough now. Why don't you talk about me. So i'm i have that risk. I have that risk going on here. But i had a conversation but peggy about a month ago and i've been thinking about it and I have a morning routine with the some prayers. And actually i thought and i am every tuesday. I pray that we make a contribution with us with this Podcast and i was thinking about peggy. And i think about how vivid my conversation was with you. Peggy because i. I've said to people about myself that a lot of my accomplishment. I had some things missing from a lot of it. Came from that part of my book that says you are not enough. I had this kind of out prove to you. That i am enough. A lot of my -ccomplish cambridge as our conversation. Peggy had yourself described. It was something. Like i'm sees student. I went to a c. diversity. And i'm an example of what you can do that kind of a beginning but i when i got was your kind of feisty. Your I'll prove it to you. Kind of mea. Is that the right impression of you. Or i might just seeing myself in you. You know what. I will give you the way that my dad explains me. My dad's my dad has always said that. I'm a job with a bump or how my dad would describe me if that's feisty. I think it's a little bit of persistence. A little bit of tenacity. probably how. How can our audience get to know you here and it's you minutes. i mean. tell us a little bit about your story. Maybe a little bit about your dad. Sounds like he had some impact on your life. My dad raised ten children. I was the baby with at totaled. Eight girls he was an amazing man as well as my mother. And i've been blessed enough to have five children four of which are girls and i've spent my entire career building communities of women. I currently have a community right now. About sixty thousand women that help brands tell brand. Stories across social media as micro influencers. But i really think it's just everyday women who have influenced in their communities. Wow how's that for an elevator speech. Well were. and then. You're messing around with fifteen men in a networking meeting. That's funny right. Well a lot of what we're doing here. Peggy is taking a look at the journey of entrepreneurs executives people that have achieved something in life but perhaps are not so famous. I think you'd qualify for that. And but part of the journey is you know what's worked and what hasn't worked but again learned along the way i believe. If i recall correctly this is your fourth entrepreneurial effort house my memory. Doing here is correct. That is correct. This is my fourth and each one has gotten a little bit bigger each one. I've obviously learned and with each one. I've been able to exit at a much more successful trajectory for my investors rollers. There's a key out gum by that's for sure. I spent a lot of investors. Want to hear what about the lessons along the way peggy Have you had any. I mean obviously have had a kind of pyramid of success here. What about the the missteps. I have you stumbled on away in any major way. I'll share. I think one of the biggest lessons for me as about making data driven decisions. You know by by the nature of miami. I liked jamaica. I mean most of my relationships most of my selling most of my management style is very relationship based for the successful outcomes of my company. They've been very focused on the better. I get at making data driven decisions. The more successful. I that interesting. You know that part of the teaching my work includes learning. Better tell the truth about current reality. I'm like you. I tend to be intuitive. I tend to be on a relationship side of things. Data doesn't lie usually if cam but it usually doesn't and it's usually a truth at least in. My experience is often a truth. But i don't want to look at it's not like a look at some piece of data and go whoopie. It almost always contradicts some belief system. That i have about you. I argue become a friend of the data rate now. I instantly get completely energized. And i'm starting to see data points in every other aspect of my life and how it impacts all kinds of parts of my life when i look at data and it makes. It's actually made my life easier. Because i recognize things like you know what if i take in a certain more rounds of water every day. I feel better if i get a certain amount of extra hours of sleep. I sleep better. If i burn more calories as what an eat less i lose weight and so i'm starting to really look at data cross every aspect but most importantly for the business i have learned by the nature of my two partners how to come to a data review more prepared with solutions observations insight as to a new ab testing that we can do to tweak the numbers from for of that. Yeah now you have You know obviously say some focus on women and women owned business. What's the state of the art. What's the state of a planet on women owned business today. You're in it in a way. That's much deeper dive than i can going to match. It's really interesting. Because i get asked a lot of times on podcast about women and fundraising and i've raised almost two. Sorry three million dollars and people will say how did you do that. Like investors just don't want to give money to females so they're obviously some truth to that but they'll always ask you. What's the secret i said. How much time have you taken to build a relationship with that investor before he started to pitch on your idea and how much research in ju The size of the market. What probably you're really solving and the economics behind it because if you just want him. I have passion or a dream or an idea. Chances are if i was an investor. I wouldn't invest you if you're female or male but i've team a lot of time to show i investors that i'm going to get them a return on their investment tempa clear commitment. Wow well you're on strangely silent. This morning i is that this looking at the leaves that it puts you into a contemplative place. When i wanna know is tell me a little bit about helping a little bit about how you see difference in women's businesses and.

peggy Peggy Peggy aflou peggy asset robert white chris vermont chicago cambridge jamaica miami
"peggy" Discussed on Our Unicorn Diaries

Our Unicorn Diaries

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Our Unicorn Diaries

"Comes into play later. Yeah it does anyway. Eventually we decide the climb on to our guys and side writing you in him and we were pegging. We were leaning in to the middle kissing and making out and everything you did. Mirus order and peggy. She's like squirt and a little bit here and there she's like little cute little sprinkles enos adorable and i get bored with riding you because you know me and my doggy style which i love fine so i yeah exactly so i tell antony to fuck me doggy style so oblige right and so i'm kinda of position facing them too and i just kinda light caress peggy and i and i figure asshole a little and Was kinda hot. It was just. My hands is kind of wandered all over while i was getting pounded by. She reminded us off. I don't betty davis a little bit. Betty davis kind of dog. You might you might. You might say. I don't know some people might think that's an insult literally isn't interest tiny. She's very very very petite. Then we switch partners which i was like. Okay i the whole the whole time. I'm just kind of like. Oh you know just like just like on edge. Because i just i don't know it was just not not just that i mean because you usually do but it's it was just every will all of you were so intoxicated and high that it was just it. It wasn't as hot as it could have been for my head. It was going fucking daydreaming. Yeah is close again. I can't stress that enough. Yeah for for minute and the guys are the guys are eating as at this point and i'm having a little trouble with with my partially stone partner. He's not listening to instructions. No i wasn't and i am not having the best time an oblivious to this. Yeah of course he is because he's high in his eyes are closed. Yeah i am. Just i had to say something more than once to him and it was really starting to get a little simone of. What was the issue. He was too aggressive down there with my it. I'm not whether their relationship there. She's more sub in his dominant. Is that what it is. So he's so he he the way he plays with well. That's what she likes. And she said that and i was like. Yeah but i'm not fucking peggy you. I'm marie meritas. Unlike that shit. So tony the fuck down kind of thing and yeah and i wasn't very happy with it was just. It was really getting old a me while. I don't know i'm having a great time. Yeah you can't seated dirty looks. I'm throwing them and the patriot. He's high bay. He seems to be performing world just fine. Because she's not complain. And she's moaning and writhing around. While i'm not gonna fucking husbands head. Yeah i'm like low mic fly. Stop nongoma fucking I'm not into that is very it was like a hoover michael it. He was really extreme. And i really you know me and oral anyway. I'm not a huge fan. Aside from you'll hear about that another day a huge fan especially when it's not being done right and it was not being done right. So i kinda try to distance myself from him a bit because i i. I'm not taking it personal. You know what i mean. I know he's he's not right to sign a right frame of mind right now so i kind of like okay. Maybe he listens when he's sober. I don't use very level headed and cool when we got there. Yeah but it changed quite fast but after this went on for i i was kind of over it really i was like i said i kinda joint you guys a little bit and you know kinda get up close and personal hands on two stroke and touching and then pagan. I had this really nice make out. Session it was i went and grabbed a check From the other side of the bedroom. And put it in the wine. Kim watching these beautiful women and kissing deplane hands all over a kneeling on the bed. Face nature very fucking hot. Yeah and i was just kinda like stroke in her her head in her face and pulling her closer to me see. I was trying to be trying to teach him how to be gentle. This point hank. I'm wanted to sit back and watch the hank laying on the end of the bed. You guys are in the middle of the bed. E hangs head of the end of the bed and stars sucking my dick so i grabbed his grabbing by the jordan. So fucking his mouth. Jaw will come. Because he's heads. Dial gay guys you got you got you. It looks. It looks pretty cool. But i'm more always wants to watch was going on here right. Very fucking hot. Yeah but he was more Seems yeah which i'm not. I'm not. I'm not saying anything wrong with that. Just dating fact that sometimes when.

betty davis peggy marie meritas antony hoover michael tony Kim dick jordan
"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

Scam Goddess

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

"Oh yeah. Wouldn't you wanna do drugs if you're in that predicament. Like or if you were a drug addict and you need it to survive like what the fuck do you care. it's either you give them money for. It's still they still need money. And why is it and that is something that we all need to decolonize from our brains. Is this classes system. That's keeping us all down that if you are if you have a little bit more money than an in house person you now get to decide what that unhealthy person does with the money that you give to them. Do you absolutely unhinged there would be if you gave an unhealthy person like twenty dollars and you came back the next day. And why would you do with that twenty. Let me seats. Let me see the fruits of their. Yeah let me so you have your gimme a smile. Like give me a smile on my god. Yeah it's yeah go for it should be given is because honestly like why. Don't we just not talk about. If gofundme defies out go is trying to establish themselves as a legitimate platform for cowed funding for liberated. Admit they wrote ability yeah. I'm sure that they're like oh if we don't do this they'll all of our stuff could be scams like i i get it. It is a weird place though. It's a it's a weird like a gray moral kind of like. Yeah yeah but also should here. This is your fall like he should've just got half of money. Two hundred thirty four thousand dollars should have gone that. Peggy jo- done that joan Pills real bitch. Yes he would have never done that. Man peggy joe was alive during go fund me man. Oh we would stand up absolutely but guys that brings us to. The end of this episode. dams was fine. James's song good talking to you. What a blast. What a blast lacy it said so good talking to you. It's a mischievous been man. This is just fun for me like i. I forgive people are going to listen to this But i think it'd be fun for you guys to i know but James always asked. Where do you want to be found. you can try. You can find me on twitter or instagram J. mas- eleven eleven. I also would encourage you to check out. The instagram of the comedy co l. a. which is A workers cooperative comedy theater that we're currently starting a group of us In a steering committee and we're looking to start theater that that pays comedians and You know gives comedians agency over the conditions which they perform and allows them to be a part of the direction of the theater so Full check it out. Thank you for doing this work. Because that's been one of the real thing. I was sad about for young actors like not having the community that we had coming out. And say my first improv teacher. Lord chen wrote florida. Girls and james was on improv. Team with her in like she like you know we all ended up in her show in some capacity. You on the writer side in onscreen in me on like you know like and that was because of the community that we had where we can meet like minded people and come up together and work together so thank you so much for joining that. James really really drop that instagram name. One more time for the folks in the comedy co op the comedy co op. Ya yeah guys as always scam. Got his pod jimoh dot com to your friends and family. Just make sure your scams retired because we don't want what yes. Fuck up your bag if you wanna find us online scam got his pot on all platforms if you wanna find me. The ivy l. a. d. lacy on all platforms guys. All my shows extreme right now. Any florida girls. I'll show max black lady sketch show on. Hbo mags all. The max is honey and then all the episode carly on paramount plus. So if you wanna bench. They're all out there now. congregation taken off from peggy. Joe and rob ask for what used to serve. stay scheming. this has been an ear. We'll production in association with team coco scammed out of stars and is hosted by me lacey. Mosley aka scam got it is produced by judith cargo engineered by marina east and research by kaelin brandt. Stay scheming at target. Your dollar goes further. You'll find great deals and low prices on everything. Your family needs like a two liter bottle of coca cola soda. Just one dollar and eighty nine cents. And that's just the start at target. The low prices never end. Prices may vary..

Peggy jo joan Pills peggy joe James instagram Lord chen max black florida twitter james lacy Mosley aka judith cargo Hbo marina east kaelin brandt paramount peggy
"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

Scam Goddess

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

"We made tell them. See a man would've gotten deadly would have got one thousand dollars because the banks heller would like. He probably gonna be mad if i don't give him more. Well fuck that bank teller for china. Pay my sis. Peggy forty cents on the dollar bid. Now give my peggy. Her hundred percent rivalry. No but so. That's see that's what it was. That was you know but actually no because they thought that the bank teller was a man they thought cowboy. Bob was a man. So i guess the bank tellers just just like i'm not gonna give up this much coin. Now feel the feel that the deeply ingrained feminine energy Coming from peggy joe's spirit but also as women. I hope that you take this as a we can all take this is the takeaway because even if the teller wasn't discriminating peggy dell wasn't asking for what she was worth scared that they will go there you go. She was asking for less when the men out here asking for more. I ritual thump to cash. This is not enough. Hey it's me. It's a robbery again. Y- totally fifty k. And his bag. 'cause like if somebody right what it done like and then you gotta do if you need a lot of less than she did. Get more of the second time. Got three thousand the second time but the second time you should come in there and really route the plays swirling doing this one more time one. More time i'm getting fifty grand and i'm getting the fuck out of this place right. I'm getting hunted. I'm getting whatever you got. And if you shortchange me it so man all right package. All backups to you man alleged. The moment legend. Peggy joe. we're gonna take a quick break for some non scam advertisements. We'll be right back with the saddest part of the show. The in where. I have to let james. Oh talk about a mental health roller coaster. Yeah we have been on the six flags kovic costa for a year and a half now and now it's sorority sisters doubt to sigma and beta lambda pulling up to play..

peggy joe peggy dell heller Peggy china Bob Peggy joe kovic costa james
"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

Scam Goddess

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

"I'm gonna take a job stan. Yea i want i want. Yeah peggy joe needs. I wish i wish he was still alive so that somebody could right and sell a moving. Give give her some money town. Peggy jal man america failed. You says america and what people want from us win. This country fails as for us to go quietly into the night. Politicians don't care how many people die. It's just a number on a ledger. You know that's the reason greg out here which is so wild to me that greg abbott. Who someone who needs care. You know who has a disability and out here in kurt not even just encouraging trying to that. Children go to school amassed in texas like. It's just so wild to see the you know. Rampant selfishness in eight humanity in this country. And peggy jal. You deserve better. I mean you a bad fish though. Yeah yeah battlements. Respects so much respect i to to to have the just to have the courage to to just be like fuck this shit. Fuck everything that has has kind of like you know. Worked against me my whole life. I i'm just gonna. Do you know a really clever really clever job of really robbing banks. The only thing that peggy joe did wrong other than the dye thing is like man. You had to get more money like you had more money is that i lick if she had come in and see. That's the thing women always underpaid. You know.

peggy joe Peggy jal america peggy jal greg abbott greg kurt texas
"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

Scam Goddess

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

"Going thirty five miles per hour like for sure hanging up sis. The rv couldn't even reach the speed limit. So in a last ditch effort. Picking joe turned into a suburb in the enter. The city where she was soon boxed in by police cars. The rv stopped and the cops left out of the cars guns trained on the rv door. Peggy joe picked up the toy gun as she kept for emergencies. Open the door to the rv hands on her side and declared you're gonna have to kill me. Holy shit peggy. What he doing. It is a fucking movie. Bro is a movie. Wow this absolutely should be a movie. Officers begged her to stand down. according to witnesses. Peggy jo tally. Last words as she raised her hand at took a step out the rv were humane. Tell me if. I come out here with a gun pointed at shawl. You ain't gonna shape me. Four shots rang out at the same. Time peggy jo fell and died later when authorities ran records check. They realized it was cowboy. Bob and fbi agent called steve powell to tell him a package as death. He said saturday. So i was like i loved her. Best friend sherry spoke of her. And said i think about her walking out of that bank sixty years old that back fulham money. I have to say that she went out doing what she loved will never understand it but she was doing exactly what she loved. I wish i could write her a note in say good for you. My sweet pig. Good for you. Oh my god how deflating that it is dr set it out because you went out like yes hundred percent to do do do straight backs. Do you.

Peggy joe Peggy jo peggy jo steve powell peggy joe fbi sherry Bob
"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

Scam Goddess

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Scam Goddess

"It will put her in prison for way and it's costing us money. No the ghetto. So would pay. Joe got out of prison. She lived a quiet life continuing to take care from other and taking small jobs found employment as a cashier at the harbor. Bay marina on lake. Ray hubbard just outside of dallas She below close to home. I know we're all these places are bent all these places. I fished races so she was beloved by the locals for unending kindness and warmth after peggy joe's mother passed away in december. Two thousand two. Peggy bought an old frontier. Rv off of neighbor in two thousand and four and took it off took off a year. When she reached back to friends and family she spoke of wanting to go down to mexico. She said before life ran out on us. Oh oh peggy then in october. Two thousand four. Peggy jo disguised as an old man with a padded belly. Floppy hat and baggy clothes successfully robbed the guaranty. Bank in tyler. Texas now tyler. Texas is a small town. So if someone came into rob a bank in tyler really feel like where's my exit happened out where they come from. say tyler and we also tyler like tyler tyler. You gotta make the wild loan tyler was. Tyler is like you blink. You miss it. It's such a small town. And i was born very close to it. I was born in sarel so Yes she was at the robin a small bank mason. Two thousand five remember She robbed the bank in october. Two thousand four. Another odd robbery occurred that morning. Peggy jo now sixty years own come home walked into the guaranty bank and the same bank that she robbed a year ago and told the teller. This is a robbery. I need all of your money. Don't send alarms the tyler. The teller gave peggy jo eleven thousand two hundred. Forty one dollars with such a jackpot. Peggy joe left in a rush and she failed to see the hidden dye pack and it exploded as she exited the bank attracting attention of the nearby witnesses. Peggy come on peggy. You can you. You can't forget little details. What it is you wrote. It is peggy. That's how you let little stuff go and you get caught. And i would be okay with this peggy if you had no sift through some money before but i guess that was twenty years ago to the money and got the dye. Pack our say. He's all says. I don't need that. I remember to say no dopp x. No doubt packs archea like nothing patriots to mexico. Do hate to see it so within minutes. Peggy jo Was hauled out of the parking lot within minutes package joe hauling out of the parking lot in her iv with a posse of police vehicles right behind her in a low speed chase on the highway. Now if you wanna rv.

tyler Peggy jo Bay marina Ray hubbard peggy joe peggy tyler tyler Peggy Texas peggy jo Peggy joe dallas Joe guaranty bank mexico rob Tyler mason
Hugh Hewitt and Dennis Prager React to the Attacks from 9/11/2001

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Hugh Hewitt and Dennis Prager React to the Attacks from 9/11/2001

"This is hugh hewitt including The worst broadcast. I've ever had to make and i've made a lot of bad broadcast in the middle of the last election. Peggy noonan wrote in the wall street journal that the day would come when the terrible big bad thing would happen and that she feared it would be soon and for that reason she preferred president bush over vice president gore. The terrible big thing has now happen and it will take some time for the enormity of it to settle in across the united states. So large is the scale of the devastation. They're joining me. Now is Dennis prager who will be taking over me along many of these. Salem radio network stations dentists three of these four airplanes which were hijacked and crashed headed for los angeles the devastation. That will see out sort of anticipated here. The big horrible thing happened. Listen i You know. I'm choosing my words carefully for with you and And my broadcast Many of the stations. You're on after you The a war has been declared against the united states and war has been declared against western judeo-christian civilisation and and i measure those words of measured. They're not they're not new to me. I have believed that. There is this war when when people screaming. Iran death to america that america's the the satan people take that stuff seriously. We laugh or a lot of i. Don't little of americans just laugh at those slogans but if enough people believe that the america is satan that it is very appropriate thing to Murder as many men women and children who are satanic as as possible as I have come to expect from you. Dentist underscored something. I hadn't thought of there will be rejoicing around the world today. In some course exactly there will celebrations and parades. That's right sharing. This is how this national holiday in. Tehran in sudan in among palestinians exactly As the japanese general. What did he say. We woke up the sleeping giant. we will regret it. That is what i think has happened

America Hugh Hewitt Peggy Noonan Dennis Prager The Wall Street Journal President Bush Gore Salem Los Angeles Iran Tehran Sudan
Marvel's 'What if…?' Series Explained

Mo'Kelly

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Marvel's 'What if…?' Series Explained

"That we are heavy into the Marvel Cinematic universe and another property just dropped this week on the Disney Plus APP. It is called. What if And it's very simple. You know what if Peggy Carter got the Super soldier serum, as opposed to Steve Rogers. What if we found out this week to Walla? I don't know about you, but I love the first episode. It's animated in nature, but it has implications for the live action Cinematic universe. Not only does it have implications for the live action Marvel cinematic universe. This is actually an animated canon series, meaning everything that happens in this series actually exist within the larger marvel cinematic universe. These stories are not just Hey, this is just a fun idea and well exposed the viewers to something that You know, can boggle their mind and actually have them asking what if the things that happened in this series spend directly out of the Loki series? What if is essentially a spin off or continuation of what we were exposed to in the Loki series with the existence of the multiverse? For

Peggy Carter Steve Rogers Walla Disney
Kathleen Turner Dripped With 80's Sexual Energy

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Kathleen Turner Dripped With 80's Sexual Energy

"Yeah, Kathleen Turner hot stuff. And she went on a hell of a run after that film. She was the 80s. Princes on her Peggy Sue got married. Romancing the stone, the war of the roses, but after that femme fatale role in body heat, she obviously became sexual target every guy in Hollywood made a run at it. She doesn't say who she slept with or she never has over the years she acts like nobody got to her bullshit. I bet every one of them did, but all of the years she's dropped hints at how she was basically open season. In fact, when she did war of the roses with Michael Douglas, he told it that and romancing this film, he told it that Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty all had a competition as to who would get to her first. I know this to be true. Both those guys admitted as much to me. 'cause I used to love talking girls with those guys. But Nicholson told me that he and Kathleen worked together on prince's honor and one night he invited some people in the cast and crew back to his house up on mulholland drive and Jack couldn't do much with Kathleen Turner because prince's honor also starred as girlfriend Angelica Houston and her daughter and it was directed by her father John Houston. So he couldn't do much. But he knew Warren Beatty wanted Kathleen China. So he sent to turn around the house, why don't you call Warren and tell him I don't have a corkscrew. She's like, why? He goes, you'll see how fast he gets here. And you know, caffeine trying to likes to go on interviews and say, well, there was an unspoken assumption that women were property to be claimed, but I can tell you didn't happen. Well, I can tell you she did an object too much to keep Warren or Jack away, okay?

Kathleen Turner Peggy Sue Warren Beatty Michael Douglas Jack Nicholson Angelica Houston Prince John Houston Hollywood Kathleen China Nicholson Mulholland Kathleen Jack Warren
Republicans Should Talk About Impeachment After Biden's Illegal Immigration Plot

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Republicans Should Talk About Impeachment After Biden's Illegal Immigration Plot

"And his comrades. They're pushing the edges of the envelopes. They're jumping outside the box. They're doing things in ways that are utterly lawless. They're trying to change the constitution without amending the Constitution. They're loading up the bureaucracy. With Reds. And not a single Republican talks about impeachment. What? What? What We are We can't do that. That's bad politics, Karl Rove says. It's bad politics Paul Ryan may not like that. What about Peggy Noonan? What about the Washington Post? The New York Times and we might get bad press. Besides, we'll lose Romney and sash and Krakowski and The weak underbelly of the Republican Party. Just hold on. We'll win. Just give us anyway. Not a word about impeachment. He's dumping illegal aliens in the communities without giving them a heads up. He's trying to change the demographics, particularly Red states. Everybody knows what's going on. And he's also doing other things he's making changes. To the Iran deal. But you're not going to be presented to Congress. He's already lifted sanctions against a number of Islam a Nazi Theocrats in Tehran without even consulting Congress. And it's his Congress Democrats. Nobody brings up the

Krakowski Peggy Noonan Paul Ryan Karl Rove Reds Washington Post The New York Times Romney Republican Party Congress Iran Tehran
"peggy" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Well everyone. I'm here with the lovely peggy rest. Who is in oil lover. But more than that. Her passion is animals. She shares with us today. Her many successes with animals and essential oils peggy taught at schools and events with her sidekick princess on oil techniques for pets and runs the facebook group peggy's pointers for pets with essential oils. Peggy welcome to the show. How are you doing today doing fine. Thank you so much at the first joy spreading the word for oil for pets and your journey started with princess. Eight years ago that right yes about prince says Princes was my side kick. She was losing for and i was done. The fed just was not giving any results and two trips. A month to the bats was just getting expensive. So i got introduced to this lady sign unseen. She didn't know me. I didn't know her and i went over. She came out sense. Wait -ment ancient statement. And she said he put the sun princess within one week of doing it twice a day on her for. She was growing baby fine for back after after week. Yup

Peggy rusk fourteen jobs Three jobs Two jobs seven drops today six drops Yesterday Today one histon Bergamo couple drops michelle
Protect Your Pets With Peggy Rusk

The Essential Oil Revolution

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Protect Your Pets With Peggy Rusk

"Well everyone. I'm here with the lovely peggy rest. Who is in oil lover. But more than that. Her passion is animals. She shares with us today. Her many successes with animals and essential oils peggy taught at schools and events with her sidekick princess on oil techniques for pets and runs the facebook group peggy's pointers for pets with essential oils. Peggy welcome to the show. How are you doing today doing fine. Thank you so much at the first joy spreading the word for oil for pets and your journey started with princess. Eight years ago that right yes about prince says Princes was my side kick. She was losing for and i was done. The fed just was not giving any results and two trips. A month to the bats was just getting expensive. So i got introduced to this lady sign unseen. She didn't know me. I didn't know her and i went over. She came out sense. Wait -ment ancient statement. And she said he put the sun princess within one week of doing it twice a day on her for. She was growing baby fine for back after after week. Yup

Peggy Facebook Princes Prince FED
"peggy" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"A sort of youth ramic objects issues and so forth but obviously which usually eugene torrential in tile making and they made roof tiles on the cont of own house in pool which i've locked in visit. Teachable has amazing of teal blue wave like cold tiles on the roof of the house and they also create a tiles for domestic interiors boffins and so forth but at a time when people were is still largely preowned baltics. People were quite concerned with cleanliness in the home and having a skull clean surface and also in the thirties and forties. That sort of clean aesthetic was fashionable. So she it was just a you know. A two waves leasing the correct point pool poultry. Were making huge amounts of paul and just the very best design to come aboard with them and one of the images that their research certainly of tunnels that she made co portrait and the way that they became so popular whereas i think flexibility of use so tall themselves all queston pool geometric shapes and some of them were with stumped onto the toes a lot of them were screen printed. So it's quite easy to change the color of tiles to mass-produce them quite quickly say they picked one tile. You could arrange them. In any number of ways to create different patterns on rule and a the designs match that the line on the edge of one tall match up with a line on the edge of the other and i became really popular and used in schools and private houses but they really took off the london. Architects use them in schools. Because i've seen his hygiene and quite fun. There's an image therapy which is actually he so apple alexa black and white image and and of the images at the time black and white the colors that the tiles were really quite striking so you could create a relative feature wall often whatever used in entrance holes are in cafeterias stairway where tickle material costa takes knocks. Scoffing said moore and still laugh. The school hasn't been demolished will select and if it is good. Nick united states talk and By some lucrative for outdoor projects and. That's an image that all the Talla in coventry in the main square the shopping centre with a cheeky leg lady godiva at the start of the hour on who lack and for that one of that. There's a hotel behind it. So they were picked off by designer. A really lovely way of saying you know durable to pop of color into this game You know was an inconsiderable low cost but you know a gerbil long-lasting feature other incredibly beautiful. I think an. It's they look really simple. Factually as with anything that looks for example typical away. And there's a lot of thought like you say it's just incredible and so interesting to think that because i had never even considered the whole idea of the The hygiene aspects of tiles. Because when i started beating into picky to For the podcast. And i saw that she had meet these titles. And i'd seen i was like i mean there 'cause i i read somewhere that there was a boom and production post world war two for new housing estates and buildings and airports and expansion and i was like oh but was there there be a lot of titles. But you're so correct. And then when i thought about i was like well. Yes thank you vitally. The entirety of the london underground near office titled Also when i think of old pops and buildings are also titled their facades child and adjust. You won't pasta and you completely. I don't know what's heading in plain sight which thank these. These things are but the skill aspect to sue interesting because they're also so colorful and joyous and just really good fun to have a skill for heads. Yeah absolutely yeah. That's really interesting. You say obviously post war government were very aware owed a lot of people suddenly becoming unemployed on and off the factors that had been used for work. Were redeployed in making materials to satisfy the housing booms. You you mentioned so there Aluminium works where repurpose for making off to making building frames narrow. Some building frames aluminium and it sounds are kotov thing to do really expensive and so forth but it was part of the government for a push to make sure that the manufacturing pulse though had things to make and people were still employed on the building boom on. So that's another. That's another whole subject about ten centuries voting but the thing that with tiles. Is that the the hygienic that gerbil fon you can put any color you like on them. There are lots of different ways thing images on tiles screen printing. Oh you mentioned victorian tall someone the berea early underground and on pubs and so forth. They were similar reasons. hygiene clean. You can wash them. And also you could because of the way they manufacture. It's you could create an sort of culprit callers in branding. If you look at london underground toil on the Earliest underground stations. So some of those on a district. Line say kensington that deep sort of ox blood purple red color and that was just a color that was selected for the outside of cheap station so that they were recognizable but also people could recognize that texture. If you couldn't see it in because the smoke was so bad you know that it was station. The mike marsh Seriously yes that's why. I think they're so that seven during you know everyone's talking skull some tall in the house now that they've chosen for aesthetic reasons call it lot texture and they're were all well. Yeah tales are beautiful. It's so interesting though. Because when i was looking at peggy's design the are sue of its time because they're very rude. They're very design heavy. There's a low of imagery they are. And i feel very much. As time has progressed. People have adopted this of minimal aesthetic entails and it's very old of the each. Have these highly of motive heavy titles bought one of her of vegas design. Projects title wise was a really important event that happened in nineteen fifty one and that was for the festival of britain. Yeah absolutely and i think it's really interesting.

london seven festival of britain one tile nineteen fifty one one of the images world war two peggy kensington Nick united two waves each thirties and forties about ten centuries one apple Teachable of gerbil
"peggy" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"peggy" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Having to use what they had at home because we couldn't get any more materials we couldn't travel the faces to get more pacers or inc or ever people use and you could see this has been necessarily being if stamos materials looking at what you can use around you to create something require astounding and repeat from making its case in point you have a tiny little line or potato. That's a few inches across. You can print yards and yards and yards of fabric will not back to basics voted. But there's some th you get so much joy and creating something. I all a nontraditional matteo and also just getting a little macy i think. Can i think piggy as a teacher. I've raised some students because she was incredibly influential on a raid. Quit low from our students that essentially were lake. She was the person you know. She really challenged us to travel and thank independently and and to create an enjoy. The the whole aspect of creating and for me won't find really interesting. Is that the this completely makes sense. Actually you so going back a little bit too and she qualified as a teacher. I raise an ahold of her battery. Anna leave a link to that in the description and the chew was below and it was really interesting because it was written by an ex pupil. And she said that she. Peggy told her that when she qualified as a teacher. She can't a week because she was she didn't want it to detain her from her Practice social only ever told part-time very much abused as a inspire the next generation but also she still had rigged to create. so. I think it's just so so impressive high. She divided her time and she knew that it was important to create yes but also to to teach next generation of women. Because this was a girls school that you can create all these beautiful things on just exploded with. Just the the idea of exploration and peggy's work you mentioned the in the nineteen thirty. She founded the artists international association. I couldn't really fain very much on that. Is that something that stowe very much going today. Or 'cause i know peggy her network on she very much was inspired by william morris and has idea of the arts and crafts movement. Is this something that she just wanted to use as a network of artists to encourage international collaboration. Yeah i think most. I can gather as you say is quite hard to find out a lot of how these things came about in such by thing that was basically it but supreme Between the first and second world wars It was a way of putting people together forming a network of think much in the same way that people created unions for foskit makers cutlers or whatever An nf become goes on some of those groups. Join together to form larger groups by thing that was basically it is about putting people together and creating voice especially i think obviously at that time in this Mid to late thirties in eastern europe russia people who were creative in any way artists musicians poets and so forth could feel You know the way to where things are going politically obviously in war situations or when somebody is trying to dominate nickel landscape often. It's people who are creative only the in a somewhat dangerous because they have a way of communicating ideas and thoughts just promoting. Oh sparking thinking thirty making an ideal when but just cepa questioning in Attitude in people and sparking curiosity and and that sort of thing people. So i think it was the way if if uniting people who may have become a so disparate or isolated narrow work will practical old geographically may be. I love criminal together but yes. We're just doing what you say about. One of the condition of scholarships the was that she had to go to school teach but actually she used as opposed booed and to give a probably a bit of a relief omits in the curriculum where she were students to explore and experiment along show. Harare causes just a as you say. Create the violence and half time where she could actually create heroin things and not be completely tied to to teaching but to have the space to develop her orion practice off the wall. Peggy went to live in new lewis in still exists. But it's a private house not treating the drive to find it is called furlongs an. It's really well known. As one of her friends. Rebellious came to stay and actually did a really lovely Like old painting and not the goal of eight. That's quite well known. And it's and it's interesting. I think if you google peggy angus one of the first images. That comes up is an image. That rebellious did on saturday service. Not necessarily even pay gangsters images it a male office as it were months into that slot. But it's really beautiful. And i think it's like a lot of office off to the war. Who lived in london. Ms out to the countryside around stallone domestic festival unlocks of people still kept holding the in town. But you could still in and hour by train yet your mouse from anywhere and had space for children You know an open. Non-paid fresher an. It's really it's a really beautiful sport. It's only half an hour to two into town of louis. It twenty minutes from the sea on the light. There is just really lovely. It's really beautiful and you can see that. That would inspire body on the house. It fell in allow overseas privately owned by some Sh actually printed her own walls. She made wallpaper but actually printed the wolves in the house as well created lots of furnishings and things for the house. Yet i love. That's and again very much. Harking back to so william morris at the arts and crafts movement so he said that she she created heart. Whoa paper was the wo- paper the thing that she became known for first or was it was it. Was it the title. Because i know she also mid tiles yes. I think well husband was an editor. He became to architects journal. He was an architecture to start with. He was able to even though that marriage dissolves they separated. He introduced her to a lot of quite Useful and influential people and one of those were the pool. Poetry and macarthur's pool. He made.

william morris london Peggy twenty minutes peggy Anna half an hour eastern europe louis first first images saturday Harare two today one new lewis google eight One
A Message to CEOs: Act On Climate, Or We'll Cut Your Pay

Environment: NPR

01:53 min | 1 year ago

A Message to CEOs: Act On Climate, Or We'll Cut Your Pay

"A lot of companies have announced ambitious goals to fight climate change. But who's keeping an eye on those companies to see if they keep their promises as npr's camilo domino's ski reports activist investors. Want to tell. Ceos cut your emissions or will cut your pay. Big companies are talking a big game on climate. Whether they're tech giants. Twenty thirty apple will be one hundred percent carbon neutral for our entire end to end footprint. Food companies like nestle. I'm committed to do what we can to protect our planet for future generations or even oil and gas companies across pay. We are changing to support our net zero ambition. Maybe you're skeptical. Maybe you remember twenty years ago. Bp pledge to go beyond petroleum and kept on pumping oil. Maybe you're wondering what happens if these promises are empty and often times when you find somebody is not making progress against that goal or we just stop is investors. Hearing about the goal. It's time to increase pressure on the company. Pat me nail tomato is with seven asset management. A socially responsible investment company and he says one way to increase pressure is to go to the board directors with this idea. It's time now once there's a goal in place to tie performance on that goal to executive compensation. Ceo's get huge incentive package is designed to reward them if they grow profits or promote worker safety or boost customer satisfaction companies could change those packages to peggy some pay to meeting climate targets so if executives hit their goals they get their full very large bonuses if they fall short their paychecks all to after shareholder pressure companies like apple and shell have actually said yes to this. This is new.

Camilo Domino NPR Nestle Giants Apple BP PAT CEO Peggy
Talking Roses With Peter Kukielski

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:46 min | 2 years ago

Talking Roses With Peter Kukielski

"Kutowski is former curator of new york botanical gardens. Peggy rockfeller rose garden. We're in two thousand two thousand fourteen. He implemented a new mission to plant and trial roses for disease resistance and less chemical usage. He's the author of an earlier book roses without chemicals and the designer of a recent garden at the royal botanical gardens in ontario canada a chemical free province and these days peter gardens in maine. How are you up there. Great appear thank you. Are you okay. So thirty five million years on the planet That's a long time so this new book. It's quite different from the earlier one. It's sort of more culture than horticulture. And as i said in the intro tells about the cultural connections we have with the roses throughout history. And i wonder if you know having completed at. Did you sort of finish and say oh. Those are my two favorite stories or you know a couple of highlights. That really stuck with you. Were surprised you yeah. I think What you betcha the introduction about the thirty five years. it's very interesting when whenever i gave tours or lectures about the rose garden. People seem to be more interested in the stories about whereas if something where about dates and things so it's always fun to say. Are you aware. Roses existed thirty five million years ago and the kind of people kind of stop in their taxes. Had no i had no idea and so the idea that it's such an ancient plant and survived. You know the millions of years It's just an amazing factory and give me joy about working with these plans to understand Their strength their resilience.

Kutowski New York Botanical Gardens Peggy Rockfeller Rose Garden Disease Resistance Peter Gardens Royal Botanical Gardens Ontario Maine Canada
An NFT-backed jpeg sold for $69.3 million at a Christie's auction

This Week in Tech

03:28 min | 2 years ago

An NFT-backed jpeg sold for $69.3 million at a Christie's auction

"This week at christie's which is the big Auction site for for art. A creator of art named people sold one of his japex digital creation for sixty. Nine million dollars Is it dollars. Or is it crypto. Well it's worth sixty nine million. Whatever it is it is the. He's the third largest price paid for living artists. People is up there now with jeff collins and david. Hockney sixty nine nine to be fair. Nine point three million dollars went to christie's which immediately i'm sure turned the theory him into american cold hard cash sixty million of it was a bid by an anonymous bidder using a pseudonym although we think we now know who it is and i'll explain that in just a second sixty million dollars what did you get for the sixty million. Did you get something you can hang on your wall. No did you get did you get. What did you get you got. You didn't even get the j. peg. You can have the j. peggy at address which would give you this. J peg which by the way consists of five thousand images that people has taken he. Does it daily art image. Over the last Well since two thousand seven whatever that is fourteen years so it's ki- it's kind of the collected works of people but you don't even really get anything except a toke a thing that says you own it it it can be infinitely reproduced. You can print it. Anybody can print up but you own it only you can own it. And that's a. That's a affirmed on the blockchain. Sixty million dollars. Now the guy who bought it uses the name medic cova. But amy caster who i. I don't know from adam but wrote in the blog and i convinced me. That in fact is a crypto entrepreneurs. Been on the scene. For about seven years named vig. Nash some dorasan and furthermore amy caster kind of explained for the first time to me. What's really going on here. So it wasn't Medico vans own ethereal that he spent in effect he created a another crypto bundle called b twenty bought the painting with that and is selling shares. Bits fractional portions of the people artwork to other people in other words. Step three prophet fifty nine. He owns fifty nine percent of be dot twenty. Motta's who else owns it. Be people owns a two percent stake so in effect people bought his own painting or part of his own painting. I'm not that there's any conflict of interest there or is there. But really i think if there is if in your mind there is some question and i'll ask you guys now to comment but if they're in your mind some question about what the hell is. How could how could jay peg be worth sixty nine point three million dollars. And why would somebody a medico van. Spend that kind of money on jay peg. It now becomes clear. He's gonna make money on it

Jeff Collins Christie Amy Caster Hockney Dorasan Peggy David VIG Medico Nash Adam Motta Jay Peg
How To Successfully Take Your Practice Online and Generate Loyal Clients with Peggy Bown

Healthcare Business Secrets

05:25 min | 2 years ago

How To Successfully Take Your Practice Online and Generate Loyal Clients with Peggy Bown

"Welcome to the healthcare business. Secrets show we interview industry leaders and break down exactly how they dominating the markets so you can learn from the best and how to double your revenue w impact and w off in today's episode. We've got peggy brown. Picky brown is a dentist specializing in olympics. End smile design now. She's graduated from dalhousie dental school in two thousand one and started working with a partner in a group practice and in their practice she realized that her vision folks on designing smiles as the decided to creator unclogging that he also lectures digital workflow digital small design and marketing. The social media. Welcome to the sharpie. Thank you thank you james. Nice three here. Yeah so the reason i got on the show was because i wanted to really talk and dive into digital marketing dental practices and i think that not a lot of people are talking about this enough. We've got a lot of sort of old school practice development gurus out there who are who are teaching things that just maybe be going to work the same way going forward especially with the pandemic crisis at the moment and how we connect that clients build communities things like that. And so what i want you to do is just a bit of a rundown on your background. And how you've got to where you are to give some context. Yes i know it does. I'm gonna tell you does get mistaken for brown but there is no are my last name so no worries all the time. It's totally fine. But you know. I grew up in a little rural community the most easterly province of canada in disneyland and i moved to new brunswick want to become a dentist my whole life but i wanted to become a dentist not for the reasons you would think all want a good job and i wanted to become a dentist because i wanted to change public perceptions. Were making impact make people feel like i was made feel which was loud. This is a cool place to be. So i knew there was some potential for that and then of course i loved art and everything so i thought it could be a little artistic. That's gotten small designed by the way but you know. I really wanted to do something. Different always wanted that. When i graduated from housi- in two thousand one's of doing this almost twenty years. I went to practice like most dentists. Do and we just. I just did the day in day of dentistry. I did a lot of photography. I love that. But i really was a general dentist like most of us will graduate and we just have to learn and i guess you know ten or twelve years into my career. I have kids and all that. But then i was starting to really see and take other courses advanced courses in you know more complex cases and and and things like that and it led me to eventually in two thousand fifteen opening a brand new state of the art practice which was very forward very digital very modern and almost spa lake holiday spa. But it's very it's a different experience when you come here from the moment you walk into the your senses things you'll smell see or not smell. Dentistry doesn't smell very good. Most clinics don't but we make sure that we created like a really amazing experience and it's different so we do have a lot of patients will say. I'm never been in a dental honey like this before or i've never had anyone explained that have invested in a lot of technology and things like that that will allow me to wow the patients from the gecko. So they're very first visited the word. Wow comes out of their mouth many times now. most. I don't know again. I am biased. Because i don't get to go to a clinic or be that patient but generally a lot of patients they know they have to see the dentist. They get in there. It's the same thing they've always done. They've always and they expected and they don't expect anything greater. But i like to. It's an element of delay. Or surprise. And i really do focus on sensory experience but also just that caring and showing them that we care about the modern and what's really available in the world right now and giving them the best. Open that clinic odds in five years in may that we open that and you know. I knew that people needed to know who i was. No one knew. I was dentist in general practice. So what got me into marketing. Specifically i know not only was opening my own. Sonic i needed to let everybody know who. I was what that was about so i began with facebook. Like you would in an instagram. Shortly after i did so well with instagram than i was lecturing about better within like a year and a half because none of my colleagues partisan really big groups of dentists across canada than us especially and everybody was like. How are you doing that. Why are you know why are you doing that. So we started that way. My interest in it just is fair. I'm very passionate about sharing that. Dentistry is good and dentistry can be better but also i just love the element of being creative. So i have. That reigns works with me and guess what it also helped me grow and explode my business. Oh it's just been incredible seeing the change in five years. I can't imagine if i had done it but the drive was to make sure that people knew who i was because i was just another dentist in a general practice so just came out of okay. I just opened this clinic. Nobody knows how. I'm here. So i didn't even put my number in the telephone book. I was so over that i felt that that was not a very good way to show people who i was so i went on and did a lot of other platforms have youtube channel as well about dentistry link. Dan facebook instagram and Yes someday maybe i'll have a podcast. You never know

Peggy Brown Picky Brown Dalhousie Dental School Olympics New Brunswick James Canada Brown Facebook Dan Facebook Youtube