22 Burst results for "Pedic"

Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

"So you grew up in East Germany like. Yes. Wow. How was that? What was that like? Does it seem like a distant memory now? Yeah. Because you know damned forty eight now but definitely you grew up in a in an environment where boggles matter friendship breeding matters inability matters no way that you can rely on on friends and. Thanks, you need a life. So I think it's a good upbringing. That's for sure. What do you think was most formative of childhood that you can kind of say that's why I am who I am today. You know I, think you entire life makes you the person you're obviously also what your parents teach you and what your parents live like and my parents from very much teaching ons too key both feet on the ground and. Always be kind respectful to other people no matter who they are and. That is something which you know. I think up to today by value by doing so. And I grew up like this and I guess out. So when you don't have a when you don't draw in extreme luxury, you know when you grow up just a few things, you become very creative and you resourceful intonations and. Keep. Going for the things you want I think that's also something. which gets less and less this society because the children for today pretty much everything from the board. I think it's a different generation. What is the most quintessentially? German thing about you I used to be always on time I'm pretty much on time still. One point it's very German, and so I think I'm sending for quantity and technology in science i. think that is something very German. I remember that Carly member we went on that navy press trip to Hamburg and it was to the second yeah. Yeah we were like Oh, my God, we gotta get to the lobby like. And then German. The wet lead you to get into medical school and you know decide you wanted to take that path. My mother was a lead doctor and she took me to the hospital. When I was a kid, you know to go on visit patients and stuff. So I got into this Medicare idea very early when it was four years already decided I won't be a doctor himself. And never changed. You know to score studied medicine. And I came Dr Early on i. read that when you were in medical school you you're also a young mum and a single mom at that time, and so that couldn't have been easy. Maybe not a lot of people know that part of your story. So was there a particular mantra at that time and you're juggling so much like what helped? You get through through that time. So I was mother was twenty three and I just had done my first big step in medical school and gratefully at that time as their had my mom to help me a lot with my kids but I, think it's just you know you go step by step I think one of my mantras really to take things. Don't look too much out what's going on in the future because then you definitely get around. So step by step and put a checkmark behind everything in Italic Sawed. So with having tried and going to school and do all these days are just doing them. Moving forward, I think that helps you know not stress about future. Just get it done and you become a manager yourself because you have to keep all the balls in the at the same time I'm really good at this now. and. So you became a medical doctor in the field of orthopedics. How did you meet the late great? Koby Bryant. So so I came into other pigs by chance originally wanted to get into pediatrician because at my chide I couldn't see the kids suffering. So I decided okay. 'cause also studied sports, parents, medicines. I win the peaks to do my doctor studied there and I like all the peaks but I was also interested in aesthetics and I had to wait for to get a place in the clinic I wanted to start working and I had to wait half year in this year I decided to go. clinic and then I loved you know working in science so much. Stayed there and didn't go to Tadic's pedic's than I did later but I stayed there pioneering this treatment, we the proteins from God's and decreed cometary proteins to stop the inflammation and the aging process in the joins and we had so many people coming for treatments from everywhere from the word courts, people and people with joint problems in Australia tried is in you know. So we got to meet a lot of people. Not just you know sports

East Germany Italic Sawed Koby Bryant Tadic Carly Hamburg Australia
A Conversation With Mary Anne,  Woodworker

It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

08:15 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation With Mary Anne, Woodworker

"Hey, everyone. Glad you could join me today. On this episode, we will close out our three part series on the Bainbridge Artisans Resource Network or barn. For Short we're going to talk to marry an a Woodworker who works here at Barn. We will talk to her about her experiences as well as how she came to the barn in the first place Maryanne. Thank you for talking with me today and welcome to its would. Thank you for having me. So what brought you here? I literally moved here because of the barn. I had left. Alaska and trying to find a location to move in the lower forty eight. And I had originally thought Portland and had lived in Ben briefly. and was looking for homes to buy and ended up. Simultaneously Looking for homes and Ben Oregon, as well as Bainbridge. And decided on Bainbridge off when I was googling different things about the island I noticed a a feed on the barn and is like, oh. That was the tipping scale and That that is what brought me to Bainbridge now had you been woodworking previous? Only dabbling because the woman I was always told I wasn't allowed in the woodshop which was really frustrating. And I had no interest in home economics and I got stuck making Keiko semester and it was completely boring. And then. I. Dated a man for many years who was an expert woodworker was he did marvelous work but he was kind of the same thing he he didn't like women in the Woodshop So. I would help design pieces, but I wasn't really involved in doing the woodshop. And then when I moved to Alaska, I found a really wonderful man who just would take two or three people in and. Teach them, everything he knew and. That was when I finally started doing some. Woodworking and then when I discovered the barn, I was totally excited because these guys at the barn are incredible. There are so supportive and the creative. Mix of everybody is just wonderful because we have professional would workers as well as novices. So it's been really really wonderful experience and he's like these are so important. Yes and I there's woodworking tends to be a solo thing we're in our basement. We're a garage by ourselves working and to be able to work around like minded people that have different skill sets than you. It's just a wonderful resource. It is the the collaboration between everyone is really what makes very special because it it it edges you along to maybe venture into different areas that you wouldn't otherwise do because this the person at the next table could be. Exploring. Exploring all kinds of different options with a poxy or doing different types of wood bending or whatever which You know maybe I haven't done before and so it's it's a wonderful opportunity for me to be introduced to it and then question whether I can maybe dabble in some of that as well. The other thing that's really nice about the Woodshop to is that we have monthly meetings and those monthly meetings they bring in some very good speakers and it's a lecture format. And you, you get your feet wet with areas that you've never dreamt of, and so that's been also very helpful. Those kind of things really stoke the fire. We all. You're here because you're maker and. You know all these people. Everywhere in Barn. It's that passion and to be able to bounce ideas off people or see what they're doing and going. Wow I want to try that and it just feeds. Yes For instance I am well, barn has the which has. Various. Different courses they offer as well. So you know there there's formal instruction in whatever you would want as it's offered and there is a a man that goes to the woodshop here who's a retired retired architect in designs these really amazing furniture pieces and now he's turning around and he's offering a course on furniture design Well. That's a perfect opportunity for me who's just really a beginner. To start dabbling an actual design and I, you know his wonderful instructor. So why wouldn't I? You know utilize that. So, it's very exciting how you can be pushed in different directions just based off of what other people are offering right now you've been coming here for two years. I'm close to two years. Yes. Almost the beginning of born as a institution. Talking to Mike earlier and he was saying this has been around benefiting for a couple of years. Yes but my can tell you more about the actual beginnings because. There was there was much more involved in a prior to the. Previous two. Yes. These kind of things don't just spring up right it's a process of years. Yeah, exactly. What are you working on right now? Well. I'm going simple now because I just needed a break from things. So right now making Swiss bread cutting boards. And prior to that, I, done matching Bedside tables which still pet every morning because they're just they're beautiful. I, love it. They were solid cherry and it's it was old tongue and groove, and I made my own slides for the doors and the doors are all dovetail and George. She's perfectly set in that little Nice Square and I just love it. So every morning I still pedic proud of it, and that's what's so exciting about it. You get you get end product that if you use I mean it's not I mean not speaking down of. Wall art and things like that which are beautiful and they serve a great purpose. But to be able to make something that you're using, you're cutting boards, tables chairs. Yes. It just it has a different feel to me. That's probably why I do it. But. What's your favorite project so far? Those tables. I'm probably most proud of those. Yes. I did. Oh. It was a a bit over adventurous here. Overzealous I first project here I named the Nemesis. Because I went. I I found a piece of throwaway. Kulla would that was beautiful and it was a live edge but nobody wanted it because it was all crumbling and falling apart. And I figured I could do something with it. So I went around the house trying to figure out where it could fit and I made this whole contraption where I had to first poxy the live edge Koa Wood. So to stabilize the falling apart pieces and then I superimposed on solid black walnut. And then built a black walnut cabinet to the left of it, and then I flooded the area of. of where the Koa wood was placed on top of the block walls and Walnut. So the whole thing looks like. A frog sitting on a riverbed because the Koa wood is like the riverbed in the knife flooded around it, and the whole thing is just a whole toilet paper in my bathroom. It fits above the toilet perfectly within the squarespace of the. Of The wall and it was. It was totally over my head as a first project but but that was the whole point. All the guys were here to help me out and it's not just men. There are some women to. So everybody kind of puts their own two cents in and. you know really the project was done by multiple people assisting me not just me.

Bainbridge Alaska Bainbridge Artisans Resource N Ben Oregon Maryanne Koa Wood Portland Instructor Mike George Kulla
"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:37 min | 4 months ago

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

"He never. I never got that call. Because then it was one every five weeks, and then six months later was one every four three weeks and ended up being like two a week as the product got more and more momentum, and the reason it got more momentum. Is 'cause parallel to this? We had opened up another channel. Called the direct response channel. and. That's the other huge moment. When we were able to figure out how to sell direct to the public, yeah, so I started advertising in the New Yorker Magazine I. AM My main goal was to get our name out there and so we were started selling in the wall. Street Journal and USA Today and then one day? I got a phone call from the New Yorker I two magazine. He said you know. You guys have an eight hundred number. That means you're eligible for direct response rates. Okay how much that he said. Six thousand. I said I've been paying twenty. Five thousand and I could be paying six thousand and he said. That changed my world because now I could advertise almost indiscriminately. I could be everywhere. And, it was at this time. That Bridgestone was selling trying to sell mattresses and people became gradually more and more aware, and they would walk into the store and say that's the one I read about in the. USA Today. and. So that's what got us going with mattresses. ooh, okay so! Let's get a sense of the landscape of mattresses in the US like at that time like who dominated the mattress market in the US and. TEMPURPEDIC wasn't even like a drop in that ocean. Right it was dominated by the Four S.'s Sealy Simmons Serta and Spring Air at the time. And they all were inner springs and They didn't even try to differentiate as a product. It was a commodity, and they sold on price and terms. It's fifty percent off and he never have to pay. That's how they they sold it, so we came along with our message in our magazine Ads Same Hey? We have something that's better wheel so okay, so you have this this growing business and you know you went from two million to six million to fourteen, million first of all. At what point were you making real money as the CEO of the company? as far as my Making money personally. I never was able to pay much of the salary because we weren't making any money. Until we merged in two thousand, the the the the merger in in two thousand was basically all of the subsidiaries that were selling tempurpedic. Around the world basically became one big company rate right because from our standpoint, we just had a distributor agreement with the Swedish guys. Right and the day that they cancelled that that agreement would be a very sad day. 'cause we'd be out of business. Essentially they could've they could've at any point. Just gone directly to Bridgestone and said your exclusive distributor. Well, we did have a contract, but well that first year they sure could have probably the second thirty years to then we probably were hitting it, but still a contract with Swedish company. WHAT HAVE THEY CHALLENGED IT I? Mean it was? Very flimsy, but what I didn't realize is from their standpoint. They had the same problem. We were sixty to sixty five percent of their world sales, so their company was only valuable pretty much because of that contract, so we both were very highly motivated to merge the problem was. How do you value? Yeah, 'cause they had the manufacturing plant, and they had the IP in during the ninety s I couldn't draw much of the salary, but I what I did do is sell little bits and pieces of equity to friends and family and stuff, so I was able to keep going based upon selling down so very many people i. talked to who have startups will say Oh never gonNA sell controlling interest. I got controlling well. My philosophy is the opposite is I rather have five percent? Of something really big than fifty one percent of something small. And so my advice is the okay. You'd always liked to control it, but you don't have to. So. Okay, so you merge you end up with you. Know a per-. Certain percentage probably fivers by five percent. Yeah, something like that, yeah! and. You are the CEO of this merged company And I guess like in early two thousands. You guys took outside investment. You took a big chunk of of money from a private equity firm rate right to private equity companies came in and. Bought it and we. We retained our our twenty percent for our US group. I think they put in like three hundred fifty million dollars or something, and in two thousand and two. Is that right? Well there was a in early two thousands after we merged my Swedish friends decided that they wanted to sell partial interest because they needed it for their other companies. This is only one of their. Ten or fifteen foam companies? Yeah, but the investors or slightly worried about. Having a minority interest with a private Swedish company. That they don't really know that much about and so the Swedes came back and say well. We don't want to be minority, so we'll sell the whole thing so anyway. That's what the three hundred and fifty million was. The purpose of the transaction was to take the Swedes out. Yeah, not a ton of it went into the company actually so so in two, thousand and three. This is no longer a Swedish company. Two Thousand and two. Actually it hasn't to, and so you're not calling. You're not calling Michael every day anymore. Well. They stayed on as a consultant. for Michael did as for a couple of years and but not as much. No certainly not, and my boss is now was the board which was to private equity companies. How did you deal with that like that? was a lot different because their thing.

US Bridgestone CEO New Yorker Magazine Michael USA USA Today Street Journal consultant.
"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:57 min | 4 months ago

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:04 min | 4 months ago

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

"A mattress company in Sweden and seeing some success? And he agrees to give you a horse trainer, a guy whose entire life isn't the horse business, the exclusive distribution rights to sell. Memory Foam in the US. Why would he ever taken a risk like that? Like what it? It just seemed so implausible. That's really a good question. But I'd spent three days with him in and the Horse Chiropractor and we hit it off on a horse level because he was in the Horse Business in Sweden, okay and so he was like my. Swedish alter ego was like Swedish spirit animal right. Yeah, and so he got comfortable with me as a person I guess wow and number two. He wanted to control it. He didn't want to have some company. In the US that is going to have their own ideas. He had a certain idea in his head of how he wanted this to play out, and he knew he figured anyway he could control me. which he could and so we had a collaboration, we worked together. Talk to him every day for twelve years basically did, and he didn't even do any due diligence like you could have been. You know you could have an axe murderer like he didn't really know much about you like you could have been. You know a horrible person like he just took this chance. He took a chance, but his ace in the hole was that I had to sell ten thousand mattresses the first year. To maintain exclusivity. How did you raise the money to start this venture at all? Well, that's another really good question. Because now I had to go back to all my basic same people who had invested with me in these yearly and partnerships. We raced in Europe and my other horse ventures Had failed and gone broke so I had it convinced them that, even though we lost money in something that I knew a lot about that, we were going to make money in something that I knew nothing about. Like. What was your pitch? He said Hey guys I know where this horse thing didn't work out, but I'm getting into mattresses or memory foam and I need your money and did any of them say. Are you out of your mind? While my dad know he gave me fifty grand or something and my mom did too and. They just did it because. You're the censure. But the rest of them. I think they did it because they were comfortable with me, but be when they encountered the product, they had the same emotional reaction that I did when I first encountered it, and this would include the first guy who invested Dave fog I had met only a few months earlier. told him the whole story. He said we'll bring me over the product, so brought an overlay over to his house. He was January and it was freezing, and one of the unique properties of the material is at. It freezes solid as a board at fifty degrees Fahrenheit. That's the temperature sensitivity sold the the mattress froze on the way over today. And so I come in carrying this overlay and. Luckily that he had a fire going in the fireplace, so I said, let's just. On this over here for for for a while, and we can chat and he's okay, and so we talked about it and I'm Kinda eyeing the mattress to see if it looks like it's uncurling so anyway. Did thaw out and he? Really liked it, and you wrote me out a check. So I think that's the answer to the question of product kept bailing us out. Mikel Magnusson came over I told him I'm going to raise the money, but can you help me so sure? So he came over. We met him in Chicago. And we went over to my uncle bill's house and we showed him. The mattress told the story. He could see that. You know Michael was really wasn't some. You know frankly fictitious guy. 'cause Uncle Bill had lost a lot of money in my early in partnerships K.. So uncle bill he goes into the back room. He comes out. Ten minutes later, a has me a check for fifty thousand dollars, so I am just absolutely overjoyed. said, thank you so much. Michael and I left. I dropped Michael off at O'hare. He went back to stock home. I got in my car and drove back to Lexington, and on the way home I stopped at a fast food restaurant. So the next morning with Saturday morning. and. I get a call. I'm dead asleep nine thirty and his uncle bill. And, he said he calls Me Rob and he says rob. I got a phone call from Connie. At a Burger King in Lebanon Indiana who said she found a check for fifty thousand dollars on the floor. There's no possible way, so I'm going through my pants, pockets and my coat and I said Oh. My Gosh and I thought bill was going to say you know. Maybe my money's not so safe with you after all. And then he said can I- overnight. You another check, wow! I said okay. Okay. Yeah, thanks! Wow Uncle Bill God. Bless him. All right, so you are now. gets money you got you got to sell ten thousand of these overlay mattresses How did you do? we were supposed to ten thousand mattresses the first year and we sold Seventy So we missed the goal by nine, thousand, nine, hundred and thirty. When we come back in just a moment, how Bobby Trestle managed to keep his company alive after selling just seventy mattresses I'm Garros in you're listening to how I built this from NPR..

Uncle Bill Horse Business Michael Sweden US Horse Chiropractor bill Connie Europe Mikel Magnusson Chicago Bobby Trestle Indiana Dave NPR Lexington rob
"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:15 min | 4 months ago

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

"Know I just decided okay. If people come to me with ideas I'm just going to say yes. And my French Horse Trainer Alana lured. He called me and he said one day. I know a Swedish horse chiropractor. Who knew accompanying Sweden that makes an air cleaner that can clean the horses stalls. Oh look an air purifier, right? It was a actually a negative ionizer with kind of ZAP. It was APP the air. And so my friend, Allen said. This Swedish horse chiropractor wants me to sell it in France. And he said I'll go in better. I know someone will sell it for you in the states. So I started. A company called Nylon. In it turned out to be the worst company. Because the product over there, it's two hundred twenty volts and he'll be here. It's one ten, so the product has good here. We figure this out before you got them shipped over. No hell, no arsenal, sorry. My my market research was lacking. And then the retail price was five hundred dollars for these, and there were products on the market that were similar that were forty, nine, ninety five. Who can make the exact same claims right? You purify the air right? Plus the company was owned by a guy in Sweden. Who is probably the only guy in Sweden? Who doesn't speak one word of English? So could not communicate with them. No so he would send me faxes in Swedish. And I would have to take them the University of Kentucky and get them translated. And when I talked to him on the phone, I had to use an at and T. language line operator and each call cost me three hundred dollars. So. This was like the worst company with the worst product over ten times. The price of should be. And so, this was going nowhere fast, but I had to go to Paris in October of ninety one. Because I had horses over, there know still kind of in the business and the Swedish horse. Chiropractor said Call Mesa's bobby. You have to come to Sweden while you're in Europe. I said why he said there's another company. It's a mattress by that you have to come. See this mattress and His name was CGI says CG. I don't WanNa. Hear anymore of your Swedish crazy Swedish. Connections but I still said okay. I'm in yes. Mode I went to Paris and I got on a plane and went to Stockholm and I met him, and he me to guy by the name of Michael. Magnusson and that changed my life. WHO's Mikel Magnusson Mikel? Magnusson is the guy he his stepbrother dog land, vic own the manufacturing company, which developed the first tempurpedic products. and. He told me that they had just launched it in Sweden the previous month and that they wanted to go worldwide with it launched wet. What wasn't well? It was a three inch overlaid like a three inch mattress pad. E, yeah, exactly, it's temperature sensitive, so it distributes the pressure over wider areas, so it was breakaway. You could put your hand on it it. It would make a handprint. Take your hand off, and there would slowly come back to where it was. Did you ask him about it? Like? Where did it come from? How did they invented? How what WH- was this thing? Yeah, it was originally invented by NASA for the Space Program to cushion. The astronauts from G. Forces, and since it was A. Public thing US government invention you as government. There wasn't a patent on it. It was freely alienable and my Swedish. France bought a company in Denmark. Called Dan. Foam and they made it better and reproducible and more durable, and the idea was. Let's turn this into a mattress to sleep on their idea from the beginning. No, that was the weird thing is they really didn't know what the head they had? This squishy squishy foam was slow comeback and They had originally been interested in for football helmets. But. They made some. Overlays and they put them in a home. In Copenhagen and they were thinking, maybe it would be good for bedsores and the reports that got back, is it yes indeed it helped people who had bedsores and the other thing they heard though anecdotally was. Hey the people who had back pain, said it helped their back, and so that's when they said Hey, like we got something like a mattress like for sleeping. Go like a mattress. That's when they launched it in Sweden and that's when I met them. You're in Sweden meeting with this guy Michael Magnusson. And as you say, he's, he's looking to take this mattress foam worldwide so. So had like what would you do? How did you decide that you wanted in so i? Stayed as houses slept on a mattress, and I woke up and he said well, you think I said this is the most amazing product I've ever encountered. I'm interested. And, when I came home after my first Swedish trip. I told Martha I, said Sweetie. We're in the mattress business. And what did she say? She said Okay but can you change the baby? I mean it is remarkable. Right? You do this overnight. You're overnight Michael's house and you sleep on this thing and you wake up and you're just thinking man. That was amazing. I WanNa Sleep Lakers every single night. And so right in the nature I. WanNa work with you or you just said. Hey, this is kind of cool. Can we keep talking well given my. Position in life. I was more forceful than that I said I'm interested I want to get involved if possible way. And he said well. We WanNA. Go worldwide with it. We have nobody in the states. So, why don't you go back? Can write me a marketing plan. And We'll. See I said. Okay so I did so. I went home and. wrote a marketing plan has some help with some. Old. High School friends who eventually came on to work for us and we wrote, which is perhaps the worst marketing plan. Ever written and what was your plan like? You said? We're going to sell it here. We're GONNA destroy their. Like what did you? What was your pitch to them? We said we're going to sell this in truck stops. Because! because. It's only three inches thick. We thought it would fit great into the back of the cabs of the semis because they sleep in like that. That sort of elevated part of the cab, right truck drivers to yeah. We thought it would go perfect in there, and we also going to put an ad in the chiropractor. Directory. So anyway that was it and He came over Michael came over in late ninety one, and we met them in Milwaukee and he I negotiated that he would give me exclusive. North American distribution rights for his products in exchange for in exchange for two things number one I had to finance it because he said we don't have money to finance you. You have to raise your own money. How much did you have to raise Undefined but I was supposed to raise. What is needed so I raised about five hundred thousand dollars. Wow, the other condition was we had to sell ten thousand mattresses the first year in order to maintain exclusivity. Yeah, and so I, said sure you know both those two things. Let me just let me just interrupt us for for a SEC bobby, ANA. Forgive me for this, but. I just I'm just trying to get into the head of Mikel Magnusson. He is a a Swedish die. Who is starting.

Sweden Michael Magnusson Mikel Magnusson Mikel Swedish Mikel Magnusson France Paris WanNa Allen University of Kentucky Europe Nylon NASA Stockholm Milwaukee US football Martha I Dan
"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:26 min | 4 months ago

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

"Said I want to work on the racetrack and. He? Said You can stay over the barn. Only one problem is we have the mattress frames came up from our Florida division, but we don't have the the actual mattresses yet. So I said okay. That's fine so anyway. I slept on the springs for two weeks until the other horses in the mattresses came up from. A who would have thought twenty years later? You would have been sleeping on a beautiful tempur-pedic mattress. Yeah, and an amazing gift back. We'll get there. We'll get hold our horses. So this is the this mid-seventies you start working at. Belmont, and what? What was your job? There I started out as a hot walker making seventy five dollars a week. It's hot walker. A hot walker is a guy who walks hots and Hotz Har- horses that come from their morning. Workout and they're. They're sweaty and hot, and you need to walk them in a circle for about thirty minutes and make sure any water them off slowly. So you make sure that they don't drink too much water because that can make him sick, and then because what I wanted to do was be a groom. A Groom made one hundred, twenty five a week, and they assigned you three horses that were totally yours to take care of to brush to clean and rush into cleaner feet, and to put bandages on them and. Feed them and take care of him shooting effort, but but. The thing you really wanted to do trainer, yeah trainers, what I wanted to do right but I did leave. New York after two years and went to Chicago and my dad bought me a really really really slow racehorse for like fifteen hundred bucks, and so it got me my trainer's license, and I got in the game and ENDED UP TRAINING my first winner was at keeneland where where's Keeneland Keelan is the racetrack in Lexington in Kentucky and Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky presumably where like the great horses are are trained. It's the horse breeding capital of the world right great, so this is like I guess you're sort of hitting up against the early eighties. You're probably close to thirty years old at that time. Were you married at that point? No, you're single guy. Single guy focused on horses single minded single. Okay, so you're in Lexington Kentucky and I guess I guess your career horse racing really begins to take off at that point right right? Yeah I got a job at gains way farm and I had studied pedigrees, while I was on my racetrack adventure, and became something of an expert, and they needed that, and that was the best move. I ever made in my young life because. I was soon involved in racing at a very high level instead of a Horse that my dad bought me for fifteen hundred dollars. We were bind. Kentucky Derby favors for ten million dollars a month before the race. Wait one horse for ten million dollars. Yeah and that horse his name is proud appeal, and eventually ran last in the Derby, but it was quite an experience and. We also had significant interest in in European racing. We were just as interested in who. was going to win the English Derby or the French Derby or the Irish Derby, as we wore the Kentucky Derby because we were looking for stallion prospects, and so I spent a lot of time I went over following horses that we had made major investments. At what point because I guess it was point you sort of branched out of one on your own and start your own like horse. Lending or insurance startup right that was in so that gains way from seventy nine through eighty six, and then I decided to go out on my own with Jim Philpott. The in house counsel for Gains Way and basically you would be advising trainers, unlike which horses to buy and sell things like that absolutely, so we started talent management services to do the same thing. We did a gauge way, but do it remotely for farms that couldn't afford to have that infrastructure. And then we also had a company called thoroughbred advisory group, which vies people on other horse related transactions. And that was a very good idea, but very bad timing, because the horse business started to go into recession. If, this is in the in the late eighties. Whoever's in the late eighties? Yeah? Prices started going down. And essentially everybody went broke including you including me like. How did you go well I? Was I felt like I? Was the brokest man in America because you know. I did get married when I was thirty four in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, and so by this time fast forwarding to nineteen ninety one, I had two little kids, and we moved to a better location for kids than my downtown townhouse but I couldn't sell the first house, so two houses two kids. To mortgage is and no job. Did you have to declare bankruptcy. No one ever did I owed everybody in town, but everybody else would everybody to so everybody knew that that suing isn't going to really help and the big joke was. If if one guy can come up with ten thousand dollars, he could pay a million dollars in debt. 'cause person would pay B. and B. would pay see and we'll come back around today. So how how how badly in debt were you? Probably a million dollars in debt. So how did you pay your bills? You your? Your Business Goes Bust. You owe the bank to kids. House that you've a mortgage Japan another house that you are living in. A! How do you what do do? Well. it wasn't easy because I would go to my office and my secretary say Bobby we haven't paid the rent in a couple of months in the landlord was down here and they're good. They're going to turn off the Trinity and then I would go home and my wife would tell me the same thing you know. The Gas Company called and so I Really didn't know what to do I would. Get in the mail I would get. Pre approved credit cards going. You're pre approved for twenty five thousand dollar line of credit. And I would say you're really stupid. I would take them up on it because we would charge groceries onto the credit card. Always, figuring that things are going to turn around. But this was the period of my life, where I fell back onto my roots, Mike Catholic education, and I started going to Sunday mass with my wife when we got married she really you know, move me up quite a bit, but you know I still kinda going through the motions So I kinda rolled up my sleeves and went to church and started going to weekday. Masses, and literally just prayed. That guy would show me what to do and I said it doesn't have to be in the horse business. You.

Kentucky Derby Kentucky Lexington Kentucky Irish Derby Hotz Har first house Florida Keeneland Keelan Lexington Belmont Japan Jim Philpott Chicago America secretary New York Bobby
"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:24 min | 4 months ago

"pedic" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey, everyone before we start the show just WANNA. Let you know that will be back online this week with our. How I built this resilience series over the past few months I've been having live conversations with business leaders about how they've been coping. During these Tumultuous Times. You can join us every Tuesday and Friday at noon. Eastern nine am Pacific by visiting the how I built this facebook page or twitter account or on NPR's youtube? Youtube page and be sure to bring your questions for the guests and hope to see you there and one more really quick thing how I built. This isn't just a podcast, but it is also now a book..

Fishing for New Drugs

The Bio Report

07:18 min | 8 months ago

Fishing for New Drugs

"The Glass Marine Genomics Institute is seeking to harness biotechnology to discover new therapeutics by studying the DNA of marine life. At the same time the institute hopes to breathe new life into a photo fishing village that houses it and create new opportunities there. We spoke to Andrew Bogner Science director at the Gloucester Marine genetics institute about marine biotechnology the ocean as a source of novel. Therapeutics and the Institute's efforts to transform the economy along Cape Ann Andrew. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. We're GONNA talk about grouse Marine Genomics Institute. The potential the ocean represents a source of new Madison Institute operates. It seems Jaji is Michigan is as much economic is in his scientific. Perhaps you could begin with talking a little about the town of where your base and how the institute came about sure Mcgraw date will this court. In America Foundation nearly four hundred years ago and it's economy is principally shortened fishing industry So but declined temperature. Fishing Industry over the last several decades has really had a negative impact on the local economy and they call me if the region for GMT I really from discussions between micro scientists missing union leader as well as governor officials. Who really wanted to do something to catalyze new economic opportunities for Gloucester and for the KPMG area All at the same time remaining true to the rich maritime history of the region The ruling was different. Twenty-first-century technologies and specifically to novel technologies to see for new discoveries that impact either fisheries are human health GMT. I is not nonprofits Research and education institute not two thousand thirteen and what's the mandate for Jim? Gee I what does it seek to do? Beyond research along the lines of economic development as I see our mission is really to conduct World Class Marine research which extends regional autonomy and our strategy really has three components. The first is to establish a research institute powered by genomics to uncover new discoveries that impact tissues and human how the second part is to create a really vibrant science community in and around officer. And so this is actually encompasses a number of things Which is attracting scientists who trump to Gloucester for collaborative research and conferences occupancy? Translational research generates opportunities to form spin out companies as well as attracting other research and biotech entities to smoking in Gloucester order. Support is growing. Science community are expanding researches if you really need a train. Local workforce in the third part of our strategy is actually one of education. We're training Well if I were training the next generation of Asia There are white ship. Education program is called the blog Gloucester Biotechnology Ademi and it's a nine month vocational training programs. You train recent. High school graduates become entry. Level lab technicians. Prepare them for jobs in the life science biotech industry. There are a number of drugs on the market today that are derived from marine organisms. There's a growing pipeline as well. Junji is not alone. In looking to marine life is a potential source of new drugs. How significant opportunity does the ocean represent as a place to find novel therapeutic? Sent to what extent this truly been explored pot. Well the ocean is largest reservoir of biodiversity on the planet and yet we know really only a fraction of their so tremendous opportunity for new discoveries and the sea And certainly genomics allows us to explore this fire diversity in a very cost effective and to go away so those really opened up a new era. She's covering from the sea. So you mentioned that there have been some marine drives Therapeutics and today third nine. Fda approved marine derived drugs on the market With indications such as Cancer Infectious Disease and education And these have had They have very unique chemical structures mechanisms of action and they'd show tremendous promise in their therapeutic areas. There's been a problem of discovery. Discovering new therapeutic because of the limited supply of starting material traditional drug discovery was based on harvesting organisms. Extracting their chemical testing now for us because many of the compounds were present in really low quantities in these organisms biomass. He's tons of violence in order to extract enough of these compounds to do experiments into tough there So it was a very cheap to call very expensive Process but now it's you know it can take a small sample of any organism liquids. Gino an have a blueprint for all of the chemical and biological capabilities of that organism. Now working from the seven zero you can have a look for other teens and violence and pedic gene pathways but maybe coating molecules with these potential had so really again. I think is opinion happened. New Era just every therapeutic something. That wasn't possible before how is size organized. What what's the roadmap for what you're seeking to do so I started. He is having a platform to address questions related to oceans and human health and we basically have three main program areas. My medicine and biotechnology is one. Inconsistent function houses the second and Fisheries Agriculture so third. So I'm officially side. Were doing as you think you now. To better understand populations of commercial fishing south and creating the next generation of tools to better assess population structure and also the house of Aquatic Animals For the ecosystem function and how program or using genetic to explore the diversity and function of marine environment and developing news. You know tools to assess ecosystem south and function And Response to natural and man-made environment and on the biomedical side were exploring the oceans vast biodiversity a focus on marine microbes to identify novels. Dna. Who's an organism For applications for other applications in biotechnology on also creating the next generation of Genomic To dance marine animals as models for medical research and our focus is on long list. Us resistant animals.

Glass Marine Genomics Institut Gloucester Gloucester Marine Genetics Ins Grouse Marine Genomics Institu Marine Drives Therapeutics Gloucester Biotechnology Ademi World Class Marine Andrew Bogner Science Cape Ann Andrew Madison Institute Kpmg Director Jaji America Foundation Asia Junji JIM Michigan Officer
Vegan #VanLife and the Freedom of Living in the Back of Your Car

No Meat Athlete Radio

10:20 min | 9 months ago

Vegan #VanLife and the Freedom of Living in the Back of Your Car

"So what does it? What does it actually mean to live? Live because right now. You're in Colombia. Right so you're not in the van. But what what does van let me into you so I think it means a lot. I mean people defined differently. Some people define it as like only if your fulltime twelve months a year. I'm kind of doing this. Hybrid thing where. I'm traveling half the year in the wintertime mostly in Latin America lately and in summertime. I'm going back up to Alaska and essentially living in my van so I am fulltime when I'm in Alaska. We'll get like a an AIRBNB every every mother's son until I do my laundry or maybe stay with a friend here and they're passing through somewhere but I'm pretty much fulltime while I'm up there so I would call that you know. Maybe some purists disagree but I also encountered a lot of people are up in Alaska that we're doing a little different versions lighter version. That what I was doing where they really Nice van setup. They still had a partner house and they would use it to. Do you know long weekend trips in the middle of nowhere and can use it as a like a little little getaway kind of house and they weren't doing it full time and I consider them van lifing also. So yeah. That's how I broadly defined yeah. I think so the two people that I knew who have sprinter vans or super fans are yes a part time. They're when they're going away for the weekend. Camping suitably bringing a camping tent and all that stuff kind of drive their van right and take their van and kind of do it for the weekend or or week long trips but still have a house that they're coming back to during the week and that's that's kind of like I have this longtime vision of myself having a pickup truck that I've converted in like Vaca so not like the whole thing but like a pickup truck the converted where I could drive the trail head or drive to a race and spend the night in my truck and then wake up and go do some epic adventure so I. I think that. I think it's super cool. That people live fulltime in the van. And you do for months at a time. I think that as amazing but I also think that it's a super awesome idea to just use what you have what can and converted and be able to kind of get away for the weekend. Yeah sorry when I told you that I didn't like free. Solo knows good because lived in his van cooking in their sleeping in there. Okay so that's why it's did. I see that's what I said more or less enough recorded somewhere. That guys ban life again. Yes he is. Yeah all right. So there's a whole spectrum you know like what what you were just describing Douglas into the weekend thing it's like it's kind of like glorified car camping but instead of attendance to your you got a nice little set up in the back so you know setting campaign breaking down campus where easier just go back and it can also look like it can also look very different too. I mean I don't like school. Easer thing right where. They converted a short school bus. Oh man that's kind of space so I I was in a much smaller vehicle. That would feel almost like too big if I had that much. Swear finisher what's the difference between this and normal are being where you just get an RV. That's made design with all. These bathrooms turn into kitchens and all that kind of stuff like is is. Is there a difference? Yes so now okay. So the way I I learned quite a bit about the differences as I got into a more so I kind of assumed that it was kind of all the same. Like like like you're saying And then I realized that the the The van life thing is more about being nimble and move it around a lot you know on a whim whereas when you're in this big lumbering. Rv PLAN PLAN. A lot more Book spots at a time. If you don't know the area You know parking forty eight foot vehicle small ones so my dad for example has like this printer. Sil- RV where it's still whatever classified as you still can drive it into cities on that but it's different because these in my limited view. It seems different because that you kind of pay for like all these. You know well-designed and often expensive things that that make your. I mean it sounds to me like the van. Life is more about putting together a situation from from an old then. Is that It's it's I mean you can definitely go and spend half a million dollars very well outfitted you know like you know quote Unquote Sprinter van. That's still technically a Van. But it seems to be more kind of do it yourself Kind of people and you could still sky's the limit I I've I've seen people. Have you know the soaking tubs in the back of their of their vans and hence the craziest stuff? But my mind's much more rustic kind of basic set up one day one day. Do you have aspirations for soaking? Tobin back you've been you know that's a little much I'd be happy with a bathroom and shower. Let's let's talk about the logistics because all right so if you if you were to look on instagram and look search the Hashtag or or just do some of the van life youtube videos. I mean like you said there are some people who have pimped out there and I mean just spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to get just looking really really sharp and really fancy is the average person who is living in a van. Because I know that you guys You were telling us in Colorado that sometimes you park and there'd be a bunch of other people who were had their like are most people really living that luxurious life inside of van or is it is it typically pretty basic very very basic so the the pictures you see of the really fancy ones on instagram. That's that's pretty rare. I mean I'm definitely encountering some pretty awesome vans and house roaming around in Alaska but for the most part they're pretty beat up You know people doing it on. A budget You know there's always some like rich retirees that have some brand new rig that everyone's checking out but for the most part it's it's that's not that's not the usual singer encountering the other thing that I found. That was interesting when I when I was getting into this and deciding. Do I go for a really small setup or do for bigger sprinter van? Everybody that I talked to all the videos I watched. Everyone said that they wished they had gone more basic and smaller in a there. I kind of go at it. They they took on too much and they shouldn't have you know they. They didn't show they didn't need kitchen. And all the all these other things that you think are critical so that that was like I heard that so much. They've really stuck in my head like man. Maybe I should just start with something small. Make sure that like. I don't hate this. Do it for season or to understand how. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa van life and have a better idea of what would be appropriate for me so I was really happy. I did that because Even okay so my initial plan. Before I went up there was I was going to get like a sprinter van. Like a big cargo. Van De could stand up in Puts BILL SHOWER AND BATHROOM DECENT SIZE? Little kitchen queen size bed. Everything and I ended up getting a minivan which seems like a pretty pretty big step down but I'm really glad I did because I I actually ended up outfitting. The minivan too much like within a couple of weeks started getting rid of tons of stuff. So yeah it was really. It's kind of like you guys. Were talking with my couple weeks about living in the minimalist lifestyle as you kind of get more into it you realize like I don't even like why did I buy a two burner camp stove. That's ridiculous excess. Lead one little little things like that So yeah I'm glad I went really small because I mean besides just you know being stealthy in Alaska is not really relevant. Nobody cares you can earn. Its little state as a campground just purview. On and for the most part nobody bothers you but it was really nice just nimble and small like if I had a bigger sprinter or a bigger RV. I couldn't pull him to some of the towns and just feel confident that I could find a spot that no one would bug me. That was really nice And I wasn't worried about putting gas of women. I would drive to three hours. The other side of the state to the weather was better. You know it's like I got a minivan hookers couple of gallons of gas definitely urge anyone that's thinking about doing this like you need way less than you think you do like everyone. I talked to was like. Oh I absolutely can't live without a flushing toilet. I can't live without this long list of stuff and then at the end of the day you realize like I was barely using any of these things that I thought were critical and then yeah I mean what what. My setup looked like at the end of last summer versus the beginning. It was lot less. Clutter much fewer things. Just life was a lot simpler and so on on that note as far as practical things I mean you you talked about how you we're GONNA get one to have the kitchen and all that but it does like you didn't get one has a kitchen. You're you're somebody tell you my whole setup broke. It's very very particular about food. But but so. The setup was super simple. I ended up building half a day with a buddy of mine that lives up in Alaska and just to be clear. Like I am not handy at all like I. I don't own any power tools or whatever I built a super basic a bed platform. That's you know. Raise up about eight inches and then I got some big like plastic tupperware sal bins that slide imperfectly underneath that platform. Carbonated that platform put a like a three inch thick tempur-pedic mattress on top of that and that was pretty much it. I just had a had storage underneath the entire bed which was more than enough Half of it was my food. Half was my clothes and gear and then I had a little like a cooler that Kind of wedged into the fronts behind the driver's and that was pretty much it and then You know a lot of the same kind of cooking gear that you would have. If you're camping side. Like a big seven gallon. Water Jug cooking. Camping stove miscellaneous pots and pans and That was much my whole

Alaska Van De VAN Airbnb Colombia Latin America Instagram Sil- Rv Partner Douglas Tobin Colorado
"pedic" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"pedic" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Temper Pedic mattress you may have tested one out of the store or see where those commercials where the people are jumping up and down on the bed next to a glass of red wine that does not scale well either way you probably know that Tempur Pedic is where these wishy mattresses that feels strangely firm and soft at the same time with this memory foam that molds itself to your body and today of course plenty of other mattresses and pillows have memory foam but back when Bobby Trussell first launch Tempur Pedic in the US it was a completely new idea a new sensation Bobbi did not invent memory foam in fact when he discovered it on a trip to Sweden he knew absolutely nothing about phone nothing about mattresses even making a living in an industry that couldn't be more different horse racing and horse breeding yes you heard that correctly the guy who brought Tempur Pedic to America eight two and a half billion dollar company today was a horse breeder but actually here at the time he discovered memory foam he was also shall we say desperately in need of a new gig and so what Bobby did was to see the incredible potential in a new kind of mattress and then he basically gambled everything to launch it in the US Seoul grew up in Milwaukee in the nineteen sixties and was the oldest of seven kids Stadtwerke sales and his mom was a homemaker and Bobby worked odd jobs from the time he was a kid paper routes and things like that but when he was eleven years old something happened that changed the course of his entire life when my dad was I think early forties he went on a vacation with my uncle and they rode some horses and he came back and he said I think I'm gonna bio riding.

Tempur Pedic Bobby Trussell US Bobbi Sweden America Bobby Seoul Milwaukee billion dollar eleven years
"pedic" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"pedic" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I want to our correspondent w w blue is today. I suppose you are to actually he's at a clock factory. Now two o'clock factory. And while he blew when you lose they gave a clock. And all around the clock he could probably hear live tequilla background fleeing Pedic. Type. Have we talked with one of the park you that RV Feb? We live this fellow right over here. What is that you're doing with the watches out? My job is wine. Eight. A little quickly but for an in the law by hand that's right teams don't do dwell time clock. One of our make fact at the fire and the family. Rome. Of the clock. Yeah. Many times. They say that to you're going say that police into this. This lot breath. All. That's right. Takhar Milan that we working on now and this is tigger.

Takhar Milan Rome Pedic
"pedic" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"pedic" Discussed on The Science Show

"Off the dogs if I do come into the pedic's. And also exclusion fencing is probably way, a lot of people hitting now to provide an extra lawn of defense and a barrier. Some of these dogs, getting in the first place, rule baiting is still their primary method of control, but the wall dogs and how to manage the problem is controversial, and it's causing quite a bit of conflict in the community. Landholder, Malcolm Healey. We've got a lot of people. That's I we only run cows. It doesn't worry us. We've got a lot of people that we don't wanna bite 'cause it kills ninety animals. I think a lot of people haven't done, they raise public tonight, eighty because the founding a lot of native vegetation, isn't it? So after all animals yes to that. Yup. So a lot of animals ninety animals are used to it. So I think the awareness obtain ID should be made more clear that it doesn't affect the ninety animals as bad as people think, and it's cheap is to Cohen. Platinum is also aware of the conflict caused by the wild dogs. It's forming cracks night. They're doing ghost. I'm Mike, having troubles with dogs and out of on by the, the effort in Varese. That is starting to devote the community. Everyone can say that. And the some people that are concerned about the animal welfare issues that peps some of the management strategies are cruel to the animals. There is a, a section of the community. That's concerned that the animal welfare issues as far as controlling the dogs anyone who's had built attacks. He's not insane because I've seen what the dogs do, I think, as far as in welfare, and guys, if you ever had the shirt shape at the war in Iran bag in Iran Karan will fare. The Bill doesn't India on lightly. There's always gonna be some people that have virgins to award. Guess I could have versions to any of those control methods just talked about biting, his typically the one that people may be concerned a bit. I think there's probably a bit of misinformation that these often during in the community about how the bytes work and how to fix the animals. And the fact that it doesn't impact on other ninety Spacey's which we some will, obviously believe that it does all the research has concluded that bicycle there's no evidence at ten ID calls pine to the animal die, lock it to an epileptic fit for a person. And so, I guess visually it could look somewhat distressing. But yeah, there's no evidence that it actually causes pine to the animal. So we have to just work off that worked at the research is done to undertake this, and what about trapping that seems quite upsetting for people to look, trappings oversee changed over the years. The old steal your traps, which many people would think about when we talk about trapping. Look, dyes are actually banned in New South Wales now so we utilize a couple of different types of trips, but all of those traps have jaws on them. So that if a dog is coordinate, obviously doesn't cutting today leg in just holds them firmly, but it doesn't cause pine to the animal. So Iran will have a different opinion. But I'll guess way. Hyping waken disorder. Tron try the damage that firstly the dogs are causing and the wise that we're dealing with them and hell obviously, as control methods can be humane, and we're always sort of Toronto address the welfare of animals. If onto Tyke and trapping programs, for example. So realize look at those things Alice to Gordon Smith. There are also concerns in the community about.

Mike Iran pedic Landholder Malcolm Healey Toronto Cohen Varese Spacey India Alice New South Wales Gordon Smith Karan
"pedic" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"pedic" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"So as wondering if you could speak to that science little bit, and what's being done in that area. Thank you. Sure. So ketamine is not exactly a psychedelic. It's actually in Pedic and. And it has been used in seizure for a long time, and it's actually a relatively safe anesthetic less impact on the cardiovascular system, doesn't depress it as much as other some other energetics do. It was discovered that at lower doses than the one that knocks, you out, you have an experienced that some people describe the second delicate experience and it kind of separation of, of self. And that, that has is being used to treat depression. The drug is approved as an anesthetic, and that means the doctors can prescribe it off label for other things legally and that's happening. They're legal ketamine clinics in the city and around the country. And there's a lot of excitement in the Seki Trich community about it. I don't I didn't write about at great length. I really did. I don't write about MD may that much either. I really I live at myself to the to the so-called classic psychedelics in this book, because they share a history and they share a neuroscience. There was a kind of logic to it. And I didn't want it was already four hundred pages. So but ketamine is very interesting. And it appears that it doesn't last that the, the treatment needs to be administered again, I don't know how often there's, there's a very good article by very fine journalist named moist, Alaska's men off that's in the current or the last issue wired. So if you wanna learn more about ketamine that's a good place to start. Also ketamine conference coming to the bay believe in. Yeah. So I don't know the details of it, but if you Google the ketamine conference in November. I think you'll find it. So If I if were I were you. you just wanted to ask the light to a lot of D in the sixties, and it was a whole trip, get all this trip with Timothy Leary. But I wanted to know the difference when you're taking it in therapy, can you explain a little bit about, what's the difference about taking a trip at home and, and going to therapy like for the PTSD, and that's a great question. So the big difference, is that you are. That you're having more of an internal trip. So in all these trials, and this is also common among underground guides. You wear is shades which too many people who have lots of experience, tripping outdoors, concert, seems like a really weird idea and you're indoors and you're lying down. And you're listening to music on headphones usually headphones on always headphones. And both the music is meant to block out the rest of the environment, but it also has a positive function, and the I shade to our to limit distraction, and they basically encourage you to go inside. So you, you have a very different to the extent that there's, there's a kind of interest Ikic movie that unrolls unfurled during the cyclic trip. That's very much created by your external environment. If you're walking around, and you don't have an your and your eyes are open. But when your eyes closed you just go somewhere else, and your imagination take. Over. And you, you are more likely to say visit your cancer, if you're a cancer, patient, or have deal with repressed memories and things will come up..

ketamine Seki Trich Timothy Leary Pedic Alaska Google PTSD depression Ikic
"pedic" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"pedic" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Only drop of love and compassion. They got was from a working animal who hopped on their lap and licked their faces by the time Earl was through. He was writing a check we have to remember what is collated with. Yes. Sure. Absolutely give to aids research. But keep in mind when somebody's coming at you for animals there there is that bonding that went on and they deserve the same recognition you see. And so they do so much for us. They keep people alive. They uplift us. They find people on the canines for warriors another group mostly I would say what we do especially at actors another mostly we do education, we need to teach people remind people I was just in touch with these people who are they want me to illustrate a book about how to care for your pet and step by step. And so and we've chosen a well, it's the wrong name. But a pit bull. That's not their real name Staffordshire terrier, not their real name. But that's how they're known, and it's bad press. And we're going to try to also fix that language is very important. For example. We take. We say we say animal companions. We don't even say pet companions misnomer. Absolutely. Like, I never say I I'm smiley zone, or I always Sam Smellie's person. I miss person. Yes. Or his or his human? Thank you so much for sharing all this beautiful wisdom and sharing your beauty here today. We're so happy you're here at global Pedic. So thank you for joining us beautiful day cube by everybody by so many amazing people here for pets with great missions and products as a twenty eighteen global pedic's though we met the adopt a pet service and pets in the classrooms..

Earl Pedic Sam Smellie
"pedic" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"pedic" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And licked their faces by the time Earl was through. He was writing a check we have to remember what is collated with. Yes. Sure. Absolutely give to aids research. But keep in mind when somebody's coming at you for animals, you know, there there is that bonding that went on and they deserve the same recognition you see. And so absolutely. They do so much for us. Yes, they keep people alive. They uplift us. They find people on the canines for warriors is another group mostly I would say what we do especially at actors and others mostly we do education, we need to teach people remind people I was just in touch with these people who are they want me to illustrate a book about how to care for your pet and step by step. And so and we've chosen a well, it's the wrong name. But a pit bull. That's not their real name Staffordshire terrier, not their real name. But that's how they're known, and it's bad press. And we're going to try to also fix that just letting which is very important. For example. We take. We say we say animal companions. We don't even say pet companions misnomer. Absolutely. Like, I never say I I'm smiley zone, or I always say, I'm Smellie's person. I miss person. Yes. Or his or his human? Loretta. Thank you so much for sharing all this beautiful wisdom and sharing your beauty here today. We're so happy you're here at global Pedic. So thank you for joining us beautiful. Thank you. Bye everybody by so many amazing people here for pets with great missions and products as a twenty eighteen global pedic's though we met the adopt a pet service and pets in the classrooms..

Earl Pedic Loretta Smellie
This backpack holds your wallet, laptop and DOG

Let's Talk Pets

04:46 min | 2 years ago

This backpack holds your wallet, laptop and DOG

"And I'm still at the global pedic's though was super smiley. And I'm sitting inside a silver airstream with Gordy spader the founder of curb go. Hi, gordon. Hi, how are you doing? Great to have you guys in here. I five this is crazy. Make sure everyone understands an airstream. This is from the nineteen fifties or something this particular one is from nineteen sixty nine so and it's a lightweight trailer. This one happens to be twenty feet long. They call it the land yacht, and we bought it about I don't know how many years ago maybe five or eight years ago and renovated the inside of it puts a my Kia cabinets in it. And it's the kitchen has gone the, but it's really meant as a trade show booth. Only is so cute and it's silver outside. It looks like silver aluminum, it is it looks like I'm a little retro spaceship or somewhat hundred percent. It's very rich. It's very eye catching people know us for the airstream. And and they really love the cute. And the reason you have this probably is because your brand is all about pet trout. That's right. So it's camping. It goes with getting out with your dog going places with your dog. So it's really all synergies they're together. So great, and Gordon I met several years ago through Toyota smiling, and I were spokes team for Toyota's. Safe pet travel, and you had all of your harnesses, tell us a little bit about your line. Yes. So the line really starts with traveling with your dog. Like, I said and really having your dog be say so how to protect your dog, and then how to protect your car. So she covers and things like that everything has a lifetime warranty. So it's really good quality. And then we've moved from there into carriers which will talk about in a little bit and other things for being outside with your dog. So that'd be like, really awesome leashes. And collars, things you really want like a run. Yeah. You really need their gadgets and gear and suffered being out with your dog. I love it. And and you've been on my show before we've talked about Curgel, many many times, lots of pictures 'cause I use your products in my car is a matter of fact, let me just say that smiley actually was in a car accident last April, and he was harnessed up. So that helped him not be as injured as badly as thank you. Thank you. That's what we love to hear. We love to hear the story. You know, the the hardest is are not expensive. Just a matter of getting in the habit of doing it. Right. Right. And I did another one of our dog is with the university of Georgia state farm was our sponsor in one of our tips was we had a cargo product that I talked about and then the ladies the state farm, ladies, they said keep them in the backseat harnessed up there. So that's awesome. That's good to hear. Yeah. So Gordy what? Caught my eye is this cool little backpack. This is the coolest thing what does this tell? So this is the g train using it ends a backpack for human cherry around dogs that are under eighteen pounds. It's a really awesome piece. I mean, it is it's really looks awesome. It's bright red. You can see it. Maybe they're on the picture, and it is has all kinds of things for keeping your dog in here. A little way to tether, the man it also has a place to store your laptop or your whatever else you're carrying with you. And it's got awesome straps. That are all padded to put over your shoulders. You can clip the straps, and you can put them in to make it more of a bag. And then it's got on the bottom. What we call our armor soul bottom, which is super lightweight. But also keeps water out from coming in. And it keeps water from if you have a leakage issue from going out onto the other. It looks like it's it's made like a bucket for lack of a better word. So if something were to spill inside it's not going to drip out all over your so far. Yeah. And it's got it'll go on an airplane. It's small and it's like a regular backpack. So be small enough to go on an airplane underneath see MRs. Just awesome people loving it here. Now, what is the name of this is called the G train G train? Awesome. And do you have a website also where people can go and look at these things. Sure. So this is a brand new item. So not quite out yet, but curb dot com. So that's K U R GO dot com dot com and everybody knows super spy are big fans were always promoting Kirkdale. And this is cool to this like a satchel that I love the material what is this? So this is a similar this also has an armor. So by this is a career style bag. So it's like a messenger bag that you put over your shoulder, and it has a strap to do that. And also buckle in the dog. This is also bright red and. Carrier. It's a dog hair. Yeah. Yeah. So the dog goes in here has a removable liner. So you can wash that if you happen to have an accident. And it's it's just a really nice piece as well. I love your products because they are so well thought out and do I remember correctly that your brother is an engineer who helps you design the yes. So my brother is an indus- who I found the business with is an industrial designer went to the Pratt institute in Brooklyn, New York. And so he's the designer had designer of all of our products.

Gordy Spader Gordon I Toyota Pratt Institute Founder University Of Georgia State Fa New York Smiley Brooklyn Engineer Curgel Kirkdale Eighteen Pounds Hundred Percent Eight Years Twenty Feet
"pedic" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

11:44 min | 2 years ago

"pedic" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"What's going on? Yeah. I'm calm about tempur-pedic mattress. What's wrong with it? I'm a part time. Arizona fulltime wrote a lot of people do that a couple of years ago ball, the Tempur Pedic mattress for three thousand five hundred dollars. Arizona. Yeah. And never felt never felt uncomfortable where they fight back out when was purchased a few years ago. How many years ago? Warranty. No, I understand that. But it's a ten year warranty on defects, not on if it's comfortable. So when did you buy it did you by how many years ago? Well, I have a man I guess I'm not going to get an answer. Two years ago. Okay. He'll just keep talking. Okay. Two years ago. And then tell me the defect Larry. Well, I miss her. Every single turned out. The mattress is a half inch higher on one side than it is on the other side. I don't think that's even determine a wall. And it bothers my back. So what I did is. I contacted the warranty. Larry how can you determine a half inch slope on a mattress? I mean, that's almost. Yeah. Yeah. And you put a straight edge across the mattress. Yeah. You measure the ruler from box spring. But decided the math. I would say that's almost within tolerance. You make sure I would say, that's almost within intolerant. I couldn't even believe that a half inch would bother you. So do they consider it a defect? Larry. Well, good. This went on and on Larry, they consider it a defect. So that's not covered by warranty after four days of emails and pictures. What what why did they say, I understand you wanna tell me about your pain and suffering? But why are they saying it's not covered by warranty? I don't know. They didn't give you all go ahead. They had me go through a lot of rations of foetal documents that you said that you said that already, but what does that have to do with their reasoning? So I need to get to the reasoning part as to why they say, it's not covered. Do you have a written warranty? You know, this is clearly workmanship defect a half inch sleeping on the floor. In my back, and they thought covered by warranty, and they lifted up after four days of have me documentary thing Larry is now the fourth time, you're telling you about your four days. I think you're more upset about the documentation. Then you are the final decision. Just for the record. Larry, you never have to mention again, the trouble you went through to document. You don't have to mention it. Again, we get it. And we get that. It's a pain in the ass. I get it. And I would be upset if I thought I had something defective. But I have to tell you that. It sounds weird to us and everyone I'm looking at everyone here. It sounds weird that four at half an inch. You're you're saying that is causing that much trouble. I don't know how one half inch across that wide of a mattress could cause back problems. In fact, Larry I venture to say it couldn't. I mean, I'm not with you on it. I'm just I'm giving you my opinion rather than lying to you. Maybe you simply don't like the match ups. I could especially feel it when I came from Denver came here because what really bothered because there was such a contrast in the mattress, I finally everything box springs, and I come up with a mattress from sleeping on the floor. Can you flip it Larry or put a Spicer a half inch? Yeah. No. It's too heavy to flip for myself. 'cause I lifted one side of the bed and put a half inch where underneath you. Sure. There's not a pea under there somewhere. No, I lifted the bed list. Underneath his head. That's on inside. Three thousand five hundred dollars for mattress have to check up to bed frame a half inch went for a mattress. What is through thirty five hundred thirty seven fifty. Well, so what I mean it sticks. You take any pictures? All types of pictures. I don't know what a picture would show. Here's the thing. I'm not gonna make you document anything. I want to be serious here. I don't want honest to God. Larry, I don't wanna make fun of you. But I'm gonna I'm gonna say this. There's no way. He I know you're looking for a reason therefore, you're hanging on this half inch. But there's no way that half inch is going to contribute this much misery to your back pain. I mean, what's wrong with your back? Do you have a diagnosis? Got seventy five years old. Oh. Okay. Here's the deal. I I think Mark was correct in saying you just don't like the mattress. So I understand you're trying to find a defect. So it's replaced. But. But I don't want no money back. I just like another mattress from five hundred dollars. I shouldn't have to Jack up the frame and put a half. You don't have to Jack up. You don't have to Jack up the frame. Yeah. But you didn't have to what I'm saying. Larry, it's not gonna help you one way or the understand. I mean, really I'm trying. I'm just try if you were my dad, or my well, you're actually old enough to be my brother here if I would say to you man, don't don't don't. I don't know what to tell you Larry. It's I think you're concentrating too much on it. I don't think another bed will make a difference about your back pain and your misery. I don't know what to tell the poor guy can how about this. Larry are there overlays, you can get, you know, those pillow those memory foam tops. You can put over a mattress. Now, they automatically adjust. So if there was a slope, your body would automatically. I mean, it would it would make it a just have you heard of those like two or three inches thick? Have you seen them? Probably no I fixed. It looks in the frame and Bill. Put a half inch would wedge on the left side of the mattress and mattresses, even and it's fine. It's still okay. You don't believe that a person can be bothered by heavy in slow from? No, not that much. The only reason why I went through all the region by the Disney, my pain, Larry, this my opinion, we're talking about a half inch. We're talking. Where I mean, a half inch for God's sakes on something that's pliable and soft. I mean, you can jump on it and shifted and probably get that half inch to fluff up. I mean, it's that I don't I can't help him. I can't oh, what am I gonna do? I'm gonna fight for a replacement mattress. I can't do it. Larry. I can. I mean, does anyone have an opinion on this? I think you get a pillow top take all those wedges outta there. Not a pillow top though that memory foam top. I'm astonished that that mattress just the mattress costs thirty seven fifty. I'm astonished by I had no idea they should that come with the box spring and everything or just a mattress that's the place with a box spring and everything and the headboard headboard of frame, right? No, no. It's the mattress and box springs. Okay. Under cloudy mattress quiz on a lot of mar Mark they're expensive nowadays. You know, the ones that come in a small package now casper, you know, and I bought one they they roll up there in a small package about yea big there's good as a big ones. Right. Oh my God. And then you let him out and then over a day they fill up with air naturally. Just sells filling and they're very comfortable, very comfortable and they're perfectly cut. How much was it? That was about one hundred twenty bucks. Yeah, they're cheap. And they're good now. Gary was rear ended by an Uber. Oh that can be dangerous. Now are. Matt Matt is going to leave John's going to stay with us. We've been talking about my money evolution. If we have to get a message across it's really talking about what I talked about before in an orchestra or with your money. You're not going to add instruments. You don't have to add musicians. You just have to make them all play together. The best way one of them is by reducing the compound interest that you pay and the other one is by looking for compound interest to earn and then there's taxes. So you mentioned about a lot of people have 4._0._1._K's, and they should be thinking about getting out of them. Because eventually they're going to have to pay taxes, and there might be a cheap way out before that. Yeah. Not added them. Converting them. Converting them. Yeah. And the purpose of converting them as wise because you can take advantage of taxes right now because Trump cut him he cut him on on on convert. And they're only no he cut taxes in general and income, right? You hired standard deductions and so there temporary. They go. They reset in two thousand twenty six so you have an opportunity now to take advantage. So if you have a lot of money sitting in a 4._0._1._K, even take it you're saying you're going to have to pay tax anyway, absolutely pay it when it's lower because are you betting? They're only going to be higher. What are you saying? I mean, if you have the opportunity to buy your partner out at twelve percent your partner. Sandy, right. Yeah. And and basically, you're removing taxes in the future. So you remove tax risk. And even though it feels like you're taking a hit your simply paying the taxes now at a lower rate than you will have to pay in the future. They're great vehicles to get you up into retirement. They're just not great to get you through because the taxation on. So why not take advantage of the Trump tax code? That's one of the things we'll be teaching on the back on how to converse now and take lower taxes. Now, anybody can do it. Anybody can take advantage of the new Trump tax code. Okay. So when you take. Take advantage of the taxes. Now, what about those who say, well, even though the rate might be higher later on all be making less money later. You believe that I mean seriously if people think they're going to retire to a lower tax bracket, I think there's a I mean again, you might but that shouldn't be what your goal is. Your goal is to make should. And the reality is is probably not going to be the case. Now, you can control every sent you pay tax later on. He's have to learn how to plan for that's a novel approach. Yeah. Yeah. That'd be taking your retirement money now, and deciding what should be converted now paying today's rate instead of tomorrow, or or what can we do now to accumulate wealth that will be tax free later on in life. So you have two ways to go about it is how to create tax free money right down the road, and how to convert taxable nanny that you're gonna pay tax on and converted to tax free money and the math works, okay? I don't understand so two things. Now, I'm hearing how to eliminate compound interest and how to pay less taxes. Here's a simple way to say it pay simple earn compound to pay simple interest your whole life in your in compound. You're gonna come out a lot better. And if you can avoid taxation on it. It's even better. All right. So my money evolution dot com..

Larry Arizona Tempur Pedic Jack Disney Denver Mark Trump partner Matt Matt Gary Sandy Spicer John four days Two years Three thousand five hundred do three thousand five hundred do five hundred dollars
"pedic" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"pedic" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Pedic's picks up more than twenty two million dollars in its first round two funding to develop a new technique to repair torn ACL's this technique restores the ligament rather than replaces it and thereby shortens the recovery time and the NFL players association likes the procedure so much it has invested in the company's first round of funding as well. Well, according to the initial gambling numbers from MGM, Springfield. People are loving the new casino. The mass gaming commission says for its first week and offer is operation. The resort brought in nine and a half million dollars in gross gaming revenues for both the slot machines and the table games. This is general manager of MGM Alex Dickson tremendous opening week we walk in well over one hundred fifty thousand visitors and we're just pleased with what we're complementing into the downtown area of Springfield. The state's slots only parlor at Plainridge park. Also got in on the action with fifteen million dollars in August between the two the casinos did kick back almost ten million in state taxes and the encore Boston Harbor. Wynn resorts two and a half billion dollar casino. Everett, launches a job training program today. It is working with Cambridge college together to hire more than a thousand table game dealers in time for next summer's grand opening a greater Boston gaming career institute in Charlestown, focus on dealer basics and blackjack and poker for starters. The casino will begin hiring next spring and a couple of hundred aerospace workers in Connecticut are leaving unfinished designs for air and space travel today on their desks instead, they're offering to walk the picket lines a strike against United Technologies. Aerospace systems becomes the first job action against the company in twelve years. WBZ news time seven twenty seven..

MGM Springfield Wynn resorts NFL Plainridge park Boston Harbor Pedic Boston Alex Dickson Charlestown general manager United Technologies Connecticut Everett twenty two million dollars fifteen million dollars million dollars billion dollar twelve years
"pedic" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"pedic" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"I actually don't fall out of mainstream media like our catch glimmers of it a lot of the news that i get when i see people on the main stations a lot of information for me just doesn't resonate so like went on twitter example so brandon kelly so be k the boss method is a guy that does a lot of trading ta charting i love love his energy as a human being his soul and also like his technical analysis stuff is is wayne oh and for somebody who's entering in makes it very approachable right so solid guy to kind of like cut your teeth on super helpful super giving from heart and his charting stuff really cool on twitter a few people so mars manches is a guy that is a mastered so that technology talking about peace probably one of the gurus of master nodes avars meant like ours the at the yep mars as in the planet and then e n s h so at mars mench if you wanna learn about master no technology definitely follow him and talk to him you'll be doing good the other that i have been recently in conversations with following his i love crypto suppo that's literally at i love crypto a lot of his charting a lot of his views are i resonate with a lot of course like at underscore pedic's anything that comes up there reach of course obviously obvious oh what about side of the crypto around who's who's one person that you you follow.

twitter pedic brandon kelly
"pedic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"pedic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"That legal we i started to realize i might need to clarify just a little bit more engineered tax services they national specialty tax firms and there's actually a license engineering firm so we don't do tax returns we're not a cpa firm as what most individuals are used to or what they think of when they're talking with their cpa about filing tax returns the way that i correlated as much like a a general practitioner dr would be your cpa and then oftentimes you go to a specialist like north of pedic if you have any injury or something more specific so as a specialty tax provider that's exactly what we are we are a specialist and the main focus of what we drill into is real estate investments real estate investors and properties all over the country we are located all over the us we deal with about two hundred two hundred and sixty projects every month across the country sixteen offices nationally and really focus on federal tax incentives depreciation credits and different types of incentives with to reduce tax liability by or or through those real estate investments as people acquire them so that's a very specialized i know like the first time i was on your website i'm like okay awesome we're going to have an accounting based conversation but then i'm like wait a minute this goes so much deeper and it's very very relevant to real estate investors that are doing.

pedic
"pedic" Discussed on The Jim Jefferies Show Podcast

The Jim Jefferies Show Podcast

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"pedic" Discussed on The Jim Jefferies Show Podcast

"Yeah literally five of thing in the world it'd be too much of it and you'll have to throw it away this is wonderful okay right so we bought this and then we we left cottage said he's you fucking chocolate don't wanna hear about it again fame about thought we were the spot as people in the world i was sending five thousand chocolates to pedic woman and my other gets a phone call from the people at seas and they're like i'm we've never delivered more than one hundred truckloads so a strayer ever we think this is a false credit card and he's like nine i this is for me mother this is too much chocolate for one person habit we just send two hundred ninety can't do that because joy that that'll be just like my happy it has to be an obscene amount to the point right and they go yeah we just send that guys look i didn't want to mention this but it's for my mother's funeral she was very popular woman she has a five thousand people showing up and your chocolate was a favorite thing and as a little gift we wanted to give h person strawberry crame as they came in anyway eventually the cya went through she's still got some of the fraser some most of its gone that was a fun story the irony will be when she does die you'll have to have those funeral that was that was very that was very mean spirited me the chair does a story last week where share and he's he's she said i'll i'll i'll let me the money and i'll pay it back to you and then he actually took up on a made a different installment plan.

cottage fraser pedic