35 Burst results for "Peer Review"

Dr. Jeff Barke: It's Easier to Call in a Prescription for Oxycontin Than Ivermectin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Jeff Barke: It's Easier to Call in a Prescription for Oxycontin Than Ivermectin

"Let's stay here for a second. So i for my sins. I spent Oh my gosh. Almost thirty years in academia prior to joining the Trump administration i. I hate being called an academic But pay reviews was the big deal. Pablo perez was was the choice of The the expression for those inside of academia Peer review dr balki. It's a joke. I mean it's it's a mutual masturbation society isn't it because you're being reviewed by your body's and therefore it's just a collective group think exercise. This isn't unbiased review. By people who have no vested interests these people have viewpoints. They wanna protect and like crazy. That i mean in theory. It makes sense it sort of like a a trial by your peers Theory in theory but what happens at these journals is that they're all like minded people and up. An article comes through. That is a positive article about ivermectin. They're not even gonna look at it. Let alone review it and so it's almost impossible to get publish. Some of these articles that are critical of karma and critical of vaccines. And so yes. You're right it's a you know it. It saddens me to say but these journals and healthcare agencies have become political in nature and they shouldn't be because when that happens what it's it's patients that suffer and so the science has been corrupted. Patients are being injured as a result and listen every single day now when i call in prescriptions for patients as it relates to cove it. It is literally easier for me to call in a prescription for oxycontin than it is for either

Trump Administration Pablo Perez Dr Balki Academia
Charlie and Dr. Rashad Richey Debate the Threat of the Delta Variant Among Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Charlie and Dr. Rashad Richey Debate the Threat of the Delta Variant Among Children

"Delta variant has changed the game in many ways where now you have children who not only have the virus but they are experiencing adverse reactions from the virus. Look like never before. I take place. Called jackson county. Mississippi school superintendent. This guy decided to ignore all nineteen protocols. He says he's going to live a life. That's external of the fear of the pandemic. Will his school system. They have a seven percent. Cove it positive rating. They've already lost a schoolteacher. Here's the other dynamic. That people are considering you think children go to school in silos these children who can be carriers of covert nineteen can infect environment such as their parents their grandparents oh the peer groups people that their families associate with and then it becomes an issue of the ecosystem of our safety. Not just the silo of the school system very good. I i will respond. So i'm glad you brought up the delta variant so a lot of people have done some at least initial studies of the delta variant so according to dr roberta debiasi of the children's national hospital. She was asked about ari shapiro from national public radio about the delta verion the national public radio host said wait a second if kids under twelve or not vaccinated is is the delta variant a significant risk and she said quote children are still somewhat between twelve to fifteen percent of all kobe cases and still three to four percent of hospitalizations and we have not seen a huge change in that even with the delta variant. Now i'll add to that. Where the boston globe. Not exactly you know a politicized paper to the right ask. The question is the variant more severe in children. Dr sharon door and epidemiologist at tufts medical center says no. I've not seen any peer reviewed data or data from reliable sources. Suggest that so. I would submit. Doctor that there is no data. To show the delta variant has any harsher 'cause in fact the data shows the opposite

Mississippi School Jackson County Dr Roberta Debiasi Children's National Hospital Ari Shapiro National Public Radio Host Boston Globe Dr Sharon Tufts Medical Center
J&J: Booster dose of its COVID shot prompts strong response

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

J&J: Booster dose of its COVID shot prompts strong response

"Johnson and Johnson has released data showing a booster dose to its one shot coronavirus vaccine is effective the company says it ran two studies in people who previously received its vaccine and found that a second dose produced an increased antibody response in adults ages eighteen to fifty five the results haven't been peer reviewed along with being used in the U. S. Johnson and Johnson's vaccine has been approved for use in Europe and there are plans for at least two hundred million doses to be shared with the Colfax effort aimed at distributing vaccines to poor countries but the company has been plagued by production problems millions of doses made a troubled factory in Baltimore had to be thrown out I'm my company

Johnson S. Johnson U. Colfax Europe Baltimore
Moderna Says COVID-19 Vaccine Protection Wanes, Makes Case for Booster

TIME's Top Stories

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Moderna Says COVID-19 Vaccine Protection Wanes, Makes Case for Booster

"Maderna's case for a covert nineteen booster shots. It's vaccine protection wayne's by thirty six percent after twelve months. According to a new study by alice park studies from cova nineteen vaccine makers and public health officials have been suggesting for awhile that protection provided by the vaccine wanes over time and a new study published on september fifteenth to a pre print server. The study is not yet. Peer reviewed researchers at medina which makes one of the two are in a covert nineteen vaccines. The other is from pfizer. Biotech report that people vaccinated within the last eight months had thirty six percent fewer breakthrough infections. The knows who were vaccinated a year ago that suggests vaccine induced. Immunity is likely highest shortly after people get their recommended two doses of the vaccine and starts to drop afterward. The modern vaccine received emergency use authorization from the us food and drug administration in december twenty twenty the fda currently reviewing the company's request for full approval aldershot.

Maderna Alice Park Cova Wayne Medina Pfizer Us Food And Drug Administratio
Are Scientists Really Worried About Climate Change?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 3 months ago

Are Scientists Really Worried About Climate Change?

"Scientists. I don't know how many real scientists if people in your audience now but The scientists. I know who deal with climate. They don't think the scientists settled. They really don't. They're afraid to say much of anything because they get stomped on if they don't toe the line and they don't get government grants which aren't the life of modern science getting money from the government. You know eisenhower warned against this in his spare well-dressed having this happen exactly what has happened so sciences thoroughly politicized but a lot of people. I know when you get them down in the soundproof room. Where they they will big exciting. We really don't we really can't justify the kinds of apocalyptic pronouncements that are made even by the un and other such organizations let alone your local crazy so We expertise is caving in on itself. Is it's a what glenn reynolds of instant fame. The already trained the k. Through twelve implosion. But the all the professions are imploding at partly because they don't place around ranks that that was one of the practices back in one hundred years or so ago. When this whole expert knowledge things started to take all the experts. They were credential daily but they also police up. They had this thing called peer review.

Eisenhower Glenn Reynolds UN
"peer review" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

03:02 min | 3 months ago

"peer review" Discussed on Science Salon

"Again i think people often focus on kind of the worst offenders. Like sean hannity's or other people on fox news or on all sides of the political spectrum there are demagogues and they explicitly or implicitly. Feel like well. If other people aren't going to be true seeking then i'm not gonna bother either and and i think there's sort of taking the worst examples the other side and using that as an excuse to be like well. No one's doing this. I'm not going to either. But you could instead be looking at kind of shining examples of people who are being intellectually honest even though they don't have to or even though they could get rewarded for not doing it and you could use those as your role models instead of the terrible examples. Further is the the ecological. Or i should say the economic landscape for punditry drives people further apart into the soldier mindset. Just because that's where you get more clicks and therefore more downloads and therefore more dollars for your advertisers. Yeah it's true yeah. Looking at tweets go viral tweets about politics that go viral is just a depressing barren wasteland. I get a little concerned. Actually if one of my tweets gets an unusually large number of clicks causing me to doubt myself. I'm like oh god. Was i being unreasonable. Back and revisit. This is not a good sign since use. You know the search for truth which truth so let me just kind of deconstructed ideas. Probably my next book. You know what is truth anyway. You know we. We talked about empirical science things that we can know or at least hope to know. And that i make claim and you can check my data my experiments you can try to replicate on. Maybe i'm wrong. Maybe partially wrong updates and so on we can you and you can look. I can look. I could take a photo. We published in peer review journal. there's some social processes at which we can derive some degree of high confidence in something being true but but then what about religious cruiser political truth. And i'm not sure they're in the same level if somebody says i'm a christian and i believe jesus died for my sins. He was he was alive he he was crucified. Three days later he was raised from the dead. If for me for you you too. If you want to read john three sixteen accept jesus as your lord and savior. Where's your control group. There's a crazy question. I mean who would even think like that. Well that's what christians believe. If you didn't believe it you'd be g where muslim or roughing whatever right. So i don't see how You know we can hold those kinds of standards. That's when it christian says well. I'm defending my religion in a soldier mindset. Because this is what i believe is true. You can't prove that it's not true. I can't prove that it's true. In any empirical sense this is just. What is the different kind of truth something like that. Yeah so.

sean hannity fox news peer review journal jesus john
What Was Stephen Hawking's Final Project?

BrainStuff

02:31 min | 4 months ago

What Was Stephen Hawking's Final Project?

"Days before his death on march fourteenth two thousand eighteen famed theoretical physicists. And cosmologists stephen hawking completed what would be his final research paper it since passed peer review and was published online in the journal of high energy. Physics on april twenty-seventh written with co author. Thomas herzog a theoretical physicist at the university of louisville belgium. The paper adds another facet to our understanding of this universe that we live in and needless to say it's complicated titled a smooth exit from eternal inflation. Be publication discusses an enigmatic problem facing cosmologists but before we delve into the crux of the study. Let's go back to win. Our universe was a baby. Some thirteen point eight billion years ago. A lot of evidence suggests that our universe originated from a singularity an infinitely dense point from which all the universe as we know it was born. We call that event the big bang but how the singularity came to be and why the big bang happened isn't of concern right now. We're interested in what happened immediately. After our universe was spawned a period known as inflation cosmologists predict that inflation occurred over a vanishingly small period. Right after the big bang during our universes very first ten to thirty two seconds during inflation the universe expanded exponentially and much faster than the speed of light after only his second. The energy from this inconceivably gargantuan explosion condensed to form subatomic particles that over millions of years created the stars galaxies planets and after another few billion years life. As we know it once this inflationary period ended the universes rate of expansion slowed but it continues to expand to this day because inflation powered a faster than light speed expansion. The observable universe that we see today is not the entire universe rather we exist inside a region of the cosmos. That light has had time to reach. It's like dropping a pebble into a calm swimming pool. The first circular ripple to propagate from the splash travels a fixed speed across the surface of the pool. If we imagine that the limit of our observable universe is that ripple traveling across the pool at the speed of light it's not that nothing exists beyond that ripple there's more pool or universe beyond it. We just can't see it yet. So the consequence of inflation is that there should be a lot more universe beyond what we can see even with our most powerful

Journal Of High Energy Thomas Herzog Stephen Hawking University Of Louisville Belgium Swimming
Is There a Climate Crisis?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 4 months ago

Is There a Climate Crisis?

"The green new deal implies number one that we have climate emergency climate crisis that we have twelve years by which to act. And the clock's ticking. I think we're down to just a little over ten years now. Another one of these tipping points and by the way in the book i trace the first climate tipping point to eighteen sixty four where we were warned of climatic excess unless we did something so these tipping points have been around for centuries literally but the green new deal even if we faced a climate emergency. They claim which we don't. We don't even face really measurable climate implants by mankind. I mean that's the thing is hundreds of factors that influence the climate. You can't distinguish him. From natural variability. we probably warmer during the period. When jesus was on earth with when during the time jesus christ was born and medieval warming period. We were probably warmer according to peer reviewed studies waiting till the world's end around that time in the middle ages red that what do you mean by end. Didn't they have some kind of a climate disaster wiped out the population actually Maybe not because here we are. I gotta tell you. I remember hearing this kind of stuff in the eighties in college these predictions. That were just you know really dire predictions and then time would pass. Nothing would happen and nobody would mention it again. So you do get a little bit like the boy crying wolf but what you just said to me. The most important piece is that no matter what the weather is doing You're saying that it's simply not a fact that human activity is the main cause. So what a lot of these people are screaming about. They make it sound like. We're all doing something that we could change. And that would solve the problem and we. We don't know that so they're asking us to spend many many billions trillions of dollars to do something without a clear outcome. Isn't that really the main point

Jesus
"peer review" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

04:47 min | 4 months ago

"peer review" Discussed on No Agenda

"Let's listen to me and he's going to try and explain he's gonna try and play in this little differently than it's been doing so far you make you know. It's more complicated than that. Neil and i don't know if we can explain it in in the brief period of time we have if you look at the research that was done. It was researched that was highly recommended by peer review. Our united states period news had got a very high score in the period system and the purpose of the research was very very clear it was to track. That was what i wanted to ask you. Is there such a thing as the peer review system and the united states of peer reviewed department. Because he's making it sound like this is some isn't that just per publication now that he mentions it. I wonder if there's not like it's like you know it. It's like when you run a news operation. You have your rolodex of people to call. That's why gottlieb gets on all these shows. They have hog relations bill. I think there's probably people that are involved in peer reviewed to such an extent. They're part of a list and it goes out to them When you finish something For example say you wrote a paper. You want to get peer reviewed. How do you do that. You have a bunch of peers in your back pocket. i don't think it's the us pr. Didn't you know that. I don't i don't what he's generalization but i bet you there's a there's a mechanism that allows us to work and that's what he's talking about at that has to be it well. I've never heard described that way. The peer review process. Yes the peer review like the united states. Peer review the united states. He just stumbled department of peer review mechanism beating me. We beat him up enough. We don't need. No i'm i'm pummeling him until just a nugget sack broken bones. Well it'll be a while here..

united states of peer reviewed Neil united states gottlieb department of peer review
Eat These Foods to Boost Brain Health & Reduce Inflammation

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Eat These Foods to Boost Brain Health & Reduce Inflammation

"Sean. Welcome back other glad to have year is my pleasure. Always love talking with you man. Let's jump right in. And i wanna talk about top foods for brain health and nutrients. I mean there's so much out there. And i'm sure people come to you for a ton of advice and one of the things that you see especially when people are starting off. They're like which supplement or which thing is the best for that and we tend to overlook some of the most obvious stuff that's right in front of us and i feel like that's what you did a really great job in eat smarter. Is you highlighted the things that it's just easy to overlook and the power of food truly is being medicine not liked medicine but medicine for real right sometimes even better and i want to start off by this study that you mentioned inside of each smarter and it was around alzheimer's and a particular nutrient tell us what that new chain is and how this nutrient was shown to have a significant reversal on our age. Yes so the current size. When we're looking at alzheimer's you know is a really really difficult situation. There's not much as for as peer reviewed evidence on being able to reverse his condition as see much. Improvement is a lot of times. It's trying to slow down the progression but now there's so much evidence coming out in so many wonderful scientists are asking these questions. What can we do. let's try. This thing was try that thing. And the funny thing is is circling back to the world of nutrition. But of course makes sense because your brain is literally made from food and we know today. That alzheimer's is largely tied to this calling. Type three diabetes. This insulin resistance taking place in the brain and so looking at what are the nutrients that help to regulate our insulin response. What a nutrients that help to normalize and he'll brain cells to create neurogenesis and sparked the creation of new brain cells.

Alzheimer's Sean Diabetes
Volcanoes On Mars Could Be Still Active

Astronomy Cast

02:37 min | 6 months ago

Volcanoes On Mars Could Be Still Active

"Bars is cold and dead today but the massive volcanoes tell us what the planet used to be like millions and even billions of years ago. But how volcanically. Active is the planet today. That's what nasa mars insight. Lander is to figure out alright. Bars insight volcanoes is there active volcanoes on mars. Today may be and in. This is such a new result. We picked this topic before the science result was published through peer review. And it's kind of awesome when randomness like that occurs. There is a new paper out with lead. Author david horvath and it discusses. How in serbia's fosse there appears to have been explosive. Volkan ism only as within the last fifty thousand years fifty thousand. Wow and soon that's rabid. That counts as active vulcan. Ism today and what's kind of awesome. Is that location. Matches up loosely. With where insight has seen some well seismic activity. Okay so then the question. So i guess the answer then is maybe. Let's let's go back to the beginning here now. I don't know if we've actually done. We haven't done an episode on insight in detail yet. I don't think so. So can you just give a brief overview of what mars insight is. Is there to do so. This is a fabulous little spacecraft that has proven that sometimes a world can defeat the most well intentioned of spacecraft insight landed on mars with two major missions. The first one was to put down a seismograph that would be able to detect faint earthquakes. And it's such a sensitive seismograph that it can see the waves of an earthquake if everything is perfect not just propagate through the world once but actually bounced through multiple times and because of this they can use a single seismograph to do the kind of science that we require multiple seismographs to do here on earth. Were things are a little bit more noisy because we have like trucks mining and things like that.

David Horvath Volkan Lander Nasa Serbia
The Cure for Burnout. Hint, It Isn't Self-Care

TED Talks Daily

02:29 min | 6 months ago

The Cure for Burnout. Hint, It Isn't Self-Care

"Let's dive right in. You co authored. A book called. Burn out the secret to unlocking the stress cycle and the inspiration for this book was actually based on personal experience that you had with burnout amelia. Can you tell us more about that. Experience well it began with me going to school while i was getting my doctorate. Musical arts in conducting. I ended up in the hospital and i had abdominal pain which they diagnosed as stress induced told me to go home and relax and in fact i had no idea what to do but luckily i have a sister who has a phd in health behavior. So when i'm in the hospital just in pain laying. They're not even really understanding. How i got there or why and i honestly didn't even believe that stress could cause physiological symptoms an. Emily said how did you not know that. I'm a conductor. And a singer. I have learned in my musical training to express my feelings with my body to use my body as a vehicle for expressing motion and it occurred to me that if it was true that i didn't just have those feelings on stage. I had them all the time high whole life and if that was true. Wow that was a lot of feeling. So i didn't even want to believe this was true but once. Emily brought me a huge stack of peer reviewed science. I couldn't deny anymore. Yes dress manifest in the body and can turn into symptoms of illness. So let's start with definitions. What are the three components of burnout. So according to the original technical definition from herbert fern burger in the nineteen seventies burnout which originally was inclusive. Only of the workplace has expanded now involves de personalization. Where you separate yourself emotionally from your work instead of investing yourself and feeling like it's meaningful decrease sense of accomplishment where you just keep working harder and harder for less and less sense that what you were doing is making any difference and emotional exhaustion. And wile everyone experiences all three of these factors over the forty years since this original formulation. It turns out that speaking for men. Burnout tends to manifest as a de personalization in particular and for women. Burnout tends to manifest as emotional exhaustion.

Emily Herbert Fern Wile
COVID in Your Genes: The Risk Factors

Naked Genetics

02:33 min | 8 months ago

COVID in Your Genes: The Risk Factors

"Since march we've been discussing how. Covert nineteen varies between different people depending on their genes and back at the start. The evidence was patchy. Look how far we've come a recent study combines. The work of a couple thousand geneticists using dna kindly contributed for millions of people around the world to pin down which common genetic variations are doing us dirty. The study hasn't yet been peer reviewed. But it's such a large collaboration that we're going to spend the whole program learning what they've found hughes geneticists nathan pearson from the cove in nineteen hosts genetics initiative. We have uneven examples where human genetic variation shapes who gets given infection and maybe shapes how severely they get it at cetera so we had kind of a hunch going in like other infectious diseases. This might play out similarly and given. That's our expertise. That's our our bailiwick. What can we bring to the table along with everyone else from you know. Virologists themselves to public health. Scientists to people are studying all facets at every scale of society and our response to it. What can we bring to understanding. How responses vary perhaps in part by the genetic spellings the dna in us. And did you have a hunch. About how much of role. Genetics would play personally. I didn't go in with a strong hunch. Either way and i think that people who are more expert in corona viruses or in viruses generally in in our responses to them might have gone in with stronger or weaker. Hunches on that front but for me it was sort of an open question and i think for a lot of our colleagues we felt similarly we. We weren't gonna put all our chips on that part of the of of the board but that we might have some say let they give you an example. There you know one of the better studied viruses before this one that afflicts people was hiv. And we know for example that human genetic variation in a couple of parts of our genome strongly shapes who gets hiv generally controls the load of that virus over time. It's a very different kind of virus so we can't extrapolate too much from hiv because it stays in us. It's a retrovirus. But we knew that it played a role in addition to the variation hiv one hiv to etcetera in the virus. Itself

Nathan Pearson Hughes
AstraZeneca Releases Fuller Data Backing Its Vaccine

WSJ What's News

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

AstraZeneca Releases Fuller Data Backing Its Vaccine

"Additional data from astra zeneca says it's kobe. Nineteen vaccine is seventy six percent effective. According to a fuller analysis of trial data released yesterday. The drugmaker came under pressure earlier this week. After provided preliminary trial data showing its vaccine was seventy nine percent effective. An independent monitoring board said the data were out of date raising concerns of us officials. Astrazeneca's latest results were largely consistent with the preliminary findings reported on monday. The company said it would submit the findings for peer review and publication in coming weeks and request authorization of the vaccine from the us food and drug

Astrazeneca United States
What scientists have learnt from talking to thousands of long COVID patients

Coronacast

01:50 min | 8 months ago

What scientists have learnt from talking to thousands of long COVID patients

"So we focus a lot on the acute phase of covid nineteen. They're really bad pot where people can be very seek but of course a really high proportion of people who get covid have prolonged symptoms that go on full months after their infection. And it's something that we don't really understand well but norman. There's a new paper. That's come out that survey people with so-called long covid and tried to figure out what the most common symptoms are but trite. And this is your preference so it hasn't been peer reviewed so this is not the one thing we were this. One is not what you'd call a population based study so population based study would survey thousands of people with covid. Find those who had symptoms that you could find the incidents of that and then describe what long covered was in more detail. Obviously that's quite hard to do expensive so by going to people who've actually got long covered already. It's a selected group. That's bad because that's a problem with this but nonetheless it's a lot of people it's over five thousand people belonging to a survivor's group in the united states so on average people were reported. Twenty-one symptoms each and up to nine ninety three different symptoms so you know this is a really broad based phenomenon but it does have a pattern which is really all of its own fatigue. That's the dominant feeling that people have headaches. The knicks communist symptom shortness of breath round about the same as the is heading to forty concentrating. So those are all up there. Roughly the same with a cough. So if you look at if you look at the instance. Fatigue and heyday fatigue is way out there in front of the hour but the rest are all equally virtually equally common headache shortness of breath difficulty concentrating cough chain sense of taste and diarrhea plus muscle or body

Norman Headache Knicks United States Cough Diarrhea
First confirmed case of COVID-19 Brazilian Variant in NYC

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 9 months ago

First confirmed case of COVID-19 Brazilian Variant in NYC

"I'm Julie Walker the first confirmed case of the Brazilian variant of covert nineteen has been found in someone in New York City the patient is a Brooklyn resident in their nineties with no travel history the case was identified by scientists at Mount Sinai hospital in New York City according to the governor the Brazilian variant was first detected in the U. S. at the end of January and the CDC reports nearly fifty cases nationwide scientists believe it's more contagious but a recent study from the university of Oxford which has not been peer reviewed found the variant maybe less resistant to the current vaccines than originally thought I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker New York City Mount Sinai Hospital Brooklyn U. CDC University Of Oxford
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

WSJ The Future of Everything

13:28 min | 9 months ago

How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

"Depression. It can be a difficult mental illness to pin down. It can feel different for everyone and even those who struggle with it can have trouble identifying bought. It is a mostly came to understood that. I had depression through talking with my friends for the longest time. I kind of system that everyone felt this way. Like weird just like general malays for this twenty nine year old. Depression surfaced about six years ago and began as a feeling of being disconnected with the world. I didn't want to eat because they didn't feel like i deserve to eat. I don't know. I didn't hang out with friends because i didn't feel like i deserve to see my friends. I didn't feel like i should be punishing them by talking to them seeing them. This person uses they them pronouns. They're a maryland resident and work as a software tester. They sought help for their depression. Trying numerous types of treatments may visited a bunch of different mental health professionals and tried different types of arby's In different types of medication but it always kinda felt like things were getting worse and worse and a current really find someone who has really helped me understand what was going on like. I still didn't even believe that. I had depression. All the while the depression advanced it felt like being alive and lake wanting to die rolling constantly fighting over like the resources in my mind then. Their health insurance lapsed in two thousand eighteen making the situation worse a surprise solution appeared while they were scrolling on social media and a posting from johns hopkins university researchers and then one day i was kind of like clicking through facebook and i actually found this ad four like this little simon. Study silla simon. That's the psychedelic drug found in magic mushrooms. And i thought it was fake remarks. I didn't expect there to be you know like a a legitimate study showing up on like facebook ad but they had no insurance basically they were out of options so they called wanted to have hope again from the wall street journal. This is the future of everything. I'm janet babbling today on the podcast. How the hallucinogenic compounds silla zyban once associated with nine hundred sixty s drug culture is making a comeback and giving people suffering from depression and other mental illnesses. Hope for this twenty nine year old study participant. Depression was not something that happened in their family. My family's from the caribbean and lived in america probably for about lake in years. We came here in ninety nine. It's kind of interesting because where from like a place that doesn't really view mental health. The that like america's mental health. It took me a while to realize that. I was having mental health problems that i was kind of experiencing depression. Depression affects a staggering number of people hundreds of millions worldwide according to a study published in the peer reviewed journal the lancet in two thousand eighteen. The pandemic didn't make things any easier. Last june about a third of people who responded to web based surveys said they suffered from symptoms of depression or anxiety disorder. Those results were published by the centers for disease control and prevention the protocol for treating these conditions hasn't changed much in the past few years. What we've been using is typically one of two things either a medication that people take every day or we have psychotherapy dr. Alan davis is clinical psychologist and an assistant professor at the ohio state university. He's also an adjunct assistant. Professor at johns hopkins university. A lot of people will improve with either medication or therapy or both to basically have both have a better chance but it doesn't work for everyone. Some studies report between ten and thirty. Five percent of patients suffer from treatment resistant. Depression and davis is that similar to what he's found in his own practice working with veterans suffering from substance abuse trauma and other mental health issues. So he began looking for alternative treatments present and welcome to psychedelic science. Two thousand and thirteen in twenty thirteen davis attended a science conference and came across a study exploring the use of silla. Sivan a chemical compound found in specific varieties of mushrooms to treat cancer patients with mental health conditions. The compounds documented facts include feelings of heightened awareness ecstasy visions and changes in the perception of reality for researchers say one of the most useful qualities is its ability to dissolve the ego to allow a user to observe oneself from the outside in the study of cancer patients. The drug was able to alleviate some of the anxiety and depression that can be associated with having a life threatening illness. I was just inspired by that word. I thought gosh this really could have a strong impact in the areas that i'm working with veterans and with others davis became part of a team of researchers at johns hopkins university that put together a randomized clinical trial. Twenty four participants. They were administered. Silla sivan with talk therapy to treat their depression. Enrollment for the trial took place in two thousand seventeen and twenty nineteen and the results were analyzed in two thousand twenty. Most of them had had chronic depression meaning decades of experiencing depression though not some had had it for shorter amount of time but this study was a weightless control trials so some people came in and started treatment right away. Others had to wait eight weeks before starting treatment so we had a comparison group. The study subjects received an extensive intake examined questionnaire to confirm. They were suffering from symptoms of depression. Participants were screened for schizophrenia. And drug use as these conditions can interfere with suicide and treatment. The big worry many people have about psychedelics is what's often referred to as a bad trip. Mary negative hallucinations. That can be scary and this is kind of trip that can go bad. Martissant received hefty doses of these drugs. The doses are based on weight and they vary slightly but patients receive around twenty milligrams in the first session a bit more in the second session to minimize the risk of a negative experience. Davis says researchers focused on controlling. What's called and setting. They work ahead of time to ensure the volunteers current mood and surroundings while taking the drugs. Remain as calm and comfortable as possible and so we spend about eight to ten hours with people before they ever get the drug talking about what the effects are talking about. What may or may not happen when they have this experience and that's why we have to train professionals there with them not only to prepare them for that but to help them through the experience when it happens because a lot of people have anxiety coming into the session. The person we spoke to the twenty nine year old participated in davis study group in august of two thousand eighteen. They had no prior experience with psychedelic drugs and didn't know watch expect basically went in kind of blindly. I don't have any other options. So that's kind of my thought process at the time was just basically kind of sticking anything to the wall and hoping it would work after fasting the previous night the treatment can cause nausea. They were placed in a small tranquil room fitted with a comfy couch. The whole room was a really really cool in very comforting because like they had like these statues like imagery in their end like. I think one of the muslim dowa tibetan model. I wanna say this and like there was like this nice lamp. It's off this really. Soft light psychedelic assisted. Therapy participants are encouraged to bring in objects from home to make them feel more comfortable. Some bring in ten bears pictures of family. The twenty nine year old brought a lightness of an ancient sumerian goddess. Soon nana once they were settled in the room. They were given two pills in a wooden cop the therapists top that the sivan would take fifteen to thirty minutes to start working. In the interim they were told to put on ice shades and headphones. That would play a selection of music they choose from classical tibetan chanting african drumming and modern music too. Once the drug fact the participants says the first session became a kaleidoscope of mental images and sensations. I remember being in lake. Felt like mount olympus the fall of the gods like oval the clouds and suffering them. And then one of my god's up to me and she gave me a key fell through the clouds. And i felt all the way down through the earth and i ended up in hell which is really strange because they don't remember being scared even though i was in hell and i remember asking like hey you know why am i hair And it was like haiti's leading me through hell kind of just like showing me around for life this very cold and desolate last. He was like of course. This is where you would come like. This is where you've made your home. The self revelations continued throughout this long session and turned intensely personal. I remember like hearing like the beats. Come on and i felt myself in like this place like all of my ancestors were and i was really close to my grandfather when i was a kid. And he died. Probably around when i was like four and i saw him kind of materialize And he walked towards the youth like these. She'll bananas which is what he's doing her then he handed one to me and i always kind of was afraid that if he was alive he would be disappointed in me and i remember asking him you know. When am i supposed to do like if my family like my parents and lake my siblings can accept me and he said that he'll always be there for me and my ancestors will always be there for me and i like that scene just like it. Metsu in mental to me after about seven hours than drugs started to wear off when it was over. You know you're still kind of like feeling it but just not as intensely so just basically like this really happy kind of floaty failing and we couldn't drive so like i had to have a sister pick me up. They ended the experience hungry and exhausted as for the depression not much appeared to have changed then. They tried the silla sivan trip once more this time with the stronger dose and after that these say they experienced to palpable shift. It felt like i was back into the world again like i was in reality. A lot of people said that not only was there. Depression differently felt like they had come out of dark hole that they've been in for years but a lot of people regardless of whether they're depression was gone or or reduced said that there was something really meaningful different about how they view their life initial results for the study reviewing outcomes from up to a month after the sessions were completed found that silla sivan plus therapy was more than four times more effective than other treatments. Such as medication alone at one week. Fifty eight percent of the sample were in complete remission from depression that actually lasted up to four weeks. After fifty four percent of people were in complete remission and were now studying those same people up to twelve months after to see how long that remission lasted the rest of the participants in the study. Were not in remission they were still experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms researchers have yet to publish the results of longer term outcomes for all the participants their condition up to a year after treatment and this was a small study. Just twenty four people. Some scientists remain skeptical of this kind of treatment not just of silla simon. But of the validity of the data an outcomes for all studies involving psychoactive substances

Depression Johns Hopkins University Silla Simon Silla Zyban Peer Reviewed Journal Centers For Disease Control An Davis Substance Abuse Trauma Silla Sivan Arby Facebook Martissant Alan Davis America Sivan The Wall Street Journal Anxiety Disorder
Your body as a smartwatch battery?

Talking Tech

01:39 min | 9 months ago

Your body as a smartwatch battery?

"So it's possible wearable devices like smartwatches. Fitness trackers could run without the use of a traditional battery. Instead you are the battery. I did not miss speak there. You are the battery. Researchers the university of colorado boulder developed wearable technology that uses thermoelectric generators it. Convert the body's internal temperature to electric to provide power so no more plugging into the wall. None of that is your body that will charge your smartwatch or your tracker researchers say the wearable can generate about one volt of energy for every square centimeter of skin space which is less than most existing batteries. But it's enough to power. A wearable device of their findings were published in the peer reviewed journal science advances which is managed by the american association for the advancement science. So how does this work exactly technology. They use combines stretchy material called pala mine poly mean. I hope i'm pronouncing that right along with thermo electric chips in liquid metal wires that can be worn either on your wrist or like a ring on. Your finger sounds complicated. We might need iron man to figure that out so how soon before he might actually see this happen. So researchers predict devices using this technology could hit the market in five to ten years and the way they see it is they see this as something that replaces the batteries altogether. So let's say you have a fitbit instead of the regular battery. Have it would have this technology where you put it on your wrist. And then your body he internal body heat would charge it and keep charged all the time. So obviously it's going to be a while before we buy a smart watch power with type technology but i will be grateful to have one less gadget that i have to charge every night here here. This all sounds good

University Of Colorado Boulder American Association For The A
Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

ABA Inside Track

06:07 min | 9 months ago

Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

"You i got interested in the idea of kind of looking at higher order thinking and sort of personal systems of instruction when you yourself were a student and that led me to the question of what was personalized systems of instruction especially computerized ones from beyond. You know i. I think today everyone sort of thinks about all you can do all this stuff online. You learn online. Everyone's an online program. But if you go back maybe fifteen years you know. Maybe even ten years it feels like one of these technologies that couldn't have existed but we know. Psi original work was from well before computers. Were something that everyone had seven of in their house and you know in in the form of a phone so could you tell us a little bit about what. Psi's were like when you were starting out in higher education. You were starting to use them as part of your doctoral program. Sure well can. I use a way back machine to tell you another little tidbit secret. Of course you can do right if we go way back to me being in grade one and then i realized this later that there were reading. Labs and reading. Lab was the self paced set of there. Were these big boxes at the back of our room and you could go through these little reading vignettes. I remember reading about brown bears and things like that. Like that. Just stuck out to me because i love reading about them right like what were they. Where did they live what they eat so forth. And then you would answer these questions and if you'd have to get them all complete and correct and then you could go on to the next one so there was kind of this. It was all mastery based and i realized later this. Psi in like k. Through twelve right like in this really popular back at the time that i was in grade one and you know as students we kind of love this we could go at our own pace and get immediate feedback on whether or not we're right and we keep going on and on and on on these things and there's a little bit of competition among us rate because like you could be finished all of this work in your reading and language arts like whenever it was up to you you could get it all done and then go into something else so that was kind of exciting or are you could help other students in the class so i think that i never thought about it until recently but i think that when i when i was introduced to computer aided psi which was topped by joseph parrot the university of manitoba but this is probably why i love this system so much because it is self paced but the early early psi if you go back to the work of fred keller when he published his seminal article and nineteen sixty eight rate and the journal of applied behavior analysis goodbye teacher based upon a rhyme and he's introducing people to assist them that he's developed and he introduced in brazil as well as the united states. Psi was you know these units of study that you could you know master hopefully in about a week or so and you would go in and you would take a test when you're ready to take the test and then you either pass or you've gotta re study and if you've gotta re study you could go over the task with the proctor or the professor and then you could come back and retake it when you're ready to do so after you know some amount of kind of time out to re steady So if you think about that like things that there's an instructor right like if you have ten units that you have to have students take tests on. How many different tests do you need for them. You know if they get a reset and one you don't just give them the same test you have to have like a whole bunch of questions and different forms of big zam right for each unit so imagine the administration of that right like just can you imagine like panel versus thirty students versus three hundred. What would that be like a lot of tests a lot of grading more file cabinets right basically all the file cabinets right. Yeah file cabinet. Imagine carrying all the tests to and from the classroom and keeping them organnized. And you know. And we didn't have and they didn't have computers back then either right so when joe pair computerized this he actually made it. So that you could go in and you could request a-tast online and this is before point and click okay. This is before we had windows right in the we actually had to learn how to type in commands into the computer. And i never think of myself as somebody who programs but i did. I had to learn programming to be able to do this. Because you have to give the computer commands to get into your account and then to call up a test and then tell it to add more lines if you wanted to add more information to your answer or are you. Talking like a dos. Prompt or more like an old like early. Eighties looking kind of you know unix mainframe mainframe o wow absolutely yeah rob. It's definitely a mainframe computer right. And so so we did that and you know we after you master to test then you could sign on to be a peer reviewer or printer for student who had not yet passed that unit. So i mean think of it right like if you love this stuff and you're and you just go in and on a weekly basis at least on a weekly basis you pass one unit a week or more you can be peer reviewing a whole bunch of them and the peer reviews were great because they were bonus points in the course you and and the final exam where something like sixty percent because it was in person and they that was the quality control you had over the online course was making sure that people were who they said they were and you know that they weren't just doing things open book so you know it was nice being able to pat up though the the bonus points just in case but he bit. But here's here's the track right like when you do that and you're actually going and you're taking your test and your peer reviewing other students test. You're actually

Joseph Parrot Fred Keller Journal Of Applied Behavior An PSI University Of Manitoba Joe Pair Brazil United States Cabinet ROB
Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

Pacifica Evening News

03:19 min | 10 months ago

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

"To Israeli studies have found that Fizer Cove in 19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission. Shedding light on one of the biggest questions of the global effort to quash the pandemic. Data analysis and a study by the Israeli Health Ministry and Visor found the Fizer vaccine developed with Germany's beyond Tech. Reduces infection, including an asymptomatic cases by 89% and in symptomatic cases by 94%. The findings air from a pre published study not yet peer reviewed but based on a national database that is one of the world's most advanced a separate study. By Israel's Sheba Medical Center, published Friday in The Lancet medical journal found that among 7200 hospital staff who received their first dose in January There was an 85% reduction in symptomatic covert 19 within 15 to 28 days with an overall reduction of infections, including asymptomatic cases detected by testing of 75%. More research is needed to draw a definitive conclusion. But the studies are among the first to suggest a vaccine may stop the spread of the novel coronavirus and not just prevent the people vaccinated from getting ill. Dr Jon Swartz and Burn cold clinical professor emeritus of infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. The implications of this are enormous Republicans standpoints in vermin individual standpoint. If if the If these numbers are even numbers significantly less than this hold true, that is that once fully vaccinated. Well, first of all we know once fully vaccinated. It's Very, very, very, very unlikely. We're going to get seriously all and there's no evidence that you'll die after you being fully vaccinated. So we know that. But what if after you're fully vaccine, you get reinfected. We know you're not gonna get sick, but you could spread it. But what if you can't spread it? Or what? If it's very unlikely for you to spread it? It's gonna really mean that our masks they're going to come off sooner that we're gonna be hugging her loved ones a lot sooner right now. I'm fully vaccinated have been fully vaccinated now for this Just actually, three weeks today, um If I knew that I couldn't transmit this virus to my loved ones, I would My strategy would be very different. If I may ask you really come off. I could be hugging. Uh huh. But I don't know that yet, And so I have to still remain vigilant. And that is where a mask and social distance to be absolutely certain that I can't do that and think about all the health care workers. If the health care workers knew that they didn't it once they're fully vaccinated, they wouldn't transmit that would make an enormous difference in the hospitals. And think about just Transportation. It's just goes all the way down the line. So the implications are

Fizer Cove Israeli Health Ministry Sheba Medical Center The Lancet Medical Journal Dr Jon Swartz Uc Berkeley School Of Public H Germany Israel
"peer review" Discussed on In the Classroom

In the Classroom

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on In the Classroom

"An analysis maybe three to five analysis sentences in the third paragraph that talk specifically about the evidence that came from the prior paragraph right and so on right so this is something that will be working with our. We'll be discussing. And i'll be giving you some suggestions about how to choose those patterns if you have questions about how to do that but it's important to think about that when you're developing deciding how you want to separate divide up those structure your paragraphs for the results and discussion section. The final paragraph of your paper is going to include a conclusion paragraph. now it's not necessary to include a heading for the conclusion but your final paragraph. Your conclusion paragraph is going to begin with your thesis statement. So you need to restate and reword. Your thesis statement stayed in three to five sentences the significance or the relevance or the big picture of your main basis. Finally you want to close the paragraph the closing statement or perhaps a final vote or famous quote that finalizes. The main idea of your paper. Your conclusion paragraph should be approximately two hundred and fifty words again. One paragraph is sufficient. And when you're stating you're significance make sure that you revisit the problem statement and expand what you stated there the significance that you thought about and developed in your problem statement is where you're going to elaborate a little bit more in the conclusion as you finish your paper. Finally the conclusion paragraph should not include any citations or references. If you go down to the bottom you'll notice that there. There's a page for references and then several pages or your pedic's now the references some key points that you might want to consider number one references should be single space within each reference and double space between each reference number to reverse indentation to what you have in the body of your thesis. That is the first line should not have an indentation and all subsequent lines of each reference should have a zero point five inch indentation number three follow apa seventh edition or all citations and references number four. Each reference should have at least one citation in each citation should have a reference number five tried to avoid websites altogether no websites as references number six. No more than two books should be included in references number seven. Peer review journal articles.

Peer review journal
"peer review" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The V, a website, they say at this time research does not show evidence of long term health problems. From exposure to burn pits via continues to study the health of deployed veterans. Do you agree with that? I did not agree with that. And I've called for the Via to remove that from the website. It is not only inaccurate, but frankly, it's insensitive to those who have served to go when they seek help, and they read the statement like that. There is clear data and published Peer review studies that show that there are adverse health consequences, most of them respiratory, but that have demonstrated the relationship between burn pit exposure and poor health. And what's worse than not helping somebody and telling them that you're not gonna help them is holding out false hope many of the veterans who served in these post 9 11 wars With prolonged exposure to burn pits. Say this is their generations. Agent orange. Do you agree with that? I do. I think that that is the case. For 3.5 million of our veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. There has been documented burn pit exposure now not all of them, fortunately or service are suffering from adverse health consequences. But many of them are and that's very similar to what we saw in Vietnam, where it was not intentional, but it was clearly a situation that we exposed our military to, and we as a country have a responsibility to deal with that the Commonality between this generation's Would we called this generation's Agent Orange compared to the Vietnam era? It's like history repeats repeats itself. What is there an easy fix of us? Yeah, I do think there. I do think there is a big story. First of all, I think we have to be much more aware. Of the adverse health consequences both physical and mental via needs to treat our returning service members better. By taking care of them by doing early screenings. The answer is you give the veteran the benefit of the doubt rather than make them suffer or worse, never get the help that they deserve. And I really want people to know about this. The injustice of it all, because my family my four year old son has to grow up without his dad. Stop with the price of war. Huge, huge. LeRoi tourists in west Black are just.

Vietnam Peer review LeRoi west Black Iraq Afghanistan
"peer review" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on UX Podcast

"Let's run some experiments on that and in design we almost never do that. Right there's no part of the process where we're supposed to stop and say, okay, it looks like this design works. Let's try to break it now and find a better designed by completely ruining last week's work you. I actually I actually tweeted I. Think he was last week a call for that. Why don't we start an open hypotheses movement Because I completely agree I think we. Totally like I kind of Peer Review type of with working I mean we're getting to the point now where there is lots of hypotheses been built and we're being data driven were even Red Blue Red team blue team is a great idea but I think we lacked openness about what we're doing. So much gets hidden algorithms get hidden under the surface and design ideas get hidden under the surface and. Get, shown to be right get validated, but we don't. Check them without the checks and balances and to a certain extent there are economic motivations and not to be open rights to be proprietary and like. I'M NOT ANTI Per Se but I can't say that I'm not I don't know but there is a version of capitalism. We'll put it that way where. You are motivated to not share. That's one. That's one problem. You are motivated to lie frankly. Because if someone's paying life or something and you know it doesn't have any real value, it's not in your best interest to look for to to prove yourself wrong. It's not your best interest to say, Oh, this person wants to invest ten million dollars in my company. What motivation can I? have to make sure product is good. Right to test that and say what motivation possibly have to ask myself if I'm wrong but also might be true when someone's about to give me ten million dollars, right? That's. So it, it's very easy. I'll put it this way. It's very easy when you have nothing but capitalism driving the design process to make some very bad choices. You kind of want these other elements. So if you look at something again to science, like there is definitely capitalism making science funding science and making it work, there are a lot of other factors as well. My wife is a pediatric psychologist, and so she does research and there's something called the I R B, which is a review board that if you want to be some research, they have to sign off and say, this is valid research like you are taking into account all these different factors you're making sure it's not going to be biased and and.

Peer Review
"peer review" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

Burn the Haystack

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

"That exegesis is not just a critical explanation or interpretation of a religious text. You can just about exit. Any kind of textile. Oh pace of literature a out there to be interesting in the days of the far future from now if somebody like unveils out text messages to each other. Full of flack emojis. Read of into and they're having to do exegesis on Vk text messages emojis and try to figure out. What exactly did they made by this with. The original audience imagined like a screen shot of like your text messages to me on like some future museum wall people just going. Wow what were our ancestors. Strange and primitive and used to have these flame emojis. What is the what is the significance of the flame scholars? Just writing their dissertations on the the meaning of the flavor merging as opposed to the POOP EMOJI. Funny but yeah so you can. You can technically exegesis on any tech so that the verb actually is to exit. Sorry and also finally enough. I believe somebody who does exegesis is also can be referred to as an exit gate so an exit can exit a text. I did not. I actually did not know that you're an exit whereby exegetes everybody. Everybody's an exit in some way shape or form because we all interpret scripture so yeah I guess the next then is will what is exit. Actually like what does it take? What would you actually do like? It's one thing to to rate a text and to interpret it but what is actually the process by which you go from knowing nothing about attacks to being at understand. It's full context So exegesis it's it's not an all encompassing sort of thing because it actually. It's more of an umbrella I think is probably the best way to describe it. It's not just like a systematic sort of scientific scientific method Style process. It's more of an umbrella which includes a whole bunch of different methods of interpreting scripture with with. That'd be feticide Josh. Is that how you sort of think about? How do you think about it? Oh Yeah I would probably probably grey. There are lots of things you can do to exit text I guess lot of facets and a lot of different disciplines may be. Yeah so yeah. It's not. Yeah it's yeah I would tell you right and just hang one thing. It's like a collection of a whole lot of things to to do one big thing And by the way if you want to just go onto the wikipedia article for exegesis It will give you a lot more information than what we are sharing right now And we've taken this from wikipedia. Which I I feel like back in the day when way were going through Allah University degree. It felt like like elections with That wikipedia is not good source. But I actually think it's a great source nowadays. It's gotten better. I think a lot younger in high school there would definitely some. Does she think even Elliott definitely has gotten a lot more. Reputable is will I? You know I think it's I think it's because it's become a lot more you know like when you're an academic and you publish an article and you get peer reviewed. I think the same price as has happened to wikipedia. The uses have gotten onto it. The better it's gotten it. Actually having the Peer Review analysis process stunned. So you conscious like like if you some lose a thirteen year old and your mom's basement trying to edit wikipedia articles to say that Apollo Thirteen never happened that the moon is made of cheese. Like you just going to be able to do that and get away with at the time I have. You ever edited a wikipedia article. I never have I did in high school early school. What did you added a game? I was really into playing and that was a detail on a particular character. That was wrong so I fixed it. Good job thanks. It show man. Don't to look but I'm GONNA mention it was Super Geeky and embarrassing. Bring that up should geeking. It's all good. Yeah Okay but yeah anyway so Exegesis it's much more of an umbrella than it is like a singular task. And if you on the way Kapadia article you'll say all the different disciplines that cut up nested underneath this thing. Sorry you've got textual criticism which we get into it at a light edite but textual criticism is a fairly well. Nine well used method for interpreting scripture that many academic scholars us. It's not the only one but it is one of the main ones And then there's the basic stuff that you would expect figure out. The historical context the cultural context. The what's who who the audience figuring out how it fits into scripture in terms of the genre site whether it's poetic his story It's a letter It's puck elliptic biographical all that sorta stuff and as well. Then you've got the sort of linguistics sort of side of it figuring out the original language. How is the author using language to make his or her point And all that sort of stuff so this is all part of the process and a May I can say. I think it's Kinda summarize at. It's really doing like the what is it. The WHO what when how and why is really like covering those which is something that we all learned from primary school so it sounds complicated. But it's really just going through that very basic practice. Yeah but obviously 'cause it's an ancient text and this is much you know. The process is a little bit more complicated but basically those are the six points. You're really looking at that. A GONNA basically bring any sort of bobble tech's to laugh and to more of what it was originally intended to made yet. Yeah and I know that. Like when we talk about all these big academic words it can kind of same a little bit of well-meaning but I think at least for May one of the things that I want us to shape today in this episode is to Really leave you with a sense that you need to be a biblical scholar to good exegesis like it's not. It's not necessary to to have all historical linguistic You know all those sorts of you know that background and that knowledge to be out actually do good. Effective Saiful exegesis and helps. But it's I think yeah and there are some. There are some texts hotter than others to exit to definitely but ultimately. I think that anybody can definitely get more meaning than just the surface mating of of a text and the good news. Is that if you have grown UP IN CHURCH Or even you know Kinda wife. You've been to church a lot and listen to a lot of sevens or a lot of podcasts. On the Bible and that kind of thing you've probably already gathered a whole lot of Context around scripture and heard a whole lot of hyperbole. Good exegesis Probably good exegesis you know because pastas will often share messages Based in like looking at the original meaning of text and their hall at Gripe podcasts. Out there that cover original Minami. We've done it now. Yeah Show in Hall. One of episode looked at the original meaning and original context of different. Bobble texts. I The good news is you've probably gathered especially if you're a long-time listener the shy. You've probably gathered one of historical context of the Bible without even realizing it. Because you had exegesis done around you a lot so does Kana make it a little bit as hopefully that you gather up and you remember those things and you begin to link things together and as you raid you like arm somebody talking about this or that sort of thing and it. Kind of it's amazing. How much of I guess a a web of knowledge we build up the Bible sometimes with With with historical context and authorship and all that kind of thing.

wikipedia way Kapadia Allah University Josh Peer Review Kana Elliott
"peer review" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"My mom was that because when you light a match how she could smell. Said something's burning. So she came downstairs and I lit out hall up and I was cooking that stuff and it was bubbling embroiling. Stairs must have turned ever. So slightly to see who is coming down in which you did I get hot spot test tube at all that Stugotz flew out onto flaming shot this. And it singed by Hydros. I never remember or never forget this mellow burnt hair from my first experiment. And she came down she said you chemistry that's your over. That's it. You were supposed. I'm supposed to read some book I just. Talking. Yeah. Totally. Well, I mean that's that's the thing though is you you can't. Whether. It's no matter what it is. If you WANNA master something, you can't be afraid to break things in dive in I mean you know I mentioned before the started that a lot of my background other than biology in analytical chemistry work. I've done everything is in technology ninety and stuff I mean. Growing up is the same way I My parents would have devices, Betamax machines and later VCR's. Computers and Stephan. You'd better believe I was taking those apart and trying to put them back together and I broke a lot of things on the way. If every experiment works the way you think it's going to work. You'RE NOT GONNA learn anything new by running. So what are you doing running? You know? You have to do new things and as has to be based on again standing on that solid scientific foundation mean the papers I opened in my own research are that of Meshulam wallner Roger Adams I mean this is the. Research and it's been pure reviewed literature you know that. You know other scientists looked this. This isn't just some. Twenty thing that may not be right or may not be. And that's I think part of what we need to transition to, which is that there needs to be more adenoid researchers doing more research and publishing more stuff. So yet genuine new journal and other journals hopefully are to make some of this research accessible for for people. So that's good. Yeah. I think. So and I'm excited to see the The prevalence of open access journals to because something that I'm sure you can appreciate coming from an academic world that it can be so frustrating once you leave a university and you lose your library subscription and everything in your like what I have to deal with all these pay walls on paper that like my tax money helps fund a lot of that research in the first place others I'm I'm excited about this push by so many researchers and scientists to try to start making research more accessible to the public and to expedite like. you know open access peer review processes are becoming really popular to anyone can see while who who was on the Peer Review Board and what feedback did they give and how did the paper change and I think all of that is so useful for us really moving forward at an accelerated rate of progress you know to to have that transparency which is really exciting. So these new cabinet wait science journals like a was Ca- cannabis and cannabinoid science one, and then the one you referenced the Indo Cavanaugh Wait. America. Journal of okay. Right. Yeah. I mean it's really it's key to be able to make these things accessible like you said, because if people have to pay like thirty bucks or something like that, you know what they're gonNA, do they're gonNA pirated some power temblor gonNA get a pre..

Stugotz Peer Review Board Roger Adams Stephan cannabis Ca America
"peer review" Discussed on Healthy Thinking

Healthy Thinking

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on Healthy Thinking

"I I'm going to pay attention to this, and that can be everything from fat, recognizing them or having someone who's a socially influential Talk about the importance of what's being done to sometimes introducing. Sticks if you will you know some slightly threatening things that that could get people's attention and we would advise using those very sparingly, but but it's a part of the mix. and then the the third pieces. How do you actually support the transfer of skill? How do you? Help large groups of adults learn from each other very very quickly through application of new models or new practices and. Here again. The name of the game is just having lots of facility with lots of different methods and approaches and I think that You know one of the things that I'm repeatedly struck by is that we have a list of of a fifteen or so methods for for reaching more people, and you can see people feverishly taking notes because I just don't think it's in our training. Not many people know these methods these approaches. And it's so contrary to a real dominant myth that if I can just get this published in a Peer Review, journal or we're going to build an APP and then boom. We do a viral video and Bam. It's GonNa Change..

Peer Review
"peer review" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

Go Beyond Disruption

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

"The things at the firm needs to consider and should be doing as part of how they work. All of this research really applied towards the way on point. Tci was built for instance. So things like being able to say We we know. I think Richard. You mentioned early in the conversation. That one of the things you've seen regularly and I think you mentioned top three most common things. You mentioned Engagement waters and may have that replicator soup but letters in general and language and so forth and this is the kind of area where we saw that and we said well. What can we do to help? And how can technology help and the product essentially was built in a way that says well when somebody goes through their methodology. Let's connect that methodology to the actual language that ends up flowing into the letters and it helps automate some of the steps even though the firm obviously has a responsibility to reviewing and making sure everything does it here. Technology is one of these areas that earns can get lost in it. And if you take a process that just really isn't very efficient in the first place and try to apply technology towards it. It's surely not going to fix the problem. it's probably magnifies it. I think A lot of firms understand that to be true. So there's a there's an approach towards technology I think is really important that firms build into this plan man. I'll jump in. I think something like that important because here review comes in after the fact and so. There's only so much we can do. It reminds me of the joke or years ago describing an audit than an audit comes in after the war's over and staff all the wounded people And so to that end period. You comes in after engagements already out the door. And so that's not really a tool that's GONNA help identify issue before it happens. It comes in after the fact and points that out of the Foreign Ben. They have to respond to an engagement. It's already been issued So I I think something that gets out in front of that type. Issued firms are dealing with his more helpful more affixed in real time that peer review is eh. Couldn't agree more. I think the role of reviews. Obviously he important to kind of keep consistency across the profession in terms of the approach. And the comments. You made earlier Richard around the improvement in the audit quality And so forth. I think many firms don't realize and then fishes mentioned a little bit but anders haven't really changed significantly in quite a while and it simply the rigor in terms of how do we approach Peer Review and making sure that there is appropriate rigor and accountability in the process. That's really what's changing. It's it's a very good thing for the profession. I know I think it was a Gallup poll from two thousand eighteen That I recall seeing talking about the most trusted free professions excuse me and the profession of accounting was they believe top five or six in terms of most trusted and one of the reasons..

Richard anders Tci Peer Review
"peer review" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Next week are going to be out of mass so I think it is I don't necessarily know if it's a federal responsibility I think it is more the individual hospital systems the individual states to take on making sure that there is enough for their workers H. what's your knowledge of these drugs that are being considered and I know there's some anecdotal evidence that they were there's some sort of efficacy of the combination of drugs but there's been sort of limited testing and that's getting under way right now tell me a little bit about the drugs there because being considered to help people get better who are suffering from this so there are medications and treatments being considered kind of all over the place and let's just kind of break it down one we know we have a vaccine in the works record time we had the genetic sequencing released and a vaccine was made and it was even injected into its first human last week against is all record time but the vaccine itself needs to undergo extremely arduous health and safety testing to make sure that it's not only effective but that it it's six of the vaccine it's in the works but this is not going to be our saving grace right now we're just hoping that it's going to be available by early twenty twenty one so when we see the next peak of this virus that we have the backseat so that aside then we talk about Ramdev's appear which we've heard about this from the get go which is an anti viral medication that was trialed and sars as well it is not FDA approved it is a new medication so it also has to undergo the R. U. S. trialling to make sure that it is not only not only that works on call that nineteen but that it is safe to give to people now this is been undergoing clinical trials now for over a month in Nebraska in Chicago I believe in other places across the world and it is showing some benefits and so they've been using it as a compassionate use or the right to try to the right to try legislation as well then what we've heard this week which is cause some controversy a little bit president trump in some of the others have mentioned Hydroxycut or Quinn and Clark when used in combination with exit their mindset so some people in France combined the two medications the clerk when and the exit there minus and and they showed when making this combination to those that were severely sick they had symptoms turning around in under twenty four hours that's pretty incredible now we do have to say this is all anecdotal and very pretty make sure data this is not a robust peer reviewed trial they're going to be severe limitations and biases likely in this however it is important to see that there has been some headway and some Ryland air showing that there are benefits in some ways to potentially treat the severe illness it's just important to keep in mind the short term success stories may not actually equate to a long term solution I think it's at least cause for hope for people in a time where things feel somewhat hopeless and very scary my last question for you would be New York City mayor bill de Blasio said that things are going to be worse in April than they were in March that may could be worse than April.

"peer review" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"peer review" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"Systems to slow or even stop infectious disease outbreaks in their tracks. I ask Dr Condie about the work. His company blue is doing to. To create such a system so blue dot, we're a digital health company or just over forty people. We are an eclectic mix of physicians and veterinarians. Ecologists and data, scientists and software developers designers were a pretty diverse group, and our main goal is to build early warning systems for emerging infectious disease threats like the pandemic threat that we are seeing blue dot was founded in two thousand and thirteen. I spent the next ten years, or so in my role as an academic and a scientist. Say Michael's Hospital and at the University of Toronto studying global outbreaks. Eventually I reached a point where I realized that we had to be able to generate and move knowledge faster than the diseases move themselves, and while the academic arena was really an is a great space for discovery, it is not necessarily the most agile in terms of communication of that discovery. If you've ever submitted publication for Peer Review, you know that that could take you months to years. Whereas with an outbreak, you have to be operating in hours. Today's and so it was just the wrong vehicle, so I took a bit of a leap of faith, I am not a entrepreneur or person with the background in in business took a bit of a leap of Faith Mars. Innovation in the Mars Discovery District kind of helped me get started. Think about this founded blue in two thousand thirteen I was just me at the time. And here we are six years later with over forty of us and building some really kind of cutting edge tools that we are excited about because they are ultimately about ways that we can make the world a safer and more secure in a better place sort of expanding on that on the idea of doing better. How can you know experts better track and predict disease, outbreaks and epidemics? You know what kind of work that's being done at blue dot. That kind of thing. How can we better address this issue? Now, going back again to the outbreak in two, thousand and three. It, was clear to me that there were a number of things we need to do. One was to be able to recognize that there were outbreaks earlier. The second was we needed to be able to anticipate how they spread and I think the final one was..

blue dot Mars Discovery District Dr Condie scientist University of Toronto Peer Review Michael's Hospital
"peer review" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

10:33 min | 2 years ago

"peer review" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"Enjoyable for you and so my my rule is always been writing is to follow my curiosity. The reason I write is not because I know something. It's because I you want to know something right. I I take on these topics because I'm struggling with a with something in my own life and the way I find the answer is to read as much as I can and right and process for myself around what I'm learning and many times I come up with a you know what actually this belief that everybody thinks is true. Turns out it's actually not true. It's it's actually the opposite or it's not helpful and and so that's the kind of stuff I like to share with others to help them improve their lives as well but really I write for me first and foremost and so you know what when you don't have an audience and then some many times I try and remind myself I mean now that I do have an audience and I have one hundred thousand blog subscribers and hope to sold a quarter million copies now I have to have to intentionally remind myself look. I'm writing for me right like if other people like it. That's great but the book will be a success. Yes it answers my question period and I don't really care about the external metrics now. That's not always easy to do. I have to convince myself of this But the nice part about getting started is that you don't have to convince yourself because it is true. There's there's in fact a luxury. I think that a lot of people don't appreciate for when you first get started that curiosity and writing. Think for yourself Maybe this is the answer to my next question. Then you seem to be one of the most articulate and understanding of your work out of all the authors. I've talked to. Is this something a skill. You naturally hat or is this something. You actively work on. Well thanks. I don't know maybe they got that's interesting I haven't what do other authors say about their work. I feel like I could pick up any page in any of your books. And just start reading A few sentences and you would dive into every bit of research into that you understand it in and out and I think that's incredibly hard to do. Even when you spend the amount of work you do on your books so I'm wondering from this has anything to do with you lecturing Stanford and just having to revise your your your writing that way as well. Yes there is. There is okay so I write the kind honest. I enjoy reading the kind of stuff. That convinces me and so a lot of my writing is my argument to myself and for me. I need data right so a lot of books out there particularly in the personal development and product design space and business books. You know a lot about anecdotes. It's here's what worked for me so it's GonNa work for you and I hate that stuff because I want the Peer Review Journal study citation right like. It's it's great that it worked for you but you could be out liar right. This could be terrible advice. Where's the study and so I need that to convince me and I think that's what other people need as well as everything else is? Just you know just hearsay is just my personal anecdote. And so that's what convinces me now. That means that for me to crank out a book takes about five years. I mean all that lit review and getting my bearings straight I'm basically like a PhD in topic from all the research. I've been reading on on on one particular topic the topic of distraction. I you know after five years I better know myself because I've read everything I could possibly find about it It would be much easier if I was like. Okay let me just sit down and in a in a in a cabin in the woods and just type out what I think about distraction but frankly to do that I would just be regurgitating stuff that everybody any already knows. It's by diving into the research and say actually To do lists don't really work and Willpower is probably a myth and all these things that that most people don't believe or don't know yet because they haven't been exposed to the literature but the research has all their right part of the reason. I have an an opportunity as a writer is because there's so much academic research nobody reads and that's that's my job. My job is to explain. Explain the world so it could be made better by showing people what's what academia is revealing to us. And of course you know the scientific method doesn't mean that this stuff is conclusive many times. These things are revised But to the best of what we know today. Here's here's what we have. Here's what's out there. And unfortunately it sometimes can take decades for what academia already knows and you know. Typically the the average HD is a horrible writer. I mean if you've read an academic journal it's a slog. It's really hard to read an academic journal and many times. I think actually that's done. Interestingly enough because they don't actually want you to really understand what's going on many academics and this has come from years now of reading being academic journals. I think they right the way they write because if they wrote simply it'd be like a one page paper but but in in order to obfuscate the fact that the results are really not that interesting they have to imbed so many so much language. That doesn't need to be there that no one can understand that that I don't know they sound smarter something anyway but that's my opportunity my opportunities to be able to sift through thousands of studies so I can find maybe fifty in my book that that really I think can impact people's lives. No I appreciate you being so open and how far down these rabbit holes. You have to understand that. I think that's a a good perspective for anyone trying to get better in a certain skill and understand the amount of time I I'm also just in curious about just your ability to articulate. Do you practice public speaking. Were doing interviews. Because you seem to be very good at this as well thank you. I appreciate that You know I think being a good speaker speaker inherently makes you a good writer and vice versa. So I try and I try and write like speak and so that that actually makes writing so much easier easier because you just bang the words you just bang out the voice in your head and so I think I've had to actually retrain retrain myself to do that because I think in school we learned okay in the first paragraph. I'm going to stay by hypothesis. And here's my three points and then I paragraph won't too I'M GONNA state my point A. B. Then my point Z.. And then points and then at the end of the last paragraph. I'm going to read. I'm going to summarize what I just said. Well nobody actually talks like that in real life right. That would be a really really boring person listened to and so I try and I try and combine the human element of why. This is personally interesting to me as well as as the academic points and of course you know it's it's hard to maintain that balance but Yeah other than that. I think it's a lot of practice. I do a lot of speaking. I mean my M- my profession. These days I guess in terms of of of How I get paid is mostly through public speaking today and I really enjoy it I think I am? I do less academic lecturing today because when you you teach Grad students a lot of times at the double. Is it going to be on the test. As opposed to when I teach industry or conferences I can see people's eyes light up and say aw. That's what I've been looking for right and I love that audience interaction and even you know it's interesting. When I first started speaking I I would get really upset? Set when people were on their phones. Oh my God how dare you. I'm I'm up here on stage. I prepared for this presentation for countless hours. Now how dare you look at your phone as opposed to listening to me and now I've really flipped that because I think actually the phone is the best thing to ever happen to public speakers. Because it tells tells you you're boring and so I I love it like if I see the I look out the audience and I see very few people looking at their phones. That means I'm doing a great job but if I start seeing a lot of people are looking at their devices well I got to step it up either the contents not interesting my presentations on interesting. Some this is like real time feedback from me. And that's incredibly unhelpful. I I don't get that kind of feedback when I write you. Can't you know what I'm writing something I don't know in real time whether people are resonating with it but when I'm speaking I actually can't get some for that feedback now thanks to these devices. That feedback loops incredibly valuable right there. So you mentioned how you identified today as more mostly speaker then also an author you. You seem to be able to combine multiple things so you started intact. Now you're in writing and Eve also been an active investor even in companies like an event bright and product hunt are there commonalities amongst all those goes to just help you rise to the top of the field. Oh definitely so. I only invest in companies that use the model. That's my investor thesis. Because that's what I know. I mean that's kind of my my competitive advantage. I don't know anything about CRYPTO parmaceuticals. What I know about is how to design habit forming coming products so those are the kinds of companies? I look for the ones that that as a competitive advantage need to build habits in their business model very good point there about the competitive advantage which I know we need to wrap up here in a minute. Your first book hooked was a huge influence on me. It's funny it seems like every few months I'm still gifting that out the someone and then the new book indestructible how to control troll your attention and choose your life. Are there any final points. I know this was a book that was incredibly valuable me but US listeners. With for them to go pick up. I really appreciate surround. Thank you so much. I'm so glad it had an impact on your life and I think the the lesson I'd love to leave folks with when it comes to how to build habit forming technology augie as well as how to break these bad habits in our life that lead to distraction is that we are in control that we actually have much more power than we know That most people when it comes to this. This idea of distraction Many people now I think in the media is subscribe to this idea that that that we're powerless that it's addicting being all of us that it's hijacking our brain and I just don't think that's true and so what I wanted to do was to give people a tech positive approach to get the best of these technologies without letting them get the best of us but it requires us to believe that we have agency and power over them and I and I certainly think we do you know it starts inside. Well there's so many great takeaways ways action steps workbooks in the book so I highly recommend you guys checking it out but near. I can't thank you enough for joining us on. What Guy There my pleasure thank you so much on? You guys made it to the end of another episode of what got you there. I hope you guys enjoyed it. I really do appreciate you taking the time to listen all the way through. If you found value in this the best way you can support the show is.

writer US Peer Review Journal Stanford Eve
"peer review" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"peer review" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"I believe my <Speech_Female> information on <Speech_Female> the website <Speech_Female> dot <Speech_Female> org person <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> awesome <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> anything else <Speech_Male> you wanna tell us about <Speech_Male> peer review about <Speech_Male> your amazing team <Speech_Male> because i know <SpeakerChange> it is <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we do have a really amazing <Speech_Female> team made <Speech_Female> up of of <hes> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> just you <Speech_Female> know the research associates <Speech_Female> in the project <Speech_Female> managers but then <Speech_Female> the project support <Speech_Female> teams <Speech_Female> and the technology <Speech_Female> support teams <Speech_Female> and we've got certified <Speech_Female> meeting planners <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> you know so it's <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> it takes a village <Speech_Female> to to make <Speech_Female> these reviews successful <Speech_Female> in the <Speech_Female> actually mentioned <Speech_Female> that were involved in <Speech_Female> that front end <Speech_Female> <hes> with brooke <Speech_Female> workshops <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> we're also involved in the back <Speech_Female> end so we <Speech_Female> help facilitate <Speech_Female> the principal investigators <Speech_Female> meanings <Speech_Female> where they're coming <Speech_Female> back reporting <Speech_Female> on the <Speech_Female> progress that they're making <Speech_Female> with their research <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> you know our complete <Speech_Female> involvement <Speech_Female> in the process <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> requires that <Speech_Female> village of <Speech_Female> experts <Speech_Female> and have <Speech_Female> this very fortunate <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> i typically. <Speech_Female> I'll be in a meeting until <Speech_Female> everybody at oh. Are you <Speech_Female> that that's in the room <Speech_Female> that i have the <Speech_Female> best team <Speech_Female> at are you <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> no one's argued <Speech_Female> the point yet <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> correct <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> for even <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> of course we you know <Speech_Female> or <SpeakerChange> out we <Speech_Female> have great <Speech_Female> employees across the <Speech_Female> entire company but <Speech_Female> yeah <Speech_Female> i'm very <Speech_Female> fortunate <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> will <Speech_Male> thank you so much <Speech_Male> for spending some time <Speech_Female> with us today. Thank <Speech_Female> you for having me. <Speech_Male> We'll hopefully have <Speech_Male> you back again soon. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> thank <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> you for <Advertisement> listening to <Speech_Music_Male> further <Advertisement> together <Speech_Music_Male> the o. r. a. you <Speech_Music_Male> podcast <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to learn more <Speech_Music_Male> about any <Advertisement> of the topics <Speech_Music_Male> discussed <Advertisement> by <Speech_Music_Male> experts <Advertisement> visit <Speech_Music_Male> w._w._w. <Speech_Music_Male> Dot o._r._g. <Speech_Music_Male> You dot <Speech_Music_Male> org <Speech_Music_Male> you can also find us <Speech_Music_Male> on facebook twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and linked <Speech_Music_Male> in <Advertisement> at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and on instagram <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at <Speech_Music_Male> ori- are <Advertisement> you <Speech_Music_Male> together.

brooke facebook principal
"peer review" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

14:51 min | 2 years ago

"peer review" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"Oh are you podcast. I'm michael holtz in the communications and marketing department here at o. Are you with my colleague. The wonders jenna harpen al morning. How are you. I'm doing great. I'm happy to be here again this morning. This is a good way to start our morning. It really is a good cerna morning always find we get to learn about our colleagues and more about the company and absolutely suffering don't always know chat going on. I like at the time we'll coffee so speaking of people who work for our company. Our guest today is carrie cagle fine. How are you glad to be here so kerry. Tell us who you are and how you got to our house. Here's carrie legal. That's that's a very good question. I'm really one of those operations compliance leaders <hes> that's really my background so being the associate director over our scientific peer reviewed apartment <hes> a lot of people had you get there and sometimes ask that same place so what's happened here <hes> but i've been at i worry you for fourteen years. <hes> and i've had an interesting journey at ory you so i started in two thousand and five as a internal auditor with viki carin yes maritime and then my path progressive me over to become a you know what we call it or u._b._s. Say which is kind of the financial budget analyst and i was actually doing that in our stride program which is now saw awed but still you know under haraz called the stroppy w s and <hes> really became interested in what they were doing with peer review and the support they provided added <hes> in in soon moved into becoming a project manager and really just worked my way through. I was the operations manager. So you know making sure everything that we did did. I'm had high integrity quality and compliance behind it so that's really what has gotten me where i am today. <hes> my edification background <hes> so i have a bachelor's in organization management a master's in organization leadership and i'm currently pursuing doing my doctorate from vanderbilt in education leadership and learning that's good so we had <hes> jim bosberg in here the other day and he gave a very brief description a regarding what peer review is but can you kind of give your your own since you are in the trenches and you know this is your thing you do this day in and day out just really briefly for listeners. Describe what you're yeah so what is peer review. <hes> it really is an evaluation. It's a very very important evaluation process. <hes> in it really does not get the credit. It deserves <hes> and that's because it's kind of way back behind everything. It's not actually the research being done. It is it is a in evaluation of research funding proposals or research project proposals. <hes> requesting funding for research <hes> <hes> all federal research federal and state research is required mandated by law to be peer reviewed <hes> so what that means is we identify and recruit subject matter experts based on the proposal topic to come in and evaluate proposals that have been submitted and then based on on the feedback from the subject matter experts important funding or project decisions are made so i mentioned funding and that's a large part of our work but one of the cool things we get to take part in is the project reviews requesting time on the national app supercomputers so that's career cloudy exciting stuff so we were not involved in the actual research but we are a very important part of the research being conducted did and the stri group for our peer review group is actually involved in the entire research funding life cycle so we help facilitate and coordinate <hes> advisory committee meetings and workshops where the decisions are being made as to what should be research search were what should we fund over this next year and that moves into that proposal process <hes> where we have the ability using our peer knit system to collect proposals or or customer system <hes> collect those proposals and then as i mentioned recruiting and identifying the subject matter experts. I'm coordinating the whether it's an in person panel review or women are review <hes> all all the way through to the point that we're providing the results of that review over to our customers and they're using that information to make that important decision to a two on what's the best value proposal that's been provided and should be funded absolutely. It's very very important you know and i i. I use the analogy of if i think about it. If if you won the lottery today one of those almost billion dollar lotteries and all of your cousins families uncles nonprofit organizations are gonna come out of the woodwork with handout and you know you're you're giving person what how do you know what's the best to give your money to and that's what this is. Just kind of you know in in simple terms. It's trying to to help make the best decisions about and to be good stewards of our federal and state dollars and not directly like you said in the research but you you guys are having a direct impact on major research. That's happening for this nation and moving us forward absolutely yeah. It is a very important role. I completely lately agree and we have. We have some really great staff. <hes> who are subject matter experts themselves in in the process and you know our our our research associates czar all p._h._d.'s or their information scientists and have the background to identify and recruit these reviewers so it's a it okay pretty special team a very large list of reviewers. Don't you yes. We have a database of over eighteen thousand reviewers that we've identified and recruited created all kinds of subject matter absolutely absolutely i would i would i would want to defer jim malone on all of those subject the subject areas <hes> because i've seen you know by have the list but it is a laundry list a lot of biomedical research <hes> but even beyond that with commercialization and shooting so in it's not just federal customer correct you also state international so we work with the pennsylvania department of health <hes> this florida department health <hes> as well as nazerbayev university university in kazakhstan. That's yeah that's pretty interesting. Actually <hes> dr dave duncan is on his way back from there. He just went to their their graduation this past week wow so here he would have a very interesting story feature podcast super for cool and i'm sorry it just trying to thought is the other customers so we actually work with the universities and <hes> you know veteran affairs as a new one as well so you mentioned pure net which is is our proprietary proprietary platform <hes> four that are pure reviewer used to score judge <hes> the proposes does that they're looking at talk a little bit about to the extent that you can because i know it's proprietary you know how it works and how that enables you to really work with peer reviewers around the world who don't necessarily have to be gathered in a room to do the review and we actually have a great vision vision with for pure net right now so it's it's <hes> it's it's growing and which is really exciting so pure net today is is <hes> as a as a is an evaluation system and it allows <hes> those identified rick reviewers from throughout the world to have a secure log in <hes> from their home computer or personal device <hes> to once they've been assigned to a review to log in and breathe the proposal and score it evaluated their adding their comments based on the review criteria that established <hes> the peer now also it has the ability now which is a fairly new feature to <hes> collect proposal so we can actually create the u._r._l. For the call for proposals those include <unk> collect them directly into peer net and so that super cool it is it is super bowl <hes> it's it's. It's really great that rolled out old little over a year ago. We've got some really great developers after throw out there that we have a great deal of development team <hes> here at o. Are you <hes> and in so now what they're working on which is that's my passion. I'm super excited about it is worth longtime coming. We're turning it into a full grants management management system so what that means is currently pure net you can use to to to the point that the evaluations been done in reports can determine provide help make that decision and beyond that then the grants could be awarded and try to all the back in and project tracking can be would be able to be done in <hes> impure net nice more value for customers absolutely absolutely and then the the you know the next thing is to become best best in class and we've not define best in class but we will look. I've used randomly internally for or a few projects and it is <hes> wonderful. It's very easy to use <hes>. It's helped us score. We have some projects where we collect proposals and i have a small team that scores in it's been great. It's been very helpful. <hes> and like you said michael the ability to have people look at the proposal and score or and not have to have everybody sitting in one room has been phenomenon so yeah i even even internal you know inside of our a u it's been it's been a great tool tool. It it really is a great deal and you know we we tend to always focus on the research funding or the research projects that it actually can be used for any type of evaluation. We also use it for a ward nominations in an agenda. That's that's how you've used it internally but we actually do award nominations for the department of energy offices society as well as whatever you need evaluate you win the lottery start using which john <hes> we know peer reviews important. It's an important part of the scientific process what makes for good pure review integrity number one and that means not just integrity the actual view that all all of the process surrounding that review <hes> that means the the products that we're putting together the service that we provide i'm needs to be of the utmost hice this quality <hes> at any point. If we're not providing quality service how can we justify the integrity of that revision so so the entirety tired of review <hes> means that it's conflict of interest free <hes> hopefully minimal bias it's kind of hard to control biased but <hes> we do monitor for conflict of interest interest <hes> and have a process around that to help avoid that or viewers if declare conflict conflict of interest you know no longer can say the the proposal conflict of interest in this case would be. I'm a reviewer who maybe i knew the researcher. Absolutely absolutely i in in different agencies. Agencies may have different requirements around conflict of interest but typically. That's what it means. You've had within the last five years. You've had some form of involvement with the researcher or the research team proposing <hes> so it's really you truly the most important part of a peer review is is at integrity because going back to being good stewards of research dollars. The last thing you want is for someone to come back can question the award may and so being able to have that that's that's one of the benefits of using you know with the individual user loggins. There's all these variety of justifications along that you could provide to prove there was no conflicts and we've done our due diligence to maintain the integrity throughout the process. I've been a peer reviewer. Isn't you know <hes> little less on the scientific excited more on the more on the patient advocates but <hes> i know in some of the in person meetings that i've attended in one you have to declare the conflict of frontier don't even look at the proposal title and then when you're having that meeting if you if you're the person with the complex you have to leave the room sign out when he left sign out when he came back look into the as you said there's prove all along the way the conflict was avoided absolutely and typically <hes> for the majority of our peer reviews. We'll we'll have have one of our project managers in in the panel itself and that's one of the main reasons why they're there to help monitor for conflicts and you know i have personally stopped a review discussion because i knew someone in the room had been asked to leave yet to remind the panel chair that this person has conflict and needs to leave the room so important part so if someone is interested in working with you guys what is the best way to get in touch with you. They are welcome to reach out to me. Carey dot com or dot org org <hes> and that's k. e. r. a. dot c. A. g. l. e. at dot oregon..

michael holtz project manager carrie cagle researcher vanderbilt internal auditor dr dave duncan operations manager kerry associate director dot oregon analyst p._h._d. jim bosberg florida pennsylvania department of hea development team jim malone k. e. r.
"peer review" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"peer review" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Robert Muller wrote a letter apparently late March complaining to attorney general LIAM's bear that a four page memo to congress describing the principal conclusions of the investigation of the President Trump situation did not fully capture the context nature and substance Muller's work. According to a copy of a letter or viewed by the Washington Post the letter and a subsequent phone call between the two men were veal the degree to which they longtime colleagues and friends disagreed as they handed the legally and politically fraught task of investigating the president. I'm sure they'll be more on that. A Massachusetts man was caught on surveillance video biting gas station clerk who was trying to prevent him from stealing a bottle drink from a cooler the nineteen year old and played finger paints with the victim's blood licked it and put it all over his face. According to a witness the witness told police that the nineteen. Told him. I don't eat flush just drink blood while he licked his fingers following the brutal attack. What's wrong with people? Billions of elderly people have a form of dementia that has been misdiagnosed as I'll Heimer disease, according to researchers one expert called it the most important dementia. Finding in years the condition share similar symptoms to Alzheimer's, but it is a distinct disease it may partly explain why finding dementia care has failed so far and amazing story from the EPA. The Environmental Protection Agency has reaffirmed that glyphosate does not cause cancer in its review process of the US most widely used beside the Environmental Protection Agency reaffirmed its findings that the most widely used herbicides in the country round up does not cause cancer. Now, two separate juries have already said and have given these individuals million. Of dollars who say that. They got cancer from round up in glyphosate. Let's check in with Turney Jeffrey Smith, this is an amazing story. Jeffrey what's going on here? EPA's coming to the rescue of Monsanto now owned by bear. And Nick of time the shareholders voted to try and kick out the CEO because of his desire is purchase of Monsanto. They lost about forty billion dollars in value because of those two lawsuits and others thirteen thousand four hundred more plaintiffs waiting for their day in court. Now, it's interesting that the court case turned over documents that showed that Monsanto's people who actually were in charge of the committee that determined that glyphosate didn't close cancer. We're in fact, Monsanto's lapdog they were colluding. In fact, they do review article published in January show that they relied on their decision based on Santa's private unpublished research, but not on the peer reviewed public research the World Health Organization relied upon to determine that glyphosate. Doesn't fact probably cause cancer. In fact, there is another group that used to use to actually advise the PA on glide state evaluations got so fed up with their nonscientific approach. They left it it their own research and confirmed that glyphosate increases non-hodgkin's lymphoma risk by forty one percent. And finally, another CDC related agency just came out with their analysis saying, yes, indeed, there's a link between glide for state and non Hodgkin lymphoma. So I think the EPA George was just trying to throw a lifeline to a failing bear in mind Santo product, it might cost them, billions of dollars is an amazing story, and how much damage do you think the EPA has done to the potential safety of people who have used round up or have been exposed to it? Well, it's been a disaster. I know Dr Anthony Sanso who with the help of his Senator was able to procure the secret documents that Monsanto us to get to. Dick, life state-approved. And he said that the state destroyed the male testes of the rats cause tumors or cancer on virtually every organ every gland. And that there was obvious problems were being overlooked by the PA. So if we track the link between round up being sprayed, for example on the roundup ready crops over the last twenty three years, and we track more than thirty diseases. They rise in parallel, which indicates but doesn't prove that there's a strong connection. But we now know that glyphosate can damage the gut bacteria damage the country amiss up our neurotransmitters cause cancer probably and also birth defects. So there's a lot of reason why we should be voiding products that are sprayed with roundup and eat organic. Okay. Bye. Thank you, Jeffrey Smith and obesity levels are substantially lower in countries that consume high amounts of rice and wild counties with. Lower average rice intakes, of course, show Jairo BCC levels. According to the international study of one hundred thirty six countries being presented this year to the European congress. That's amazing need some rice, folks. Apple's iphone has an incredible money-making machine for the last three months of just this year apple sold thirty one billion dollars worth of iphones at the same time. The iphone is becoming less important to Apple's total sales as the smartphone industry stalls all around the planet. Let's check in with our expert, Lauren Weinstein. I guess people aren't buying as many phones as that used to Lauren. That's pretty much the case indeed around around the world, the smartphone industry now is relatively mature phone capabilities or leveling off in terms of what most people need their powerful enough for most of us now. So what's happening? Is that more and more people are holding onto their phones. Two years three years. Maybe more in some cases rather than upgrading every year. So it's natural that apple and other firms are smartphones. It'd be looking for additional income streams now that's not to say apple doesn't make a bundle selling iphones about half their revenue now is based on iphone sales, but it has been bobbling lower. So they're looking to maximize their other income streams they have wearables like the apple watch the air Pottier phones, that's going to be a big growth area for them. But a real biggie is services, apple music. I cloud if you can get people paying every month year in year out for subscription services. It can ultimately ultimately be much more lucrative than individual hardware purchases and keep in mind at once people buy into a particular technical ecosystem, whether it's apple Google, Amazon, or whatever they tend to stick with it that creates a lot of. Potential future revenue from those users. And that's what it's really all about not whether it's whether it's anything else, it's the total revenue per user. And and as these industries mature we're going to see the firms that are the winners constantly adjusting their portfolios in this regard to try to maximize that revenue. All right, my friend. Thank you so much Lauren Weinstein. I wreck spurred on the internet up next. Let's talk about space. Charles Shulz, third joins us on coast to coast AM. Christine rose. How did you become involved in holistic, health and healing? Being extremely.

glyphosate cancer Apple Environmental Protection Agenc Monsanto Turney Jeffrey Smith Lauren Weinstein Robert Muller Massachusetts Washington Post president Hodgkin lymphoma Charles Shulz Alzheimer CDC congress Trump general LIAM
"peer review" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"peer review" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Robert Muller wrote a letter apparently in late March complaining to attorney general William bear that a four page memo to congress describing the principal conclusions of the investigation into the President Trump situation did not fully capture the context nature and substance Muller's work. According to a copy of a letter reviewed by the Washington Post now the letter and the subsequent phone call between the two men were veal the degree to which the longtime colleagues and friends disagreed as they handed the legally and politically fraught task of investigating the president. I'm sure they'll be more on that. A Massachusetts van was caught on surveillance video biting gas station clerk who was trying to. Event him from stealing a bottle drink from a cooler the nineteen year old then played finger paints with the victim's blood licked it and put it all over his face. According to a witness, the witness told police that the nineteen year old told him, I don't eat flush. I just drink blood while he licked his fingers following the brutal attack. What's wrong with people? Billions of elderly people have a form of dementia that has been misdiagnosed as I'll Heimer disease, according to researchers one expert called it the most important dementia. Finding in years the condition share similar symptoms to Alzheimer's, but it is a distinct disease it may partly explain why finding dementia care has failed. So far. An amazing story from the EPA. The Environmental Protection Agency has reaffirmed that glyphosate does not cause cancer in its review process of the US most widely used or beside the Environmental Protection Agency reaffirmed its findings of the most widely used herbicide in the country roundup does not cause cancer. Now, two separate juries have already said and have given these individuals millions of dollars who say that they got cancer from round up in life Assayed. Let's check in with attorney Jeffrey Smith, this is an amazing story. Jeffrey what's going on here? EPA is coming to the rescue of Monsanto now owned by bear any Nick of time. The shareholders just voted to try and kick out the CEO because of his desire is purchase of Monsanto. They lost about forty billion dollars in value because of those two lawsuits and now there's thirteen thousand four hundred more plaintiffs waiting for their day in court. Now, it's interesting that the court case turned over documents that showed that Monsanto's people who actually were in charge of the committee that determined that glyphosate didn't cause cancer. Or in fact, Monsanto's lapdog they were colluding. In fact, they review article published in January show that they relied on their decision based on Monsanto's private unpublished research, but not on the peer reviewed public research, if the World Health Organization relied upon to determine the life is safe dozen fact, probably cause cancer. In fact, there is another group that used to used to actually advise the PA on glide state evaluations got so fed up with their nonscientific approach. They left it it their own research and confirmed that glyphosate increases non-hodgkin's lymphoma risk by forty-one percent. And finally, another CDC related agency just came out with their analysis saying, yes, indeed, there's a link between for state and non Hodgkin's lymphoma. So I think the EPA Georgia just trying to throw a lifeline to a failing bear in mind Santo product, it might cost them billions of dollars is an amazing story in how much damage do. You think the EPA has done to the potential safety of people who have used round or have been exposed to it? Well, it's been a disaster. Dr Anthony, so who with the help of his Senator was able to procure the secret documents that Monsanto us to get to. Dick life state approved. And he said that the destroyed the male testes of the rats cause tumors or or cancer on virtually every organ every gland. And that there was obvious problems were being overlooked by the PA. So if we track the link between roundup being sprayed, for example on the roundup ready crops over the last twenty three years, and we track more than thirty diseases. They rise in parallel, which indicates that doesn't prove that there's a strong connection, but we now know that glyphosate can damage the gut bacteria damage the country amiss up our neurotransmitters cause cancer probably and also birth defects. So there's a lot of reason why we should be avoiding products that are sprayed with roundup and eat organic. Okay, my friend. Thank you, Jeffrey Smith and obesity levels are substantially lower in countries that consume high amounts of rice and while counties with. Lower average rice intakes, of course, show higher obesity levels. According to the international study of one hundred thirty six countries being presented this year to the European congress. That's amazing need some rice, folks. Apple's iphone has an incredible money-making machine for the last three months of just this year apple sold thirty one billion dollars worth of iphones at the same time. The iphone is becoming less important to Apple's total sales as the smartphone industry stalls all around the planet. Let's check in with our expert, Lauren Weinstein. I guess people aren't buying as many phones as they used to Lauren. That's pretty much the case indeed around around the world, the smartphone industry now is relatively mature phone capabilities are leveling off in terms of what most people need their powerful enough for most of us now. So what's happening is that more and more people are holding onto their phones. Two years three years. Maybe more in some cases rather than upgrading every year. So it's natural that apple and other firms are smartphones. It'd be looking for, but this no income streams say apple doesn't make a bundle selling iphones about half their revenue now is based on iphone sales, but it has been bobbling lower. So they're looking to maximize their other income streams they have wearables like the apple watch the air Pottier phones, that's going to be a big growth area for them. But a real biggie is services, apple music. I cloud if you can get people paying every month year in year out for subscription service. It can ultimately ultimately be much more lucrative than individual hardware purchases and keep in mind at once people buy into a particular technical ecosystem, whether it's apple Google, Amazon, or whatever they tend to stick with that creates a lot of potential future revenue from those users, and that's what it's really all about not whether it's an iphone whether it's anything else, it's the total revenue per user. And and as the industry's mature we're going to see the firms that are the winners constantly adjusting their portfolios in this regard to try to maximize that revenue. All right, my friend. Thank you so much Lauren Weinstein expert on the internet up next. Let's talk about space. Charles Shulz, third joins us on coast to coast AM..

Apple cancer glyphosate Monsanto Jeffrey Smith EPA Lauren Weinstein attorney Robert Muller Washington Post Massachusetts president William bear Alzheimer Charles Shulz obesity
"peer review" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"peer review" Discussed on KCRW

"And sent it out for peer review, and I was told it was locked from editing, which meant it was going to be released any day. Now Zimmerman press releases were drafted to send to the media. This is may twenty seventeen they were about to publish and then something came up, and they chose to delay the delay seen temporary. And then I was notified again in September that they wanted to release it. But then hurricane Harvey hit Texas followed by Irma and Maria pummeling, the Caribbean in Florida. And they didn't release it after all Maria was left guessing why the repeated delays were frustrating for her. But she was distracted by another big project. She gave birth to her first child at the end of December twenty seventeen and went on maternity leave. Okay. So we're up to twenty eighteen Trump's been president for more than a year. And this report still hasn't been released. Yeah. That's a long delay. I got curious if her research was getting ensnared by the Trump administration. I e mailed a park service spokesman who said the report was still an internal review. So I filed public records requests with the park service. And the university of Colorado Murray is home base the park service stalled but the university responded pretty quickly and gave me eighteen different drafts of the report dating from August twenty sixteen to March twenty eighteen eighteen different drafts. What did you find? There had been. Lots of changes the early drafts had many references to humans causing climate change and flooding the national parks then about a year after Trump became president. After the report had been considered final for months. The changes started showing up park officials commented that this was really unusual. For instance, the first sentence of the executive summary read anthropogenic climate change presents challenges to national park managers anthropogenic, meaning humans, right? It's the scientific term for people causing something aversion from January twenty eighteen dropped the word anthropogenic and other references to people causing climate change. I can see that those changes were made by park service spokesman and the head of the park service's climate change response program. That's the part of the park service. That's supposed to help parks. Get ready for climate change. They'd scrubbed the report of all mentions of humans causing climate change. An Email exchange showed their boss had just communicated. His quote anthropogenic concerns I called Maria and told her about the draft side scene. What would you do if your report came out as I side edited without any reference to the human causes of climate change? I'd be very disappointed. If there will words that will being attributed to me that I didn't. Right. So have you been under any pressure from colleagues to delete words from your report that you think are important to have in your report?.

Maria Trump Trump administration Zimmerman press president Caribbean university of Colorado Murray Florida Harvey Irma executive Texas