35 Burst results for "Peel"

Americans who fear COVID at work entitled to jobless benefits

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast

05:05 min | 4 d ago

Americans who fear COVID at work entitled to jobless benefits

"And would joe biden said is that it's not fair for americans to have to choose between work and health meaning that employers are trying to get workers to come back to work offering them their jobs back. Maybe they were temporarily laid off and the bosses are like you know we'd like you to come back and biden pointed out. If they refuse to go back to work they no longer qualify for unemployment benefits because remember unemployment benefits in theory. Right you're only supposed to get those if you're looking for a job and you can't find one because if you're offered a job and you don't want it will then you're not really unemployed. You're basically retired and so unemployment is not supposed to be a retirement plan. It's supposed to be money to tide you over until you get a job that you are looking for but would biden said is this is in fair. We don't want a situation where somebody loses their unemployment benefits because they don't want to go back to work and the reason of they may not want to go back to work is because it may not be safe right because they don't want to risk getting cove it so what biden has now done with his executive order. Is he saying that if workers don't want to go back to work because they are worried about getting covert or for maybe some other health related reasons or maybe they have some other things they have to do right that interfere with work that they're able to turn down a job offer yet still get their unemployment benefits now. This is a disaster in the making. This is a moral hazard of extreme proportions. And what it really amounts to is the beginning of universal basic income now on the surface right. It probably sounds compassionate. Yes why should people have to choose between work and potentially getting sick right but we make that choice all the time. I mean everybody who goes to work gets a risk. I mean there's always a risk that you can get sick at work if it wasn't cove it it's something else i mean. Clearly if you stay at home you are less likely to catch a cold or any other disease that if you go to work and you interact with other people. I mean clearly if you get in your car and you drive to work well. There's a risk that you might get into a car accident and you could die but you still go to work and there are a lot of people that actually have jobs where there's a lot of risk they operate heavy machinery. They could get hurt. You could die people working minds. The mind's cave-in they died so there's all sorts of risks that people except when they go to work so people choose you choose between going to work and accepting the risks and not working. Now if you choose not to work then you lose your in cup. So people always way the benefits with the cost. Yes if i go to work. I could get hit. I could die in a car accident on my way to work. Or i could catch cold or i could slip on a banana peel. It is an or whatever. I can avoid those risks by staying home but then i don't have any income and then what risks do i have if i have no income right. Maybe i don't have enough to eat. So i don't have enough to pay my rent now. I'm homeless. what are the risks. So that so everybody has to trade off or the cost benefit analysis and most americans are going to choose to accept the risks inherent with going to work in order to avoid the risks inherent with losing. Your income biden wants to do is totally skew. The playing field. He wants to make it. So americans can say you know what. I want to avoid the risks associated with working. But i can still have all the money. I can still get paid to stay at home. And now i get the money and i don't have to take all the risks associated with working. So this is what's going to happen. You're going to have a whole category of americans. And i'm not blaming the americans for making a rational choice. I mean why. Go to work if you don't have to if the government gives you an excuse not to work take advantage of it and if you don't somebody else will look. I agree. everybody. Who goes to work has a risk of getting kovin right now. You reduce that risk by staying at home so that means everybody by definition can say. I don't want to go to work. I don't wanna take that small risk of getting coded. I'm going to stay at home and collect my extended unemployment benefits so these people are not going back to work and most of the people who are unemployed. Joe biden has made it so that they never have to go back

Biden Joe Biden
Professional video-gamer, 25, hangs up controller over thumb injury

Weird AF News

04:23 min | 5 d ago

Professional video-gamer, 25, hangs up controller over thumb injury

"A top video gamer has been forced to retire at age. Twenty five because of a thumb injury. That's very early to retire from anything. Twenty five years old. But you imagine he's probably been playing video games for twenty four and a half years. Correct these dudes just come out of the womb looking for a controller. Ready to play games. Kids start early. This guy's name. Is thomas zuma papa arado. He says he's stepping back from professional gaming due to injuries. I've never heard of this guy. I don't do gamer stories. I don't really follow gamers. But i thought hey. Let's do a gamer story on weird news for one time now. I think i covered video game a few months ago as as well so it says here. The twenty five year olds zuma will stop competing for the foreseeable future because playing through the pain in in his hand just isn't possible anymore. Here's a quote from zuma. It breaks my heart to step away from a game. I put my heart and soul into every single day for eight years. I tell you. He said that on his twitter account going through that process. You know getting healthy again was one of the hardest things i ever had to do. Both and mentally which led to a lot of stress and anxiety. I needed surgeries. I've been struggling with injuries. It's the hardest thing ever. Yes got wrist thumb problems a makes this makes it tough to compete against the best players in the world. I don't enjoy competing. When i can't be the zuma everyone knows and loves and and feel like it's not fair to myself or to or to my team to go through all that again potentially causing more damage to my hand been grateful to have had a very long playing career. Actually i've met so many amazing people through e sports and have made so many friendships continue to cherish for the rest of my life. Sure i can't use my opposable thumbs. Which really is the thing that distinguishes us most from the other mammals and it really allows us to live in life. But you know what this just some things. You gotta sacrifice when you want to be a very good gamer. I can't pick up anything now. I can't eat a twinkie. i just can't have. You should see me and peel an orange. It's just terrible thankfully. I've made enough money in east sports to hire somebody that appeal on my oranges for me. That's what's going on here. And i cannot hitchhike because i can't raise my thumb hitchhike. You think that's an old school thing that no one does anymore. Well i'll tell you people do it. People do it sometimes. You need a ride okay. As always only half of that quote was correct. I just can't take this guy so seriously. I feel bad you know. He's he can't play video games again. Know get a real job. Now just go and get a real job like the rest of us now zuma welcome to reality sir although he probably has made so much money playing video games these east sports. If you're very good at it you can make so much money from what i understand. He probably never has to work a day in his life ever again. He probably has enough money to buy biotic thumbs and fingers to replace his regular gidgets. I'd imagine Do they do that yet can you. Can you get like a thumb plant thumb implant like a robotics. Thumb seems seems possible. I mean if you if you can install a vagina. why can't you get a robot thumb. I feel like now it mentions at the end of the article that the video game that zuma most successful ad and has to retire from his call of duty which is a first person shooter. Game that i used to play along with black ops. I really enjoyed those games and played them for quite some time. But i had to stop. Because i had this moment of realization word. I looked in my xbox and you can see how many hours of accrued video game time you've been playing and it was like almost eight hundred hours and i was like. Wow what a loser i was like. I gotta get my life together. One eight hundred hours. What does that like. Several months wasted playing these games. It was it was a real sobering moment. I got rid of my xbox and now you know now i record a podcast in a closet so you know sometimes you just got to pull yourselves up from your bootstraps and just you know. Be successful like you know like me.

Zuma Thomas Zuma Twitter
How to Rank on Page 1 of Google in 2021

Marketing School

04:41 min | Last week

How to Rank on Page 1 of Google in 2021

"Today. We are going to talk about how to rank on. Page one of google in twenty twenty one. So okay get off. I mean look. We'll talk about page we've been talked about ranking number one as well so look for twenty twenty one the core web vitals that is going to be a big part of google's algorithm so it's having a great website experience making sure things are fast things are not broken kind of the basics. Just making sure that google is just trying to make sure that there's a framework for websites to follow to rank carnage. Want to help make you more successful because they do want to be indexing your content. Another thing that you should do if you wanna rank really well. This year is build les lames. I know this sounds crazy. Eric and i will do episode on this topic within the next week or so but build less links. So what we've seen is if you build too many links to fast your rankings. Don't move up as fast and they usually don't go up as high to people who are building at a much slower pace taking their time building higher calling links rowlings in both scenarios. You never wanna buy links. It's more so just people do ten of manual outreach and just try to bombard how many links again getting try to aim for rich anchor techs and i would tell you is do the opposite when you create content. Let it sit wait. A few months and then build natural high-quality very relevant -tated links and. Even if you just let trick lynn. What you'll find is that your rankings. Climate a much quicker pace all right under giving oldie but still relevant the skyscraper technique from back linko also known as brian. Deane but the idea here. Is that all of us ranking number one or page one there for a reason. So what conclusions. Can you draw by diagnosing. The top three results. And can you do something. That's ten times better than that. That's still something that works. It's the same thing with product craciun. You make something that's ten times better and you know you just keep iterating right. So let's use the tesla electric cars an example. I would say it's maybe. It's not a ted ex. Could be ten x. I mean. I love it as a car right but yeah i think it's a great car. I do think it's the best. It's the most pleasant experience i've ever had right so same deal here. That's why their stock is. There's a lot that goes into why their stock is so high. But you know that's one of the reasons it's just a great product and a great company so think about how your content. How can you make your content like a great product and when you are also optimizing trying to rank really high up. Keep in mind. eric mentioned. They're using user signals right so they have the core web vitals but some of these user signals that they're using is our the senior listing and or they can go down to the next one. I'm clicking on that so things get peeling titled tag appealing meta description can really help. Bolster your rankings. Things like adding in the year in there. We seem increase more. Click through rates based on data. That i got from eric from click flow also keeping it short into the point. Also helps increase clicks adding a meta description. I know sometimes you always see or not always in most cases you see a meta description each listening but it doesn't mean that each site has a meta description is more so google's pulling text from page but if you manually create a meta description you're more likely to get more clicks because he can pick what keywords earner but those are some things that you can do to increase your click throughs as well as evoking curiosity example. That is like the seven benefits at green tea number. Six will shock we. What's number six shock. Me i gotta click and just go look at number six yup lund thing. I'll add from my side is making sure that you're able to keep people on the page for a long time right. So what can you do. Maybe you can add a youtube video to it. Maybe you could add more content to it but dwell time is still important because it is. It's a very nice signal similar with you too. When you think about youtube they look at retention rates right. I mean they obviously want to the platform to show you more ads but you know in terms of ranking you. I mean google's core product is making sure they create a good search experience right. So they're gonna make you hard. They want good signals. Coming from your page. Neil and the last step and i know we can keep going on and on for this but we want to keep it short and to the point so that way you have action that you can creating is update your old content over a billion blogs tons of content way find his right less content but update your existing articles especially ones that already ranking the continue perform. Better if you see pages that are dipping in rankings. Update them look all the people rank above you and make contact better than i know. Eric mentioned the skyscraper technique. You don't have to go that above and beyond just making a little bit better than your competition really helps with your ranking when you make those changes and update your content rankings may not shoot up in the next few days or we but typically within thirty days. You should start seeing go back up

Google Deane Eric Lynn Brian Youtube Neil
Optimize for Success 2021: Put Storytelling at the Core of Your Marketing Focus

Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

04:28 min | Last week

Optimize for Success 2021: Put Storytelling at the Core of Your Marketing Focus

"You can develop so. I'm doing both and it's really exciting. So i'd like you to peel back a little bit on storytelling for those. Who don't understand what that role is. I hosted chief storyteller. Steve clayton to speak to a group of early career professionals. When i was leading that program within microsoft and so i know a little bit more about it but i don't think many of our listeners do can you describe what that role is what the function is. Yeah you know satya. When he came on board a little over six years ago. I think almost seven. Now you know he he. Does this idea of leading with empathy. We were asked you know at microsoft. We were these. I know it all and we were transforming ourselves into becoming learning loss in so that just really was a culture activation that he brought on in. We began to invite people. Such as steve to be he became the chief storyteller. With this idea that we would have storytellers microsoft and we actually today have four thousand worldwide. Four hundred. Hq within these functions. So it's not this. One thing of a storyteller is one person that's communications or branding or marketing. It's truly the activation of culture through telling the stories in so the chiefs storyteller steve. He serves as our hours are ahead guy. He leaves us in the mandate of culture activation and enabling storytellers throughout the business functions. I love that you talked about the activation of culture. I think that a lot of organizations don't get this piece and i coach organizations on mindset. Another one of sasha's principles right a growth mindset but i also talk about branding and i think that we in the tech sector in general and also microsoft partners have a little bit of a gap here and understanding. Branding i know this is an area of focus for you as well. Can you peel back a little bit more with me on this. And how the two correlate absolutely so actually my book is about brand storytelling not just storytelling and into me. What i've learned in my own trajectory is that the brand has a responsibility to continue. Reminding people why they exist at the course that origin story. Why why are we still here. Why is that important to the market. Why are services or products important in relevant in the beyond that is continued to also keep telling them in reminding them how they're getting to the market in what they're doing to continue to stay relevant so it's the approach of the brand's story at the origin level and then the approach of of keeping on top of customers mines that why in that relevancy especially as we move through so many ambiguous environments such as market trends in we have Alpha's coming into the market as well and so there's so many contending trends that continue to evolve in we. We don't have it but together. It's there's this evolution at the story continues to evolve setting that tone with the story for the origin story and then designing stories that continue to remind customers why existed they should care is very important so i'd love to dig into this really terrific book brand storytelling customers at the heart of your brand story. And by the way. Congratulations you just want a stevie award for women in business category. that's amazing. What was the genesis. Just really terrific. What was the genesis for the book. Yeah i was actually. I was in london at the time. Ed talking about what we were doing what we are doing at microsoft. This work began for me specifically in core services engineering. A lot of people got curious. What are you doing as a storyteller microsoft. What does that look like. Especially in engineering. You would think would sit in branding marketing and so. I began to speak outside microsoft and talk top brands about the work that we were doing. The things that i was learning specifically my space in the publisher came was at one of these talks. I was in london and they said while you should really put this in a book format. I don't think i can do that. I was like. I'm not an author and we actually went back and forth. I was not immediately warm to the idea of a buck but you know she really pressed onto. Tell me that storytelling needed to be democratized in. That's when she hooked me as a publisher said while that that's really resonates with me. People leave storytelling. They think it's big for leaders or for politicians or preachers. It's not for me and it is for all of us. So i literally spoke about my own journey of becoming storyteller and discovering we are all storytellers and

Microsoft Steve Clayton Satya Steve Chiefs Sasha Stevie Award Alpha London ED
Many Tigray refugees entering Sudan with nothing but their clothes: UNHCR

UN News

05:56 min | Last week

Many Tigray refugees entering Sudan with nothing but their clothes: UNHCR

"Nearly sixty thousand people. From ethiopia's volatile tigray region have now crossed the border to remote southeastern sudan optimal than two months of fighting many with just the clothes on their backs. The emergency has created a massive protection challenge for the un refugee agency in sudan. Unhcr which is doing everything. It can't provide what they need as spokesperson. Xl bishop tells us news is daniel johnson. I've just been on a mission to the east. Where i have looked at the response in relation to the refugee influx from ideo. Peel right. so we're going to talk about the refugee influx which comes after two and a half months of fighting water. The numbers now that you're seeing seeking shelter over the border of sudan from ethiopia's northern region of tigray so we have about fifty eight thousand at europeans. Which are actually entered into saddam at the moment the influx is between two to five hundred people daily coming across the border. They're coming in through to border areas Diet and lewke that number coming over two to five hundred a day. That's a lot less than it was but you suggesting that perhaps people are just too far away from the border to get to safety across the border now yes the first influx which resources came from the villages on the western side of tigray at the moment the people which we are seeing of people who have walked for some time what we see is that maybe we have an indication that the western side of being emptied and the people seeking shelter not come from further away. What are they telling you what are their needs. So i mean. Most of the people have Actually entered sudan without anything so they come with their clothes but many many few coming with no possessions at what we hear is that many come without documentation which is also something which we are trying to address the first influx came in relation to direct fighting the influx which we have now. The people are telling us that it's more in relation to the fact that they don't feel safe in tigray not so much because of the fighting because they are from the gray area. So do you have an idea. About what the level of fighting is in tigray today. What is your access you know we are working on the sudan side and our office in addis. Ababa is actually trying to gain access now. What we are doing is trying to relocate them. From the border areas further inland. We have two camps at the moment which are some distance from the border where border conflict should not be a problem. Okay but i'm just concerned that there's no access to hundreds of thousands potentially of people on the other side of the border of sudan with. He need essential food. Water and other services reported rising malnutrition from the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs and they cited bureaucratic obstacles in in getting access to people who need it so. What's the latest you have on tensely getting help to these people in need as we are sitting here on the sudan side we are focusing on the influx which has come across the border from at the opium and we also have offices in the opium which are dealing with the people who have moved inside the tigray area but also inside at your more at large. So let's talk about two and a half months into this conflict. In the northern region of tigrayan ethiopia. You're trying to relocate tens of thousands potentially of refugees because you've got camps further inland in sudan. Could you may be explain what the difficulties are first of all. It's always a challenge to actually find. Land land something which is owned here by individuals but also by government and we have been working together with the government of sudan. We go a piece of land which is old campsite which is called ambre kuba what we have placed about twenty thousand refugees at the moment here. We have within. I would say short span in able to at least all stem in attempts but also ensure water health and food the second site which we have because kuba has been saturated is tenable. it's further way than kouba and it takes about twelve to fourteen sometimes. Sixteen hours to actually have the buses leaving the border area arriving at the campsite. Which therefore makes it arrivals in the middle of the night now. The campsite is located in a very remote area where we don't have any electricity and we are concerned that actually offloading these amounts of people in the middle of the night with no lights is something of a concern to us. We are trying to do this now. In such a way that we have larger area rub whole set up where we host people until we have the song light out again and then we give them the tents which have been set up for them. Sure and final. Question to you mr bishop. We are two and a half months into this conflict refugees telling you that. They are hopeful. Being able to return amid this fighting between two grants and the marines in the northern region of ethiopia. Refugees are still hopeful. But i think that what we see Is that people are here for longer term and why we have had some people expressing hopes to return they would like to return to the tigray. Which was there some three months ago not to the new situation which stay. I've heard the bald.

Sudan Tigray Ethiopia Daniel Johnson Unhcr Tigrayan Saddam UN Ababa Office For The Coordination Of Addis Ambre Kuba Kouba Kuba Mr Bishop Marines
What Is Worcestershire Sauce?

BrainStuff

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

What Is Worcestershire Sauce?

"It's that brown sauce with a nine unpronounceable name. It looks on paper. Like war hester shire. It's a tiny tasty edition to red meats soups and pretty much. Anything that needs brazing. And according to the company that originally created it lea and perrins. it can be pronounced. Worcester shire worcestershire or worcester. Sheer worcestershire sauce is used to make good things even better because it packs a lot of savory nece sometimes called you mommy the word emami by the way was coined in the first decade of the nineteen hundreds as a way of marketing. The then newly isolated flavor compound monosodium glutamate or msg but back to the sauce. We spoke by email was shameless. Mullen a chef at the institute of colin area -cation he said in recent years there's been a newfound interest in amami or the fifth taste after salty sweet bitter and sour described as deliciousness. The amami brings out the natural flavourings and food makes steak taste more sticky mushrooms. More shrew me worcestershire sauce is made up of a lot of flavorful ingredients including anchovies. That's right it's not generally vegan plus red onion molasses garlic tamarind and malt and or cider vinegar mullen said the vinegar and tamarind bring a punchy city to the sauce and the molasses and onion balance out the sweetness but the true magic happens during the lengthy fermentation process which takes eighteen to twenty four months. This last and most critical step was something of a happy accident. When supposedly in the early eighteen hundreds to chemists based in worcester england john lee and william parents were charged with duplicating a recipe that one british nobleman or another had enjoyed in bengal. Their first effort was an utter failure. However and chemists left it to languish in jars their seller a few years later they rediscovered the batch and were thrilled to realize that fermentation had turned it into the perfect savory sauce. They started selling it in eighteen thirty seven. It came to the us in eighteen thirty nine and is sold in over seventy five countries today when that original leeann parents product was shipped overseas. It's glass bottles often broke as a result of rough waters. So the company began rapping the individual bottles and paper. The tradition continues today more a way to distinguish the brand rather than a need to keep the product whole the company lost the copyright to the name in eighteen. Seventy six a while. Leeann parents recipe remains a closely guarded. Secret competitors have sprung. Up to make similar versions. The bbc counted at least thirty others and worcester alone. You can even making it yourself at home. Mullen said while the aging and fermenting process might be a bit much to undertake at home. You can make a very tasty approximation of worcestershire sauce. By simmering soy sauce mustard powder malt vinegar tamarind paste garlic anchovy paste tomato paste ginger molasses and spices. Those spices he said can include coriander seed mustard seed and the clove as well as orange peel and black pepper. He explained the simply. Mix all the ingredients and similar to sauce consistency. Then strain in store liquid. There are lots of recipes online including several for those of us who have been playing around with home for medication and of course the beloved sauce isn't relegated to stakes and such either. It can be added to pretty much anything that needs inning bitter bloody mary fondue cheese sauce eggs popcorn potato salad dressing or a grilled cheese sandwich. Leeann parents even recommends a splash of it in place of your normal dashes of salt and pepper. The continuing enthusiasm over mommy flavor is carrying over into the share market and this recent uptick is expected to continue projected through twenty twenty five. At least mullen explained amami hounds have been on the hunt for heritage condiments likely and perrins original recipe and there's an ever increasing trend toward finding new applications for the sauce or marinade. Cocktails worcestershire sauce is having a moment.

Hester Shire Perrins Worcester Institute Of Colin Mullen LEA John Lee Leeann Bengal William England BBC United States Amami
Zcoin: Looking After The Community With Reuben Yap

Bitcoin Radio

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Zcoin: Looking After The Community With Reuben Yap

"Let's start off with you. Know for viewers. What exactly is a z coin. There's a lot of privacy. Focused crypto currencies out there. Different types of token people are sometimes confused between the differences. So you know how long has z coin been out and what exactly is some of the benefits you can do it. Right so Zeke hainan Main in two thousand sixteen. I think probably in the work of oil probably sought bali one and a half years before that. can be launching the twentieth of september. Two thousand sixteen so we can just post office having Just like i mean upper months ago. So that's really exciting and what we do in z. Coin that we really really belief in the importance of a ripple that is uncensored book and private because we feel that if you want to have an ought to ought to the financial system in asked to be both Private and or it to be uncensored in unseasonable privacy's also asked important As well especially with bitcoin now you know every single from sexton is is kind of recalled. The payments lee on the blockchain barry single movement of a coin is traceable promise in inception and i think you know what we do to provide privacy's we allow people to actually destroy the coins and at any time in the future to regain them for brand new ones with no previous transcendent history. It's almost wiping all the transaction history and getting fresh virgin coins and that's the crux of technology. And we've used this being the all. This technology is kind of homegrown is not a faulk of something else and we do have independent research and we probably can talk a bit more about that later. Yeah yeah that's really really interesting to hear. I think that's one of the things that that is unique. You know i've i've read a lot about even for the employees in internal stakeholders developers. Will you all offer a burning redeem different privacy models at y'all have switched recently and You know one thing that maybe you could talk about. Is i heard that you all kind of bitch. The founders reward and you increase development for funding post having or at least. That's what your plans are. So why did you take this approach. As opposed to other protocols out there that still do keep that founder reward into the protocol. It seems that you all are working hard to support the community. Keep them happy. I think he's a balanced right. I mean on the one hand you know people unfortunately see founder words and stuff like that. It's a formal and reaching and reaching the faltas or the initial investors. And they don't see as like a peel community project by the same time. I mean realistically except for very few handful of of really really projecting even those suffering for funding You expect of like development improvements on almost like a donation basis is also very difficult. I mean you know you take a look at a bitcoin. Right it's funded by you. Know a lot of funds but it d- may be pursuing their own interests. Even someone like lou dash junior. He couldn't get funding. He's been like a call developer for so long and he he's like i need the final edition of what because the on enough. I mean bitcoin is like the biggest cryptocurrency and dean of having problems. Funding green itself has a green another privacy. Coined the ailsa struggling You know they have the handful of programmers and very reliant on on donations that may or may not continue coming along. And that's a really bad way to attract allen who want job stability and things like that right. I mean that's something to be expected of. You wanna try thailand. You have to be able to pay them

Zeke Hainan Main Sexton Bali Lou Dash Bitcoin Allen Thailand
Managing Your Money In Marriage During Uncertain Times

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

03:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Managing Your Money In Marriage During Uncertain Times

"Me ask you. You're wonderful husband darnell so often. Money affects marriage. More than almost anything How can we be mindful of how are mismanagement of money is affecting our relationship with our spouse and how do we get in sync with our spouse. Well we're going to have to set some common goals. And that's the fastest way to stop. Because finance is really are the source of contention and most marriages and so we'll say what is our long-term goal. Let me give an example. Let's say one of our goals is just to make sure that we have accumulated at least two to three months of living expenses. Someone whatever we're doing should be driving stories that goal so if somebody's going to run out by some luxury upper end fishing poles. My husband is currently at the fishing example. Here where he is this moment. But you know you have to say now. Is that going to get us towards our goal. Let's let's agree that this is where we're going because how can to walk together unless they agree and so you gotta sit down. Write down and say what's our goal and make every decision. Make sure it's not taking away from your goal. It can be hard but if you really talk about. What's driving yours expenditures. You're gotta find you're going to get on a path to agreement deborah's sometimes that communication can be really difficult in a marriage. I mean you're saying that you're a trained. Cpa and i can imagine it's put a little stretch in your marriage when darnall saying had like this you know this luxury item and you're going honey seriously really and you're giving them that look like you're looking at me right now and i mean so that can either start some friction between you or it's achieving the right goal which is accountability. So how do we make that communication a little easier in our marriage. So it's not abrasive. Well we do it by reminding ourselves. What the goal has been so darn out at me. We know that we're gonna pay ten percent of our income to the church sell. That goal has been met. We know that we're gonna need. We would like six months living expenses in the bank in that sounds excessive in this environment especially with everything being cancelled but we also have a formula. We saw we spend some we save some. Those are three s. When i say we so some we give to others. We make that a priority give to the church and then we know that we save some and darnall reminds me all the time. We can't save it all say all of it and i'm thinking yes but you know i know. They have six months in the bag. But i want to years suppose. We can't work with two years with that doesn't make sense. I know it doesn't win. In my head i have to peel. The onion was causing you to think that you can't trust god that there's going to be such a shortfall that you're going to have to hoard money and so you know you have to be truthful about that and i know them. I was driven by the fact that i had a mother that was not empowered at bothered. That was abusive. And so i saw her not ever have enough money. And i kinda about inwardly that. I'd never been in a position where never had enough money that i couldn't put my hands on money and runaway. If there was abuse so you you have to understand what's driving those financial mindset that i mean that's powerful that statement. The things you learn is a child those Pains end up being your passions. Like so many say. And that's what you're describing.

Darnall Darnell Deborah
"peel" Discussed on Maya 's Upcycling as both Art and Function

Maya 's Upcycling as both Art and Function

02:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"peel" Discussed on Maya 's Upcycling as both Art and Function

"I sometimes get as how. I started my podcast and why anchor fm Did extensive research and anchor is is great for newbies like myself it. They provide good support and it is easy to use the cost. You can't beat it just starting you can start for free and this is another reason shows anger. Fm up cycling. Orange peels lemon appeals in grapefruit. Pills it seems that Now that i am sort of limited my audience due to coronavirus. I am definitely finding more and more uses for some food items. I remember when i was a kid. My grandmother used to dry orange peels and make a nasty when you had a cold. Walk fast forward. And i have for sometime be using our orange. Peels levin peels and grateful pills and mixing them with an organic soap base to make my own soaps. These are so good. They smell delicious and they turn a beautiful color. My only suggestion that you make sure that you keep the Drainage plug in said. it doesn't all. These appeals on go down the drain and clog it up. I have done the same with lemon peels making beautiful lemon so at times. I have mixed all three peels orange. Lemon and grapefruit appeals to make a citrus salt. The smell the smell just lingers on any it just smells so good it feels so good just as well Very cleansing. I also make what i called infused oils where you put the ingredients into the oil led the infused infused oil. Sit in a double pan Sort of end boil for about an hour. A doping is one where the wood is on the bottom and another pen on top is holding the bottle with the oil. This method takes a while for the oil to take the color and smell. But when this all comes to life they are delicious especially the orange and lemon oils. I tend to put my goals in the refrigerated but definitely do some research as some people recommend leaving them outside in a cabin for a couple of weeks before using. I also taken out these dry pills Ground up and mixed with grounded. Oh meal for soaping bad. I guess the possibilities are endless. Well for now remember that life is about possibilities not impossibilities to next time stay well..

Peels levin
Freezer Aisle Finds for Baby-Led Weaning

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Freezer Aisle Finds for Baby-Led Weaning

"Let's look at the frozen foods that do work for baby led weaning all right so let's get right down to it. I don't need to tell you about all the foods that don't work in the frozen food aisle. Let's focus on all the foods that babies can eat right of course frozen dinners and frozen pizzas and food with lots of salt and sugar. Babies should not have a lotta those foods in the frozen food aisle. I'm gonna go through five of my favorite foods for baby led weaning. This is not an exhaustive list. Every time i do. I start with a list of like thirty things and then i'm like that will be too long narrow down to five. Here's five of my favorite foods. I love cauliflower rice. I love regular call from. There's a million different as you may call safe for babies to eat. I don't offer call prices like a lower calorie low carb option like the reason. Why a lot of adults he cauliflower rice. I think it's a really cool way to impart a different flavor in different foods and it's a convenience food normally would not. I'm pretty frugal. I would not spend money on many produce convenience foods. Like no thank you. I can cut up watermelon by myself. I don't need you to quintupled the price and do it for me. But coffers rice is one that is a pain in the neck to make and you can find it in the frozen food aisle. How do you use it for baby led weaning. I like to call for race when i make fritters. It's already all chopped up. Its rice like a very very fine dice consistency or size. I guess more so than consistency. So you can use it in if you're baking like zucchini muffins. I'll sometimes add. Call rice in there. I'll add it to fritters or patties as a vegetable. If i'm five just like some leftover grains like oh shoot. I don't wanna just make grains and eggs in my put the cauliflower rice in it. I'm you can use it as pizza crust. I'd also like regular pizza crust especially for babies but sometimes the commercials pizza crusts. Do you have a lot of sodium in them. So there's really cool recipes using call race for that also use it and mash it up of. I'm doing like baked potatoes. Just add different flavor so again if you're cruising through you have cauliflower rice any recipe you would make adult with cauliflower rice. You can just adopt that for babies. Just making sure doesn't have added sodium or any sugar. Second up. I remember being super surprised when i found out that there are some brands of hash brown potatoes that are in the freezer aisle. That don't have sodium now. Careful 'cause like there's just as many that have tons of sodium. So my general rule of thumb as i mentioned is less than one hundred milligrams of sodium per serving of food that i'm going to serve my baby. Now you feed your baby. Don't come out of the package so it was kind of a moot point but if you're choosing packaged food look for less than one hundred milligrams and also babies don't eat the same portion size that adults do so they're going to be eating significantly in many cases less than that but back to the hash brown potatoes peeling and shredding potatoes and then like pushing all the water out of them. It's takes so much time to me. It's like never work that. I do not like hash browns enough to do all that however i do like that. There are some brands of already shredded. Hash brown potatoes. That don't have salt in them. And the thing that. I use these primarily to make like a crust to line either quiche. Or if you do like muffin. Tins i'll make like the hash brown potatoes mixed with egg and push it down as the crust for making like zucchini. Ed cups for use it for a lot of breakfast foods. There's a million other ways to use hash brown potatoes. Not personally a huge fan of them. But i love that as a convenience food there an option for you if as a safer way to feed babies now you can of course feature babies regular potatoes if you want to. I do just point out that a lotta times especially if you're doing baked potato bake russet potato. It can be very mealy very dry and any dry bread product. Any dry food for that matter can potentially choking hazard so you want to add a lot of butter or a lot of fat lot of liquid a sauces to make any potentially dry potato product. A little bit more moist for your baby to eat so number one. Call our rights number two hash brown potatoes number three. It's kind of a weird. One ezekiel bread. Now i mentioned the brand usually try not to mention branded foods because of course everyone's grocery store looks different. But ezekiel is one of the few national brands in the us. That has a low sodium option now. Sodium breads are hard to come by breads by themselves. Don't love because they tend to be more on the dry side and dry bread products like albro products as just mentioned. Can you token hazar. But if you're gonna be doing better when you're ready to read you might be looking for a low sodium option. First of all you might have never looked at the sodium in the bread aisle. And you're like oh my gosh. Why does every single piece of bread need of two hundred fifty or three hundred milligrams of sodium will is obviously is a preservative. So that's why you're breads can stay on the shelf If you've ever traveled other parts of the world. Do not use as many of or the same preservatives as the united states and your bread will go moldy in a day or two whereas here. It can stay a lot longer. Some of that has to do with higher levels of sodium but sodium is also a leavening agent meaning that it makes bread rise and it also provides moisture so all those things are important for. Bread ezekiel brand. Is one of the national brands. That has a low sodium option. You don't always find the bread in the braille though so for example like if you go to a smaller grocery store they probably have ezekiel bread. But if it's not fresh in the bakery section you can actually find it in the freezer aisle so again check out. That brand ezekiel bread for lower sodium. Bread options you'll taste it and be like this is gross because it's low sodium bread. Do keep in mind. it gets pretty dry. Though because it's not retaining that moisture with assault so astra butter again. Add extra sauce. Do what you need to do. But the low sodium. Bread ezekiel bread. You can find it in your freezer

Ed Cups Browns Ezekiel United States Astra
Sea Hunt - It's Still Alive: Point of No Return

Scuba Shack Radio

06:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Sea Hunt - It's Still Alive: Point of No Return

"It's time for another installment of seahorn. It's still alive in this time. We're going to season four episode one titled point of no return and it premiered on january seventh nineteen sixty one sixty years ago. The episode starts out with a boat pulling up alongside coast guard cutter. The boat is dropping off a reporter. Dorothy may brooke. She is heard that. Mike nelson is on board and figures. There must be a big story. If he's involved. The captain of the cutter tells dotty that you'll have to wait three days to talk to mike. The research is about mike. Living and working out of the scuba sphere. A two hundred and fifty feet now. That was right at the beginning of the work. That the davy jacques cousteau and ed link. We're doing on underwater habitats so sea hunt was a little ahead of the game after dadi get some basic information from the three scientists on board the cutter. The scene shifts to mike underwater. He's in doubles swimming with a big bag of rocks. And he's going entire inside the scuba sere. The scuba sphere is small diving bell shaped habitat with liquid helium and oxygen tanks. Act out once. Mike is inside. He gets a call from the booth. Lieutenant totally tells him that a tropical storm is heading your way rather than hall him up. It seems that mike is going to ride it out so he strings up. His hammock gets ready for bed in gets into the sack and because he says he can't raid the refrigerator like he normally does. He settled for a bottle of liquid protein. Well you guessed it. The big storm hits and as the cutters tossed about so is the scuba sere. Suddenly one of the tanks cured to the side of the sphere breaks loose and crashes down on the hatch rendering it inoperable. Mike can't fix it and now they can't bring them up and properly decompress. The project engineer vic jennings says it will take a day to make a new hatch. Should they cut him loose. They try to get them off the bottom and ride it out but discovers fear is being dragged it gets caught on a coral formation. Two hundred fifty feet. Mike gears up with his doubles and he has some additional small tanks between the double cylinders. Not sure what they are. But there's copper tubing Spiraling up to the vows on his. Saunders looks like kind of like a still. Maybe it's helium. They never really say as his fear breaks free. Mike reid it along until the cable and telephone connections part and luckily to screw this. Fear settles when the bottom in an upright position. So mike can go back inside and he says that he needs to spend his second night in this chamber of ours. I gotta tell you mike wetsuit. Looks pretty beat up in this episode starting to peel or something like that will now. The storm has passed the cutter realizes that mike is no longer attached. They have a new door but now they have to find a habitat might goes outside and tries to inflate one of his marker. Booties but it won't work at eight atmospheres so he takes out a balloon. Blows it up a bit ties it off to a line and sends it up. Will you guessed it it bursts now. He reverts to filling up a pair of denim jeans tied off at the bottom. I remember this from my time in the navy where you could use your pants. As type of life preserver on. Mike sends the inflated pants to the surface they briefly mark the location before collapsing. But lieutenant totally thought he saw something so they stay in the area back inside scuba sphere. Mike says that he needs to conserve. Air and pray then. He remembers something from this cub scout. Days and concocts a plan to use his wetsuit. Top as a surface marker buoy. He goes back outside. Fills it up and shoots it to the surface and then ties it off to the scuba sphere dadi and or intently scanning surface suddenly dadi spots to wet suit top. Well the next thing we see. Is mike nelson signs wetsuit. Top two hundred and fifty feet dragging a new hatch cable and telephone line across the bottom. He fixes the hatch. Attach is the cable and splices in the telephone. It's cold wet work he says and he's ready to rejoin the human race. Might get back inside. He hits the hammock and sleeps through the hours of decompression. They have to bang on the sphere to wake him up once. Mike opens the hatch up. Pops dotty to give him a big hug. Mike says he must be in heaven. 'cause this is the angel he's been dreaming about what are the best of my knowledge. This is the only episode. That dadi mayfield was in. Although it appears that from the dialogue from lake that daddy was intent on marrying mike nelson or as as he puts it put a ring through his nose. Dorothy mayfield was played by the actress. Joyce meadows whether there wasn't a lot of diving in the point of no return but mike nails nelson was well ahead of the likes of george. Bon jacques cousteau and egg link in deep sea. Saturation habitation

Mike Ed Link Mike Underwater Vic Jennings Mike Nelson Jacques Cousteau Mike Wetsuit Dorothy Brooke Mike Reid Swimming Saunders Navy Dadi Mayfield Dorothy Mayfield
Timeline of events in Britain's exit from the European Union

Newscast - Africa

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Timeline of events in Britain's exit from the European Union

"Britain. You signed a post. Brexit trade deal wednesday. That drought the bulls in the pros and hours. Definitely ends its european experiment. The lion and charles the heads off commission and european council black televised thirty names on one thousand to expand trade and cooperation agreement. In brazil's bounced argument was then flown by the royal air force the number for prime minister. Boris johnson to odd his signature as you can find him. Held a find deal the inkling jumps in now it is the beginning of what will be a one ship between an austrian. Cotton is in the prison to leave the european single market costas union as eleven hundred peel and thursday the end of a post brexit period amongst by told his trade season which culminated the christmas deal.

Commission And European Counci Bulls Britain Royal Air Force Boris Johnson Charles Brazil Costas Union Cotton
New Years Eve Festivities

Extraterrestrial

04:40 min | 3 weeks ago

New Years Eve Festivities

"Happy new year listeners. We made it as finally less than twenty four hours left in the year. Twenty twenty if you're just joining us. Welcome i'm alistair myrddin. And this is superstitions a spotify original from podcast in this podcast we use short stories to explore the ways in which human beings interact with luck and fate in each episode. We peel back the layers of mystery surrounding peculiar rituals totems and practices. Today's episode is a very special one. C. you may not believe in santa claus leprechauns or the easter bunny. But new year's eve is the one holiday where everyone becomes a little superstitious because the future is uncertain and new year's eve is when we take a moment out of our lives to face that uncertainty head on according to cultures around the world. What you do on new year's eve will determine the trajectory of the next three hundred and sixty five days for good and ill. So maybe don't relax on this. Last day of twenty twenty after ruled a whole new year is at stake coming up. We'll see some practices from people around the globe and hope none of them drop the bowl. Time never stops it. Never waits never stand still for anyone throughout human history. We've given it to name a face a persona. Even cronos carla banged goon. Bang rune the knowns father time all these deeds he's only there to moscow truth. That time is the one thing that will remain forever out of human control when our story starts time is running out all over the world. It was already january. First in the area known as ut. C plus fourteen the earliest time zone senator earth but in the western hemisphere it was still december thirty first and all manner of hustling and bustling was afoot in. London beleaguered playwrights. Emily jordan would receive a parcel from her irish mother containing a single sprig of mistletoe. And a note saying. Please put this under your pillow when you go to sleep tonight. Emily knew what this charm was supposed to mean. It was a way to ensure a single woman found romance in the new year in atlanta georgia griffin. The hair murphy was also rushing out for some last-minute groceries. He found himself laying. Low the business partner darius who insisted they have collard greens and black-eyed peas. Dinner who was griffin to deny a southern tradition. Farther north america's central hub for new year's new york city was teeming with activity there. Ruth oltman gathered dozens and dozens of confetti poppers and blowers of various sizes. She was once told that noisemakers with scare off evil spirits and in her haunted brooklyn apartment complex. She wouldn't take any chances at the same time in midtown manhattan. A man named thatcher refused to loan out any money to his friends. He saw on a logistical online. That it was bad luck too low. Now money new year's eve it lonely guarantee they'll keep coming back to you for the rest of the year. Each of these individuals was engaged in different superstitious ritual. They followed wildly different rules. That had originated in different parts of the globe yet. They all had the same purpose to ensure good fortune of one form or another in the coming year. What none of these people realized indeed. What very few people understand is that it wasn't just their personal luck on the line. For new year's eve is special. It's a gateway in time a moments when all humanity takes a deep breath then walks hand in hand into the future and it's in moments like these that anything can happen

Alistair Myrddin Bang Rune Emily Jordan Griffin Ruth Oltman Carla Moscow Darius Emily Murphy Atlanta London Georgia North America New York City Thatcher Brooklyn Manhattan
How To Build Your Best Skincare Routine with Celeb Facialist Rene Rouleau

Breaking Beauty Podcast

08:26 min | Last month

How To Build Your Best Skincare Routine with Celeb Facialist Rene Rouleau

"So what is the first stop to like assessing your own skin type. Like how do people figure that out at home. I think people often. It's just like your boss is like. I think people misdiagnosed that all the time and a lotta people misdiagnose skin type so help us. Yeah so i'm definitely the queen of skin types There definitely are some basics that people need to kind of look at so one is the concept of dry normal oily. So that's the first thing you need to look at and mainly you need to know that information because that will drive. What kind of moisturizer that you need to use light or how heavy it is so if you are somebody that gets shiny and your skin gets oily and greasy. That means that you already have oil in your skin so are gonna use somewhere water-based if you're somebody that's feeling really tight and gets flaky and doesn't look smooth to the touch. Chances are you're going to require more oil. And so you can look for more of a cream or even a skin oil or something like that. So i think understanding drone norman oily is important but i think also. It's one kind of side note of that. Is that a lot of people. They use a lot of strong active ingredients and so if they still get breakouts but they feel dry. The thing the understand with breakouts is that you have oil underneath there somewhere 'cause people who have truly dry skin bone-dry skin that don't have any oil at all. They're not going to break out. Because oil breeds bacteria bacterial to breakouts. So i'm always kind of educating people because people are like oh my gosh. I'm so dry yet. They have you know they still get a lot of acne so it could be because they're using things that are too strong so they're getting the sensation of being dry. But if there's breakouts there. I always tell them there's oil in there somewhere so we don't want to ask things that are too heavy so i think yeah so. I think the first thing is kind of just trying to assess. If you're dr norman oily and and again it's just more dryness is more if there's flaking and a constant kat constant tightness and absolutely no oil whatsoever a normal skin tiber combination could be somebody. That's a little tease zone. If your pores are larger in the area than they are on the other areas of the face. That usually is an indicator that you're a little more combination In that skin. Ken feel type. It's typically not going to be flaky. I mean obviously if you're using a prescription retinoid or something you know that would cause that but generally you can feel type but it's not flaky and then more oil is somebody that has enlarged pores all over the face and they're just shining in greasy like in a by one o'clock in the afternoon they can be blotting their skin with blotting papers and they see a lot of on there but again that you know. It's a lotion verses. A cream sensitive skin is one of those tricky subjects because the definition is different from anyone for from everyone when someone says yeah. My skin's really sensitive. The first thing i said is tell me what that means to you right so to one person. They'll say if i use something really harsher strong it. What you're a tape. My skin for which. I'm always like well. How about let's not use anything harsher strong okay But but then someone else will say if i use something too heavy will break me out. And then someone else will say everything. I wash with sting's my skin get read. I get rashes easily right. So there's and then some other people might even have other descriptions of them but those are the three that i hear the most so my definition of sensitive skin is more. They easily irritated the redness. The pinkies leave the Things staying easily as more of a moisture barrier issue. I don't really consider sensitive. Oh i can't use moisturizer that's too heavy because we'll break me out. Then you use them worst riser. That's stuck to you know will break you. There's an easy fix. Yeah yeah and but the problem with quote unquote sensitive skin care products out there. If it says for sensitive skin typically it means that they just took out the synthetic fragrance or the synthetic die but a lot of the sensitive skin care products. Don't necessarily actually try to calm the redness they'll take out the quote unquote irritants out of it. But if you have somebody that is you know. Easily irritated and read. The goal is to try to really like put the fire out com circulation sedate the skin and a lot of sense of skincare products. I don't feel like necessarily do that. Because the goals were trying to improve the skin barrier and make the skin less sensitive over time so just avoiding dyes and fragrances. That's just not gonna do that. Sure sting so dehydrate and dry. Those are two different things too right correct. And that's i mean that's a huge one. I have a great blog post about it. But that's probably you know the biggest the hardest thing for people to understand because people always say dry and And so i always say when someone says how. I'm really dry but then i see the breakouts. I'm like no can't be but all always say like. Does your skin ever get flaky. Because to me that's true the definition of dry and then absolutely you know producing no oil but the main difference is dry is lack of oil and dehydrate as lack water. So you can be oily in dehydrated. But you can't be dry. And so i think the i mean all skin types require water but not all skin types require oil right so so typically again if somebody has breakouts they still produce oil but they feel tight than that's dehydration versus somebody's you know bone-dry and they're you know forty five plus and they have tiny pores that's going to be more of a drier skin type so if you're trying to assess your own skin type do you even put dehydration into that category at all or thus just a condition you right. Yeah i mean the whole thing is any good skin care routine. Should always be hydrating your now if somebody comes to me you know if we have a customer client that has been using really harsh things and they kind of have destroyed their moisture barrier than we might need to load up on a few extra things just to repair their skin and get it. Back to healthy state the concept of the moisture barrier which. I'm sure you guys understand but let me explain it for your listeners. So your skin has this moisture barrier and think of it as like bricks on a house and when the barrier is damaged from harsh products. Genetics resistencia were. The skin is hot. And heat kind of naturally can deplete the moisture barrier or the moisture within the skin over full leading to many acids things like that so in these bricks like the mortar. In between the bricks starts to loosen you. Get these little invisible cracks in the skin when you get these invisible cracks in the skin moisture can escape easier and then irritance can get any easier so sometimes when people like are like yeah. Products are stinging my skin lately and normally that never happens. Well it's because when you have those cracks products especially water-based ones hit the nerve endings. Faster and you get a stinging sensation. So i have a great bog post about this as well. But it's all about kind of sealing up those invisible cracks so that wished your stays in and then irritants you know they're not irritating the skin as much and that's probably the biggest thing that i've probably seen in the past i'd say like four years or something is people's moisture barrier. You know were people who are. Oil are feeling dry. And it's because we have access to so many more active ingredients everybody's big into the liquid acid toning right now. They're using the. The acetone is twice a day. And you know then. They're using sonic cleansing. Brushes and there are you know which is is an expulsion in itself and then they're micronesian derm rolling at home poking holes in their faces. And so there's just a lot of people and we've kinda fallen into a culture of like if it doesn't burner staying it's not working and so people relate feeling something with doing something right and so and then you know you can buy all. These chemical peels on amazon. And so i just think that's like a big conversation that i'm having a lot with people as having people back off. A lot of thing is there in their effort to control their skin. And do more often die micromanaging. They're like that boss doing too much like if you actually back off. Yeah i'll be more productive

Dr Norman Acne KEN Amazon
Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | Last month

Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

"Listen up. It's a great lesson for any business leader or marketer and a whole lot of schadenfreude of fun. well sherwin williams america's biggest paint company. Just got its comeuppance from a tiny florida rival and tiktok loving college kid and embarrassing. Faux pas by sherwin williams is the very example of a culture clash between behind the times corporate america and gen z creativity. Now perhaps like millions of us stuck at home. You've been on a painting. Bench come on admitted. Maybe you've even seen tony. Pilo pilarcitos tiktok channel tone. Stir paints until. Recently the ohio university business student worked at an athens. Ohio sherwin williams store a job loved in fact he so excited about paint that he started a tiktok channel on which he simply mixes paint typically with hip hop music playing in the background watching pillow saito. Mix paint whether it's a gray for sherwin williams shopper or the viral video in which he tints paint by mixing in real. Blueberries has proven to be oddly mesmerizing and incredibly popular. The paint mixing artists has more than one point. Two million tiktok followers. His short videos routinely receive half a million likes even more in fact it took pilarcitos tone stir paints virtually no time to go viral. According to buzzfeed the sixth video asano ever posted got more than a million views. So pilo saint did what any enterprising college senior might do. He whipped up a presentation for sherwin williams marketing department with such a huge following. Figured he could show the eighteen billion dollar company a thing or two about using tiktok to attract younger gen z shoppers. Alas his plan backfired for a while. Anyway rather than using enthusiasm about the million plus followers sherwin williams could have for free. The company fired him according to peel asano. The student told his story. On where else tiktok. He says sherwin williams marketing department. I ignored him but later they called the loss prevention department. Which accused peeler say no of stealing paint and making the videos on company time. He admitted to making some videos. While on the job at says he purchased the paint. He used no matter. Sherwin williams accused him of gross misconduct including quote seriously embarrassing. The company or its products at age reported one could easily argue that sherwin williams has its marketing covered and doesn't need any rogue creatives on its payroll. The paint giant suffered a bit during the early pandemic lockdowns but since then has surged with home sales renovations and diy decorating projects on the upswing. We all seem to be buying paint along with flour booze and toilet paper the today show points out. That's pushed sherwin williams sales up about five percent. The companies also persuading more and more customers to purchase premium paints as a result profits soared twenty one percent in the third quarter according to the motley fool. But this sort of publicity. Well that's not something. Any company would want news appeal. Santos firing elicited disdain on social media on twitter. One observer said some not so nice things about the presumed age of the marketing department. Staffers hello baby boomers and added that they quote missed out on a cutting edge marketing campaign for your products. That's why bear painting. Kelly moore paint or going to outsell. Y'all close quote an industry publication at age quoted. Pr executive andrew cross of agency walker sands cross said sherwin williams sent a signal as loud as it was unintentional that employees. Who do what they're told or more valuable than employees who think outside the box out cross added that the company had quote stifled ingenuity sherwin. Williams are the biggest beneficiaries of the outrage. And they were quick to take advantage of an opportunity. Lost pilo says he received job offers from bear. Benjamin moore and other major paint brands but he chose a role with regional chain. Florida paints the ohio university senior plans to finish studies online provided. He's not too busy. Establishing what will be his very own custom line of paint colors. Oh and keeping that tiktok channel up featuring colors only from florida paints saint story is now a marketing. Fabled should be repeated in entrepreneurship classes at business schools everywhere and perhaps quickly forgotten on purpose the boardroom sherwin williams

Sherwin Williams Tiktok Pilo Pilarcitos Pilo Peel Asano Ohio University America Saito Athens Tony Peeler Florida Ohio Andrew Cross Walker Sands Cross Kelly Moore
Brandon Viney on Being Group Creative Lead at Google Brand Studio

Revision Path

04:17 min | Last month

Brandon Viney on Being Group Creative Lead at Google Brand Studio

"What's an average day like for you google. A lot of calls me obviously used to be a little bit different before cove. It probably the more balanced but you know now wake up by non among calls reviewing work having some status updates looking at was coming up counter strategizing about how we're going to deal with things that are on the horizon and then we get into the work. We start working on the word meeting with teams polishing presenting in repeat. We do that until we hit a deadline. What are some of the deliverables that you're creating for google with you. Think studio every year does a year in search we crunch the data of the entire year and we look at like what are the most interesting notable data driven trends of the previous year and we make a year in film of that we also have been doing for quite some time now data driven work in general so for example like black history off. We did a data driven piece international wednesday. We did a data driven piece. And since it's really interesting Brief advertised inside rarely. Do you have a brief like this where it's rooted in fact not just general creativity opinion strategy just in our case. Now we're looking at strategy but also we have to be validated through the data has to be real and so it's really interesting in a little bit harder but also like really satisfying when you come out and you go. That's not saying that. That's the people saying that the world said that we can look at the numbers. We're not saying this in this commercial. You said this now. Two of the the spots. That i saw that you worked on for google moments and it looks like there's sort of centered around search terms that one was for black history month and the other one was around black girl magic. How did those spots come about you know. We had a brief that was obviously around data. The goal was to tell some data stories on a cadence throughout the year. Because we're trying to show the power of google's data and what the resulted at is that that is a snapshot of the world's pov's in a way right now again. It's not me brandon sing like romantic. We saw that in in the data it was hitting an all time high. So we're like yeah and then you can start to go out and correlate what things are happening in design guys did are making that most searched and we wanna tell a story about that and so for me. It was when i first got to google learning about how data works. We had a super strong team got in started concept and things that we want to say and obviously black magic was something i wanted to say because i felt like the year i wanted to really felt like the year was like very appropriate to lean on black women and show our support and respect for the consciousness of black women cause it felt like at the time we were hitting all time highs of of like recognition for once. It's always been happening but people were starting to notice it and so we want to do. Put a cherry on top of that. Show that so. We dove into the numbers. It was real and that gave us the ability to say a message like that. The same thing with black history office started off at saint. Thomas like romantic but we started to uncover peel back the onion ago. We got a lot of material here. This deserves big stage and us. Happy developed it. Now you're getting these briefs like what is your creative process like when it comes to. Starting a new project is different. At the at the creatively level the group lead level. You know we help flesh out the brief to give our teams but when you're when you're at the lead level and at the creative level you know from the start diving into would no i would. Do i think i i was trying to do a round of contracting without really diving into brief because i wanna get my preconceived notions out. I wanna get the low hanging fruit. I wanna get the thing. That i came mind. I want to get that out without it being inhibited by any other thoughts starters and then at that point when i feel like i've tapped the bottom of that will i start to pull the brief in and pull nuggets at the brief out to repeat that process and i found for me. That's a very fruitful way to get a very strong diversity of thought and ideas

Google Brandon Thomas Nuggets
"peel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

05:09 min | Last month

"peel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"I write the music for the deceived. And i was able to go on set and the the tv show in itself. The house says is like a character it plays.

"peel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

02:48 min | Last month

"peel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"When i started to get into electronic music at to view the world differently. Because i start to think of the sounds and how they were produced in the sound waves. And how fast a sound wave is moving to different notes whereas before i just accepted that each is tuned to a and that was it but actually having oscillators and filters and ways of putting actual public trick form of energy and that kind of conversation between the human body and the energy produced as well. That's all changed. Everything in terms of like how i made music and how i now listen to music as well. I guess with comparising. There's a balance between my ma electric side and the moral ganic side. And how do we balance that to make it sound like it is equal or is part of the same thing rather than two separate entities as you saw only really came when it was a student and actually capturing because of the mobile phone because of the voice recorder and being able to capture diggers and builders outside or the flowing of lake or the sounds of marina when the flagpoles hitting the yachts. It's it's only since i've had in my hand in how to in my pocket of took interest in the manipulation of that and the joy of that the world has opened up and i guess one of the things i found interesting about is that i'm not a dreamer and i've always found it difficult to come up with beats all feel comfortable with beats and rhythms and by capturing field recordings and turning them into sounds it makes me feel more comfortable. It makes me feel more like manipulating a synthesizer and an i get much more enjoyment and not creates a kind of sound world palette. That he can. I feel. I can attach myself to like in comprising filming tv. I would still feel that connection to my own albums. Because i've created my own rhythm using nature or using something that i found..

Airbnb’s IPO Will Be Hot. Why Its Stock Will Be Worth the Price.

Bloomberg Daybreak

02:47 min | Last month

Airbnb’s IPO Will Be Hot. Why Its Stock Will Be Worth the Price.

"Well for Airbnb. We're looking at evaluation around 42 billion, which is pretty remarkable because in its last round of private fundraising, its valuation was something around 26 billion on. Of course, that's that. That's the high end of the range there that 42 billion Previously the high end of the range of 35 billion, so sort of the picture we're getting. As we get closer and closer to this company finally going public. It's clear there's some demand for it. Perhaps oversubscribed with this. I P o. So it's given us this Situation where they can keep more richly pricing their shares on and get a bigger valuation. I think this really just speaks to the times when you have a hotel type company having so much demand behind in, you know when we're just seeing this general rebound in equities. Yeah, it is interesting that Airbnb has held up so much better than traditional hotels have during this pandemic. What are potential investors? Saying about this company what's making it so attractive? I think a lot of it has to do well with one just the general environment when it comes to ah sort of hotel Leisure Recreation type Cos they have the vaccine coming onto the market. So there's optimism there. The world can get back to normal. But with Airbnb specifically, what they really have tried to do is make it a company that caters to a customer base that Perhaps wants to do more domestic traveling Airbnb. You know, of course, is it is in many cities. So it's easy for that. If you want to, you know, rent a cabin somewhere or something like that. They really been very public, touting their various hygiene protocols that they're having their host do And I think in that sort of sense, it has made investors excited that This type of company that they had been looking forward to. I peeling for some time now. We'll also be able to whether this pandemic we're seeing and then out perform when the pandemic in and and society starts to normalize. What about Airbnb his path to profitability? It's not there yet. It's certainly not there. But look that has not stopped investors before. A lot of these IPO's have done extremely well, despite the fact that they might not be profitable bowl to begin with. I pose. For example, recent IPO's have outperformed the S and P 500 tremendously. Their prices have more than doubled so far this year, which is again incredible for what are typically More risky investments often without profit, but it just shows the sort of general appetite for more risk right now, that's that's coming into the market. And look, Tessa was a great example of a company that surpassed Toyota and valuation before was even able to book Anania will profit, of course. Now it's getting included into the S and P

Airbnb Tessa Anania Toyota
"peel" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:07 min | 2 months ago

"peel" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"And especially in in little kids who seemed to go through all kinds of stages of bone growth When they're really little You know it seems like the. It's growing their bones are just growing very quickly when they break the bones. They seem to heal really quickly. So can you tell us about sort of the differences between like what's happening in kids bones versus what happens after age twenty five or whenever they stop that phase. Will i in general. If you like watch a tree branch grow. It will just continue to grow right from the atip. But that when we consider that are long bones have cartilage on both ends of them in the cartilage mix for the slippery Glow friction surface in the joint is that there's an area near the end of the bone but not immediately on the end of the bone. It's called the growth plate and that's where the bone pushes the cartilage surface away from the the shaft of the bone. Most bones have these growth weights on both ends and so that the the bone grows longer from near at each end but it maintains the Growth plate on the maintains the cartilage on the end of the bone In analogy. I used in the book. Is that you think about a growing twig. But on the end of the twig you put a little piece of the slippery of banana. Peel so the banana peel is the analogy for the cartilage. So the the growing twig just keeps pushing the cartilage further away from the trunk of the tree and so the the bone always has a cartilage surface on it but it can grow nonetheless to turn a child. You know infants femur that may be four inches long into an adult femur. That's you know well over foot long. I often hear stories of parents who say like. I didn't realize my kid had broken their arm when they fell off the whatever place structure because they didn't really you know they were just kind of holding it..

Peel
Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:24 min | 2 months ago

Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

"From the outside. We often know autism through observation of behavior. but are there biological markers for autism. Despite an average diagnosis at four years old stamina biomarker discovery has developed a blood test for autism spectrum disorder for as young as eighteen months. Beth tonle is its ceo. I want you to tell us if you could about autism so much has happened over the years. People have forgotten about what this means to be on the autism spectrum. What this exactly means today. Well i'll tell you the prevalence of autism is the first issue. We now have one in fifty eight kids in the united states that have autism and that's a new statistics from the cdc previously. It was one in sixty nine so almost everyone knows someone or has someone in their family. That has autism Obviously autism is a behavioral disorder. sometimes characterized by social shoes. Repetitive behavior cognitive issues. We're actually looking at it from a biological perspective and trying to sort of peel back the onion and understand What is the biology. That is autism and their multiple. Biology's that manifest then and the behaviors that we see. Well we should say right away. The your the mother of someone who is on the autism spectrum. And he's in college yes. He is so the idea that the these are not functional. People put them in some special class and not deal with them anymore. It's just not true. There's so much that can be done but you have to have knowledge. That's true and autism spectrum disorder. It's a spectrum disorder from cognitive behavioral and biological perspective. Jack is pretty high functioning. But he's had a lot of interruption over the years Lots of behavioral therapy ot pt speech. Language you know tutoring We've tried modified diets and dietary supplements and vitamins. Attention deficit medicine three kinds I think your study and your cell we are. We are like many parents. You go to the internet and you read about these things and There isn't any precision around how they're applied so parents. Try everything And that's what we're trying to bring at stamina. Neuro point is some precision about what's different about the biology of these kids. And how do we order our thinking around how to intervene. Obviously behavioral therapy. Every child should get. But how do we prioritize some of the other choices to address the biology. So there's a major study out there. Eleven hundred children. what have you studied. And what have you available still to continue to study So the children's autism metabolism Project or camp took place at eight sites across the country led by our head of our sab. Dr david amaral. Who's at the mind. Institute at uc davis. We recruited eleven hundred and two children to be specific Children with autism typically developing children and also children with developmental delay but not autism and we collected i of the morning plasma. It's important to have a fasted sample when studying metabolism as we do because just like you don't need a sweet roll before you go get your glucose or cholesterol tested. We can measure that to. This is an enormous resource. That's allowed us to identify the first set of biomarkers that Show a dysregulation in amino acid metabolism. That may be addressable through a supplement. it describes about seventeen percent of the kids and we publish that in biological psychiatry back in september of two thousand eighteen We have a second paper in progress which we hope will be submitted by the end of the month which looks at mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. And this is an area that's been known in the literature in smaller studies of thirty or forty or even a hundred children. This is an opportunity to look at an eleven hundred and two kids and so we really get a chance to kind of dissect some of these hypotheses and bring forward some additional biology. That could be addressable through specific treatments if we know this. Can this become a diagnostic. Do we know enough that it will be. Yeah so that's a great question. We are going to start offering this as a i would call it a prognostic so it will screen for whether or not the child has a metabolism subtype that we've seen has highly associated with autism. And then they would be referred to a developmental specialist to would screen them using traditional behavioral assessment that will be necessary for insurance coverage for. Iep's at school for behavioral therapy etc. But we hope it will do because our kids are eighteen months to forty eight months. Is that child. Re- referred sooner right now. The average age of diagnosis is over four years. My son was seven in fact when he was diagnosed with pervasive developmental delays not otherwise specified. Pdd s which used to be a form of autism. That's been rolled up into the regular autism diagnosis as part of the dsm. Five and we didn't. We were not told it was autism and we knew he had pervasive developmental delays. So a lot of time is lost. Where if we can diagnose as young as eighteen months with our test and get a child referred they can get into behavioral therapy and that can be critically important to the outcome In addition the insights into the metabolism that we can give as i mentioned. We'll give opportunities to sort of prioritize all those different different interventions that parents try and take the most innocuous one first and see if you can make a difference

Autism Autism Spectrum Disorder Beth Tonle Dr David Amaral CDC Uc Davis United States Jack
"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

03:51 min | 2 months ago

"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

"But when when i had clots abroad. Snakes that smothered this nike in olive oil that you ended up with a very severe district. Dasa send because i would be shitting bits of scales for four weeks if not months and almost like so my like handling a fish from the market when you get sky also alive e they absa bit of a disaster. They say yes. I agree with you. Just just keep it simple. will mortar Gentle tells a great not like him the date and that's what encourage clients time to help as shit off. An animal is to is to gently buys the animal and then Use a A wet towel to gently help as well to to soften up that retain shed. I suppose we should talk about a couple of conditions before we finish with the disag- dawson some of the other spicy lot lizards And particular Tacos mac We can have retained shed around the bice veto And if it's not addressed um we can end up with a with a construction. They like put it in. Elastic band ran the tau. And you end up with the toe full enough. So i really am encourage my client especially for some of the spaces of the pride into it and here in australia. The one that i save is commonly that has retained kids that can potentially cause issues of the The skinks smack the blue tongue lizards etc and the shingle backs and Be interested to say whether or not you've had the same problem so really stressed to the clots about when your when you listen is going through a shedding cycle that you pipe particular ted's intention to those ties and the tile tips as well exactly what we say the. It's it's an interesting thing. Because i think i'm the Kaya faked And the cumulation of dade karasin provides excellent environment for dome atop switch wave coaching from a number of the the the the toes that are parching so fancy tation But i you've Again that the regional problem is those retain sheds on the constrictions like kohl's which saying ulta blood flow and allow of pathogens said accelerate. The problem so on the same as you. I emphasize to people that have Particularly the liam to acquaviva tons she'll vaccine particularly the Obscene is more in the new kalemie. Says wilburn i emphasize to the Animals that do nate to be festivus in their attention to the token.

disag- dawson wilburn bice kohl australia ted nate ulta
"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

"Off on that particular diet that it comes in for the consultation We can we can slightly work at it We'll let soy prices as ones anyway. Annoy explained to the client the approach of gently softening. If if we talk about the spectacle for instance. I'm that's retained softening it with a can. Just be something. As simple as water holding a i caught bowl salton in warm water ivory for a few minutes and softening up that spectacle the retired and then gently gently robbie no gently picking at the edge of it too safe. It's coming up. Oh peeling away and the if it looks like it is great. If you get very far with a you can try again the next day and often initially if it's not too disastrous or multiple retain sheds Shied to the client have to do that process and tell them do that. Every day for several days some water bots and and some sort of steam type therapy as well to sit a hydro will soften up the the retained shit on that. Tom rectal anti you time. And then we'll have another look at it in waco And we also concentrate on. All the other aspects of the husbands have resulted in the app. No motion in the first place precisely and you hit the nylon ahead as usual brandon. Time is not of the sensitive definitely had sons. Thanks to have retained spectacles but is not into Spectacle comes off End and as long as closely as united snow. If he's not an active in an certainly can cause more problems by trying to aggressively into the the so one of the things. I always you you were talking before about tom. husbandry one of the things to interesting about this in rentals. Is that something that we do see is usually in In wild animals. And i think it has to do with them. united stress. Oh maybe environmental stress of the whole crisis is Hormonally driven primarily by far right but also number of months in london sometimes with some of those wildlands The result of out various potential to minnesota that interfere with that minor problem is predominantly. Diseases of Yes ransom predisposing conditions. That might set it off. What what have you seen any particular. The one i'm thinking over set at might reptile mice to give you all the clues. Yes you need to obviously by. That's one that may be causing in those wild ones as well. Um silent on be surprised if you have heavy infestations of reptile martin. Some of those wild reptiles they struggle with their what they shedding process. Say yes so. That's the first thing i think of. I'm shorts often. The first thing you'd think of mark for the for the pet ones in the have.

Tom robbie waco minnesota london
"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

"So yeah if you're after a game Which i'm sure all the. That's the one that i suggest you consider purchasing on working four to one. We play it next brandon. Yes you'll have to next time you down here. Being your mask we can have a bit of a play of wingspan. And you'll probably kick my butt mark. So that's my review this week I'll say you want to jump into the you've got a couple of news stories this week. What you just one. They related news stories but the first one is well wait you been trying to be more uplifting more positive a. I'm afraid of let the saw down with this because to be honest. It's a bit depressing. Sira australia's national science agency am his just after doing some sort of what gain some of the woods around the strike by prepaid asante report on the the global estimate of micro-plastics on the full Previous less qualified estimates suggested something About a six or seven tonnes mccray plastics in the deep ocean Batum the real number would appear to be more than double that and the same sorrow announced an estimated fourteen million tons of of a plastic these marker plastic fragments of plastic less than five millimeters. Long all may be Dede's that added to some mike up so cleanses and these macher plastics. Have a huge surface area owner. Mike show and as the the plastics breakdown. Naturally they release a number of organic compounds which affect on local walk. Not to mention the physical. Why that they can Like can obstruct The justice systems and through that Old white through different spaces to affect tall ecosystems so the interesting thing was that the robotic submarine Which collected samples was three columba's down a nearly four hundred comas off south australia. The some of the locations head twenty five times greater Mockery plastic Expected so it's a real problem. It's a real depressing problem because it's not showing any a major sign of ending Plastic is now will that wind up and laze locations. Am next few decades brenda supply. Basically extrapolated is previous studies in the one night. It and i worked out the. There's a lot there's a lot there but there's potentially things that could be done to help. Amelia right isn't they mark with children. Subtle second little little article. They're going to jump into my my article here that's well as sort of a positive violence negative with positive sort of spin on it us supplies and that is the risk. Feral pigs pose to marine turtles and their nests Here in australia and the federal government is funding indigenous ranges and community groups to cal. The feral pigs pigs and other predators and install cages on the beaches to protect the eggs. Full them and it's a twenty million dollar funding program. I've rolled out in in association with the indigenous ranges and community which is great and the trapping and colleen the predators developing fox tick dogs in the cages to cover the clutches of aches. And for those who deny marine turtles nest on beaches along the queensland coast. He in australia. And six of the world's seven spacey's of marine turtle living queensland off queensland and that salunke ahead the hawksbill the olive ridley and the back turtles which are listed as endangered and the grain and flat back to italy as well which found multiple cy except benign. Lisette putting money into Help summons as species Do their thing mark. And there's a couple of really really cute. Fight is in the article at the same they..

australia queensland Sira australia mike Lisette Dede federal government Amelia Batum italy
"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

02:01 min | 2 months ago

"peel" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

"It's up to the vet gurus brandon and mock. Come brendan here with mock episode. One six three friday the thirteenth spock friday the thirteenth of november. Two thousand and twenty. And well i don't know where we can segue from them but it is friday the thirteenth. Well i'm going to jump into one quick thing before. Forget because of gotten a couple of times the country with one listener one subscribe amac. This wake is wave. Been to you. Been to so many places around the world. I'm not lightly The fair islands. Have you been to the fair. I have not been to the faroe islands of heard. It's quite a nice place to visit. And perhaps we might get there one day so hello to one person. In fair place in does the name of that gurus at james dot com. We haven't got one yet. We meet with from all these countries whose one people and we'll running at we've got we've got better half a dozen left to to shed out and i just hope we get a reply from one of these one person's otherwise we're going to have to go up at least countries with to pay. I'm not going to jump to the county with it's Thousands of paypal. It's genuinely like h tone. We talk about the people who listen to. It amazes me that That debating. Listen to nick. On the. It's on. I would be just over the marinate while them send us a message. Talk about the reasons listening in and yeah a silver guide burn. We have we have. We will cross effing as a more hype that we do get that from the country i country or more more than one country. With one listener that would be fantastic vet gurus dot com the place to go Poke around they. Look the previous episodes. We have.

brendan brandon paypal
Media Bundles in 2020

Exponent

07:02 min | 4 months ago

Media Bundles in 2020

"Are going to. Talk about a article did right September. So we'll pretend this podcast which was twenty bundles and interesting because we've talked about bundles, unbundling it on bundling at multiple times throughout sort of the run here and I think the Queer book end here was twenty seventeen. I wrote the great unbundling, which is mostly focused on TV sort of stuff but I think what's interesting about this post, which was not necessarily about TV IOS about APPS and video. Games and storage and consoles, and all that sort of stuff is i. think that's the big picture take away about bundling and unbundling. The key thing is that when something unbundled and then re bundles that's not gonNA happen along the same value that it did because it was the same vector. Then why don't you just keep sort of the previous Bucknell? So yes, it made sense that sort of the cable bundle was going to unbundle but. It wasn't an essay re bundle as just a video bundle because then why don't we just keep the one that we had originally is you think about it, there s something about the impetus for the unbundling. That is the same impetus for the re bundling, and because it's sort of orthogonal to what caused the bundle in the first place that new bundle is going to look different. Sorry. That was a lot of words that make sense. Does perhaps another framing on this that I thought was interesting in contrasting the two articles. The starting point was for the previous article with a previous set of bundles dominant across society and looking at how tech had come along and kind of knock them out or was in the process of knocking out the cable bundle and how editorial and ads in newspapers of big blown apart by facebook and so on. Oh interesting about this one was this almost felt like with the exception perhaps of Netflix, which is the connection between the two paces, this homeless how bundles or evolving in the new world we talk absent Amazon visa things that didn't exist twenty years ago, but new bundles that are emerging as. These companies in April new kinds of consumer experiences. That's exactly right and you think about those addicted newspaper in the TV bundle which I think are the most obvious sort of bundles from before that sort familiar with, and they are both distribution where'd were repeating about a million broadcast. By you know the newspaper because the you had printing presses and delivery trucks, and you had a multisided market of advertisers and readers you could bundle together lots of different editorial from sports to business to local news do national news with advertising into one bundle, one newspaper and the customers, and by having all those different types of editorial that attracted the maximum sort of audience by getting the maximum audience you. Got The most advertisers and you can see how it was all sort of wind up. The key thing was predicated on that point of distribution and so what happened was once the point of distribution went away that bundle started to fall apart and not just advertising material, but all the editorial pieces fell apart, right? No one goes to a general news site and gets their sports and all sorts of sports sites or they go even better site about their specific team or they go to a specific author, right? Like the degree to which the newspaper has been atomised is remarkable right? You think about it the same things happen with advertising it went from an advertisement in a newspaper that's reaching. Tens of thousands or hundred thousand people to win early per person advertisements that are very finally targeted and you know people get wrapped up in what is targeted advertising what does it mean? You think about it every single one of us as long as there and has been around has been basically viewing targeted content that's tune to ourselves. We are often doing the tuning by deciding what we click on what we read, but it's just as varied as the Advertising is you and I read completely different things even if we have broadly similar interests because we're different people making different choices. Yeah and I mean D- advantage of tech. It was kind of easy to say, I mean you think about even the classified section, which is another one that appealed often you have that in print and it's slow and you've got a raid all these things manually. You just put it on craigslist than you can have this global thing. At easy to have categories whatever, and you can make it free and that was just part of the start of these newspapers having that bundle peeled away completely unbottled, right? Even the different parts of the classifieds went to different companies like craigslist took a lion's share but some stuff went to Ebay some stuff went to wink in recruiting like. Of different places, craigslist was the big one with unbundling happens it's like a shattering effect. Everything is really completely broken apart, right. So just to stick with the newspaper advertising, this sort of bundle that came out of that it was content and advertising that was bundled does not necessarily mean that the bundle that is going to happen in the future. So actually the bundle that actually happened in the case of like. Was People and advertising. They had all the folks on their platform and they got all the advertising. They will put those pieces together, and in that case, sort of the content became completely sort of July zed and commodities. So that's a great example whereas trying to you know with all the Highfalutin words at the beginning is where abundant that formed on one axes in one set of conditions in a different set of conditions it forms a completely different axes is not necessarily going to be the same sort of thing right figuring out like one part of that, and in this instance with facebook, it was what people wanted. And what would hold their attention is the starting point and then once you get one pot can start layering on the others but it's a great point. The way to think about their market is very, very different than way newspaper thing but their market, right a newspaper had sort of default position in. So they had to think about certain maintaining that major the continent appealed to everyone and didn't appear to extreme. You wanted to play down the middle because you know you gotta fill the both sides of the aisle, etc etc. Whereas facebook, you can always go somewhere else immediately like you think about it people anti-trust like facebook. Woke newspapers where I have been awfully, you have anywhere else to go and they didn't want to call attention to that fact. So they were motivated to sort of play it on both sides whereas facebook. The fact that it has a tendency to drive towards extremes is actually evidence of facebook not having sort of monopoly not having a sort of lock in at least as far. As users going to go somewhere else with your time, you go to talk to snapchat and you just go to the web your twitter and they need to fight to keep your attention basically hasn't been offline attention I think is the way to put it and that's different than it used to be previously right the reed hastings let it a shareholder recently where he talked about. How they track and Net flicks loses more folks to fortnight than they do to hbo I feel like it was a really illuminating example. There's a tendency just to view these things narrowly by category. But when you think about it from the customer's point of view and you think about it from the perspective of attention does a better job of driving at the job to be. Done

Facebook Craigslist Netflix Amazon Ebay Reed Hastings Twitter HBO
"peel" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"peel" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Ever non can peels mouthful of food. He to struggles through to get what he wants out. The just the authentic into experience. He talks about in a way. The curious thing buttoned since views I think Martin. Aston Thought of John Peel in a way that John Peel doesn't think of himself, so there's a lot of the sort of like negotiating cigarettes, is he? A figurehead is e this. Is that undertones always saying no I'm basically on the FAM-. I like stuff because I like it. There's no agenda behind it. There's no attempt of creating culture anything like that. He has no intellectual response to pop a toll you know. Just does he lightens record? It doesn't record and he's going through a time when a place where the stuff is liking was getting noisier. And noisier one of the things he had to contend with a little bit. Once he become the guy who played every scratchy abrasive news. Indecent goal it was that was coming out something people remember de back in nineteen seventy one. He was of flying Goeman supertramp. Pizza France and show me the way I and the sense. He went that far. Trust me hate. Show me why. -solutely my hand on my heart, I'm the first of the clips in a sense he talks about he talks about playing. Crap doesn't seem so. Maybe she just had that. It would oriented. Spies labeled as lawn and the Aston Challenges Him and he actually vigorously defends his signing choices from nineteen. A. If you look back through the history of the pros. A place. In Amongst This pin. There's been some you know some real. Food, I. What air is. Under, say that like a decade or so nice, so? Lost singer-songwriter county. In the beginning of the seven. Rows Tonkin imagine his seventies early Seventies. Liquid Anti. War. Type goods in the stolen. Data. It's crap stood strong, but if it is a Lotta stuff, which now made lush princeton into the roots of von have when I hear these. Uh? I hear some of these things. Shorty went people mentioned. The liable. Civilly. Proud of them those stack water. Plants. Daddy..

John Peel Martin Shorty France Tonkin princeton
"peel" Discussed on dgoodshow

dgoodshow

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"peel" Discussed on dgoodshow

"Enjoy all right. I'm I'm here with Justin. Berlet and we will be discussing various topics on comedy Justin how have you I got into comedy well. It's something that I've always had a passing interest in. I think we all laughing but it's never really thought I'd be doing. I'd had been in Chicago for a couple of years and moved here for work. He and I met my then girlfriend now wife and she moved here because she wanted to do comedy issues like I want to be Tina fey and she ended up not doing that up but through her she'll be like my first show at the old Idaho which is now like some fancy hotel really and yeah well. This is really neat and then a few years later my mom. Tom was actually undergoing cancer treatment and we were up late one night killing a bottle of wine. She said you know I was always sad that you you didn't pursue performing or some sort of art thing because made you so happy until the next day. I signed up for class at second city. US perfect yeah. I'm actually it's very therapeutic here. I've signed up for this. Oh my parents actually made me sign up for this and second grade because I had then in a second grandson is born with just like hold onto invited and it's very traumatic experience. Birth birth is horrifying. Yeah and my therapist was like go to the second city to have great program didn't want to go with it and I've been doing it ever since for the last nine years so it's been it's been amazing. I mean by Kombi done was horrible because it was the second graders com date so I mean not sure the second graders loved. It is loved it. They loved it. Fourth graders not so much graders little I. I guess there's like what's this yeah are sophisticated. COMEDIC ALAD fourth fourth grade yeah the one. I got like fourth grade on the fifth graders. Look down upon me. They're all like what is this that way. I mean that's your whole likes the older people. We know what's hit yes. This is why it's so great that you are here to interview then why you except to be interviewed here today. A lot of people will choose to say oh. He's seventeen experience not gonNA early interview but it's great that you have to look past that and they were interviewing so here. I know I know people who were my age. That behave like children are way worse than most seventeen year. Olds have actually like no through friends so yeah yeah of course I see it's in comedy comedy like Bridges Age Yeah. It's like a it's universal scurries original after somebody slips out of an Anna unless you slipped on a banana and I've never slipped on the banana but I have slipped on a orange peel and I am being very serious about that not I have. I have slipped orange peel for and it's it's no fun. It's pretty scary never sent in San Francisco a few weeks back and we were out walking and we legit. It's also and slept on. I'm an animal like that. receive it before but we saw this guy. Just go down Oh and as we walked by like he's kind of gathering meeting up and there's there's bananas on the ground. This is the greatest day of my life yeah. You're on his day but yeah you just saw something right out of Tom and Jerry cartoon. That's awesome exactly exactly so you right after you begin to do classes here at the second city. What did you well I. I what do you think about the buses. Were amazing right so it was an interesting time day. I signed up for classes is also the day the building caught on fire. Oh I I remember that. I know that it's like there are people. I'm meeting the community. Now don't know about the fire drill yeah. They just kind of student. Training Center Hunter has always been this like Escher esque labyrinth owner right now. This is all new to me and they were building. They were building. We sat in recovery but that was really cool because we got to be in the old classrooms like what was the original training center that was like. I think it's now it's where they do. A lot of people do a lot of additions in there now the wood walls and all that yeah expandable wall area and stuff like that so that was neat and it was magical to me was just meeting people who also enjoy riffing and seeing the fear it stripped away out of everyone was kind of awesome. It is really awesome because there's like this rule. If you don't WanNa look like an idiot but everybody else's looking like an idiot. You're GonNa look like an idiot. You know it's not like you got to be an idiot with everybody else. You won't be an idiot or or like you know. Even the street man works like this statement so the person comedy works because the street person is so unreasonably unreasonably like holding to their thing and pushing against the crazy that they almost come off just as crazy which just in the opposite direction ah I love that about it. It's sexually really funny how it's set up so I when I was watching your videos. I was wondering how much of that not do right and how much a lot of it you act in it but D- right a lot of that or do you just purely act in those sketches so so it's been Improv. I have on the website because a friend built it for me so I think most of what's on the website right now so I'll sketch. Ask US how much of that sketchy right. Oh probably about half the price. Now I mean again. I'd have to double check with southwest uh-huh yeah. There's there's some really good stuff. I've been very fortunate to have friends that are incredibly talented. Riders Generic enough to be like yeah you can come play two of my favorite shows that I've done in the last year mixed rewind and dread and breakfast. I those both just this morning got accepted into New York sketch fast so really. Y- congratulations thank you yeah. It's exciting really the second time I've I've done something New York. I've have done did the Douglas Marathon back when I was there with a show that I co created it was an Improv show and so now it's secret origins. Yep Yeah. There's a lot of fun. It's a cool show yeah and now I go again with sketch and I had more fun. Doing those two shows than almost anything else yeah. It's just very well written really well. Ridden show can make your day and we can mont that it's really good stuff is just is amazing. It's so weird how he makes a difference does make a lot of people try to go for a quantity and the you know I actually now starting to buy gas to try to go with climbed and that was a big mistake. I tried to put like fifteen minute episodes out and when each they were not good you were in the lesson. That's one the things you know doing comedy for as long as you have. You're probably very adept at taking feedback and making adjustments. I think that's something that in my professional non comedy life would have the tendency to try to invoke is reacting to that feedback. Not I take it personally. Quick adjustments yeah earlier this week. actually on snapchat you can tell that. I am a Gen Z. Person because you still using snapchat understand the snapshot. It's been over for a little bit going on well yeah but are people using it the way they did or is it starting to know people are decision really think sexting. Yes you can tell I'm I am Gen-x so I text over my tech stab and and one of the most things address nuts is when you first join a new comedy group. We're like a new team like the biggest debate is which platform of your time you indicate and everyone's like oh it was just use facebook and then one person as US group. Meanwhile grew so that to me is if if you're an APP developer out there you should build an APP just for comedy groups to leave. I beg there's enough APPS APPS for just comedians out there because you see there's like a whistle were some apps for comedians where they could have like new ones who were not like actually. Salihi no because there's Africa laugh mayor laughable or something like that and it's like all these variable known comedians. There's no new comedians comedians to discover on it in like an easier way. I think that's what podcasts are four yet. I feel like that's that's the podcasting thing now everyone my wife's listened to a ton of podcast from New York comedians. He's a big fan of Chris Gothard and through that she's turned me onto so many layers leery as people really tough game show never heard about chicken out wonderful and then there's a cold dead eyes with Connor ratliff now. I don't know that one either I'm I'm still getting into the entire cast con Conrad Materials Very Good Guy New York and he does the George Lewis talk show every month and then he was a regular show and he was cast in Band of brothers need the silver. Tom Hanks and he was cast in it was like his first big break and the day was supposed to shoot ah yes he got called into time trailer to read his scene and then the outer like we're going in different way. Oh Tom Hicks you'd have cold dead eyes but that's just the tip of the iceberg of the story and it's a great tale so yeah yeah. I'll try it out. Check it out guys. Check like no Conan so now outside of comedy. I was reading that you are from Kansas City correct. I lived in Kansas City for a good long while I I'm originally from Western Kansas and then bounced around. Yes you did in radio there correct yeah. I was in in Kansas City guest on radio podcast Radio Radio Radio podcast. Oh No radio the local. NPR affiliate a beyond with my friends Austin and we were the experts and we talk. We breakdown down technology news in ways. That is a little bit more digestible so it's a little bit more simple for like general public understand yeah because take a lot of times when you report on technology. There's a lot of Fud in an fear uncertainty and doubt where it's like..

New York Tom Kansas City Justin Tina fey Chicago Berlet Idaho ALAD Tom Hanks Tom Hicks NPR Anna facebook San Francisco Conan US Kansas developer George Lewis
"peel" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"peel" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

"I want the truth to come out yeah so she's like just yeah like. Let's see what what the truth looks. Let's see where the d._n._a. Leads us. What the truth is yeah so together. They persuade investigators to use familial dna fucking brand new thing to try right to find angie's killer but idaho doesn't allow familial dna searches in their criminal database so greg mckeown. He is like let's try to search public databases so in twenty fourteen they search a public database owned by ancestry dot com that has it's fucking crazy. They have all these connections to the mormon community. You did you another like one of the biggest contributors dna yes they're. They're the big family. Tree people yeah like the the mormon church knows all about your family and where you come from it all that stuff in there keeping it in like a bomb proof mountain shelter and all these churches like line up to get their fucking cheek swab like understandably. It's not a big deal. I don't think but they they get their cheek swab. They get their fucking ancestry built up and shit so ancestry dot com was like can we have that you bought it. Wow yeah so basically six unclear. I want to see the documentary movie about the person who brokered that deal because it some sweet talk and mormon ono. That was someone that sweet talked some mormons who knows some slick salesman had to go in and be like of course. I won't drink coffee yet. Can we have access to this. I know you're already rich. There's some more money basically one point six million people in utah alone had given their d._n._a. To this database and ancestry bought it amazing yeah so according to a search warrant investigators received a list of forty potential matches when they put in the d._n._a. From the crime scene in july two thousand fourteen one match is just one dna marker are away from the killers d._n._a. Thirty four out of thirty five markers blow. They're like great they track him down and when the man is looked into further investigators. Estimators are like holy shit. The man's name is michael junior and right off the bat <hes> they're like his name is mike. His name's mind that's what fucking christopher tap said young right so they're like boom then they look more into his life and they look on facebook and it turns out that he has friends in idaho falls even doesn't live their lives in new orleans. <hes> um then look more into him. He's a low budget filmmaker whose films are like literally about violence and murder. <hes> let me redo one of the <hes>. This is what the move one of the movies are about. <hes> description is an average suburban housewife tries to stop her neighbor from going on a rampage after he witnesses a gruesome attack and the other one's called a murderer delia like it's just about murder. It's his passion right <hes> so they go go to new orleans. They questioned ersan. He admits to being an idaho falls in the spring of ninety six low like on a trip. He's like totally there visiting friends but i don't know what was going on on that night. I don't know anything about this. He provides a dna swab an early two thousand fifteen. He's cleared totally not ham. It's fucking it just coincidence after coincidence jesus at this point he's like i want to get on the fucking bad. When i get to help solve this. He teams up with carol to help her so now sorry but we have to pivot back and then be like just because you like horror movie yeah just because you're that doesn't make you a killing doesn't mean anything yes. That's unrelated. Let's turn our opinions around. I was happy to jump on board with that. I see the era of my way but i bet if you questioned him for thirty fucking hours straight he keyed. What's it called confessed to young yeah probably by this point idaho innocence project had taken christopher taps case and they're able to get taps interrogation videos released and the holy shit angie's monteiro watches videotapes too and she's just like oh shit. She's like i kept thinking and she was reading all the case files. She's like i kept not understanding what i was getting wrong and like what i wasn't understanding until i realized it was all a false confession yet was not the whole story that didn't makes sense yeah so cares convinced the man serving time for her daughter's murder was coerced into confessing and wrongfully convicted. Oh i know in her only daughter she even contacts an expert an expert <hes> she even contacts an expert in false confession analysis which is like what a fucking cool job yeah really his name steve drazen. He watches all the videos well and he says it's a textbook case of psychological coercion. He says that police fed christopher tap facts about the crime scene using deception and other sophisticated and psychologically manipulative techniques weeks and that's how they got the confession out of him. Wow yeah couldn't have been too sophisticated if they have if they're not experts enough to be good at solving the crimes we can't then turn around on and say that their expert manipulators in the interrogation room. I mean it can't be that hard to convince a twenty year old high school dropout. These men are like educated. Eh professionals to that. He did it same with draymond asi. It's not like brennan. Dossier was the mastermind and they got him to confess yeah. That's true. It's could be the emotional employ right as anyway okay. No no it's good so during this time christopher tap appeals his case several times and eventually taps attorneys offer prosecutors deal l. in march of two thousand seventeen for his immediate release from prison tap would agree to keep the aiding and abetting murder conviction on his record but they're going to drop the aiding and abetting rape conviction conviction so both sides agree to this deal okay and after twenty years in custody. It's just let's christopher tap walk free. He was in jail for twenty year. Yeah holy shit yeah and you'd see like he's yeah. It sucks yeah so like when he's in at trial trial and stuff. He's just this little little boy and now he's has grown man. It's crazy so fucking. Cut you this past may of twenty nineteen. Oh what's that four four months ago months ago. Hat idaho falls police announced that they had used familial d._n._a. and they were able to find a match to the contributor of the d._n._a. Eh angie's crime scene who a man now fifty three years old named brian drips drips and tap is at the fucking thing. That's terrible. That's crazy. Incidence so brian drips had been living in idaho falls at the time of dodgers murder but he had no history of violent violent crimes he had he had been talked to by investigators when they were doing the canvassing the neighborhood because he lived across the street from andrew's house so they had like talked to him just like i don't i went out and came home and i was drunk and passed out like i don't remember what happened here like great goodbye. Why aren't you later yeah so after what happened was <hes> investigators had gotten a familial dna hit thanks to the help of perreault bon nanno labs which is the virginia virginia based company that also helped i._d. The golden state killer hi stanley. Hey what's up best friends. Everybody <hes> police had they got the match like familial match match. They had to do the same thing with golden state killer. They followed him they found cigarette but yeah tested at to be sure and it matched him exactly so over the course of an interview that lasted about five hours drips admitted to the rape and murder angie dodge and said he acted alone. Yes so christopher. Taps is finally cleared. He's charged sam night. The two investigators who had coerced a false confession from christopher tap their now retired and they refused to talk about the case. Yeah i saw one thing that was like one of the investigators said he doesn't remember anything about the case but then i said another thing that was like he might have early onset alzheimer's so that might be why it's not then you could argue early onset alzheimer's. You forgot current things. I really not to be an argumentative. Be it but i also bet there is such a massive amount of guilt that they can't even acknowledge because to actually look and face they approach that with you know. We're all doing our our best at all times they they approach that with. We want to get this woman's killer street. Yeah all these things are pointing to you whatever we have to do to get you off the street and that's what they were trying to do. Their aim was true but it was just way off. It was off yeah and like i wonder if they'll even admit it now that he had nothing to do with it or they'll say oh well. I bet he was still there. Aiding and abetting must have known each other somehow. You know what i mean like won't let go still but if the actual killers acted alone that's kind of the end of the story totally okay so on july seventeenth twenty nineteen that was just like a month and right now forty three year old christopher taps charges charges were vacated after fighting first freedom for twenty two years he said quote i am appreciative and deeply humbled that this moment has finally come his case this will serve as the nation's first exoneration to rely on genealogical dna testing. Wow so i mean i like we should expect more of those. I'm sure more than twenty eighty five percent of the more than three hundred sixty wrongful convictions overturned by dna evidence in the united states have involved some form of a false confession recently recently <hes> brian drips was in court for preliminary hearing and he said that he didn't know angie dodge and he was drunk and high on cocaine and didn't remember what happened that night. He had just had a baby so he admits it but there's a whole thing about like did they. Now he's fighting because he sang they didn't read him. His miranda randy writes but it's tall just stalling bullshit right though we'll and that's sounds. I actually even more internal denial where it's like <hes> e._s. Drugs will make do things especially amphetamines or laying uppers that you normally wouldn't do but murdering a person yeah coal in cold. Hold blood is a whole different area like you. You knew there was a single woman living there alone so you must have seen her there before and like that's it's gary meditation on coke exactly yeah exactly so you knew where to go yet. Yeah yup just top right so carol dodge mummy <hes> <hes> was present at the hearing and sat through the details about how her daughter was brutally raped and i don't know how families do that. They do it. I know and it's i. I mean it's just so sad. It's so sad. It's i got it like you want to you. You don't want them to have suffered alone right. I think you're there with them a little bit really yeah. It's it's just so. It's such a like a brave and incredibly strong thing to do because you're already in the worst place you can be right and then it's like now. We have to go on further minor..

christopher tap idaho angie dodge murder new orleans carol dodge abetting mormon church brian drips mormon community alzheimer utah rape salesman greg mckeown facebook michael junior steve drazen united states
"peel" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"peel" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

"Great the neighborhoods canvassed and her friends and family are questioned their eliminated mandated suspects and the first expensive. The investigation are spent on tips that go nowhere and testing of d._n._a. Men and it goes nowhere and fortunately in this town. The average homicide rate is zero to one per year wow but because of that the homes and investigators don't have a ton of experience investigating these kinds of crimes so they're not prepared. They're not experienced. One of the two lead detectives put on the case jared furman who gets like fucking decimated for the story in and so many of the articles he had been a high school parole officer but not pro you know like he had a truancy officer now like a security officer walking around in which is like a fucking noble job nothing wrong with it but then to then go to homicide detective is hard rape to understand okay so he had almost no investigated investigated experience at all. Meanwhile andy's mom carol is like determine it's cold. It's months and months. She's like i'm gonna find leads on my own and she starts to question angie circle of friends and go to the places they all hung out and in january of nineteen ninety seven one of those friends a guy. I'm ben hobbs who was possibly one of the things that he was the last one the last people to see angie alive and there's video of him carrying flowers at his at her funeral aw <hes> so he's like close to her. He gets arrested in nevada on suspicion of brutally raping a woman at knifepoint. Oh no like connection yes right obviously xlii so hobbes denies being involved at all but when police start interviewing hobbes's friends there led to a twenty year old high school dropout named christopher tap he had been a juvenile delinquent in the past seems like he was on the straight and narrow. Maybe just a hang out guy but none of taps d._n._a. Matches with samples taken from the scene or the semen found on angie police ignore this evidence and assume he's involved somehow so over three and a half weeks. Tap is interrogated nine different days for for over thirty hours total. He's given six polygraphs and question for more than forty hours yeah. He's just as skinny twenty year old kid. It doesn't have a high school education. He is not ready to like fucking spar but he like cooperates because he knows he didn't do it yet. So he's cooperating in coming in every time they call him. In so they start worked to lie to chris tap to to get him to confess they tell him that <hes> his his friend invest to the crime he said that that hogshead not only confessed to killing angie but that he had also implicated tap in the murder so they're lying to him and you know and it's videotaped the like which i guess she couldn't do yeah couches so <unk> like crazy they tell him that he had likely suppressed his memory of the incident when he should trust them because they'd be able to prove he was there anyways anyways and he'd get the death penalty he doesn't confess and they and they still take him to trial and find him guilty which they said they could totally do then he's getting the death penalty so oh he might as well start talking and they can offer him immunity. That's what they tell him which they can't do <hes> and they can help him. He'll just go home. It's the second classic story yeah. That sounds like brendan dash yeah. There's a show called the confession tapes on netflix just hard to watch because it's these cases over and and over again it seems like using subterfuge to get a suspect to admit something like a good idea but there should be limited yes the idea that you could suggest asked that someone is repressing a memory yeah and basically fuck with their own like the way their mind work and be like and we have the proof that you're repressing your memory marie. How do you go what if i'm impressing my memory. He says exactly that he's hooked up to the polygraph machines and he's like. I would know if i did it right. I would remember right like he's he. He is he clearly trusts. Here's the thing he went to the same school where <hes> the investigator was the a cop the school so yeah trusted this guy to and he's like why would they wanna frame me. I'm going to work with them. Maybe why would they lie there right. He trusts them. Yes you know so sorry but when you're in that situation you can't do anything else but tell the truth because if you didn't do anything all you can do is keep on repeating being exactly what you know about what you did right introducing the idea that you don't know what you'd be yeah is really fucked exactly and tap trusts furman it because he knew from high school and police interrogators threatened tap with the gas chamber like quote the gas chamber and or life in prison. They attacked his memory summary. They feed him information. Which when you watch the video of it it's ridiculous like they're even like <hes> and that's when you cut her and then he goes and that's when you and like let let him finish cut like it's so fake so they promise immunity and threatened to take it away they pushed aside taps claims of innocence and they offer leniency in exchange exchange for a confession at first kristap denies any involvement but over time he's coerced into telling six different stories which is a red flag on itself. I would think there should be one story. Eventually investigators assured him that if he cooperates in admits he was there he can go free like lie and tell him that so he agrees to cooperate whatever version of events police think happen they feed him the story and he confesses to detectives that he and two friends included not dude hobbs who had been brought in with him had gone dodgers his apartment on the night of her death and that <hes> after fighting with her kristaps says he held her down while his friend killed and raped her <hes> so he just like puts himself there <hes> but neither hobbs nor kristap match the d._n._a. At the crime scene they it doesn't match them. Oh yeah so chris tap than tells. A third tells them third friend who is there. He says he could only remember the name mike like he invents a fucking person. Yeah it's beyond red flag yeah and we're into this is like a mountainside in tibet where it's just red material flapping in the wind everywhere the i can see that's right horrifying refine so this guy hobbs maintains his innocence. He is convicted of this case in nevada rape at night point so let's fucking crazy but he's let go by the idaho falls investigators that even though his d._n._a. isn't at the crime scene and there isn't any other evidence pointing to him police arrest chris tap on his confession and charge him with murder his case goes to trial and nineteen ninety eight where he recounts his confession he pleads not guilty which upsets carol <hes> dodge of course carshield like just distraught <hes> and on and it sounds like they coerce someone else to <hes> to a young woman police had manipulated her into a false testimony claiming she had heard chris tat mentioned his involvement in the murder at a party now the west memphis three ships right. Oh god how they got her or maybe they were like hit. Gotten her on some evidence and this is how she got out of it. Maybe at the trial. He testified that the admission had been coerced and at the d._n._a. Clearly shows does that. He's not the killer but prosecutors withhold videotapes of his confession they only showed little bits and pieces of it that you know cooperate their story right unknown twenty-eighth nineteen ninety eight the jury convicts chris christopher tap of aiding and abetting rape and murder and sentenced to life in prison with a maximum of thirty years and at the time idaho falls this doesn't happen they are freaking out they want and it took a couple of months for them to finally get someone who is like. They said responsible yet. They needed to close this case. It's pressure. I mean it's the story every time is they're always working under massive pressure and the fear that the the community has is when it's a small community and people know who the victim is. Yes yeah that that creates that pressure cooker but but still well. It's just like a as as the people in that position as the authorities along those lines knowing full well you are. You're putting a young man in jail a person in jail bill that is going to be there for the restroom label even though like in in this <hes> keith morrison investigates show when he interviewed them in twenty twelve they won't they won't won't go on camera anymore. We interviewed. They're like they just keep saying look at the tapes. Look the tapes where it's like yeah. We looked at them and they they believe it still owe because they they don't realize they were coercing. They don't realize they were feeding in the story. They didn't understand so they didn't know the procedure. I knew that they in their minds knew that he had done this thing and they were helping hand him to get off his chest. Yeah which oh yeah you know what i mean yeah that makes sense <hes> and it needs to be like they need him to be meanwhile carol dodge the mom who's like the sweetest we this woman ever is determined to find out who this fucking mike person is because he's the killer and she's like stoked. Christopher tap had gone to prison but she's like. They're still murderer's out there. I need to find these people. I'm not settled <hes> so by two thousand nine. The dna profile of the killer the actual killer had been put in the national database code is no match then she read an article in the paper about an internationally known dna expert named dr greg hammock dan. He's the executive director of the idaho innocence project. She just fucking read about him. Thank god and she was just like i need help now just like fucking call him up <hes> that's interesting though because she's calling the innocence project to talk about a killer not right getting somebody that she loves off or would it usually what people go to the innocence project for his going saying he said this is the first time a victim's family member had contacted him but he you know he was and well known d._n._a. Expert so she just she read an article and you know mom's cut articles out. Maybe the sky can help us. What else does she going until you can't look it up in the phone book. Yeah i mean there's no and it turns out that dr greg champion is like yo. I can totally help you but full full disclosure. I just started working on kristaps. Conviction overturned like i just i just started working on christopher taps case yeah trying to see if it was a false confession because christopher tab probably has a family. That's like there's no way it was him well yeah. They keep trying to overturn the conviction yeah so she's like i don't care. I just want to know what happened. No matter what the outcome is so let's work together. That's real mom energy like i just want..

christopher tap murder ben hobbs carol dodge angie circle idaho rape investigator officer chris nevada hobbes netflix jared furman chris tap dr greg champion andy keith morrison brendan dash
"peel" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"peel" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Peel and Keith. Her name hit a slim. To nothing currently, Steiner, AM five seventy sports nine nothing dodgers over the giants that our tenth shutout win of the season. Royals with a nine nothing shut out of the Mariners. Kansas City's won three straight games tied for the team's longest win streak this season. Aim chicago. White Sox and cubs were tied at one in the knife. Fly ball deep left field. Turns and looks and it's. Hit a two run. It's three to one White Sox that you run home on the top of the ninth as the difference. The call on WGN White Sox beat the cubs. Three one Cole, hamels a no decision after allowing an earned run in seven innings of pitching. He became the tenth lefty to record twenty five hundred strikeouts. He had eight of them last night. It's Wednesday June nineteenth born on this day in nineteen. Oh, three Lou Gehrig, be Ironhorse on this day, one hundred sixteen years ago. I last next. I'm Jay Reynolds, back tomorrow with sportscenter allnight ESPN radio. Players on the market. Kevin durant. Kobe letter Kemba Walker, Harry Irving. I have no idea what's going to happen. This is going to be the craziest summer ever. Sportscenter all night. Hey, people at my friend's company got blackmail emails. Yeah. It's a popular type of spear phishing attack. Wow. That sounds serious scammers claim to have compromising information like video threatened to share it with our contact list, unless the victim as a ransom target someone at our company..

White Sox cubs Cole Lou Gehrig Kevin durant Peel Steiner Jay Reynolds Mariners chicago Kansas City ESPN Kemba Walker Keith Kobe Harry Irving hamels one hundred sixteen years
"peel" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"peel" Discussed on Plantrama

"Three, any fresh organic matter, whether it's a fresh banana peel an orange rind. You know, scraps your broccoli stems that you don't wanna eat whatever it is. If you dig those around something like a rose plant in the soil in the decomposition of that fresh stuff it takes nitrogen from the soil that the rose really could be using on its own. Okay. So by burying any fresh organic matter around your roses. You are actually taking something away from that rose. So we should composting it, right? And then putting it in. That's right. And and you know, if you're throwing the banana peels onto surface of the soil, then they're taking the nitrogen outta the air. So then it's not so much of a problem. But Frank looks. Wants to live with this garbage thrown around your rose plan. And I I'm guessing it would also like attract raccoons and all sorts of other things, you know, it would look terrible. And would not do you any favors in the garden? That's right. So throw those banana peels in the compost bin with their mediocre amount of potassium, and let them break down along with all their other organic matter friends, and then once you have compost put that around your roses, and your rose is going to be happier the roses going to look better. And if you are like me, and you actually hate bananas. You don't have to worry because any other component of the compost is going to be just as good for your roses..

Frank
"peel" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"peel" Discussed on Plantrama

"L for Nari. It's the podcast for everyone who has ever grown eaten or wondered about plants today. We're talking about walnuts. Banana peels and storing seeds that you did not plant. Let's start off Ellen with what's for dinner. And what's for dinner might be walnuts? Now, are you? Are you talking about regular walnuts or black walnuts or any kind of walnut? Well, I'm talking about any kind of walnuts. Because I think you're talking about black walnuts. Correct. Yes. Yeah. Black walnuts. I just love black. Walnuts men. There are a lot of work. But they are so tasty. Well, I like black walnuts. Well enough, but I love regular walnuts which come from the English walnut tree. And I think that people need to realize that these trees are actually easier to grow than you might think people think about planning an apple tree or a peach tree oftentimes, they do not think about planning a walnut tree. But here's the thing. First of all walnut. Trees do grow better in the northern parts of this country. Not in the really hot deep self. As we all know, the deep south, you can grow pecans to beat the band. But walnuts do not perform that. Well in really, hot and humid weather. So that's one thing. Second thing about the walnuts. Is that a regular English walnut? Tree will start to produce nuts when it's about six or seven years old. But it doesn't really start our really produce nuts until it's about twenty years old. So I would say that, you know, a great thing to do if you have space might be to plant a couple of walnuts trees, the fertilization is always better when you have more than one plant. And plant those maybe for yourself. But also for somebody in the future. I mean, what a gift that is right? Yeah. Yeah. It's it's really looking forward playing it forward and just think about whoever enjoys your garden after you're done with it. How how thrilled they'll be defined this mature nut tree Ellen?.

Ellen twenty years seven years
"peel" Discussed on Couples Therapy with Candice and Casey

Couples Therapy with Candice and Casey

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"peel" Discussed on Couples Therapy with Candice and Casey

"But instead all you'll talk about is like some wall and a pantry, and it does. It does make me frustrated because I know that the the, the actual underlying concerns or something different. That makes sense. Yeah. Yeah, I, it would be nice if we could figure out a way for if you know all those things are the real reason for stressing me out than just address instead of being like you really making me feel bad about this, like then turning it on me because then I feel bad for. That's fair. What's the plan with the baby. Keep it in as long as possible. Are you freaking out at all about the fact that we've done zero preparation. In fact, all we've done is had our closet flooded kiss some pipe bursts in the room that we thought might be. The baby's room is filled up with all your clothes on the floor stressing. We didn't have a crib. We'd have a single bottle. I bought one online office woman who didn't use it. So hopefully it's clean. When used crib that in the basement. Okay. That's it. That's it. Or. Yeah, we don't have blankets. We don't have. We don't have anything. We don't even have diapers ready. You're ready to pop. I think he's at any second. Honestly, it could. I don't think it's going to last until the scheduled c section. How funny was the? Were those dulas that came to the house, the great. They're wonderful what to do a Kansas. Definition? I don't know. Just maybe. Oh. They're certified. They're certified training for them. So they're certified dulas Dula think is different than a midwife. But anyway, it's someone who hold your whole hold your hand during the birthing process doesn't have to be like a home birth. It can be in the hospital. It can even be a c. section, but a lot of times women get really scared to ask what's going on to the doctors or the caretakers and the Dula if she's good. We'll be one that's like Candice. Let me just ask what the fuck is going on. She asked for an EPA Daryl twenty minutes ago. Okay, Honey, it's fine. Thank you for trusting me with this. In texas. Do like a bodyguard woman giving birth. That's what I think is just there to protect you the but most dulas are very improbably necessarily kind of spiritual and calming and like intimate, I guess like they, they do get to see the grossest part of your the grossest timing your life. Oh, it's beautiful. They said things like the flowers about two. The nanny that we met with our dulas this week. It was very, a very spiritual experience wasn't this? It was spiritual. Yeah. It was spiritual. Why do people bring up what music you listen, you're giving birth? Well, remember when we went into the operating room for my c section, there are playing like country music, and they were talking about the Cowboys score or something like that. Ten to go. The only saw his cowboy boots was like now I like country music, but probably not in operating. They're about to gut me. The one the NFC goes, we need to shaver. That's like, that's not calming. That's not appropriate. Now I'm wondering if my bikini wax is not good, just too much, but you know. Yeah. Childbirth is one of the most discount. Anybody says, childbirth is a beautiful experiences completely full of shit, having a baby, a beautiful expanse. Childbirth is really disgusting. There's just so much going on God, but that's why part of the reason why we have to have a Dula my. So I have a nephew and I talked to my brother had the kiddo, and he was like, so in there like delivered the kid himself and stuff, and I'm proud of him for doing that. But he was all about it in a million years. I couldn't do that. I in the corner and highly total terrified little baby. I haven't asked you if it if be okay, if the Dula came into the operating room. I think that's a wonderful idea. I'll just have her bring your gopro. Oh my God. I remember right before they knocked me out the doctor. Absolutely not an or I don't want to put it to exist. I remember kept ako pro going, but down at the on the ground like no picture just audio, they've never listened to you listen to it because I wasn't there..

dulas Dula Candice texas Kansas NFC Cowboys EPA twenty minutes million years
"peel" Discussed on StoryCorps

StoryCorps

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"peel" Discussed on StoryCorps

"Peel see the both the the those those may and the whole head slowly and as they gave they thought people die love the woods became yellow in color and they still deepen the to take the yellow mesh just go deeper deeper think pains oh day and then we both seated until the fifteen when them for his decision about surrendering and then we will take it to be five is about where i've come out that's me my name is correa el chico off dribble i'm eighty four years old i lived in japan for twenty three years and i was leaving in sheet up it's a suburb of hugh shema the bomb dropped the sixth and everything went down stroke it was a city and then there was no city you could see the ocean and right after that then black rain and wind and that's when the fires started the people that they just got a big big holes in front of when that interview was done it was very fresh in my mind my dad told us he said now you've got to forget all of this it's gonna make you very sad and the experience must be extinguished from your mind i very rarely ever a tell anybody that i went through the tummy bomb ever i don't tell in my friends they don't know and maybe and maybe it's the fact that i don't want to remember it you accept it and you go on.

japan correa twenty three years eighty four years