20 Episode results for "Peckham"

Tiana Brown of CCG on Maintaining New Best Practices

Bank-Fintech Fusion

19:00 min | 3 months ago

Tiana Brown of CCG on Maintaining New Best Practices

"Hello welcome to bank. Fintech fusions fifth and final episode of the bank operational alignment series. I'm tiana brown. Principal at c. c. cg catalysts and with me. I have john peckham. Also principal at c. c. g. Jon gruden yes absolutely. I am excited about this conversation. Today as this series has been jammed packed with tons of information. We've discussed identifying how your business. Units performance supports reaching the overall organizational goals how to gain full visibility of the overall health of your business unit and last week we discussed how to act on the identify needs for prudent and the importance of communicating. The why we'd role clarity and setting deadlines so moving onto today's episode. You and i are going to discuss how you can show a commitment to making operational alignment within your organization a priority today and going forward. Now john i've really enjoyed this podcast series and i know that by taking action on recommendations an insight shared leaders financial services will truly know that they are not alone when it comes to necessary changes in addition i hope this brings about some movement really supporting leaders and taking the first step toward doing their part. Right in. The organizational alignment goals so john. Let's begin by talking about some ways. That leaders can remain up to speed on overall organizational strategy. And how they should always be thinking like. Where does my team come into play here. Yeah i think that largely depends on where you sit within your organization if you are on the executive team as an example you're probably gonna be pretty tightly tied in your organization strategy and ask the strategy changes all over time. You're going to be pretty. Luke did if you're lower in the management team within your organization you might. You may not have that kind of visibility so i think it's important that if your link to the executive management team isn't downstream information to changes and priorities changes in strategy. Things like that. It's incumbent upon you to reach out and have those conversations with your executive sponsor if you will what's going on within the organization is anything changing. Is there anything i need to know about. you either. Redirect my team or build up additional resources in certain area or retrain. Some people things along those lines. I also think it doesn't hurt to reach out beyond that one linked to your executive. I think it's important that you build and maintain relationships with different people with different skill sets different areas of the organization and communicate with them frequently. That's not just going to help you understand where your company has gone by way of strategy and changes in priorities and things of that nature. It's going to help you better service. Those detroit's i absolutely agree. And i think that if your relationship with the executive leadership team is not readily accessible or even when it is and you get that direction of the organizational goals. It's important for that direct leader to really understand the functions of their team and then if they better understand the functions of their team that conversation with that executive is so much more valuable his enact where they connect the dots absolutely. And it's also important. I think to know that that conversation should stop with you if you're a leader if your manager of your supervisor and you have people working for a reported to you. It's very important that you take that information regardless of how you capture it downstream into them. I think the more you can connect what your individual staff members due to achieving successful the new organization. It's gonna continue to motivate them more and more and more and continue to improve. The performance notched a staff member but of your role team. Yeah i could not agree more. Think we talked about this on one of the podcast where it drives that purpose inside of them purpose in people. I mean that's like putting full throttle on your kpi's dot your yeah. It really does In episode three a you and i discussed key performance indicators and you know how can these be used to measure ongoing progress in most importantly continuous improvement. Yeah you know. I think captured a lot of that In that episode that reference but again. It's it's the notion of identifying the that are important to your constituents the people you service and reporting those out on a periodic consistently periodic basis. So if you have something that triggers weekly monthly annually whatever that is established the cadence that you're going to report those out in e- consistent. Oh yeah because if you stop measuring and you stopped communicating them and you kind of abandoned those checkpoints of your performance will will definitely alter i think right in in subconsciously. Your customers may start to think what's going on there. Is there more. I should know that. I don't know so i yeah. I think continuing that periodic regular canes and being consistent about it is important. Consistency builds trust trust builds. Strong relationships completely agree so then now we also spoke about risks in episode three and this too is very important to keep women your immediate scalp. The first in most obvious step is to remember what he discovered before and have controls in place to prevent some of these risks future. What else can you kind of share with us on that on that note thirteen. I think when you discover risk. The first thing that comes to mind is the reality that there can be risk. And i think that's a i always say wearing a risk hat at all times Especially when you're an operational leadership it's going to understand the process understanding what that process looks like if in when it runs smoothly but most importantly understanding if you choose to not manage it to run smoothly or there is a hiccup or your team doesn't perform in accordance to the kpi so for example. Let's say one of your. Kpi's is to fund x. Amount of dollars in loans by the end of each month and as a result of that you appease the investors at purchase these loans. So there's a relationship risk there in the event that those. Kpi's are not followed another risk in my experience that i've seen is. Let's say that you have the ability for fraudsters to get in and abused accounts said worked in banking in. Let's say that we see that. There's a link in this level of behavior when it comes to a specific debit card performance. If you don't understand that that's possible in have those controls in place that are then monitored ongoing so the thing that a lot of leaders especially new leaders would really benefit from understanding. Is that you identify risk. And ideally you put a control in place but if you don't manage that control going forward. The control is kind of not a control anymore. It was just a quick fix but you do need to check back on that. Make sure that it's actually operating in being effective if you not continuing to follow that control. It was a great dog. Then right In your comment about abou- always wearing a risk hat reminds me of the notion of three lines of defense right. If you are a business unit manager you are that first line of defense from a risk perspective and so you you consistently and constantly need to be thinking from that perspective. That's not to say to allow yourself to be hampered to avoid risk. It's more to consider you identifying risks when you see them assessing the degree of risk you. How much risk is there. Something that i can live with something. I needed to mitigate. Is it something that is within my responsibility to make that call or do i need to funnel a backup because again this goes back to some comments that we we talked about in. I think it was episode. Three which is when you identify risks. You're always better off to report data from cuba to yourself. Yes i completely agree with that. And i think everything related to the operations peace whether it's the key performance indicators managing the risk and even the process so all of these things change all the time and you made a point a second ago about communicating to the bottom line so we were referencing speaking to your executive understanding deliverables. But then making sure. Your team understands. It's also important for your team to be comfortable with risk just like in a gap in process a lot of times. We'll notice a gap in process. That doesn't have a lot of risk. It just means. We may have been skipping a step for five years that out of it But when you when you respond as a leader and say okay great. Thanks for bringing that to my attention. Here's the things that i need to know. Can you report this back to me. Your team is gonna feel empowered again like we just touched on going to be more comfortable identifying these these episodes of risks that are inevitable often within the banking infant tech space. I you're spot on there. If you create an environment of fear than your your the degree verse you have within. Your organization is going to inherently continue to increase. Why because nobody's gonna wanna report up or out that they found something for fear of the chastise. I think that your organization is always going to be healthier. It's stronger if you foster that kind of a collaboration that communication without fear reprisals now if something that he should have been doing all along you identify the risk because of lack of performance. What maybe that's a different conversation but even still. I think that can be handled in a way that that doesn't scare people dream. This thing's falling. Yeah and that's such a great point because we were focusing a little on people right now which is really important because without people today. Maybe many many years from now right. But we're still need some people. Would you agree that if you don't react on the risk. And you don't mitigate that risk through a a new process or new documented process Let's see improvement of behaviors. Were going with this. Is that oftentimes if leaders don't put a control in place. The employees tend to look at organization. That doesn't care. Were not fundamentally sound. Were not really trying to run an operationally efficient line of business and then employs actually lose engagement when were not driving the business in the direction of being secure providing client services. I've seen in my day so many times that when a leader is slow to respond to an issue the employees engagement. Because don't feel that you were meant to do the right thing or follow process and then they begin to feel like their role is less important but when you find a level of importance i think it. It drives the law. Yes all right. I don't say the right way bus. Good what you just set up right. There's this notion of how you communicate with your staff and the level of comfort that they haven't gina accounting work you. There's the notion of your staffy your secret sauce to success right. If you don't have the people you really have nothing so as as you kinda go through this. It's i think it's really important to think about how you're going to communicate with your staff. What you're expectations of them are in understand. Make sure that they understand this and importantly understand what their expectations of you are. Once you've level playing field. I think he's santa. Mike barrett chance of identifying risks when they arise mitigating them properly coming up with the planes to do so. And then. Baking those your. Kpi's is that you could see over time that just that you identified the risk matches that you came up with a plan of how to address it but how that plan is working out over time in when you might need to go back. Yeah his your employees are looking for it actually to be in effect like you identify you planet and then what did you do so when they see do part that that gets them excited and they become an employee who raises their hand provides a solution and looks forward to acting it out and that is depicted evidence long-term consistency transparency builds trust. Yeah trust builds bills successful relationships. I love that we could end there because that was good. Kerryon heck is. We will close out this podcast today in. But i want to be sure to discuss. How important internal operations assessments are. Think these are honest way to practically identify opportunities in your business and to really make sure that your business unit is aligned with your organizational goals so leaders really must understand that. Finding problems is not a problem and looking or not implementing the best practices that lead to identify gaps risk or performance impacts is the actual problem so john as a previous leader and both of us financial services announced principles here at c. c. g. a. What is your take on. Implementing and communicating organizational changes. Boy i think involve people in the process. If if if you include folks from the beginning then they feel engaged they feel valued they feel like whatever that change ends of being they were part of creed and i think when you bring people along that way. There's better buying and you're going to have better results in the long run. If you sit in the corner your ivory office at the top of your skyscraper. Whatever an you devise some big change and then you kind of throw that down on people. There's risk there. Why is this happening. Why is coming as a surprise to me. i don't understand it. i don't agree with it. Is going to reduce your chances of success. Successful to the point that stands out to me is the not agree. And i've seen it twofold where they don't agree because they don't like change they as in the employees. But i've also seen i would say. A higher percentage of the lack of agreement is because the leader making the decision is not close enough to the process. So we're i have found my greatest wins leader. When i was leading an operation was when i took the time to assess the team being new. And i saw who my key players where i saw my subject matter experts were. They became my right hand people. I just love them. Because i was a what do you think about this. He this is something that we might be thinking about. What would be your take on it and again that inclusiveness which is huge today Really went along ways in making these final operational decisions because not only. Do you have as leader. Who's confident about the change. Being addressed with the executives excited they need to make this change for production than you're excited as a leader but when you have an actual team member who believes in that change that's another level of communication and reliability. That can help drive. That performance yet changed. Here's a mean. That's that's a natural thing. The more you engage people in the process of defining change the less scary of becomes four. And we really. I think what we tend to forget which is going which is touching back on. Finding problems is not the problem head so when we realized that we are within an umbrella organization so banker fintech. When there's problems were all in it together to fix it because it actually becomes all of our problem if it's on your team so i think it's really important to be comfortable with that with that transition now. Is there anything else. You'd like to add on that piece. I think we covered a lot of ground here today. I think so too. I think you know to kind of hit on a couple of highpoints one. Identifying risk is actually a good thing to communicate it three come up with a plan to address it or when you are facing change engaged the people who are going to be impacted help define and implement change and i think that's all great advice for anyone to take way. Yeah i completely agree. And i thank you for sharing that and being on today's podcast with me again. Schlueter great fun. We should do it again sometime. We should actually will that. Sales up of the five part series on operational alignment. Thank you for listening to today's podcast. If you've enjoyed this topic in are interested in learning more about the operational lament. Please subscribe to our bank. Fintech shell again. This is tian around and john. Peckham principals at ccd capitalists and be sure to share this series today with partners and colleagues. Thank you for listening.

tiana brown john peckham Jon gruden john Luke abou detroit Mike barrett cuba gina us Schlueter ccd capitalists tian Peckham
Tiana Brown and John Peckham of CCG Catalyst Consulting on Identifying Areas of Improvement

Bank-Fintech Fusion

14:39 min | 3 months ago

Tiana Brown and John Peckham of CCG Catalyst Consulting on Identifying Areas of Improvement

"Hello welcome to link fintechs. Fusions third episode of the vein operational alignment series. I'm tina brown. Principal at ccd catalysts. And with me. i have john peckham also a principal. Cd's i don the Absolutely i'm really excited about this conversation. In episodes one into through identifying how your business units performance supports reaching the overall his ational goals and had a full visibility of the overall health. Your business unit in today's episode we're going to discuss. How operational limet calls for current process review risk assessments an implementing key performance indicators sadat. Let's start with discussing how important it is for a financial services organization to complete an internal operational assessment. Especially today and tell me your thoughts on what makes an internal operational assessment. Sure first of all like with most things. I think it starts with attitude by that. I mean if you have a continuous improvement mindset rather than trying to prove that. You're the best all the time. I think you're going to end up with a better results. I think being inclusive. In by that i mean including your internal customers. Your external customers is going to be really beneficial to you as well. Ask them how they rate. The effectiveness of your service in. What's important to you after all if they think you're services terrible doesn't really matter what you think. And lastly how other organizations doing what you're doing and learn from a love that and i also love the context of continuous improvement mindset. It's important to have that. Wants a leader establishes themselves as having that mindset the their trusted more organization and they are expected to be really a problem solver and a solution driver versus just somebody who's managing or leading space grew. Now some things that i you discovered through this type of assessment are potentially current risks within the organization and these could be smaller risks such as need to pit it work responsibilities in order to maximize the cost of employees or later things such as not following regulatory islets such as maybe fair lending practices. Just for an example. So can you give us some information around. Best practices when risk is discovered during an assessment. Then i'd love to hear some examples that i had maybe some experience with this law first of all. I think it's important that you document when you find these risks or opportunities to improve prioritize your findings and develop a plan and a time line to address the second reported to the appropriate body within your organization whether that be your immediate supervisor a steering committee ariss committee even fits the board. Nobody likes to admit they have risks. But i find it's much better to be transparent about these kinds of things and have a plan to address them rather than wait for somebody else to identify them. As a result of another business process like an audit absolutely. So i guess the example that comes to binder of in my career. I've seen where someone has acknowledged too late that they identified a gap in the process. And so there's a huge difference in identifying something that's related after the fact in not saying anything about it for example let's have identified. It got too busy. And then i don't mention it someone else brings it to my attention and i say oh yeah. I knew that you don't have the same amount of credibility at that point. I i totally agree with you. It's worse to say. Oh yeah i knew about it. And i haven't done anything about it. I think what happens. Is we do these assessments. We find things that we need to improve upon or need to be corrected. We prioritize them in our own little world and in our priorities trumped by bigger priorities within the organization then again some of the process comes along with exposes these issues and you're kinda laughed deer in headlights kind of thing i knew about it. I plan to work on it but something else came up much better off saying i've got this issue. Here's how i plan to address it in my view. It's a high priority item. And i need to get that wrapped into the broader priorities of the organization. Yeah i absolutely agree with that. I think that's something for everyone that that is listening today. To highly consider now operations in general would have to be my favorite piece related to financial services and there's so much that goes into successfully running a baker fintech in order to successfully operate. We need people automation navy. Robotics and for sure we need to have a process to follow. And you just touched on documented process as well so i found that the best way to scale perform is through establishing. Kpi's that drive performance Towards the goal of the organization that truly supports the effort within each line of business we refer to these as he performance indicators again brise i'm gonna agree with you without having something a benchmark yourself against over time. You have no way of objectively knowing whether or not you're performing to customers expectations you have no way of gauging whether you're harnesses improving or declining over time nor identifying where your areas for improvement are lastly without metrics. Neither you nor your team members have an objective way of knowing how they're doing collectively or individually which may lead to surprise it performance review time and nobody likes those kinds of surprises another reason to establish kpi's to help planning for example. If you know you have capacity constraints say one person can produce x number of widgets per day. The right kpi's monitored over to overtime. We'll help you proactively address. Those constraints by adding resources timely. The also help you build your business case when you go to look for funding or an f. t. finally publisher. Kpi's to your constituents provide that level of transparency to build trust and again reduced prices. Absolutely so with all that being said. What would you suggest as recommended approach for leaders today in establishing your kpi's well first they do need to define what they're trying to accomplish as we discussing the first two episodes of this podcast now than it's important to go back and review the previous performance so understanding what's already taken place We're we can improve. And what new goals might look like for the organization or that business unit precisely so with this information leaders can recognize the opportunities. I love going back and looking at metrics from I always give it a thirty sixty ninety day. Maybe one twenty. You can even do annual if there's been. Kpi's is in place that long In for example measuring comparing individual performances. Really big that alone will tell a business unit where there can be Meeting more accomplished comes to productivity of their employees. so let's say for even Let's say for instance where they were never keep. He is in place now. This is merely common in companies today as it usually just run with your business without any definition of process. They're just doing their fame in. That's okay to begin with so with technology today. That's where we have the capabilities to go back and pull data to retract the production so this enables us to calculate output and set new expectations for future performance. So some performance items they can't be measured on and you'll find this from time to time. It's nothing to be alarmed but it's also not something to just ignore and say oh we can't measure it will will get it done This is where you can be absolutely creative finding ways to capture that productivity and however there's just various forms of doing this which is where you know it consultant might come into place if you just can't reach that result on your own so for example if i answer. Services call center would measure performance in ways of average handle time for call resolution There'd be customer sat force. This will drive the way that your employees are treating your your clients in on the other hand back office operations which has no no. That's my favorite a potentially track. Let's say depending on the line of business. It could be the number of legal orders number of claims resolved or loans not mention managed service level. Timeframes is also be considered as a key. Pi so if there are internal and external service level agreements or sla's place. These types of agreements are very important because they drive not only performance. But they drive the relationships. Yes yes they do. You know. I wanna take off a little bit on a comment you made earlier. You talked a little bit about how some things are. Hard to measure in that. There's a need to be creative. I would argue that. If if something is important enough you will find a way to measure it. You should find a way to measure. Yes you may need to be creative maybe instead of looking at strictly numerical output you look at things like net promoter score. You look at things slack. Results of end user focus. Groups are things of that nature. The point is if it's important to you if it's important to your customer if it's important you business you'll find a way to measure it. You will absolutely so with that being said tell me how does this impact. The client does reviewing the process. Mitigating risk establishing. Kpi's only have any term impact or is there more we should be thinking about. It accidentally goes beyond the internal impact. Now everything a financial services organization does and in this case for us a banker intact impacts client so after all this is why you fintechs operate today on a daily basis is further clients so taking the time to understand what was planned house actually going internally and externally and making adjustments means internal movements but it's also ongoing enhanced service for clients. It's just really exciting to know that what you do is impacting the extra audience. And i find that the more honest and you can be about how things are truly going within your organization. The veteran organization is actually going to be long her now. What are your thoughts. John so a couple things one. I think the more he bring the external impact back to your staff. The more you motivate your staff your staff can see what they do what they do directly impacts the success of the client. I think that motivation right. There is almost as good as compensation But i would. I would have that in establishing. Kpi's it's imperative to ask you constituents what's important to him without doing so risk establishing. Kpi's provide little or no value to your customers whether they be internal extra. I also strongly believe that transparency is key. Share those results with all of your stakeholders you going through the trouble of measuring performance. Your kpi's publishing them helps you build trust enhance that relationship like you talked about earlier dishes exercise. It's important that you do this. Periodically circle back are these. Kpi's measuring still relevant today. Is there an opportunity for me to improve them. What if what am i Customers think of them you know a ceo that once worked for would say inspect what you expect your kpi's your indicators are really expect right you work with your customers you work with your internal constituents to develop what those measures are in how you're performing to those publishing those actual numbers is the inspector part allows you back in the logic customer too. I love that everyone listening to just go by that quote of your your ceo. And one thing that you said here which i love and we're gonna talk more later on in another episode. This podcast series. I believe episode fi. Which is this is not a one and done exercise if your organization is planning to evolve in scale going back and looking at the. Kpi's that you have in place is absolutely critical. Unnecessary in order to scale in actually continued at proof. Yeah by the way. Time isn't always your measure of to revisit these things right. You know. it's great to say. I'll revisit these every year but maybe every year is at the right time. Maybe there's been a significant change in your business right that li that should drive your time to revisit those. Kpi's yeah exactly. I completely agree with you so today. John and i really hope that you've been able to take away. How operational Calls for current process review risk assessments and implementing he performance indicators. Thank you for listening to podcast. If you enjoyed this topic in are interested in learning more about these bank operational lyman. Please subscribe to are being fintech fusion channel again. i'm tiana brown principal at cc. Catalyst and i'll see you next time.

john peckham ariss committee tina brown brise sla Kpi John li lyman tiana brown
Episode 4- Pet Cremation with Legacy Pet Crematorium

All Creatures Great and Gone

25:47 min | 1 year ago

Episode 4- Pet Cremation with Legacy Pet Crematorium

"Hello and welcome to the all creatures. Gretchen gone podcast. I'm curry and pepper. Even counselor welcome to episode four of the creatures grads income podcast. Where today we are discussing pet cremation and your options. I've been joined today by Marcus from legacy pet crematorium imbera which is our local crematorium. So I'm just going savage chat with At what they do what they can offer their clients so without further. Ado I shall hunt the mic over to Markus. And we'll talk by legacy. Pat's so marcus pleased to meet you. Thank keep coming in and so could you tell me if I like is he pats what looks thrall by Who who you have. And yes so let's passes cremation service several by me and Nebraska. We essentially. We've kind of had a poor experience with Our cat and they've bonded. We'd had him for twelve years. And the experience we had a pet cremation and and really plus fit for quite some time but I also had a dark of McLean choose guessing. Quite old and she was really the inspiration. Fahd Peckham Torian cloud of life to have cremated. But I just didn't really trust the what the options I had out in time. And it's something people very concerned about public main concern. People have with the moment so Me BEING SOFT IN MY NATURE O. Well you know I could cremate myself you know. Then I would reassure the ashes at that quote my dog so she really became inspiration. Followed crematorium and within a couple of years. We WORKED TO STOP. Wish to pass cremation services so essentially what we are about is fundamentally you know giving you the service that you can be confident in that you can be sure that your pets been handled with respect and care. You know you feel confident that you've really do your very best. You Know Jerry of your life and since then you know it's just become so entwined with our lives and our principles and I'm really really proud of where we are now So I'm not really sure what. Yeah no that's brilliant. Our thank you. So we got in pet cremation Walked options to you have available client so for some clients who think that It has to be there has to be collected from the vets where you're leading edge took place all if the hall after ten into the vast. Is that the case with pets. Do you collect pets just from the vet saw you come to the clients hallman clip pets from that to all. You have a free options. Remain you come to us. Would you have a quiet room? And you'll have time to say goodbye. Passing recognize tranquil space. And then we can come to your home and collect from from your home. We have people maybe struggling to leave the house. Maybe pets quite a large. Safin odds and then we can come. We can collect your from your home but rarely a. There's no limit on side. You could have a hamster complex. We can't collect from your vet and a lot of people seem to be under the impression that you know you have to. Have you packed cremate fruit events? You know we won't release you. Bet The impact from the vets and No we can if a call will come down with cleft Nevada as well and so you. Those are free options and it. It's just an entire what you're comfortable with. Some people do like come to the Crematoria does do you WanNa meet the staff really want to get a feel for the people you now that going to see the pass through and that brings a lot of comfort to people and a if if now hit home you become more popular you know so if you want us to come to your home with more than happy to because I know that something that You know another thing Liz. Some clients minded set. The struggled with was You know leave the pets of the vets all so think connection to comb t-cells and you know the pet vet Lati- exotic takes away a little bags. They upset a spouse. I suppose it said it helps knowing the that obsolete the pets you know the with Amtrak all of it so with regard now do you allow you the clients to weights and receive. The she's there and that Baal they're on to something you offer at Koon. Currently it's an electoral article Buffalo. If your pet is is that some people can find the environment is sterile. Are they feel rushed? You know They don't really get that time to say goodbye. You could we could collect your pet from the vets and we can place now in a quiet room commit were and if so we could collect from your home are there and you're still welcome to use the quiet room if you if you want to you can have time sake by So The orb euro question from that was So connect clients weights. And you know I can say Enga- vast night so currently that we don't operate where you can solve. Just choose exactly you know when he perfectly like attack for technical reasons do really calmly predict exactly when we go into cream cremate or pat it kind of just depends on you know our equipment thought some usually if we if you have a smaller. Pab like cat So long as you're you're ready to be created By you know mid Matai some time you know could probably get him back same day so we do office out of the same or next day service. So in some circumstances we we. We are generally in for same on our next David as having a space where you sit and wait for your pets be cremated. It's very difficult to really predict exactly going to cremate that day So is something that we are thinking about and and how we would go about making that possible As of right now it's not some manage to figure how to make it work out so thank you very much really so I would like to but I've got to ask you what questions you commonly asked from pets owners. The most common question that people most concerned about goes back to you know. The trust in receiving bad path has ashes and in some people very concerned about that And what people are looking to be. Sure that the cremation is an individual cremation which cremations our which means that. Your pets is cremated in their own chamber on the road. Not alongside any of the pets there. She's are exclusively your pet's ashes and that's probably our most major concern from people which we can understand that was my main concern and you know. I do tell people all the time you know from Maha. We the ashy that you get a your pets. She's and all I can do is you know is give people confidence as possible. Yeah we do. The process is that we will depend. We'll have a certificate and that will stay through the move out for the whole process and that's how we will follow through and then you know but by the end of the process you know. We're confident what you're getting back with your your the over questions that may appoint on people's Minds Pasco into stay whilst rivers and you know And what. How long does the process take and things of that nature and we do? Have what what we call. Waiting Lounge. Generally if we don't have to New York from our quiet rooms we have a quiet room and we'll lay them on there and they'll feel nice and comfortable if we don't need to move them then won't something needs to the new to quietly. We will transfer to our way to Mount Lounge will put in a bad and they'll be able to wade out opportune moment. Cremation people want to bring the pats with the Batson the toys and we've had people you know bring photographs and lay them out on the path. We're happy to leave. The you know in every finale one up until the moment they are cremated and we just we just want him to be. Achy as you take and you know we've created our own paths and so confident in what we've done for Maggie that you know you'll be happy. Well we've we've how we treat your pets from the season. Most teams faxes said. We can of things. Are you know? Come you take a clip of the we do. And you can. We'll give you your tests clippings glass vials. You know and lovely. People really reached them Paul Prince Infants a bat. And you know if you ask goes you know we're all Really friendly like group. If you just let us know no matter how unusual the request you know. We'll do our most to accommodate you soon. We'll fly so what do you oftentimes a casket sedans etc. Because I'm the pawprints. And the the fact pains So what do you do just wouldn't end Do Cascade saw you know what's ranged. Do you have and can they personalize? Can you do like Pesha inscriptions on the plcs etc? Yeah of course. So we have. Different options suited Different situations really so we have. What's called a sketch Schubert? And this is biodegradable. Kabul chew but it's most commonly used for barry lost scatter. It's cheapest option but this is the option. Not Me chose far our dog because we chose to bury the ashes And like I say they are biodegradable. So he can become extent GonNa harm you environment Thing next options we have and probably the most common is a wooden casket and the different colors to sue. You know different some people are more like pine or maybe like a Mahogany. The mahogany home. So we've got a selection of of the author wooden caskets and these can be personalized within an engraving. We do in grave in in in the criminal Rio so if you want any Like proper saw so you know look designs on. We can do that for us. Well you know you know. We'll we'll do our very best to accommodate. We do also have sausage by round Brussels They can kind of screws top and Gaza. These are due to the shape. Become currently engraved is something that we do have a selection of Honchos in. You know as well you know found some very like Nice unique I- options and you'll be able to see them in the chromosomes area in the quiet room. So we don't want to party pressure on you to like you know. Decide what you like everything sort of so. He could cotton timed to have a look around. And you know make a decision. Flu and with is always a decision. You can make later as well. You know some people you know about echo way fake and we can. We can wait on option law lawyer you thinking about. We like say we can take our prince as well. We do a powerpoint frames. Shot the dog. Will you take our print? We'll take as many poverty. It takes to get you a nice bike path and so we don't rush it. We've got really really good feedback on the quality of the print Take and lots of people. Bring those pictures of the tattoos. We've had so lovely thinker. Something dog is now permanently on on funny too. So if you do that with our partners like please like seven seven to really like I was excited to see you know and we can do those in traditional can in inner black ink but we can also do Capelle princes while soft paints a different color pains in If you have a cat we usually take two popcorns. You know. And we'll take a back pop back. thought food. Yeah and we've even chillers twelve hounds. Those Rabbe silly now. We'll really work to make it work. You know whatever you Turks who recently as well and it came out locally so you know we can personalize those as well. He passed name on that. Some people like Mary specific. Mind would like right on that and say you're more than welcome to just let us know when I'm on. We'll do that for you So those are of likely the main options at this current time we are looking you know to expound on what we can do you know. Get some more creative People on board who really fulfil more of these interesting gripe People inquire about we can't always fulfil every every request Barbara do keep them in mind. We are looking always to improve the services that we can offer expand. What what we can provide up. I've seen a post on fast race limit rainbow. Pawprints look stolen the absolutely gorgeous. Yeah really have to give credit to jody for that one. You know she really. She took something I solve in place into Friday to a whole new level. You know and people love them so it's ties Rainbow Birches wild inside. The you know the positive watts crossing the Swe Absolutely love as beautiful. Five billion so what can client expect from their local pet crematorium so? I May with your family business. Obviously she say Allahu dignity respect. Bashar news is the fall from everything you do so suppose. A bit of a shared was pulled. Greeley Y Y legacy patch. Why should someone choose? Legacy pats for the pet cremation. This is a time I personally believe an I do say it to you. Know the people come to regular you know is a part of the experience of owning. Pats is lose depends and if it hurts now it is just a reflection of just. How much love you had for that. And I understand the difficulty and you'll have one chance you know to really feel contented like what you've done it very best that you could have done. Feel and it's it's such a shame. We've our own experience with Bonnie that you do you play me. E south of a you know could is too and we don't want anyone to feel that way we won't listen to be absolutely perfect for you and take out of your mind and give you relief really. The thing that took power is that we do everything in our power to make this experience of beautiful experience. We can feel and it is beautiful experience when you know after all these years this being popularity so much joy and so you know even though they did love unconditionally and and you know to lose that he hits you all at once. You know not really realized just how much of an impact your life now are part of your life and you have now that that chance to really celebrate. You know just what they've they've given you an all comes out in this one moment when you say you find coupons and really is won't have peace of mind you know and feel like you know that really meant some into you. And if you have not challenged just to reflect and able to calm you know it'll bring people so much confer and that's always like full from now on. We have people very tunnels have the past experience. Just how much do you feel now that they had that option to say by with like pets That's for me is the most fulfilling part of you know people give you a Hogan Gino. They just tell us how much mental meal and so ty soon you question is just not connection. You know that is a very raw you know to lose a pet and We an all we know we understand. I get that from leaving the bats. I E oh and overpass crematoriums. Not many around now our our privately and I would even if you don't choose legacy pass specifically do well to choose a private control. You own real people. The Love Packer owns and they are around Alaska. And so we choose peck until fabulous a low fall. So how can clients reach like as a pet? So a you on social. You're spoke so declines. Get until Saw website. All volna breaks of course so you can come. Tatsu our contact page on our website. You can email directly. You can give us a call and equities cut contact with through facebook. Of course if you do have an emergency best option would be to give us a call we. We're always open. We are a small team so You know if you don't get free under unfair showers this gives them the call us. We are on the ball most of the time. It's just that sometimes we are dealing with some very difficult situations Gives a call. We will not as soon as we possibly come in. Thank you very much so often famous talking to today and if you've never heard of legacy pet carbon sorry. I'm very strongly suggest that you look the mole and look at facebook posts because the information that the point night. They're in support of the gated clients is phenomenal and the lots of lots fashioning the especially on facebook on that website there really love the bones really protocal and you just you just got the feeling the. Yopat is is loved by them as it was by you and that there is genuine concern and compassion and heart there. And that's what you need isn't that that's what you can fall. And when you lose a pat and you decide SACO for creation you want choose accompanied. The you know has your best. Your pet's best interests are and that they still see them as a beloved path and not just a number so you know look for those privately owned current solium so talk to the gremlins views talked to the owners become the stop You know the humid end of the day the not faceless robots you know with gats to Legacy Packer Musavi Berry Please check the minute you know. Get in touch with them about your needs and the positive Their options and social demand. Mock printz Just absolutely stunning. So thank you very much wrong for tune in today and fully sin. I hope you've enjoyed today's episode as always feedback go in between is always welcome and thank you very much to Marcus from legacy PATs. Fall Putin and talking with today and explaining a bit more of what they do so take care of your body and I will see in the next episode thank you.

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On the Trail of... Bob Marley. Plus old skool pubs, old skool drugs and an old school. (S4, Ep9)

Deserter Pubcast

53:43 min | 7 months ago

On the Trail of... Bob Marley. Plus old skool pubs, old skool drugs and an old school. (S4, Ep9)

"And. This is desert. Today we're in Sunny Peckham on the trail of one of the pioneers of reggae Yeah we've got old school pups, old school drugs and an old school. Walkers Tokens entices plus what stays. South London wine. What I've heard it all now said nothing that's place do. When it caught welcome groups of more than six Well, you say. Listen on my simple friend. Yep We've got tactics on how to party in Babylon later in the show, we'll to service on duty south and on Dallas Radio and you'll listening to the desert podcast sponsored by go out London the APP. But does it all. GOING, out in London department. It does reservations. These days does everything you need hand democ table service venues, Carl's. preorder home dining. It turns a Sambi. Sandwich into a banquet. Is the only product you'll ever need. finished. To carried away. Okay. So why don't slip into something? We'll come to crack open the code one and take learning to the minimum. Do the first pop quiz I guess yes we as as we mentioned are in Peckham clear. On the Ryan, going to the Ri-. Yes. We're going to pub-. The. Used to have a Buco it didn't it. Did table tennis and it's very good and that's unpack and raw i. think that's sufficient. PS here the. Guns. We'll find out. Right. Let's get drunk I. Mean get it work. Welcome back. Where are we? We've any we at the. Yeah you gave it away. He said we're going to the Ri- but you, Action and riding the upright DDS. Anyway. It was too easy that one was, but you can still have your first point where and blood hell week deserved. Yes, we have. We've had to wait with They didn't have I. Three options. And the APP didn't work but apart from that. We're in a lovely garden sun is shining. Bear in front of us. Yeah multi. Right. What the hell of I been up to? Yes. What the hell have you been to? About a holiday in. London. Benny. In, London he told me that law no, no, no no. Not Not not. Wrong. We made me my that with you. yeah I wanted to say with this is to check out the pedestrian is. Meanwhile I went to W.. W One. And it was a lovely the olex Gershon. The city is this is a great city. Yes. In August September where we are now in the middle of pandemic. It's it's quite empty. You can along and you know. See anyone a lot of I, forty five minutes. Mind you. We will into the brandon estate in war with. Where we chanced upon an estate up court the Canterbury arms, which identing I'd ever come across before. and. A way outside was a grizzly old guy sitting that asset to A. Should we stop for half and he said Hey stop for? Welcome. And let me stop took for the harp whether. Awesome. System Love, the drinking one way system and then onto Soho which is expected is much better with less traffic. But even better off five o'clock when some Rosa closed completely and people come out rolling astroturf onto the street and all the chance to tables. And then we went to the coach and horses beside Clo-. You know again, you know 'cause wandering is perfect table. Going around. Yeah. Wonderful back now in fuller's direct management better or for worse. Does mean as op-ed those. Little Bit if he wants. Yeah. But now it's Not. Great. Pandemic. Pandemic. Love it. And then we walked home again Via, the river at one by the river we dropped into the other from council check out its last days. We were going to have one in that, but I'm afraid it's already. Into you. Know, the other concert shopping and. I. think that is officially closing on the twenty. Fifth September. Inside. Peter and all the little. Beach Bar Center. So finished dead. Yeah very sad and so we win win for one in ten cuts more throat one in the next heads in Campbell and finished up with the name. Donald Triple cheeseburger. Codes due to missing number being called while giggling. Proper holiday. My advice would be eight triple cheeseburger hot. Yeah. Yeah. Wasn't much of a trade in. You could say that was my key takeaway from the day Oh. Oh. So, yeah there's a wonderful holiday and then you could sad holiday and Brixton. went to the Brixton old school pub. Cool. Nice pop popcorn put together by goose which took in a lot of the PUPS. Back in the day that were great. We just checking to see this location. That's nice. Yeah. Relatives Yeah. So involved. Lots of Hansen. On my hands I've never been descriptions instant with the Scotch chilly and my right testicle. Think about and. So we start off first of all at the effort whole tavern. Lovely. It was We were told it's full inside limp off. Empty. But Type it in the garden whether fourteen person limit. But they seem to be fifteen people coming going the guns if you get into the toilet to wait until someone car. But that was lovely and then we went onto the dock star, which is I may have mentioned before was reverted to basically boys pub-. Pu- The decks have gone tables on the floor. This is not done anything to do with the pandemic. No, just. Another step in evolution of bookstop. Yeah. The W nine Baugh was closed goose very sad about that. I think he had some Shenanigans on. Back in the day but he pushed on to the Marquis of long which. CENA full. Not Far, from David Bowie your house. Very handsome. Victorian. Backstreet lovely fixtures and fittings the rich or extensive skunk outside and some old boys swearing at the does on TV. It was really quite. and. Go into a bit of Baldwin advertently photographed gazes. Second. Fight the pope. I did about you. But whenever someone takes a photo of me, I'm like, how do you want me? What's my motivation? The. Tell me breezy in. Yes. Exactly as some direction, but this oversee felt very differently. anyway, I let him live and we pushed on to the Queen's head. She may remember a massive music back in the day. The fact white family famously formed there and called it home and all sorts going on in the upstairs room where parrot would you cocaine? But when we arrived, it was evacuated quiz not. Believe it and. We raped guess the outback and shoutout TIMBUKTU and nineteen seventy four random points. And then it was through the estates to the hero of Switzerland. Soon, you may remember to be a tower. Block? But Alas and indeed a lack. Closed at ten PM. This is the problem with the new normal no fucker updates to websites. No. Not that the hero hit Switzerland how's IT website? If you WANNA find out when there you have to send them and telegram. anyway pushed on to the junction junction. This too was just about to close at ten thirty. So you know thinking. Way order two points each and settled. onto the terrorists to enjoy the traffic. And perhaps not unrelated to this. It was favorite probably not. Yeah well, that sounds wonderful. I went on a mini cool myself out to a depth with Mrs started off with Busta Busta Mantis. Has Jamaican fusion fusion food. What makes it fusion chips? Actually, that's not true. That's harsh is is. It's very It's. Very nice food and villages room. Lovely. But it's next around mountain and you are sitting out on the roundabout now that's you know Knicks Knicks the roundabout Oh. Yeah. Okay. Inside faith. On Creek side. I think having a pump on the sort of quite industrial bit means you can you can have you drinking outside music can be worked out. And Yeah. It's a people. Looks it kind of. Shutting Down, how many beers they're offering? Many as we found today yes. Yes. But not little faith they had. Six, absolute bangers. Trinamul them. Not. All of them but but the majority perhaps. And football is back life. Suppressing. Being. Good Fun. you've been to some life game i. mean there are many available to us but you may find. Read I have you came down to To watch him. To see the friendly match against. The cry. Is it in crave foods cray cray food slash. Bonner's. And, Yeah. It was great to ICS Sealer Games. Again and also see some of those faces. Somewhere where it's just test. It's spear into debt by this. Isn't it? Yeah. That very dirty Burg was Ziegler ingredient salt fat. normally the keep it gets a bit of. Defense from the it was the other way round. VCD given us. Greens I think we were out have much practice. Apologize to him and said I'm sorry. This because he was, he was on yourself the buggers which was ironic 'cause he's big boned himself. Yeah. He was. He was suggesting that we might be interested in Vegan, burgers? Yes. Because we're hungry. Hamlet. hipster cons something like that. Yeah. Yeah he mediating. I stopped beforehand for one in era. Yes which had never been to I've always been meaning to go to since Kerr Church wrote that piece on desert about air. Yes. So linked to on the coast. It's It was a while ago now and it was a great. Good he's made me made me want to visit because you. You may remember she. wrote about seeing a pig driving a car. I mean this is an odd place. And she mentioned the running horses pub where I went for Pine and. Although it sounds like that one I think it was another pub that she did have an issue with some running. Local travelers turned up at the pub. With in on their horses and rode them into the pub. And when The. Issue with them. They said well, it says pet's welcome. pint outside the running horses by the street and watched opponent trap overtake. Police car. Well perfect perfect. and. Found another local game Peckham Town F C who just landed the London trophy indeed With is thought to be the first men's team to win a senior trophy under the management of a woman. Mary. So, congratulations to them and her. I thought time for their I league match of the season record attendance of about seventy. And they've got a famous tiny stems there the holds about. Eight people. The record what is seventeen seventeen? Pandemic indeed in these post Kovic Times now limited to one person at the time. As Little Q.. but it's a lovely day out on the south circular three quit infrequent for ten pair. Yeah. Yeah. Definitely. Be taking advantage of them over the next. Yeah. Weeks that was great and funding on the football front. I went down to see touch that women play another hundred seventy five souls champion Hill on Sunday to watch an eight goal thriller. Eight nil. Win. that. Often and the great thing about women's team is that afterwards, they will go out for a pint. Do they. The human. Just, like me except fitter than better foot will. Put up a quick mention four to places that. We both went to didn't we in Ramsgate? On the. Air Yeah apparently. Yeah. Very little memory I remember the boating pond. The voting point was great. Now I'm the boating pond on the West. The team behind the Ravens in the skies have opened the ravens gay on see. A pop up a majestic voting. Yeah. Lovely. Gloss in your hand on the palm trees and some Silky from speakers it could be on base. and we enjoyed a fulsome range of gats ails washed down with Margarita, slush aces lot you do. and. You've heard. Pub Garden. Pub Beach. Beach always coming back to me now. Zehr. Off We went to another face on the west side on West road actually the Bedford which was a rough house. It used to be the new landlord described as the place where drug dealers went to die. Anyway the kneeland imported five tons of Sahara and sand tipped into the garden. now, you can lounge out in the garden deckchairs with the fate of and we did shoes off even and we did. Quite sensational feeding couple of. Gems Dan the in Ramsgate. Right. Onto. Posts. Coast yes. Yes. Actually did some did some writing on deserter? About Peter Perez, not everybody knows who Pete About he was in the band Kuti only once lived in south London and Forest Hill mostly and one of the singles another girl another planet has been on virtually every indy combination. You may not know the only ones, but you know that song you'll never. Sing it. Well if it wasn't for the copyright issues. But yes, he was a bit of a south London legend he Didn't live in south London with his wife and his girlfriend and his valet. You can get away with it. Yes whilst he was putting together the band, the only ones and he was he financed the band basically through dealing as she. he he smokes an incredible amount and it's even hit the team used to smoke. Molly Yes. Good until two one source. Who will be visiting late who who's footsteps will be pulling later in date. And? Yes he even had a snort off with Keith Richards. Keith Richards wanted to produce the band and had a couple of meetings about it, and then they didn't really get much further than competitive cocaine sniffing. But yeah. He had a very interesting life and his the biography about him is really trillion well written by Nina Antonio. and we a piece on the site at the moment with a couple of videos from his mean it's amazing. He survived. Because he, he the only ones had like three albums as of. Late, seventies maybe the and then disappeared a split up and he disappeared for ten years down drugs home popped up again disappeared again. And Struggling heroin and crack addiction but then popped up about three years ago did a CETERA album with his sons behind him and yeah. Somehow has survived I think the suffers now with COPD. Is As does his? Wife because. They've been smoking and chasing the Dragon. on this kind of tin. Tin Foil nobody. warned you about tin foil. Keeps making. Toxic. Tenfold There's not the heroin all the crack. And so. Next we're going on the trial. Yeah subject for this episode. We're going to. A spot in Peckham. It's now the Damilola Taylor Center. where he played a seminal Gig to some school children. Bob of cool was a history and influential figure in reggae. He really brought reggae to the to the world. Imported into the mainstream chance the. Incredible crossman pop songs as well as ring a and covered lots of different genres even folk. And but he's he's trips to London were quite significant in this Korea definitely yeah. He was already a huge stall but he in in his own country but he came here. and that. Kicked kicked his career on the. and south London Hannah Poulton definitely yeah. Let's. Just go. Right. Here we at the. Taylor Center in Peckham, formerly Pekka. Amana. pick them out of school when Bob Marley was invited here to play a Gig in classroom with his mate Johnny Nash. who was was probably more famous England at the time due to. His single I can see clearly now. he was already a big star in Jamaica. By nineteen two, but he was trying to broaden his audience coming to England. And it wasn't going very well. Was it the he was struggling to get radio play sterling to get gigs and he made some Geezer in Soho Club who? Disagree come and do a little GIG GIG for his The schoolchildren he talked. And so he came here Johnny Nationally they played an acoustic to acoustic sets for the kids. And then afterwards, Played football in that yard there in that yard with with with all the boys and. Looks like they're going to build on that yard now it got. Some. Building fencing around it But yeah. We Watch documentary recently didn't we about that time in? In Peckham. With some of the children talk about their experience. But quite amazing to see the pictures of Johnny National. Folk, money sitting there in front of the school kids that gets us. Yeah. Amazing. It's quite good Taco. It's on the I play. Now should you fantasy catching it and? Some of his experiences. In England informed his next album catcher fire, which was a kind of A. Another kind of breakthrough for him is slight change of style and not not for the traditional reggae fans and he was a pioneer in. Rick. Ails. And he returned to tour with their album in seventy three and play two weeks in Peckham. wrote. Plays all over the country, but he played it Mr B's. A forty-three Peckham High Street also known as Mr B's bouncing. Ball. At in Hawaii. And yeah. He also played on the old grey whistle test when he was over that time and that was that was quite important again, boy into a new audience. And it very unusual to have a reggae artist on a on a rock show was Russia. Wasn't here. And then his his. Audience was even further broadened when Eric Clapton covered I, shot the sheriff, which was a massive hit on both sides of the. Atlantia. Slightly ironic given that he was a racist taunt. Maybe it wasn't then. May grew into maybe yeah. Yeah although. You know powwows but he he supported that speech A. And later gave one of his own which was. Worse. SPEC Jockeys. Lovely. Lovely. Yeah. So yeah I think you're coming to England was a big step in his career wasn't in it it moved him on a bit. Hit, brought into a much wider audience, and by the time he came for his next trip is to sold out and his audience is kind of fifty, fifty of black and white. And he he kind of brought. reggae from Jamaica to the world. and. Considered London and Britain as his second home in many ways didn't he i? Think he recognized it. had. A big influence on him and although when he was here about accounts, he missed the Sun Sea Beach. Punctured CETERA. Lots of about he loved yes he could still get ganger. Yes. Thanks Don. Let. He could still play football when they will probably his music football and we'd where he's yes, he's loves. Are we going to mention here that he used to play Bulla in Battersea. Park we candy. Yes. He he used to live in Chelsea for TI. He ended up there after an a session assassination attempt on him in make. And Yeah, he he just loved he would have a football everywhere. They went. He Yeah. They take it on, take a ball on tour course and he would say you know if you want to get to know me, you have to play football against me in the waiters rock. Was it Peter Tashi said that wherever they went on tour that stop off the town? No playing in five or something, and he said that book would just go and buy those footballs. I know. Yes, yes and he used to buy kit to take home to trench town. For the kids they're young play with play with Eddy Grant Battersea power. Yeah. Yeah. All right. Next up the news news. News. So the News put-in-bay news I mind done my pumpkin guess but there is one you wanted to add, right? Yes. There is an i. only know this because of Emma who? is at every pomp and burry opening MS, dump Ms Dump. Thank you Emma appointee the Silver Fox to us. This is in the Bar Bexley, where which is become my microprobe central in i. mean there's so many Michael there possibly because it's the least London like Barra. Yes. It does candidates the epicenter of my republic explosion. On the kind of feels like Kent. Difficult time to be opening Microsoft fill and in that location as well it's on. PDA Avenue in kind of Bexley and we know it because it's round the corner from where my parents used to And if it had opened when they were like I would have visited much more often. Say Fair. Okay in other news I thought mentioned the perimeter. Project, by Quinton Lake whose Zim Spent five years walking round the edge of Britain. Not. Six thousand six, hundred miles. Any finished it yesterday. he finished Erkki Day. It's been a great twitter feed really enjoyed it. filled is wonderful observations and photos will be I'm sure great book. I would have gone to macy mistake but preparing for this. fucking. I think the most impressive thing of the whole trip is getting the time off from his wife and children. Young Charles Wow maybe maybe too I think definitely won. I mean, what would you say if you said you were for five years? Don't come back then. If I said to Mrs Raider boy by. Five years. She'd say bring me back a cream egg. in more walking news Andrew Morris Walking. Slightly more modest hundred and sixty four miles in memory of his father Ralph. Yes. The X. Hamlet. Plan. To raise funds for the Kale Foundation in the community along the way. you can search. Ralph. Morris pilgrimage. On read all about the trip. Lincoln on that was well, yes. Indeed. Good Luck to Andrew tells us he will be raising gloss in memory of his father every night. And lunchtime. Roy. Andrew also would like to be remembered. Plus Chateau to. Do. What what what? Y- yeah. Are they called urban one urban one they they receive grapes grown all over London lie in back gardens and scrublands etcetera. And turn them into. Wow that's brilliant and you can sign up and take yours along this Saturday, the nineteenth of September. I wonder what it tastes like. I mean people say it's Tastes okay. But I'm going to give troy. Yeah. It's going to be a massive slander isn't it? it's always tricky. Isn't it with? Making it from scratch. The runs move my friend Ali thought Humor Rodney story tries hand at winemaking any report vineyard emigrated to Australia. And them off the first harvest, he sent away a sample of wine to the lab to be analyst. And it came back with a note that said your horse has a bladder infection. After that. The stock market. what else we go Oh we'll go to Kiev hang of it. Couple that. Thanks to the Brixton had to bring this to our attention. As an article on Bloomberg actually is a group of Finnish research is believed they've discovered. What people have spent? Sentry Searching For a cure for hangovers. Apparently. A- dose of twelve hundred milligrams of the amino acid l system. was found to reduce alcohol related nausea and headache while a dose of just six hundred milligrams. Helps Alleviate, associated, stress, and anxiety. this is coating to researchers at the University of Helsinki Invasive, eastern Finland. Around Dump Blind Study. Lots of volunteers consuming alcohol. As. Well as Reducing or even eliminating entirely else esteem also helped reduce the need of drinking the next day. thereby cutting the risk of alcohol addiction the need to drink the next day when you have a terrible hangover. Do Ya the dog of course. Yeah. Anything that kills. Well I'll until this finding yes, exactly. Apparently Binge drinking is very film Finland and That's why. The center of this sin this test miss. Experiment. How a little bit further down the article, it says the researches received funding from the company which sells the L. Sistine supplements. Twist still was. So that's probably what other bowls in and. You can have dose of L. Sixteen or you can basically do I do and have a dose of double-leg banking and chips the lovely nap. Back in the game. I did enjoy in the articles. The study ran into some difficulties. Some participants weren't able to consume all the alcoholic quiet. excluded. Some had such high tolerance levels that they experienced. No hangover symptoms. And some was sidelined because they insisted on topping the dose by heading for the bar. Good. I'm. Right even though we've been talking about almost nonstop for the anti cost, we're GONNA do title. We're GONNA do towns yes. I. businesses to pump recently. You'd be surprised to hear and I was talking to. Aligned likely friend of mine who she she it's not a rough public Chichi runs and I won't say which one these But. They do have more than Fisher of Ankara and a young policeman came into pop recently and decided to be a real. stickler wanting to see license and he wanted to search the premises and was so thing. and doing this inspection. He found a baseball bat was just above the bar. And he said to. This is suck. Deadly weapon. Can you out. For. This. And she said, well, if you look closely is a bowl next to it. It's not a deadly weapon. Children Living, upstairs. This is this is what we do. You're going to have to get up earlier in the morning to catch me out my lap and he said to a little boy nearby am. Yes and activists isn't it and she said, yes, ma'am. Yeah. Smack him on the wrist. Yeah. She managed to get out of it somehow but. She wasn't pleased that. They need the police around the law. To have a poking around for. That baseball back election. LESS THAN IDEAL Next we're. On the trail. Backpack on trial back on the trail with going. Wilkinson more of Molly's footsteps. We're going to go to Crystal Palace Park where he played his launched UK cake. and. His last London Gig. At the Crystal Palace Garden Policy, which was a huge event in between seventy and eighty. Young the old rusty up. The rusty that. Yeah. So we'll. See. At Crystal, palace? Park. Where both molly. Lost on the GIG in nineteen eighty? Very beautiful is to today isn't it is really lovely. Isn't it the stages still he'll though it's in some states of disrepair yeah crystal. Palace. Bowl I. Think it was cooled. Filled with. Surrounded by water. and then you can sit up on a hillside. Watching the gigs scene of many great gigs in the seventies eighties. That's right. Yeah. the Crystal Palace Garden Party Pink Floyd the faces Beach Boys Lou Reed. oxy Music Elvis Costello and that alleged account Eric Clapton. Enough him. So. Yeah. By the time Bob had returned to live in London. He he was he was a pretty big stall at in Nineteen, seventy seven he brought out the exodus album with a string of hits and Time magazine called it the greatest. The Twentieth Century LIKE WAITING IN VAIN AND Jamming JEMAINE JAM in Yeah. Doughnut. Susan. Yeah if he did four to bridge with with punk which was going going off at the time, didn't he? And PUNKY REGGAE party was one of the tricks on the album. He named checks bands. Yeah not do. that. Maybe that's where he got the idea for jamming. You. Not Going to get this information anywhere else. Information. And unfortunately prior to this Gig in one, thousand, nine, hundred. Injured a toe playing football in perished in the someone. Foot. and it revealed because it wouldn't he'll reveals. What turned out to be skin cancer. and he had some alternative therapy I'm afraid do. Yes which of course didn't work would urge you if you're unfortunate enough to to get cancer to see proper doctor and see. Certificates. Yeah and he wouldn't have toan `putative, which might have A. Let. Him Live Longer So it ruins football. Yes. Fair enough. Yes Sir but by one thousand, nine, hundred, one of the one of the biggest stars in the world. And he played here in Crystal Palace Park right here not stage. Yeah. Supported by the average white band. And Joe Jackson. Yeah, yeah. So as we can see in front of the stage is A. So potent, really an algae covered potent. Yeah, and there was a lot of week going down the GIG and it was a warm day in. June, and people just piled into the potent. Getting. Even more stoned and some some get. killed a duck. And through a Joe Jackson. And he stormed off you wouldn't come back on these very upset about he loves ducks. Ducks. Like bobby smoking as well. He he was a big campaign to stop smoking being banned in bars judge. Smoking facts can thanks man, yeah Yeah, Fox ducks. Yeah. Yeah, and so the boy was played a fantastic set by all accounts legendary Gig, and then after she came back on his own with his acoustic and then played redemption song. which that point was unreleased came to that year. very special. Moment for For everybody, who was there none of whom can remember it? You living down the road there's an one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, nine, hundred. have been living in that didn't know anything about him Of course, I would have only been five or six. Expected to. Be. Sure. Yeah and yes, and as a result of he's he's cancer Bob Molly died. At. The. Young. Age. Of Thirty six. UNBELIEVABLE ISN'T IT And he carried on for some time still doesn't away but. The compilation album legend so zillions. Around the world what does the Post. A poster on everyone's wall seemed to be at one point. On the seventies and eighties. Those like to smoke up yeah yeah. and. Yeah. Amazing. He came from a country that was exploited only Britain and he came here with A. Lot of positive vibes and to the author. Babylon. Babylon and help help change it in some way. Definitely, the influences palpable wasn't there not just punk post punk as well and yeah. The police. Not. Not. Yeah Yes that's Bob. I'll be making an investigation into rest. Of any. The religion or way of life espoused by Bob. And apart from the stuff about gold. Religion. Bits I think that might be something in it I very what's that the sanctity of cannabis Yes. The tree of life which bears twelve men are fruits and unitive fruit every month and the leaves tree with the heating of the nation's. Revelations twenty two to be good mate. And an I am now going to hear myself with the help of this blue. Peter? LUPITA. When I wrote earlier. Called sebate. Don't see you can't see. Down over your eyes. Oh Yeah. That's better. Well. Look would you look at the colors? That's amazing. You love this. I'll sure what are you going to? You Know Pasta Duchy on the left hand side. I'd love to great. But I'm I'm prevented from doing so but what I can only call Kovic common sense I don't understand that this. Sharing of splits during a pandemic would be foolhardy in extreme I'm sure you agree. Really the end of this debate could contain literally almost a dozen microscopic viruses that want sucks deep down in your lungs could do untold and lasting damage to the delicate lining of your, what the actual fucker they. They dinosaurs. Dinosaurs been. You have especially for me Thank you. YOU'RE A BOMB DASA Okay time for bum. Bum Dasa. My first offering. Is Douglas Adams, oh? Yeah of. CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE Yeah Yeah he famously said I love deadlines are like the bushing sound they make as they fly by. Yeah. He said he liked ideas and hatred writing Benza he had a great idea for a book once a starship title. WROUGHT, great idea. took it to the publishers. They loved it. They gave him a tasty advance. Years went by still hadn't finished it years and years. To nearly seven years after he got the. Is Five weeks to guy before the final final final deadline and he rang up a mate Terry Jones. Fame is it can you write this book for me a copy? Any dates did they Jerry Jones record already? Yeah. Tremendous procrastination good. One. Oh I've got a couple of nominations sweet one from a guy from fessel the twitter feed of anonymous. Confessions? He wrote during lockdown. I bought a pack of twelve adult nappies. And when drunk regularly pair on comedy wet myself in various locations around my house hugely liberating. Like. Him. To be considered. and. John Shea tweeted about playboy tennis star. vitas. Colitis do you remember him a little bit before my time but? I thought it might be a good submission John tweeted just being reminded one of my all time favorite sports quotes. Playboy tennis visco lighters, glass of champagne in hand after a rare victory over Jimmy Connors in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty. He says. Let. That be a lesson to your nobody beats vitas Carolina seventeen times in a row. Those three. Well, you know, I, I think this is the funniest. I think as far as bummed dosing is concerned I think the man with the adult nappy is good. Will play anonymous. You're a boom DASA. What's is it the scene? Social Media. Yes well, you may well make noises like that because the first one is a very sexy one. This is Love Sexy. This is from Tips Stevenson who? has written about men way men right about women all. This is She did a whole threat there's loads of them. Kicked off with this. He charged into the room. Testicles Bouncing Gaily. Enough. I source scar and wondered if he'd have a sick. You opened his plump lips. Promise but annoying words came out something about own match. The temp had his two top buttons open. Detino how much kissed her eating at me flirtatiously. Almost, more fun if he doesn't talk to what allowing myself fantasy after all I was running fortune five hundred, he was just a blank page for me to write my desires. He set opposite on the tube daily. This was an invitation. When he picked up his copy of shortlist, she would start a conversation he was shot she could tell by how he crossed his legs to shield his pocket potatoes. He liked to finger to turn a page filthy little shy smut. Loads that threatened is absolutely, but just to prove it men. Don't worry about women in. His an example from ogled awesome posts. CASSANDRA, woke up to the rays of the sun streaming through the slats of her blinds cascading over her naked chest. She stretched a breasts footing lifting with her arms. As she greeted the some she rolled out a bed put on a shirt a nipples permanently showing through the thin fabric. She breasted boob early to the stairs and Titi downwards. Tremendous. What was the first threat again, I'm going to see now that was tipped Stevenson's woman writes about men like men right? Bent Women. Yeah. one of the thing that amuse me where we put a a cool out on twitter to ask if anybody could. Figure out which south London legend connects the stones the WHO's squeeze? The Dole's blink one, eight, two, baby shambles and T rex. Coast Pizza Parrot but MR folds e tweeted. Is it Con Custodian of the Bride's Hill Tavern. then. tweeted Keith Moon famously remains bond posthumously. Do some kind of a carry on the carnal nature in the Gulf Room Oman combing talk about it if you ask him. Dental. Okay. I saw A couple things on the social media. Benjamin Myers came up with a neat way to circa invent the rule against Moore six people meeting up. We alluded yes. That's what we need. He said he tweeted I'm organizing an illegal rave on the Moors come dressed in Tweeden and carrying guns they can't fucking touch us. Best, artisans lunch. and. The other thing that you must have seen it was the dental at. ODDS joining in coaxing us back to work. these ads on the tube the first of which read and I think it bears reading in full for the full horror. The first which read. Hearing an alarm putting on a tie. Carrying a handbag receptionists caffeine filled air taking lift seeing your second family water cooler conversations, proper bands, the buses, jokes, plastic plants, office gossip those wade carpets face to face meetings not having to make lunch seeing BCC accidentally replying all hearing buzzwords leaving early for a cheeky afternoon in the sun. Wind. You fucking. Absolutely fucking. Car cracked. First of all. I'm not sure which is worse out of receptionists or hearing buzz words. But someone else pointed out. I think it's just so telling. The end of list of things we supposedly love miss going to work they had to add leaving early. Before we will. Talk shows. And they admitted to put. For a beer. Exactly yeah nothing about sleeping in the toilets. No. I'm I'm never sanitizing delegate nights. and. Finally Oven Welsh the author. Had some advice on twitter about Sunday's. He wrote Sunday's a tough bastard. They think they're they where they race reset you into wage slavery. Is it fuck? So you have to treat someday rough show who's boss and hammer the Boston relentlessly, the recovery must be a Monday or Tuesday that time. attack. Wise words very wise where very. Well played. On Sundays. Well I suspect that we have time for this time out. Yes. I'm just wondering Vince voice about Sunday's to Wednesday's to. You mean. Exactly. Let's get paralytic in a responsible sort of way. was hoping you were going to say I. Mean it's the end of the working day. Yes. It's the end of all working day if you can go to that. Thank you very much for listening and thanks to Pope Molly for being such a do absolutely. Thanks to go out London the going out in town. And we'll leave you with this. for we know we may have said this before. Hard work never killed anyone. But why take the chumps A quick. Kutu because we know where we're going we do going because we're so we're in Crystal Palace Pong. You Ain't got to consider the options around here and there's one that will favorite, which is a taproom which you say. We very fond of. Local crew. Named after. Tree. The Barry's. Enough? Well since this industry would have to do the revered as well or just one pint. If you go. The Douglas. Attack really important affiliated. With. Gipsy Hill Brew. Thank. God. Look for the sitting out. The traffic with a punt.

London football twitter GIG Bob Molly Peckham Britain Switzerland Pandemic Molly Yes Crystal Palace Park Babylon Finland Eric Clapton Gershon Mrs Raider Sunny Peckham cocaine Peter South London
Not No Men (with Amb. Samantha Power & Comm. Nikki Fried)

Hysteria

1:54:57 hr | Last month

Not No Men (with Amb. Samantha Power & Comm. Nikki Fried)

"Grub hubs restaurant. Her platform allows you to order from over forty thousand women. Lead restaurants go to restaurant. Her dot com to find restaurants near you use offer code hysteria five to get five dollars off orders of fifty dollars or more. It's a limited time offer so hurry up. Hysteria is brought to you by magic spoon. Okay so magic spoon has a new flavor. that is it's it's a maple waffle flavor. And the second i tasted it. I was transported back to my absolute favorite cereal. From when i was a kid and this is sort of a deep cut. But do you guys remember os which just. oh apostrophe s. exclamation point there's a lot of punctuation in this particular cereal brand name but it was so good and it was so sugary and had so little nutritional value. I consider the fact that magic spoon is making maple waffle flavor now a personal compliment to me specifically because it tastes just like my favorite cereal from when i was a kid. 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I also like cocoa and fruity if you're listening from canada magic spoon now. Ships there as well go to magicspooncom slash hysteria to grab the new limited edition. Cookies and cream maple waffle or a custom bundle of cereals to try today and be sure to use our promo code hysteria to save five dollars off your order. This offer is now good anywhere in the us or canada. Hello neighbors to the north but only when you use our code at checkout and magic spoon is so confident in their product. It's backed with a one hundred percent happiness guarantee so if you don't like it for any reason though refund your money no questions asked remember. Get your next delicious bowl of guilt. Free cereal at magic spoon dot com slash hysteria and use the code hysteria to save five dollars off. Thank you magic spoon for sponsoring this episode. Hello and welcome to hysteria. I'm aaron ryan. I'm melissa master monaco. Unless i have a question for you that i bet you're going to really enjoy answering okay. Hit me okay. What's your favorite wacky old-timey supreme court name like a guy who is really on the supreme court and this was his real name really on the supreme court and it's his real name. Yes well erin. i've got to go with brock. Whole livingston broad coles. Ooh that's a good one. I think my favorite real supreme court justice for american history name was lucious. Quintas see lamar. But do you think that that's leaving. Salmon portland chase out in the cold salmon portland chase actually. Was the chief justice in the supreme court for a while Maybe old salmon p chase was a was a pretty crazy name but what about bushrod washington. Well i think he was friends with wheeler peckham roof. If you mean rufus wheeler peckham rufus wheeler peckham. How could i have forgotten his first name. But i mean really can any compare to david davis or horace lurton. Here's a question at least in the seventies. When i was born people could be like. I had a friend in high school whose real name was sky blue. That was her first and middle name. At least then people could blame being like when my mom was on an acid trip when she named me or some shit. These people were just eating very wholesome food. Yeah these people probably were riddled with if i. It's a very good point very good point this week. Commissioner nikki freed ambassador samantha. Power tian tran. And grace hara joined to tackle the following questions. What makes florida's rhonda santa's such crappy governor. What president obama ambassador power fighting about right before she went into labor. Why do men keep making excuses for violent acts of misogyny and hate and should blue jeans. Just go away forever all this and more right now okay. We have a really packed. Show this week lissa. it's exciting feels. Good it's exciting it's nice. We've got some really exciting people to talk to. We're going to talk to one of them right now but first we have to give a shout out to all your deb head. Why don't you do it. we're deb. Heads deb haaland confirmed us department of interior. Finally i american. Who is in charge of america's lands. We could not be more excited. We really did try to give. President biden a lot of room and picking his cabinet but we could not hide our enthusiasm at the idea of deb jalan being secretary of the interior and now she is an were deb heads forever. I'm so excited. And i think that she's going to do a great job and we'll be we'll be watching and celebrating her victories and hoping that you know she's the best secretary of the interior of all time. I think she might be. I wish that there were cameras. So he could see all the polar bears high fiving. Oh my god doesn't that exists. I wanna see the polar bears. I fi- now. They know they definitely know. Okay let's get to our first guest because you know we're celebrating deb haaland but there's some people that definitely deserve did not be celebrated this week. One of them is the governor of florida. so let's talk to somebody who has some firsthand knowledge about what's going on in florida and why things are bad. She's currently the only democrat elected to a statewide office in florida. She is commissioner of agriculture and consumer services. Nikki freed welcome nikki. I'll thank you so much for having me on today and really. Honestly thank you for everything that you guys were doing on the fact that you are targeting People in red states that are standing is really incredible in helping. Those of us who are in those positions are really carry our voices to know that there is a lot of support out there for what we do. Yeah definitely for sure So florida has made headlines lately for a lot of concerning kovic related reasons as somebody. Who's actually there. How has the last year of the cove pandemic gone for you. And how has it gone for your fellow floridians from me personally. It's been just as just as hard as it is for everybody else out there You know haven't been able to see my family either at got a ninety one year old grandmother. My mother in south florida. Who also had a chemo had cancer with mike and chemo's not able to see her so it's been hard for all of us until now that we've got some vaccines here in the state. But certainly it's been difficult in. Unfortunately here in the state of florida You've got these two camps one camp that are very into the trump were owns that you have no baths and we really were trying to throw parties during spring break last year in. Pack the stadiums during super bowls both in miami for last year and tampa this year. And then you have our other half of the state that hasn't seen family hasn't been to funerals. Haven't seen ito bursts of grandchildren and weddings and just holidays. And that are really so scared. Had lost loved ones at our obscene. Loved ones get really sick and beyond ventilators and unfortunately we've got a republican governor of who took his marching orders as entire time from president trump So we didn't do anything without their permission from from trump whether that was supposed down the state whether it was open the state we had no mask mandate The the orders that came out of his office for confusing he was hiding numbers. In changing numbers from the department of health not releasing information. It has been a dumpster. Fire here in the state of florida and but for our local mayors and our city council members from prostate who stepped up during these times to protect their communities We would have been very very far worse often than we are today. Speaking of your governor ron to santa's it seems like a lot of problems in florida can be traced to him. Can you explain how santa's handling of the pandemic has made it worse. Yeah Lack of leadership again that he is fought was following trump times. Anything that trump said no pushing all of the hopes types of vaccines medications you then all of a sudden florida's buying them You know so he just really been so you know up to to get the support of president trump and then what happened also is he will be changing numbers in changing series of no. We don't have community spread await. Maybe we do or dozen impact our kids maybe at dies and so he went out of his way almost to continue to confuse people so instead of having a leader who went to the cameras everyday put confidence into the people of our state said. Listen we're all in this together. Please wear a mask. Please social distance. I know it's hard not seeing your family and your friends but we gotta do this together. In order for our economy to rebound we've got to get through beating virus. And he didn't do any of that he has it really taken himself out of any conversations with experts are surgeon general here in the state of florida. We haven't seen for nine months. He was pulled out a press conference because he wasn't spewing the same rhetoric that the governor was spewing uphold at a press conference and we haven't seen him since you know health care crisis our certain journal is nowhere to be found And so he has not listened to experts he brings around those hoax experts that we saw president trump talking about how you know. Herd immunity is is the way to go in. And that's how the governor reacted. It opened up our state a completely with no guidelines new patrick's of how that have twenty five percent business. Pass the or fifty percent in kind of slowly going into this. He stopped talking to me a long time ago where my responsibility is feeding. Our state of refused. To have me on reopening taskforces wasn't talking to me wasn't engaging in my office doesn't talk. The rest of the cabinet infrequently talks leadership of our it in in our house of representatives doesn't talk to our. Us senators or members of congress has gone this alone and now he's just out there on his own giving out vaccines to wealthy donors and making a to play for even getting the vaccine So it has been an absolute disaster here in the state and do all the people that are listening. That are from the state of florida. I just want to apologize on behalf of government that this is not the way. It's and this didn't have to be this bad if he would have just been listening to science in cautious not been abrasive to the media and to people that aren't necessarily in his mindset. Can you actually for our listeners. Plane a little bit more about the pay to play as it relates to the vaccines. Who is he prioritizing. vaccine distribution. You know i it. Was you know. I i served for our seniors which was an absolute disaster There is no safe plan. There was no organization. There is no talking to your local department of health's or your hospitals he decided no first-come-first-served and start distributing the vaccines. That was the first and then started getting smart and certain realizing that he can have a political win by designating these vaccines to republican areas areas. Where he has seen it has received significant campaign contributions. We have three already documented areas here in our state. Where a vaccine pop-up site refunding pop-up sites because they're not organized. They come at the last minute typically abs because he had a press conference in that area and your three specific instances. We had wine. That was in Manage county here in florida where it was too specific. Zip codes and the County commissioner from created a bi key list that was at the direction of the governor who was getting get these vaccines before everybody else and exclusive zip codes which happened to have been the wealthiest zip codes in that county and the governor was questioned about it. He's wagon this move him to another place if you aren't happy with getting vaccines year. And meanwhile the other part of town the west part of town it is really an underserved minority community that had no vaccines and you only could be getting these vaccines if you lived in sokoto and we then saw amount of campaign contributions from this area that had gone previously. Were in the last couple of months to governor. We saw the same thing a little bit. Further south one of our other counties where there is a wealthy republican donor Who has given significant campaign contributions to him over the last couple of years and is in developer and these vaccines were going into this. Developers exclusive communities Again gated communities. That other people couldn't get into and i think the most atrocious one that we have seen as down in the keys in one evacuee largo in one of these again exclusive resort areas of where there were seventeen individuals that gave five thousand dollar campaign contributions in the month of december a past republican governor of illinois that gave it two hundred fifty thousand dollar a campaign contribution and the hospital that gave the vaccines cancelled appointments or other people to Shift these vaccines this area. And there's also a membership for this community and people that were members couldn't even get the vaccines you actually had to be equity shareholder of community in order to get these vaccines and now the governor saying. Why wasn't involved in this one. This was through baptist health new all back to say governor. We would have never done this without somebody from your office. Giving us a green light so there's back and forth back and forth in that just three examples that we know of. Today i can go on lists other times when we know he's going to community Worry that it's been just released that there's a press conference in volusia county and there's gonna be a pop site of lucia county but meanwhile the day before the republican club lucia county sent out an email encouraging people to go and see the governor and get your vaccine and again this is not a wide distribution of county and this is just the republican of that unity and again so we are constantly seeing that he's using these vaccines as a tool to reward his donors reward people that have supported the republican party and at the same respect those counties in those city commissioners who have been were critical of him He is not providing vaccines knows areas or going around them to provide it into those communities. Wow oh my gosh. Well that seems sounds like a lot of covering up for something that a year ago he was calling a hoax. Wow that's a lot. Are they just pantomime. Vaccines that he's giving to people or like come on picking lane governor from a public health perspective. What happens when people who need the vaccine. Most aren't prioritize. Like what have you seen as the overall harm when so many people have been allowed to cut in line and the problem is is that you know right now. Our teachers aren't getting vaccinated. Unless you were fifty-five in above it and have a health concern. Our teachers are not being backs needed Our farm workers things that i oversee are not hiring. These individuals that haven't suffered inc. Our farmers have been out there making sure that we're feeding not just our statement but our country in we're seeing the people that work at the food stores are not prioritize so these individuals that have quit their lives on the line every single day for us that are essential workers are waiting in the back of the line and the other part. Is that the individuals that are not getting a back seat because again. They're they're waiting on websites and waiting for this in a sacred vaccines sign up appointment. They're saying home which means not contributing to the economy the rebuilding the economy. And if we're doing things like this you know. It is taking away the concept that everybody's got an equal opportunity to succeed in life and to live. And we already know that there is a disparagement and inequality with our healthcare system. Not just as lord of across the country but even worse than florida because florida has refused to accept of the federal government's money has not expanded a medicaid here in the state so we have a good portion of our state two point eight million that don't have access to a primary caregiver so we got a big problem here that you really disenfranchising and really hurting minority communities more so than that are white communities at our rich republican donors and so there's a ripple effect that is going on in a lot of these underserved communities already have health issues to begin with you know already have you know whether it's ibd's or other types of conditions that we needed to make sure that we are prioritize them great thing that the government did was expanded it out of for those who have medical issues in any of these vaccines. But here's here's the kicker you need to have a doctor's note and again just said two point eight million floridians a don't have a primary doctor. So how are they getting that doctor's note and some doctors are charging three hundred fifty dollars to get the notes so now those new unity's that are already under served Again are at the back of the line which they have seen consistently through this pandemic and quite honestly last twenty-five years here in the state of florida under republican leadership. Wow what garbage human Are you seeing any encouraging signs in the state that things may turn a corner despite your terrible governor. Yeah and that's the cause of dow behind president biden has really ramped up the delivery of the vaccines across the country. We're seeing more and more here in the florida. They actually permit sites from fema are coming online Unfortunately i the governor was not promoting those because he doesn't getting political win as why promote this fema sites and sites unfortunately for a for a good portion of the last week there was no one there. You know that they were going the they couldn't give out enough of the vaccines in the other problem. Not promoting this is the fact that he hasn't opened up the eligibility so a lot more people would have to these sites however the center here. The sites are here. That vaccines are here. The florida And so i am definitely encouraged that as you know hopefully president biden continues to push a ford his his recovery plan and getting a work speed on the delivery of these vaccines. More and more people will get them Which will hopefully make people get back to normality. Get people traveling again. Tourism is our number one economic driver. If we don't have people coming here to the state of florida visiting Than we really are going to have an economic downturn in the state I'm glad that there's some green shoots in that. There's some kind of signs that maybe the worst is over in the there might be some healing coming. And we like to end on a lighter. Note here so As a lifelong floridian as a triple gator three degrees from the university of florida. That so impressive. What is your favorite thing about florida. And what is it hidden gem for somebody who is visiting from out of state. What would you show them. So my favorite part of the state is definitely rpg's. I have traveled our entire state entire coast every beach. A little bit different You've got miami. Beach is very different than the beaches that are in the panhandle all different experiences but all beautiful in so we are surrounded by that and i think that are hidden gem that most people come to the state they go to the beaches they go. Disneyworld is our springs We have some of the most amazing incredible natural springs that i spend a lot of time working to protect their. Some of the most gorgeous opportunities just freshwater. There is awesome and so for anybody who's traveling to the state. Look up the florida's springs. I m make sure that you are incorporating them into your plans. Plans will thank you so much commissioner. The next time. I'm in florida. I will check out the springs that is a hidden gem for me too. I had never heard of them. Thanks so much for joining us. This was great. Thank you for having me on today and keep up the great work out. There thinks okay. We have to take a break but when we come back ambassador samantha. Power hysteria is brought to you by sikora. Feeling your best starts with what you eat. Sikora gives you the ability to not just eat healthy but truly enjoy it with chef crafted plant rich meals that build a foundation for radiant health. Sakala is nutrition company that focuses on overall wellness. Starting with what you eat. Their organic ready to eat meals are made with powerful plant based ingredients and are designed to boost your energy improve your digestion and get your skin glowing. 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Lead restaurants raise awareness about inequality in the industry and help improve things for the better it. Such a great platform that allows you to find an order from local women lead restaurants in your area and we're excited to speak to one of the forty thousand on the platform later in the show plus grubs donate the change feature allows you to round up change on your order this month. Donations to world central kitchens work supporting women lead restaurants who prepare and deliver meals to women and families impacted by the pandemic goes restaurant. Her dot com use offer code hysteria. Five to get five dollars off orders of fifteen dollars or more and remember. This is limited time offer and welcome back. Today we are thrilled. To welcome samantha power. She has got a resume. That just won't quit. She's a war. Journalist turned diplomat. Who served eight years under the obama administration. I know security council as senior director of multilateral affairs and human rights and then u. n. ambassador. She's an author a pulitzer prize winner. And now she's president biden's nominee to serve as head of the us agency for international development. Welcome ambassador power. Thank you erin well before we get into the weeds. I wanna talk holistically about your life and career when you look back on your accomplishments setbacks milestones in your life. Is there a single moment or experience that you remember that defined or change your trajectory that you still hold onto now. Yes and eliza will remember this well And i don't think i've ever heard from her. Her side of the story but one of the up to this particular point in my life the highlight of my professional life was getting to work on the obama campaign Back in two thousand seven into two thousand eight and it was just incredibly inspiring and satisfying for this scrappy. Insurgent campaign that nobody had really expected actually win primaries that they thought oh what a great symbolic chievements. It will be for obama to do well and then you know someday in the future when he's more seasoned he'll come back and maybe one day he will be president because obviously is great promise and instead it was so satisfying and i'd worked on my own war correspondent initially and as a nonfiction writer and human rights activists. Even as a professor had students advise my syllabi on my own and so forth so working on the obama campaign was the first time i've ever been part of a big team and a team. Where all of my colleagues that i. That i knew seem motivated by all the right things. It didn't have the ara in those days of what i had associated with washington. Everybody just sort of looking out for themselves. They really believed we really believed in this candidate. What he stood for so it was a kind of magical time and and i played team. Sports as a kid very sporty and and so it was just back to being being part of a team and then i screwed up massively. And in retrospect really was flying too close to the sun wasn't sleeping off and was to kind of caught up in the campaign and probably the competition and so i got really mad at hillary clinton after She took out and she personally but her campaign out an attack ad on my college Classmate austin goolsbee. Who of you know. And so in. And what. I thought was an off-the-record conversation with a reporter. I said bad things about her. And those all got published. And i had to resign from the campaign and now why did that alter my career trajectory given that i landed on my feet. In retrospect first of all i had no thought then that could happen that i could recover I had the experience of googling myself. And th you know being told maybe won't be deal including by obama who said worry about it. We all say stupid things but don't do it again and then he just. I don't know why it was. Like i hit a nerve at a time when our to the obama and the hillary clinton campaign were in great tension with each other and so i became a kind of symbol of the cattiness on my part and and And the kind of tensions between these two people who saw the world and in many similar ways but were there were differences that they've got You know amplified in a tense political context. But when i got the calls david axelrod who called me instead. We actually despite obama initially thinking. Just ride it out like you know this is. You should resign and that'll help us win that happened. It was the first time in my life that i looked at the calendar and i had nothing in my professional life ahead just blank at i had not up to that point in my life. Taken much care with my personal life and co incidence. I had met this guy cast sunshine. Who had been obama's colleague at the university of chicago. We'd met the obama campaign just a couple of months before i highly public implosion and so in that moment of great vulnerability and with the future wide open because i literally did not have one thing on my schedule because my whole universe was the campaign and suddenly it was gone. My friendships Were gods people are off doing their thing give. Were nice and checked in on me but but it was so different than you know being on this on this team together and cast was there and and i for the first time in my life i allowed someone who wasn't an immediate family member to take care of me because i was almost catatonic and i was so ashamed that i've done this to the campaign and and i just was completely on the floor and cast was so good to me and so kind and i thought we again things were going okay and the relationship but that was right around the time where my antibodies normally kicked in and i began the method. What am i love. My friends called the scavenger hunt for the fatal flaw metro. How is days away from finding that. But instead i just kind of melted into his care and his goodness and It was the best thing that ever happened to me. I mean sense of. I don't know that. I ever would have had the discipline to just say. Actually my personal life matters to not just change in the world and supporting a great candidate or trying to promote human rights in this way or that way that that my fuel now in my life comes from my my my family my kids. My my husband casts And i just don't. We can't rewind the clock and in for so long. I just wanted to rewind the clock and wanted to undo these words and and to maintain you know this. This incredible opportunity. That i that i had on this amazing team and be part of the whole journey. That will listen and others were part of And i wanted to go back in time. But now i it was like a sort of knocked down blow which proves that you can bounce back also professionally if you if you're willing to swallow your pride in your dignity and other things along the way but also just sometimes it takes an artificial meteoric almost to get you to kind of right the balance In your life and and as a woman professional woman like the idea of admitting vulnerability admitting i needed help that wasn't high on my to do list until it was imposed on me by by real world's events and by my own stupidity will sam that is So one the. I think the interesting thing is i don't know if it's naievety or if it is that we were young or what but i mean i actually worth mentioning. I shouldn't meet you on the campaign. I'd known you since two thousand and five us. When barack obama came into the us senate one of the first people he wanted to meet with after he was appointed to the foreign relations. Committee was you. Except he didn't say samantha power. He said susan power. And i was like you mean susan powder like the like inspirational wackadoo. You you didn't tell us before this would have been perfect. For the education of an idealist like was like and so i came back to him and i was like. Is this what you want me to find. And he's like literally the face you know that he gets your the stupidest person right now. And he was like samantha power pulitzer prize winner but only sorry and so we had known each other so and we live near each other on capitol hill. So i used to see you on your green bike all the time on the way to and from work so when that happened and you had to leave the campaign years later there was such outrage like if we had known that we could unionized to bring you back like would have happened because it seemed based on how that campaign was going. It seems quite absurd that of all people who would have to leave any campaign it would be you but neither here nor there at this point because we got bound is bringing back all the bats in the bat cave so my dad is a bad cave rights and the bats are all flying around now. All the demons getting resurrected but but it was a it was a great. I mean i was just watched you from afar killing it through the rest of the campaign and just and just hoping that people would return my calls once it was all said and done and then we were all together once again but one of the reasons that barack obama did want to talk to you back then in two thousand five was because of all the work that you had been doing you you started. Your career is a war correspondent covering the yugoslav wars in the nineteen ninety s before coming into government house that experience inform your future career path and also what inspired you to transition from covering stories to changing stories. Yeah it's a great question. Well i think so. We back at all these phases. You're so young and we were so innocent. But i did go to the former yugoslavia right not about a year. After i graduated from college and i went with the idea of never again in my mind i was i was. I'm an immigrant to america from ireland And i only mentioned that in the context of i think some immigrants at least we we believe the slogans and we take them pretty seriously and i was coming of age at a time when the holocaust and the lessons of the holocaust were getting Heightened attention in high schools and in college campuses and so forth in the museum on the mall had just opened dedicated to commemorating. This are horrific crime. And yet there was bosnia and women being hauled into rape camps and and men in not death camps like auschwitz concentration camps. Many of them were executed and so forth. And so i went over there. You know saying this is so inconsistent. Shocked shocked that people in washington and elsewhere could be inconsistent and i think my experience on the ground i mean first of all. I may friendships with particularly the young female. Correspondents many people were drawn to that conflict. For the same reason just really the cold war had just ended and there was a feeling of such promise and was like wait. Why is ethnic cleansing happening in wire and people doing something about this so kind of very different spirit. Let's say than exist today among young people who were much more inclined to say. Let's get out of that place in pullback. In given how long these wars of lasted and how How insufficient the impact that has been made. Feels like it has been So i think on the ground. Probably what i got those Those female friendships they were all. would years. Later twenty years later would become Maids of honour and bridesmaids in my wedding and so forth. I think learning to to right but not just to right. Try to bridge the distance between two radically different experiences. That of my readers back in the united states and that of people who were being shelled or sniped at because of their religion or their ethnicity and just always kind of having that i am. You're great at this Both of you but a list. I saw you do this at the at the white house is just thinking about your audience okay. How do we put this in language. That is going to resonate for people. Who aren't here they're not. They're not living our political constraints or in the case of bosnia. They're not they don't know what it's like to send your kid off to school and not know if that child is gonna come come back home. Needless to say some americans do have that fear You know But but by large a lot of the readers did not and so. I think that ended up being hugely important as a diplomat. You know thinking okay. I've got my agenda. But i've got to walk in your shoes. Even the russian ambassador shoes. I gotta find a way to hang out in his shoes and think about what it'd be like to work for putin and think about how i get him to. Yes given that on the un security council. I can't do anything. Without russia's because of veto and we need the un security council to work for us interests and and the storytelling to just learning how to paint vivid pictures of the people that you're encountering you'd be amazed in diplomacy where you would because you've seen it but at just the turgid kind of timeless talking points that have no heart and are totally You know it's preordained. That they're not gonna convince anybody to do anything differently. Because they're just statements of one's preference that don't make any effort to bridge distances and that don't open up the fact that we actually have a fair amount in common even if we worked for governments. That are at loggerheads. We're mothers. Let's say or we're baseball fans or basketball fans or we're immigrants to our country you know looking for those those sort of common circles. Overlap let's say with people with whom we disagree. I think that that training as as a writer and just trying to to make incommensurate worlds connected in some way. I think is actually really really helpful in politics. An geopolitics ambassador. When you served under the obama administration you had to do a complicated. Balancing act between your natural idealist instincts and realism. It's kinda what your book is about When it comes to handling high-stakes policy issues or just one's personal life. When is the best time to lean in your idealistic side. And when is the best time to fall back and be a little bit more realist and do you have any more examples of that yet. I mean i guess. What i'd say is i feel elissa having gone through the grinder. The white house. If she feels the same way. But i feel very continuous with my unadulterated ideal self in. So far as what. I in of course now amount of government and have been teaching and can sound off and i'm not. It's not mediated in the way that it was when i was at the white house or or at the un. But but. i think it's important to to know what you want. Some sliver of the world to look like and to know what the changes that that you think would be. Optimal not gonna be perfect. None of us are utopian. But but it'd be kinda shocking now in two thousand twenty one especially but even when we went into the obama administration. If you weren't idealistic if you define idealism as believing the world is not as it ought to be in the changes are needed right. Be shocking with racial injustice and economic inequality in climate change alone. Even if. you didn't get to some of the issues that i'd worked on on human rights and mass atrocities and so forth. And so i think just. I think what's challenging. You wanna. you wanna keep an protect space to know who you are and what you want to see and then and never lose that this would allow me to call the kind of north star right like what is your. What is the vector that you would wish that your institution or the world were on toward some different set of circumstances and then we're got smarter not smart. Probably smart her is then. How do you do it. And that's i think we're the realism comes in. So i i don't know that the objectives changed so much i mean yes. You do have to make assessments about what to prioritize and and so forth and so there's a there's a realism in that but the realism is really like okay. Now how the hell am. I going to get the pentagon to want to cut off military assistance to the egyptian government after they've carried out a massacre like that's going to be really hard. Okay so is that is that. That's not my idealism. Hasn't gone anywhere it's just. It's problem solving around tactics. And in that case i was not wholly successful. But but what i did was billed as big a coalition as i could and get as many people on the same page so that in meetings we were emboldened to know that even though You know there'd be initially crickets would be the response to a proposal to do something controversial like that. It was emboldening for each of us to know that someone else was out there in the room. Who was gonna come in over the top because in institutions of any kind whether government or companies are at the academy have now not university Being that person to be the skunk at the lawn party is hard. But if you know they're other skunks in the room it. Actually you can break the seal a little more easily. So so it's you know and then when you lose which happens. I think it'd be a loss if the disappointment was discounted by realism. If you know what. I mean i think i think is then you don't get back up and think the next time there is a moment of opportunity or when they're the see on the hill that something might be brewing on capitol hill. That might be brewing. That might actually help your cause if you're kind of like yeah. I sort of expected that it is the military the egyptian military after all of course that was going to be challenging and and so i think to live the disappointment and to continue to feel. Of course you get a little bit jaded at the edges. Our if you if you tried and failed a few times you may be less likely to of push the boulder up the hill again. But it is. I think tactical realism about coalition building. A about how to frame what you're doing in terms that will be appealing to people who don't share your background right who've got different priorities and so forth but try to try to step into their shoes and think okay. Kill If i were to get them to come onto my side of this issue what is it in their own agenda That i can maybe play with here and so that is. I think that that's on reflection kind of how the idealism and realism come together rather than the more traditional story which is aw. I went in believing we can do big things and then you know learn. The life was british nasty insured. Or whatever i that's i mean. I came out of eight years in the obama administration having been just privileged to be part of his. You know negotiating. The paris agreement securing the iran nuclear deal so we wouldn't have iran mobilizing a big global coalition to end the epidemic. Being able him giving me licensed he. Obama giving me licensed to try to get political prisoners out of jail and to be a kind of activists t diplomat in a way. That was a little unfashionable at the at the time. And so if anything my idealism about what you could do what one person can do as part of a team like that Was was affirmed. But but i hope i'm more sophisticated now about how to how to get where you want to go see. I'm in your book. You are very open about your struggled to find work life balance especially while working in the obama administration With work usually winning and so now to me. This is all very relatable. Because i think it's a story for so many people especially who worked in the white house. But i remember armenian genocide in two thousand nine very vividly and i was wondering if you could tell us all about the day that declan was born. How the day started how the day started. Thank you so much well. If my writing about the elegance of my work life balance read familiar. It's also because. I was very inspired as i wrote you a buy your book elissa in your opening up all of that. I mean it really. That was for me new to share some of the the internal struggles that we have as we Juggle far too much Imperfectly and and so you really blazed the trail. There thought with your with your first memoir really really had an impact on me so to your question. It was actually the day before so a Tell the story is simply as i can. But on april twenty third Two thousand nine. I was around eight months pregnant. And barack obama the president can present. Only few months was giving a set of holocaust remembrance remarks at on capitol hill and because i had contributed a little bit just a few ideas to the remarks i was invited to Go and attend the speech and this actually listed was my first time in the bubble rain. The van Sara hurwitz one of obama's speechwriters invited me and got seat you're sure you've facilitated from the cockpit In the oval or near the oval but bottom line is. I'm so excited to get to go the speech but my heart is kind of breaking because in the week. Previous is lost debate to have obama fulfil promise made on the campaign to campaign to recognize the genocide and because my first book had been about american response to genocide had written about the armenian genocide. Because i promised the armenian american community who really campaign hard for obama that he would recognize. I also knew that. I was gonna have the task of telling them that he was. This was not going to happen because of the relationship with turkey and a fear that as we got our troops out of iraq we could destabilise a region for the sake of something that T to some could be viewed as a symbolic recognition to me. Seems like telling the truth and it's not symbolic to tell the truth but nonetheless. That was the argument. The other side. Which prevailed so the challenge was as happens often in government. Is you often are fighting. These fights over paper or over email. And you don't actually have the chance to to make the case to the person that you think is actually most likely to agree with you. Which in this case was barack obama. And so i was. I had been on the campaign before had to leave the campaign and i had been You know in email touch with obama before he became president many times a day as you were a and then suddenly i don't have email. They're all these layers. I can't just walk into the oval. I certainly don't have walk in privileges of you know. Mid level staffer lucky to have a job after the whole controversy in the campaign. And so i just don't have a way of talking to him and so it's a completely decision is made and i think he's breaking his promise and and i wonder if anybody's even talked to him about it. You know you just never know really in terms of how these things work. So i went to hear the remarks having lost this my first Big defeat on a human rights related issue. And i end up. Just everybody takes their seats. And i end up in kind of limbo. Because i'm deciding. Do i sit. Do i stand. I'm a staffer. So i should stand but i'm very pregnant. So maybe they'll let me sit. And so i- equivocate for too long. And i don't understand the bubble. And how in the bubble you cannot equivocate or you get left behind that left behind and a security guard came up when was going to actually forcibly remove me from this area in the capital because they thought i was like some kind of vagabond or something and next thing. I hear my friend who happens now. Suddenly be the president. Who i haven't really been in touch with since he became president and took the oath saying. Hey she's with me leave her alone and so instead of thinking. What a coincidence. And what a nice chance to say. Hello and find out how he's doing. The light goes off in my mind. I'm like armenian genocide. This is my. This is my chance i've lost. I've lost the debate. Let me now raise this issue with him. And unfortunately he had left his version of the bubble which is a much more sacred bubble than than what. I was in to use the restroom. And so he's like trying to go into the restroom. Any just sort of idly you know hoping he can just check the box and move on you know. Hey how you doing makes a comment about you know b- my tummy and you know how how good you abelson and asking about my due day and cast my husband and so he's trying to have like nice little social friendly friendly and so when he says how are you doing. I said not so good. It's like why is everything. Okay you know. I'm really worried about the armenians and his face just like rage and so inappropriate. I mean i just didn't know what was appropriate. What was inappropriate but bottom line is when he and this is true for all of us when we feel bad about something were way less nice right like if he if he actually was totally sold on the course of action that we re pursuing. He'd been. I think very kind of low key. And but he was he he. He knew this was a really tough one. And that there were people who are gonna be really disappointed and he felt terrible about it and so i because i raised it ended up being the recipient of some of that frustration and a little bit of defensiveness. So so we had the least pleasant conversation of Our our time knowing each other. And what i realized a couple of hours later i didn't notice that the time because i knew nothing about babies And i thought from the movies that when your water breaks. It's like some gushing thing. That happens so i didn't really take it amiss. That as i was listening to his remarks. I was feeling a little off and i thought it was just upset because i was kind of crying about what had happened at instead as sort of like crying and yet also like felt like. Was it extra humid. What was actually happening. Anyway it turned out my water had broken and also i didn't realize it because it was just in a more gradual way than in the movies and so but but you know within a few hours when i got back to the white house i thought i should probably call case and so i told him feeling a little moist little something might be and they're like catch your ass over to civilian hospital immediately and so i was admitted that night and my water had broken whether in this conversation or in the seat as i listened to him commemorate the holocaust in his remarks and as a result of all this. Thank you for asking lists of my son. Declan was born about a month early but on armenian genocide remembrance day which was the next day april twenty four so we light a candle every year. You can imagine my son's ambivalence about this story everything about this story. But it's the part of my book. That obama like the least that chester titled april. Twenty four. if you really. He's not a fan of that. Chapter of education of an idealist. But it's it is a sort of man in story. And i mean just the way these things come together life work. You know these jobs kind of all the same at the thing you said about the water breaking is so funny. Because you know as i've known more and more people more and more my friends have had children the more. I'm like okay. This is all completely in opposition. To what i've seen in movies. Oh yeah movies are written by men that oh yeah maybe women should be writing about childbirth instead of matthew. Gosh is totally big. Pools of water like under desks does happen. It can happen that way but those people to whom it happens. That way won't be under. You won't be confused about what's happening to them. I think it's the vast majority of other people who fall somewhere on the spectrum that need to be educated so your listeners. Now will will be informed in a way that i was not. Yeah i mean and luckily now. We have like a lot more internet than we used to have. Where both good and bad information can be obtained Okay so we like to end on a light note probably our most important question in two thousand sixteen forbes named you as the forty first a powerful woman in the world now as a woman and as a human. How did it feel to be on that list. Did you feel powerful. And does your last name help you at all fully realized power in the world. Well let's see i though. I don't think that one in government that the even though that there's an aspiration that everybody has to be more impactful thus to amass power in order to pursue. What one is there to do. I don't know anybody who actually feels powerful in government if you know what i mean like. I think you're just and i think this extends to the president is that you're just the salience of the constraints is so great. So you know i think i think it was really challenging for the president. For example everybody thinks the presence going to close guantanamo bay. That was one of my objectives as a longtime obama supporter staffer. And and then. Everybody blames obama because he didn't close guantanamo bay which makes perfect sense. He's the president. He's the commander in chief but The congress wrote into our appropriations bills that we couldn't bring any of the prisoners in guantanamo to the united states. And we couldn't pay for that. And and that's just an example of the president feeling a constraint and yet you know things being ascribed to you and so i felt that way on syria especially i had written so much about mass atrocities and how the united states should be really responsive and open the toolbox and be very creative. Five hundred thousand. People were killed in syria so it there was a tennis to any anytime. Somebody would. Approach me on a list or an award or this. Oh god really and And i will say an you were you. Were probably there. I only heard about it later. But when obama the whatever about the forbes list or this list obama got the nobel prize. Obama got the the biggest news of all And i bet that was one of the low points of his presidency in terms of like you know what i mean like. It's like no like people are ready at all these expectations now. They don't know what it's like working with mitch. Mcconnell it's hard you know who. Sam response his response was like i saw him first thing in the morning and i was like so the nobel prize. He's like wild. that's actually very negative. at least that's kind of like it's an out of body experience. Almost you know he's just floating in your happening to him but But yeah it's just aaron to your question it's it's you so want to get things done in the short period you haven't. I actually think having had four years of trump people in the current administration must be just more of a hurry. Right because to institutionalize lock things down and make sure that nobody else can come around in the future and and take down and and so that makes you just very focused. On the score. The real world scoreboard rather than the light lists and frills for at least that. That was my reaction. Scala go no now. They think i'm gonna. I'm gonna point to the discrepancy between my power. And and what i've actually able to do on a given day but Well one of your one of your kids is eleven now. So they're getting into the sassy age. Have they been like. How can the forty first most powerful woman in the world twenty sixteen not helped me with my algebra work homework that i have to have used that again. There is. there is a little bit of a. You know you're going to go be a member of the national security council and seeing joe biden. But you know you still haven't really graduated from toasts in and scrambled eggs for the family. You know this is going to be the time. This for years off from being in government at least going to be the time where i learned. The guitar was perfect. Mom compensated for all my time away and so i'm getting a lot of here. We go again and word of the less. We're we're where's the new moms skill set. That was gonna get the card that was like my big thing was after eight years of being the obama administration as i'm gonna make a damn christmas card. My my children at some point in their lives they are going to be captured looking in djelic. Find that moment you know in a week where they have an angelic. Look and here we are heading in the senate confirmation processes and i still haven't made a damn christmas card or holidays. You should just do it whenever you can find time in your schedule and send it out and be like this is when i had it is a. It's an odd me. I've had on my to do list has been like valentines days in patrick's day easter july fourth. And somehow those dates have come and gone. But you're right. It can be just wednesday to all my friends and family look at my beautiful family investor power. Thank you so much. This was a lot of fun. samantha powers' memoir. The education of an idealist is now out in paperback. You've got to come back and see us again. I'd love to this love to you. Guys are the best thank you. I love listening so thank you. Thank you all right time for a break but stick around because after this tan tran and grace pirate join on personal. Political hysteria is brought to you by ali. Pop all pop is a new kind of soda. It tastes just like the sodas i grew up with. But unlike other sodas that are full of sugar corn syrup an artificial ingredients like aspartame ollie. Pop is made with natural ingredients. That are actually good for you. They also have delicious. Nostalgic flavors like vintage cola classic root beer. Orange squeeze cherry vanilla and strawberry vanilla every single time. I read an alley. 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The app make sure to use the code hysteria to get one hundred dollars off your first month and show your support for the show that's hysteria and talks face dot com and welcome back. We have reached the part of the show where illicit and i are joined by two of our favorite people. Probably two of your favorite people Let me bring those two people on first. She is a writer producer and actor. It's grace park grace as high. It has been a while. Since i've seen you. I know it has been far too long. I have i seen you in twenty twenty one. Maybe yet january. It's all march considerable here. Twenty the all pandemic is just march. Twenty nineteen march march. Only twenty two. Yes that's it that's it. We're still wearing the march of our lives for sure i r- so glad to be here. Thank you bye so much for having me on. It's been a crazy busy time. But everything's going going great and i'm so excited to be here and i'm thrilled to be here with you. Ladies as always thank you thank you. We're glad to have you up next. She is a writer and a comedian. And she's the head writer. Once again of the cbs diversity showcase. Hello tantrum her love. Thank you so much for having me. We're so glad you're here today. so i just want to like just to let our listeners know you know we the show up we make the show up. We decide what's going to be in the show Starting around like sunday. Monday before we record and this week because of what had been going on in the uk in australia we had a pretty good idea of what we wanted. This conversation to be We're recording on wednesday. On tuesday there was a A tragedy in atlanta a man shot eight people aged spas three different asian. Spas six of those people were women and so that has sort of changed the way that the conversation is going to go so i want to start by quoting a law enforcement official from atlanta I don't want to name the guy because like who the fuck cares who says i don't want to name him. He doesn't deserve a name. But i do want to talk about the way that he's being treated by law enforcement and the press so there was a press conference with law enforcement and elissa. You watched it right. Yep what did you think of it. I mean look. I'm never quite sure how helpful those press conferences are because they come at a demand for information when people actually don't have all the information so i don't really think that The ever served the purpose they intended to. But you know. I think that my take away which i think is where you're going is that there was a lot of apologize like excusing or apologizing. For what this monster had done trying to explain. It was interesting because they tried to explain what they think was going on a while saying that they i. I hope i don't like undercut. You're about save. But essentially they were like he's a sex addict and he was blaming these parlors for giving him sort of like this outlet to do something. He knows that he shouldn't be doing so they. They don't they say they don't know the motive they don't think it's a hate crime. He's a sex addict so it's like either say you don't know more say it when you know because i just found it utterly unhelpful and frankly kind of silly yeah. One of the quotes the quote. That stuck up for me. Because i didn't watch the whole thing like you did elicit you have way more intestinal fortitude than i do compliment. Yeah it in the best possible way and also the worst because it means you're watching these press conferences But there was a quote that really stuck out to me. And i really want to hear your thoughts on this The quote that stuck out to me was a law enforcement. Officials said yesterday was a really bad day for him and this is what he did. This is a man describing. The actions of a man killed eight people ten. I know that this is like a hard story for you. And i just would love to hear you share. What's going through your mind and how you feel about that quote what it insane fucking thing to say You know i- i- feeling a lot of feelings and most of them are sadness and fear. I feel upset that i feel scared. Now in a way that i didn't before i feel like walking around in the midwest by myself in like walking past white men when i'm by myself i'm there now. I have this like tinge of like what are they gonna say. 'cause i already had it happened here. Like some fucking brohi. College student told me to fuck off and like why you're the least. Fuck off person because he he tried to give me a high five. And i didn't give him one and he told me to fuck off bitch which felt like very both like sexist but also he didn't do it to any of the like he just did it to me and i was on on the street by myself. Anyway i think what i i think. My overall fear is that hearing him hearing that and hearing the fact that they're not saying they're like we can't say it's a hate crime we can't say it's gendered violence yet. That guy isn't gonna fuck in show up in the police interrogation and say those things. Can we please connect the dots and call it what it is. It is a hate crime and it is gendered violence specifically it is violence against women and i saw something that was shared that i think is is very pertinent to this. Is that something that is not talked about enough with regards to racial. Violence against asians is a type of sexual violence. That asian women face how interconnected that is to violence against those in the sex trade. An how that binds has been so deeply shaped by american imperial worlds wars in asia. Like this isn't a new thing. The way that asian women are sexualize in violence against women in violence against women is because we have this we allow in our normalizing these patriarchal or like boys will be boys narrative which is why that guy can say. It's the worst day. Like i had a bad day. He was able to center himself. Because he's like god. Damn i can send her myself and say like i had a bad day today because i gotta go deal with a boy who is being bad. Speeding ticket. I hate crimes. A bad day. there's a bad day. we'll also not for nothing. They treat these villains these criminals. These murderers lake children. Did anybody think this fucking guy doesn't know the penalty is a hundred times stiffer if it is categorized as a hate crime. Look why that's why. I think these press conferences are so fucking stupid because like give him the benefit of the doubt. So now you have every anchor on every cable news channel being like he said it wasn't a hate hand no vulgar. You walking kidding me. Give me a murky right. Where because people are tainted by the first information they receive exactly and that's sort of like the problem with breaking news reporting. Is that yeah. I think it would be really irresponsible for police to come out and say definitively yes this one hundred percent we know we have evidence that this is what happened. But it's also you're responsible of the news media to report it without like a pile of grains of salt like just to preface. This is an ongoing investigation. This is what we i sure. Know this is what we don't know. Here's some wild shit. The cops say based on nothing you know. And that's what that's what it feels like to me. I want to tie this into kind of the larger point here because the excuse making is something we see that in often in a lot of cases accompanies these moments that are like watershed moments where people come together and are like what the fuck something needs to change. It's time for something to change. There's on the other side of that. Somebody saying well. Actually the person who was doing these things the person that did. This isn't so bad. Were humanizing the person who is the perpetrator and we're villain ising the victims so In australia this week. Thousands of people mostly women participated in marches. And that's because there have been multiple sexual assault allegations involving current members of parliament current members of parliament There is a woman who says she was raped in a minister's office in two thousand nineteen. Another person the attorney general christian porter was investigated for rape in nineteen eighty eight Women are pretty mad about it and The prime minister scott morrison so far will not meet with organizers or protesters. Which look i know. Some nice scott's but that's a typical scott move right Right it's just like yeah. Yeah yeah yeah yes scott. Of course you won't meet with them. Come on over the past weekend there were protests in the uk against the abduction and murder thirty-three-year-old. Sarah everard Everard was walking home alone at night in london. On march third on march ninth metropolitan. Police officer was arrested for the crime. on the tenth remains were found. There was a vigil in clapham. Common that Grew into a large demonstration and police responded in a very copy way. I'm going to say when. They tackled and arrested several of the women who were armed with candles and signs So those two protests have gotten a little bit less attention than huge protests that went on in mexico on international women's day Sure people read about this but if you didn't what is going on in mexico when it comes to women and girls is major and important A large crowd carrying their children blow torches bats. An hammers protested outside of the national palace in mexico city The protests were sparked because mexican. President andres manuel lopez. Obrador supports felix. Salgado macedonia who is a candidate for governor in the state of guerrero who has been accused of rape by several women in addition Mexico has a super high rate of violence against women and average of ten women were killed in mexico every day last year the sixteen thousand cases of rape one investigation found that only five percent of sexual assault allegations including rape result in a criminal sentence in mexico in turkey on international women's day. Thirteen women were arrested and detained for insulting the president insulting. The president Thousands of marched in india against sexual violence in the us Last february thousands of women protested violence suffered by native indigenous women in the us and canada native and indigenous women suffer violence at a much higher rate than other groups and last year on international women's day one million chilean women took to the streets in santiago to protest violence against women and the next day. They just didn't show up for work to show what it would look like without them. So i'm not trying to equivocate between all of these movements But what i am trying to do is kind of draw thread between all of them like in every part of the world women do not feel as safe as men and there is a reason for that and the protests are happening in an attempt to change those reasons. Grace i wanna toss to you. Because every time women gather on mass to protests in against violence against women Which is overwhelmingly done to us. By men. There are men who unhelpfully jump in and claim not all men. What do you make of the not all men guys you know i. It's interesting especially in the context of mexico because one of the plants that president himself has has issued an sort of counter to to these protests is. Look at all the women that i employ all the women in my minister. They're more women in my administration than any administration. So mexico's fine. We as a country totally fine because look how many women are employed by my administration. And i think that we are seeing a. I think we're seeing that everywhere i think. Actually there's something that that Governor cuomo's offices argued as well or how many women that i have in my office. So i've done it too exactly exactly. So there's this quick is false equivocation that if women are presence if women are employed than violence against women doesn't exist but the fact of the matter is that those two things are very very very separate but also point because i am so glad that we're talking about mexico today. There's an interesting element to transportation to public transportation in mexico. Which is that. they're actually a women. Only a subway cars on subways because of the amount of violence which i just i find is striking because you know god for so long suffragettes in this country and and feminists across the world have fought for equality so that we can occupy the same public spaces as men but now we have moved so far in the direction of of such vicious and tangible violence against women in public spaces that now countries are forced to make spaces just for women in public areas and in public Public transportation Spots and i find that to be really sad that though there is at least an awareness of the kind of violence is happening and there are moves to make women feel more safe that there is also just acceptance. That violence is everywhere. You know and so rather than change rather than fix. The problem is just put a band aid on it by making sure that we're yeah. They were providing women only spaces. It looks like we're doing something. Not sure that. Answer the question but it was. I just been been thinking a lot about about this particular with with mexico As i see how. They've really mangled the response to these protests and It is at once heartening that there are so many women that are willing to take to the streets and men to not to disregard their involvement. No men not no man the site of not all men not no man not no but You know the one thing that will also say to is is. I do believe that a threat that we're seeing in many of these protests across the world is. The language is a little less pretty in a way that i find really useful. But it's not like we have to support women and let's look out for women we need to stop rape. We need to stop misogyny. We need to stop assaults against women. We have to stop femicide. I'm seeing more. And i think it's because there's more anger in women across the world that we are you know we have to be specific and we have to use language that is raw and that is real in order to get the point across because support all women and let's be there for each other and like give your ladies a hug or whatever bullshit. It's too soft. It's too pretty And that's i think common thread that i've seen throughout all of these protests that language of like we support women and that that sort of softness also completely erases who is doing a lot of the violence. Like so many of these things it's like the stats like one in. So many women have experienced sexual assault. Okay well like who's doing it Like yeah it's like okay. So we all this. Violence is happening. But we don't have a perpetrator. We're not going to name him him. We're not going to name the men that the that are the violence that is being put on women is mostly at the hands of men and like we don't name it and like i think it's i think it's very much a systemic thing like you said grace of like having these women only sections on the bus like it's sad because i think that is you know governments and people power politicians being like you know what we do see. It's a problem but again it is on you women to take care of yourselves. Get on the right train Don't walk home at night. Be with friends. You know all of these things like we have just normalized for all of our friends and family women. Trans folks nonbinary. Folks like to be afraid moving in public space and we have normalized normalized it It's like we've totally thrown in the towel on changing the men that are doing the violence. Yep we're like well. They can't be bothered to alter their lives in any way whatsoever. So let's totally refashioned the train system to accommodate the fact that they get better. It's like a such a low expectation of what men in general are capable of elissa. I'm i would love to hear from you about what about men who compare women's fear of being assaulted or raped but on the on the walk home from from work. Like or from a friend's house like sarah everard. What do you think about men who compare that to their fears of being robbed while ramadad. So what one. Just to go back to grace's point for a second. It shows the inherent laziness. Here is. we're going to give you which we're going to give you a special train right on right instead of saying we're going to increase the penalties against people who commit these crimes and also not for nothing but fucking psychopaths that want to commit crimes against women putting them all in the same cars not the way to go like that's and i don't even mean to be funnier like logistically. That's a terrible idea. Backs yes exactly. It's terrible the conference that's a creep con. We're we're putting them together in a in a convince situation yes and so you know what i say to men. Who are you know what it's like to worry about being robbed okay when you were sixteen and grew up in upstate new york okay upstate new york at this time when cows probably outnumbered kids in my high school and i was taught. You always carry your key between your fingers when you go to your car. You'll always check the back seat of your car before you get in it like okay. We've lived with that our whole lives. I have a beeper. I have a beeper thing in my bag. You pull the pin out at flashes. It makes noise. You know to try to ward people away. I don't know one man. That has that in his car or thinks to himself before he leaves to go down to the city. Do i have my bird beeper just because you never know. So these men They just they just they just don't know guess. What chances are if you're really just being straight up robbed and you give them your money. They're gonna leave the fuck alone okay. That's not what happens when a woman gets assaulted because she's about to be fucking raped. I think that those guys need to just continue their membership in the not. All men club and You know leave the leave. The opining on safety concerns people who actually have them Tnn i if you're comfortable sharing Do you remember the first. Because eliza said that like for our whole lives were walking with our keys between our fingers and everybody was nodding here And i've tried to think about this for myself like. Do you remember the first time that you felt like compelled to either fear sexual violence or speak out against it and what happened. I can think about like the fear of it. I come from a family of ball sister sisters. I have three sisters. And i my mom and i and my oldest sister used to go to new york a lot together. 'cause my sister and ghost rider word and i just remember like any time we got like truly anytime we got into a car would always look in the back. Like non like without question would always look in the back in the other thing i remember is being like it has happened a lot of times but like being at a bar and some man trying to pass through and like touching the back of my like the bottom of my back and i spoke up and i was like. Don't do that. And he took offense to that and it's little moments like that that allow for things to trickle to larger like the level of entitlement that men move through space feeling like they can put their hands in places on women in a certain way. Like that's a small thing but it made me feel violated. And i spoke up and he took offense to that and thought i was like tried to make me feel like i was not. I was in the wrong that it was the wrong for not liking like it's it's his he's he can do whatever you want and your responsibility is to like it. I like it. I one of the last things that i did in a public space right before the pandemic was was that a mall and i got into a fight with the dude. This is real angry. Grace never comes out. But i was trying to pay for something at some department store. My husband was trying on shoes in a different area. And i was trying to pay for something and this guy rolls up. And he's got like a group of women around him and he just steps in my space like he can tell that. I'm checking out but i'm not done yet. And he just you know he gets. He gets close to me that his elbow was like in my ribs. And he's laughing. He's gesticulating and he's making his presence very well known he's taking a lot of space and like you can is that something was like don here or something and it was a it was a little kurt but it wasn't like fuck you just like. I'm not done yet. And he was like. Oh really wow you wanna start a fight into my face and i. It took everything. I didn't hold back. I was like no sir. I'm just trying to stay in my space here to finish my transaction or whatever and it was just a perfect example of exactly what you're talking about that men move through space expecting us to move out of the way for them which is emblematic of the conversation that we're having men moved through life expecting to take up the space that they're going to make the decisions that they are going to and we as women are expected to mold to that and and when that is challenged violence occurs which is why i believe we are seeing these greater threads violence all over all over the world. Do you think that it's more violence or do you think that it's women being like no dude like if you look at like what women face throughout history. I feel like the difference now is not the level of violence. It's women being like no. I think you're right. I think you're absolutely right. Yeah and that's what what men are uncomfortable with. They are not historically accustomed to women actually speaking up against them and your violence has occurred throughout history and it is not new. It is not new by any means it's i am on a lot of sports instagram's and the comments section is truly wild place for sexism but any time there's like female athletes or any sort of mention of equality. There is always someone who's like if it's going to be equality will then. Can i punch a woman in it's like can can the equality be that nobody gets punched life. I mean my comeback for that. I don't know can you have a baby. Visit division of labor women like the somebody born with a uterus was reproductively capable has certain abilities than some people can do push-ups but the thought that like in equality to that person was like okay. Well then can. I fight them. Can i like. Can i go box a woman and it's like no i think it's i think it's okay if we nobody gets punched i think a blanket of no violence is the equality that we're trying to get to bright men have falsely equivocated masculinity with violence as though to be a man inherently means to be violent and that when we challenge violence we are challenging masculinity. Those things are not one of the same. you can be a man and not be I i totally agree. And i think. It's like eliza. I was you know you and i have kind of like texted a little bit about like protest movements stateside like here in the us When it comes to like women standing up against gender inequality like the women's march you know that was one of the biggest demonstrations globally in history when it happened in two thousand seventeen but before that there were slot walks and then there was like take back the night. yeah Do you feel frustrated that this issue is coming up not only in the us but globally over and over again and do you see that as like us repeating our mistakes and what needs to change. Do you think in order for something to be considered like a success footsie. So here's what i think. I think that it is all successful. Fry it's all successful because the truth is that before people were suffering in silence before you know one of the most interesting things about the women's march back in january of seventeen wasn't that there were massive crowds in new york and la. It's that thousands of cities participated and it's the actual percentages of populations in places like alaska participated. And so i think that sometimes it's looked at as these problems are like elitist is just white ladies. They're just they wanna wear their merged and they wanna go out in march and i think that what these protests all do is is really kind of bring everybody's stories out there. There's not one kind of issue that the galvin will actually. Donald trump sort of galvanized people around the women's march but there were so many different experiences that people had in their own lives that got them out to march and to see all these other women and to meet all these other people and families who had had either similar problems are different problems and to realize that like it takes everybody to be loud about these issues and say yeah you think you think you pass some laws you think that we all wear matching shirts that everything's fixed in fine and it's not and the truth is though i think that by continuing to march i mean look i think that and i'm not being america centric care but i think that the movement of the women's march galvanized all sorts of communities across the world that started talking about the problems in their communities which may have been very different than the ones that started the marches here in america. And so i think that getting people together so that they know that they're not alone. There forming support systems. They strengthen their communities when they do these sort of demonstrations of of solidarity by getting together and marching and they also continued to remind people. It's not over. it's not fixed. You know just because donald trump's not president anymore doesn't mean it's fixed in america is because argentina has legalized abortion. Doesn't mean that it's easy to be access doesn't mean that women have exactly information about how to get it done safely and properly. I mean you're you're absolutely right to that. Even when laws are passed doesn't mean necessarily that they are implemented. There's a big difference between a passing of law and implementation of a law that that can take generations to ex Yeah i mean look at what happened in chile chile as an example of like a super 'cause and seeming effect like the one million women marching in santiago and twenty twenty at the end last year. They got a whole new constitution like that that that mandates gender parody in in the government representation like they re wrote the constitution. And i think it was a long time coming because they're old constitution was like a relic from the pinochet area era. I think they probably wanted to move on beyond that. But you know it it works. I think that it's like it's not just like a legal change. I think it's also a cultural change and you can't really legislate culture so tan. I want to end with you. Because we have to move onto the next segment of the show but i mean look. I hate that i feel the need to even say this like we all know unlike some men. We're all fine with some some men that we know. My some of my favorite dads are men. But you know it does seem like the common thread here has been like. Do you think that giant Women's movements are changing men's minds. And how should men go about like the the good man. How should the good men go about changing the culture that the bad men are are displaying. I mean i do think it's changing the culture for men. And i think for you know quote good men is is to speak up and and say something and to you. Know advocate for women. Who aren't related to you. You know just like an advocate for women across the board if you don't know them When you see something that happens that you speak up like for example hate to bring him up but you know that the reporter from good morning britain. That spoke up against piers morgan. It was it. Was that if a woman had i. I really believe that. If a woman had tried to confront him that he would have pushed back not listen interrupted and yeah it takes an i think it it does. It takes like men. If you're hanging out with all your boys picking fantasy football drafts. And someone says something. Sexist homophobic say something. Because i think those like you said cultural it's both legislative but also culturally like if we allow for these jokes that are sexist phobic and racist to continue to get just a pass it dehumanizes people in a way that then trickles into rhetoric that then turns into legislation that is violent and then also that like seeps into people's brains in a way that leads to white supremacist violence so you know and i say white supremacists because i think that has all entangled with like how violence against women as well and so good men out there to speak up. We need you. We need you to help us push back against this bullshit. Yeah like use your power if you have it and you're not using it. What's the what's the point in having it. If you're if you're one of those guys like you know. I i've got privilege i've got privilege. I love women feminist like okay. Yeah use that and be uncomfortable. Sometimes like it's it's literally we're uncomfortable a lot of the time so maybe like i'm uncomfortable. I'm like i'm totally uncomfortable. Oh it's like it's like we get our periods. Once a month they should also pick one week of the month where they're very uncomfortable and they stand up against everything they do. That's what i meant. When i said congrad gray as yeah do it take a week every month men and just feel like i'm gonna be a pain in the ass to every man that is a sexist homophobic or racist. I will buy you advil. I will bring you ice cream. I think it's only fair Okay let's take a quick break but when we come back we're going to switch gears and do i feel patty and welcome back. We are almost at the end of the show but not quite there which means it's time for us to air. Our petty feelings it is. I feel petty. I'll go first. Because i think mine is dumb. I wish everybody could hear us like shuffling. Around what order. We're going to go in because we have all kind of vibe the show mines worse. No mine's worst like a humility Okay i'm gonna go first. So it's this isn't that petty this bothers me all the time But you know it's international women's month or women's history month or whatever and we had international women's day and stuff which means that a lot of things that don't do dick to help women are trying to sell me things on the basis of a false feeling of them doing nice things for women. I think that caused marketing. If it's actually backed up with like cool action and cool. Initiatives is like i'm totally behind it. I love it. I love intentional. Inclusion of people This is the system we live in. Whatever it's it's fine. But you know what i don't like i don't like being told that like a house. Cleaner is empowering like let things be norm like there are things that are just not empowering products. It's our whole for me to buy this product. Busy not toilet paper. It's not a federal. I'm just. I'm just trying to cape a clean down there. Yeah exactly like you know what. Let's just talk about it as little as possible. It's just for cleaning my asshole. I don't need any more thoughts on this. But i think the worst part is when things that are harmful to women are marketed to us as empowering like i think i've seen a couple of advertisements for like scented feminine products and douche products. That are like girl. I know you don't go girl. That's that's bad for the for the unfort- another regions and we. It's like it's it. It drives me nuts when things that are actually bad for us or that make us feel like shit or that that like perpetuate harmful stereotypes are marketed to us. As somehow empowering i am against it i it annoys me and the thing is i think. I don't think i'm like that much smarter than most people. I think i'm about like life took that out there. We love you. That's a terrible thing to think. Because i will go mad with power but the thing is like i think that most people are not dumb enough to fall for those things and the fact that they keep hammering it over and over is like come on man. You're really going to try to tell me that. This douche product is empowering everybody learns said that it's bad free like it's it's so annoying. I it feels very very. that's some. Ceo advertising man. That's like don draper being like this month. Exactly and then whatever. The peggy olson is in that meeting and leaving okay. And what do you feel about this week. You know okay gonna along the of international women's history month There is a house hunters international the soda and i just. It's probably from several years ago. House hunters international germany. I want to call out the husband who moved his entire family his pregnant wife and two little girls and every time they went to the house he she kept him being like. I really just want to move somewhere. That is close to okay. I just want to move somewhere that has community because we're moving our family across the world. I want my girls to be able to play with other kids and he kept on being like. It's about the commute for me. It's about. I needed to be closer to the office. Side and so. The options were like to stunning homes in the city centre and so cool close to community or for the house that is in the section that they called industrialize that has no homes around it it his. There's like no community. There are no stores he kept on being like. This is the best for me. I this is. This is the best for me. And let's say it was being host honors. Because i would scream at the television. If you're making the move you don't get the vote like you don't get the boat you don't get if you are making everyone move you if you are making everyone move. You don't get to go. This is the best for me. I started taking i actually. It felt really good. I started giving the tv the middle finger. I was like fuck. Fuck you man liberating but i feel pity about that. That husband in germany episode. Iv hope you're over at seattle. They're in ireland france spain. They're everywhere they're everywhere. All your house hunters international. You don't get to pick the house. Sorry like the complete. The lack of the cultural. I follow a lot of like threads on reddit communities. Because i love like learning about people's bad lives and makes me feel good that i have an okay one And there's all of these like there's always like the asshole my wife's pregnant she doesn't want to move into a fifth floor walkup but i like it. It's like why you fucking empathy. You are always. If you're like pregnant wife wants something or you're the mother of your children who takes care of your children is like i have all these children to take care of and this is not good for me and you're not having maybe there s aswell but there's just one person who always carries the fucking groceries. Okay so fuck you fuck you and your i. Having so many of the house hunters international. Men are like i made her give up her dream to move to a place where she has no one and knows nothing about the country. Maybe i could give her a little bit larger of a kitchen. And you're like yeah. Maybe i could give her a bigger room for her to make me snacks Elissa what is your. I feel this week. Oh god so you guys got to be honest. Know sharon osborne no idea. No idea she was on a talk show had no idea but i feel like there are a lot of other people that could potentially take her spot. Yes that aren't so what's the word like now offensive. I can't believe it know. People always tell on themselves when they tried to defend themselves. And so it's like look girl. You really fucked up and so did my were you out. Gotten out there and be like i lost my shit. I was so wrong. I was really just defending my friend and i went too far and what i should have said is that i defend him but not what he did or something instead she just doubled down and now every person who has ever co host that show with her his come out and said you know what sharon you've said some wild shit your shars newsletter really sort of laid it all bear the other night and i just i guess my petty is hey shan known. That's a good one. And it's extremely petty. I support it. Thank you it was either that or ron. Desantis is like a cadaver. That's been in the hudson and this just seemed like the governor of florida's not doing it looks like he has. He got his hair from a grave. Rob in the seventy s Okay grace bring us okay. All right listen. I have seen the arguments about skinny. Jean that we can't wear skinny jeans anymore. That we gotta wear mom jeans that we at bell bottoms. I i am i of the millennial generation and i don't know what the fuck i'm supposed to wear. But here's my. I feel petty. I don't want to be wearing jeans. Like genes are alive. That had been fed to us for generations now and it leads to stop. They're not comfortable. They're not cozy. i don't like him. I'm not a woman who lives in jeans. You can't calvin whatever. Yes you can get in between me. And my calvin because i don't own any and i don't want to own any so the conversation is us trying to always me trying to figure out what style of jeans i want what i don't even want. What is a style of something that you need to incorporate georgia. When you don't even want it at all. I feel petty. Is that i i read genes right now. I got soft joggers on all about the soft job. I like leggings. joggers. I like you know taylor. Cut spacey sorta things. That's fine on occasion. Bike short loved like short. A pandemic has introduced me back to the magic of the bike short. I will tell you what though jeans have no place in my life. And i don't know that they ever will love it Yeah i just don't see grace to to add to what you're saying. I completely agree. I don't see us going back to genes after this man. We have sorry we on style. they're never flattering. There's not like one style that is flattering for every woman's body. It's just not that doesn't exist so you know. Stop trying to sell us something. That's not comfortable. that isn't universally stylish. A fucking sucks rights violation. I just all right. I think that's fair. Okay and so now we've got everything. We feel petty about. I believe today i'm even. I have like a whole notes out. Like where i'm just like. What do i. I don't like it when people like catering die like it's just it should discuss off only one and it's the only one they give out during road races. So if you like are somebody who does like five ks or whatever and it's always warm and it looks it's just warm yellow licko and you're running during the no grace are we. He's not wrong. Oh my gosh guys Wish to show was like five long tian in grace. Thank you so much for coming by elissa. Thank you for being my ride or die for this week where we had like five recording sessions. Thank you to florida. Agricultural commissioner nikki freed thank you. To embassador samantha power. And thanks most of all you the listeners. There will be more hysteria for you next week. And this notion. Janet exposed van it as hysteria is crooked media. Production carolina reston is our producer. Our executive producer is me. Aaron ryan eliza master. Monaco is co producer and. Brian is associate producer. Kyle seguin is our sound engineer. And our editor is sarah give alaska and the folks a chapter for our digital team normal conan and magic ruth. Thank you juliette. Extra for production support every week. Now i'm excited to speak with kayo acids zoo the owner of komai sushi kitchen in austin and one of forty thousand restaurants that are on grubs restaurant her platform. Cayo tell us about your restaurant at the Kitchen we specialize sushi in home style. Japanese cuisine along with japanese top food with a very casual environment event welcoming atmosphere. How did you get into the restaurant business. My dad was always working for a restaurant in my parents. Always likes to take us out. That's where i am today. What inspires your dishes. My parents could gain ozone my husband size could i was feeding. My family is might took is are very young. So what is the most popular dish at komonews. Spicy chunk tuna wrapping associate vice in seaweed is vice a tasty we always this most but also we or fresh fish from toyota. Sue every wednesday in serve as That's another popular days. How does the goal when opening up your restaurant by today's i was working as a server. And then there's a lot of customers. Hey you up my birthday next year or a. You are already bursary next year. Realizing the japanese cuisine is considered one of them. Expensive cuisine and and people can't afford every day so when i came up with the idea of opening my own restaurant i wanna to make our environment as possible an affordable as possible. So people can come back as often as they want. How has the last year ben. We had to change around our concept. Completely one hundred percent to Take out only always take out pickup surveys. We have grab who debris service in a has been helping us because we don't have enough stuff sued Places but the gra hobbies. Well established system. That could integrate resolve are pure system that we already so we did spend any time or any effort but we have been able to davor food to people outside of our neighborhood as being very helpful. I heard that twenty four percent of chefs in the us are women only twenty four percent. What's it like being female chef in the industry. I think i was lucky. I didn't feel any different being a female shopping in the kitchen. Some titles we have to raise comedy and we have very limited time frame that we can be outside in war. How do you think that we can change that. How can we make that number grow. What can people do. Grab a hazard. home that order from women restaurants that celebrate necessarily support to food from women. Restaurant will be very helpful for us. Thank you for joining us. Cayo to find women lead restaurants like komai sushi kitchen in your area goto restaurant. Her dot com use offer code hysteria. Five to get five dollars off orders of fifteen dollars or more limited time offer. Plus corrupt hubs donate the change feature allows you to round up change on your order. This month's donations go to world. Central kitchens work supporting women lead restaurants who prepare and deliver meals to women and families impacted by the pandemic. Everyone is brian with crooked. President biden is already halfway through his first one hundred days on the new season of rubicon. We're going week by week. Assessing all of biden's early decisions to see if they meet the moment that means covid. Relief stood loan forgiveness. Climate action schools foreign policy. And getting all the right people into the right jobs so join us. Rubicon new episodes drop every friday. Subscribe to rubicon on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

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How Does Animal Crossing's Black Market Reflect the Real World Economy?

Wild Wild Tech

29:38 min | 9 months ago

How Does Animal Crossing's Black Market Reflect the Real World Economy?

"Alright confession time Jordan I don't know the first thing about investments. Do you ever purchased stocks. Not once yeah neither did I. How collective depends? I couldn't tell you buy low sell high that ring. Any bells. In an advert woods or how `bout turnips yes. Yes. This one I do is that is that what this does avow that's what this episode is about. Yeah. Today, we're talking about it mania an animal crossing animal crossing maybe the biggest success story in games right now it's a game for the wildly popular Nintendo switch and arrived in late March twenty twenty just as the world was answering lockdown. Yeah I've been playing since the day it came out and a lot of my. Friends have as well. It's basically where we hang out because we see each other in real life actually interviewed a bunch of them in the game for a podcast Oh. What a good idea for those who may not know it's very sweet game were you go off to a deserted island and very slowly turned it into a vibrant town full of animal friends. But Funny Story Jordan you and your friends and your villagers aren't the only guest on your island someone else shows up. who capitalism my friend. A- capitalism comes and it brings with it mania over turnips a market crash bounces for protection adorable animal trafficking, all the horrors of the free market. So today we're going to hear from someone who got caught up in the craze firsthand. Josh? Money. Now it's just I don't need any more of it for literally any reason it gets wild. So wild, the virtual economy of crossing even began to spill over into the real economy affecting players both inside and outside the game. So how did the relaxing world of animal crossing acute soothing game blur the line between game world and the real world and become a nightmare. When we get back how animal crossing turned Willful Wall Street. Hello and welcome back to wild wild tech I'm Josh. And I'm doing Erika Weber and we are back again to bring you some of the wild stories from where culture and technology collide like video games that get a little out of. Extremely out of hand, but it doesn't start that way. It never does. So explain animal crossing people who may not be familiar I thought it'd be fun to play together ready to jump in. Yeah absolutely. Some island or should I go to yours? Can you come to my island because my flowers? Needful cheering. Does that. Okay. Yes. Sure. I'll go ahead and use the code you gave me earlier to fly to your island. So, in crossing your characters cute little around cartoon human right and you have your own islands and now I've landed and there's Jordan she's wearing cute little address glasses looks a lot like how she looks. Now Yeah everyone says that and the dresses are very important to me. My Wardrobe is the most important thing in the game. So yeah, in addition to like flowers outfits in animal crossing everyone has a house that you can continually decorate an improve. You can also catch fish pick fruit, collect bugs, or fossils, and trade with other players, and of course, a big part of the game is doing chores, but with your friends. Jordan speaking chores with friends where the flowers unique water. So you should be able to see the clearly marked out garden with a sign that I made myself with a pitcher for watering can on it so you could just water everything that is in soil please. Wow, Jordan's flowers are all organized along a color spectrum, which is very, very lovely, and there's like little benches there. You can sit in and Meyer them very well done Nice Botanical Garden Experience Jordan. Thank you just you're yeah that's what animal crossing is all about relaxation cuteness friendship. So now you know the basics of animal crossing and why people are so drawn to it. Another reason animal crossing so successful is that it arrived in a perfect storm of circumstance. There is the Nintendo switch, which is a wildly popular video game console that's appealing to people who maybe weren't drawn to an xbox playstation. There's the fact that Atom Crossing New Horizons the latest in a series arrived seven years after the previous animal crossing new leaf and I've been waiting every single year. Yeah there's always been. A hardcore you know animal crossing fan base like people love these games and then there's also the fact that this game is connected console and a time where it's incredibly easy to share what you're up to on social media. Yes, and it's also super approachable. It's not difficult to play. It doesn't try to test you and it's all about expressing yourself as well. It's about creativity and kind of showing what you can do kind of like the Sims of all those the biggest reason animal crossing became phenomenon was the unforeseen timing of the game animal crossing arrived just as people around the world. Answered Self Quarantine in response to the coronavirus pandemic giving everyone a new shared social space at the same time we lost most of them. Yeah. I mean it was basically how I was talking to my friends during lockdown when I couldn't see them in person. Yeah. It's also helpful and compelling because animal crossing gives you concrete things to do. You don't just dream up whatever you want to put on your island you have to work for it. Your job may be on furlough, but here's adorable meaningful work. You need money bells in the animal crossing universe to help build out the island. Of Your Dreams, you have a mortgage to pay off but don't worry there's no interest or deadline cool clothes and decor to by and all sorts of things you can get to just improve the appearance of your island of close to get the money you have to do kind of chose like you have to do fishing catch bugs, things like that collect fossils like I've been doing. Yeah. I'm big on collecting fossils 'cause I WANNA get a museum full of them? It's great once you museum is fully, you can sell the spasm for lots of bells. I WANNA be filthy rich and bells. And it sounds strange if you've never played the game right but there's like this, the soothing, very accomplished feeling that comes from clearing tasks and working towards you know a bigger house or or a Koi pond, but you've always wanted but also like in the real world working isn't the fastest way to make money and that is where the turnips come in. Animal animal crossing the selling of turnips is called the stock market get because turnips have stokes S. T. a. l.. K. and that sounds like stocks S. T. O. C. K. in case anyone needed an explanation the stock market is a speculative market. So once a week on Sunday mornings, you buy tenets from a traveling turnip merchant you can buy as many as you like and the price. Is Always between ninety and one, hundred, ten bells I think, and then every day of the week following that you can sell those turnips at the store on your island or someone else's island at a price that changes twice a day, and then the goal is to turn a profit before the following Sunday because if you don't sell them then at that point they wrought and they become worthless. And the interesting thing about this like Jordan said is that everyone has a different price. So even if you're island store is buying turnips for pennies on the bell while there's a good chance, you can make a fortune selling them on someone else's island. You've just gotTa find out which so can you see where this is going Joshua? I have been there done that. Got The t shirt. Yeah. But I wanted to talk to someone who got in deep someone who won Big High Zach, Reno. I live in Los. Angeles. I am an actor and a writer and a host of a podcast called book the improvised musical or we improvise a musical and that's it. Zach. Came to my attention because the stock market caused them to do something unusual on his animal crossing island but we'll get to that I. I wanted. To know what drew him into the game and it wasn't the high stakes speculative market at its core say life simulator and it was just like a very low stress game where you sort of walk around and decorate Your House and talk to your animal friends all of which things are very and have always been inside of my brand. The other thing I like about it is that it is a sort of game that is meant to be played. Over a long period of time because it's on a real time clock, say the game doesn't pose and wait for you. When you go to sleep, it's the opposite of fast paced, which is kind of intriguing something. adorable is always happening round the clock. So you log in at three o'clock pm it's three o'clock. There you lock at three o'clock. Am It's the middle of the night and there's different stuff going on and the seasons change right so This game will be different a month from now than it is now, which is cool. Yeah and despite Zach's chill intentions, he quickly threw himself into the stock market once it opened. I. Jumped in right away and the first two weeks I was really aggressive about it like I bought literally took literally all the money I had put it in the stock market and then went on twitter and like typed in turnips and then refreshed over and over again. Found, found like a good island price that I could do it. That was too crazy and I didn't enjoy that at all. This is the wild part to me. Immediately, there was an ad hoc network of people sharing turn up prices charting with the parents were like coming up with tools, guessing one and where good prices would show up all basically overnight. Yeah. I'm actually in discord with a bunch of my friends and other people who are playing the game and they're all tracking that tenant prices on this kind of. spreadsheet that predicts what your prices will be throughout the week, and then as my sister who doesn't bother with all that she just goes straight for this site where you could just to a stranger's island who has the highest price and cellular turnips there and that kind of makes things kind of cutthroat. You know like people could be dishonest about their prices and chase like social media clout or you could have people come and steal your turnips right? Which is why in some cases you had bouncers or like fences which. Is One thing Zach as he got more and more wrapped up in the stock market started to think about her getting into my controversial turn-up room Joshua which people said was a turnip jail simply because I had jail bars on the front of it to keep people out of my turnip broom. Now maintained that bars are used on all sorts of things that are not jails. For example, vaults have bars. This was my turn volt turnips were safe from people was not a turn of jail it might have been A. Turnip, jail but it was a turnip fault because they filled the they filled the vault not jail and I had to put them in the kitchen and also the bedroom because if I leave them outside my house, anyone can pick them up unless I fenced them in a maternal branch, which I also did a little bit by no people that just leave those on the beach but you can't have visitors over because that's like leaving your dollar bills around just. So we're clear Jordan Zach had turned vault Mata turned up jail. Yeah really needed to emphasize that. So, Zach with his turn vault and a steady supply of clout chasing social media accounts eventually worked out a way to make bank on his supply of turnips. Do you think he likes the game better or worse now after all this? I think it might have spoiled it for him a little bit. You know like a rotten turnip listen to how he describes things now, Josh I. Just have so much money. Now it's just I don't need any more of it for literally any reason. There's like weird scarcity of other things in the game. There's only so much. You can actually physically by like my house isn't getting any bigger I could buy another house, but I have to start a new character to do that and like I'm not going to really do that. He won Jordan. He won capitalism. Congratulations. But can you really win capitalism? Right the grass is always greener and that's when things start to take a dark turn in the world of animal crossing you stick around and we'll tell you a little bit about what makes people go bananas for the Stock Market and the dark things that happen when turned up trading just isn't enough anymore. Support for this podcast comes from state farm with surprisingly great rates. State farm is the real deal when it comes to home in Car Insurance State Farm agents are in your neighborhood ready to help personalize your insurance and you can manage your coverage, pay your bill or even file a claim right from your phone with the state farm mobile APP visit. State farm. Dot Com today to get a great rate without sacrificing great service that State Farm Dot Com when you want the real deal like a good neighbor. State farm is their support for this podcast comes from Goldman. Sachs companies in the top quarter for diversity are thirty three percent more likely to have industry leading profitability and those in the top four tiles for gender diversity or twenty one percent more likely to outperform. This data was the catalyst behind launch, with G., s. a five hundred, million dollar investment strategy that continues to focus on increasing access to capital for women Black Latino next and other diverse entrepreneurs learn more at gs dot com slash launch with G. S.. Jordan I'm curious how swept up in the stock market crash that you get. Out of the game now but that was only because I spent several weeks monitoring my network of friends to make sure that I always sold at a high price and I made a grant of ten million bells to get the achievement and then I stopped yeah. Yeah. I'm asking because Zach isn't an edge case turn up Walter side like you. All of my animal crossing playing friends succumb to some form of turn fever and if I wasn't otherwise occupied and if I'm honest I, extremely forgetful I would have also tried my lug at playing the market in order to make a nice stack for myself which feels kind of crass right or at least against the things we say to become animal four. I guess it's kind of a way to fast track your way through the game, and that is not the point of animal crossing, right so I wanted to talk to someone who spent a lot of time thinking about how games have this weird tendency to sort of emulate the realities of our economy in a way why can't we stop killing our Chil- island vibes with greed? Eric Peckham on the media columnist at Tech Crunch where I write about gaming entertainment and the future of virtual worlds. So animal crossing isn't the only game with currency to spend within the game on stuff you need or what and according to Eric. That's not just life. That's good. Game Design Part of successful game design is creating some form of of virtual economy within the game is basically. They're being items or currency that can be traded between players and some degree of scarcity where you can't just have an infinite amount of everything and so it forces you to trade with others to go through all sorts of obstacles or challenges within the game guides us through experiences so far. So good Eric's read a virtual economies is extremely line with animal crossings, very low stakes motivation for accruing bells but what about the stock market that's kind of a game within the game right? It attracts more people to play it. It gives. You more reasons who keep coming back every week participate is a great cut of psychological way to keep people engaged throughout the week and making sure they're continuing to stay part of this world from a Game Design Sam Point. It makes a lot of sense and here's a bit of insight that I'd never really thought about before Jordan. You know how part of the appeal of getting new stuff in animal crossing purely for cosmetic things? Yes. My Wardrobe is the most important thing in my game. So Peckham this isn't all that different than say. The photos on your instagram feed if it seems like people care about animal crossing more in this moment, it might be because our virtual worlds are starting to blur with the real one. He actually had the majority of the generation who spend meaningful time in virtual worlds, virtual economies where they can participate trade different goods just like I might pop on Instagram or snapchat and chat with people visit just an online sort of. Extension of real world interaction and activity games in other words aren't just things you do their places you go there parts of yourself. You visit and maintain the big wake up here for a lot of people will be that video games aren't just games anymore. They are are truly increasingly extensions of our real world. Lives are real world economies, right either two point five, billion gamers in the world now, most people to some. Extent play video games, and Games are increasingly being designed as social hang out spots and ways to meet people spend time with people just like your has happened with social media ads that we think of as fairly normal video games are basically the next wave in this have social media online socializing space to me. This means that your animal crossing island is just as much an expression of your identity as your instagram profile. And so of course, you want to get a leg up on the fortune you need to make something reflective of you. The obsessive stockmarket behavior makes perfect sense when you think of it that way and just virtual economies make sense for virtual worlds. Peckham, argues that any problems that stem from them are also part and parcel with their inclusion. There are so many unintended consequences that come from video games becoming a kind of A. In their own right, I mean there been major issues around gambling especially underage gambling money laundering I. Mean you're you're inviting all sorts of problems that come with creating a market that's generally not heavily supervised. We're talking, of course about cheaters. But. How do you even cheating the game like animal crossing or even do anything approaching unsavory? Well, I'm not to ask Sarah I couldn't possibly comment on that. So one popular way of gaming. The system is by something called time traveling which Zach scribes for us in the context of the stock market. The one way to quote unquote sheet animal crossing is called time travel. The game is set to link to the real time clock of whatever time your switch that right which is connected to the Internet. So what people do is they changed the time of their switches at and they move forward in time in animal crossing. Yeah. Actually have friends who time travel, but it's just like a step too far for me but here's another thing in animal crossing you can keep your balls in. A bank account and that account like a real life savings account accrues interest and curiously like the Federal, Reserve Bank Nintendo lowered the interest rate. The very first month Nintendo was like oops are fake interest bank rate is too high. We need to turn it down, which is just wild if you think about it, it's so it's so low and they were like to high I actually got the letter from the Bank of nook about the interest rates going down the very same day that I got a letter from my real life bank This is kind of preposterous and extremely funny that they this closely mimic real life banks. But. It's also one of the few as of cheating the game that Nintendo can actually curb Zach thanks I suppose they could have been worried that people would like skip Ford month after month after month and be like several years in the future and game that interest rate to like make a ton of money but it seems like a lot of work when you could just sell fruit and make. The same amount which brings us to the sort of things to can't really curb for place like Zach who have one big on the stock market and can more or less build whatever kind of islands they want, what is left for them to conquer? What can they consume with all that spending power turns out? It's villagers and one guy in particular everybody loves him. There's one villager who has two different color is is. A new cat named Raymond and people I ask for insane amounts of in game resources to have that particular cat again, there are over three hundred villagers but this cat for some reason everyone loses their mind for this is actually a huge thing according to a polygon article by Patricia Hernandez. The next frontier for hardcore animal crossing players isn't just building the ideal village, but in populating them with the ideal villagers okay confession. I was playing animal crossing at four o'clock this morning because Raymond was in my campsite and I what reflief considered that it would be good for my Internet brand if I managed to convince him to move into my island so that I could start above online and maybe even traffic him to somebody else is it trafficking or does it just feel like that? I? Mean it definitely felt dirty of knocking alive. So yeah. This whole thing is not rare. It's not uncommon for people to do Jordan has done here or consider doing, right So he ended up leaving, he's not around anymore. Yeah. No, he is not my island. Okay. Listeners do not pass to me. Raymond does not live here according to Hernandez Polygon article, their entire sites that kate, it's a cataloging who has desirable villagers. They're called dreams. Raymond as I said, is the most end demand with ass in the millions of bells. I've seen people comparing him to like K. pop stars. He's got that kind of a floppy friend and I've got to admit this is kind of wire is tempted I don't actually like him his personality puts me off but I thought I could turn them around you know. I was mainly for the social media cachet of to say, I just wanted to be big on twitter for a day. Yeah. You had a hot commodity and been the bell of the ball, an animal crossing. A And this is what's fascinating to me. You could have earned more than just clout or bells. If you wanted to using one of these third party sites, you could have earned cold hard cash for tipping people off that Raymond was on your island people want their favorite villagers that badly tem. So I lost sleep and money. Potentially right. If you're ethically okay with selling Raymond off and according to Peckham. This is a thing that can happen when you have a successful in a game economy that doesn't really let you spend real money games that have tried to maintain closed economies like you can't sell your virtual goods for real money within the game. It doesn't actually prevent people from doing that just moves at off site when he starts a covet something. Rare in the game economy that you can't buy with the game's currency, the market blossoms in the real world with real money, and so all these games actually have big grey markets or black markets off site where people sell accounts on Ebay or through other marketplaces. Digital goods do get treated for real money. Did you ever anyone in high school who maybe like paid someone to level up their character in world of warcraft? Not Personally Emma Moser like a full time job at school is hard Sarah. I can kind of believe. I mean it happens with MMA's now right like whole groups of people get hired to just let up people's characters folder them to like grind when I was in high school it was it was a much smaller scale operation. It's totally a whole black market thing now absolutely. Yeah, and the black market in animal crossing is a little more subtle. It doesn't have levels of progress like memos do so most the transactions happening in animal crossing while sometimes extreme are more limited and game resources and currency. There is no obvious way to spend real money until you start to do things like look. Chris. Pacific villagers one way to bring some villagers into your game. As you might know, Jordan is via something called Amoeba Amoeba. Like collectible toys produced by Nintendo that use near field communication I, think to connect with your switch and when you connect them with your switch, you can unlock in game goodies depending on the game you're playing an interesting thing to mention here is one of the reasons that Raymond is. So popular is because he is new to new horizons. So that isn't An AMOEBA for him so you can't buy him that way. Right and this is what Peckham was talking about. It can get really intense and there's all these opportunities for real money to enter the equation here these days Zach doesn't really do any of the stock market speculating anymore I thought that would be because he seeing the error of his ways he. Wants to go back to a sweet fantasy utopia because at a certain point, it's just greed. You know it's just capitalism running unchecked. The least fun I have had playing animal crossing was like the first week of doing the stock market and being really worried about getting money like looking at twitter and refreshing the word turnip is actually surprisingly not a good. Time it is not enjoyable but the real reason he quit isn't because it was ruining his fun short the character trading or trafficking still bumped him out and he didn't do it. But the thing that made him stop the obsessive twitter refreshing evaluating third-party sites and speculating as much less moralistic. He didn't learn a lesson as he said earlier, he just became A. Billionaire Joshua I just have so much money. Now it's just I don't need any more of it for literally any reason the stock market did ruin the game for some people who are overwhelmed by the obsession with accruing wealth. They went back to fishing and buck electing worried less about winning the market which sounds kind of like your experience. Yeah I definitely. Analytic Friends of mine as well. Once to achieve what we wanted to the stock market, we were so relieved to get out. Yeah, and Zach's experience raises an interesting question for me and a world where. So many of us don't have jobs our wealth and saddled with debt. Many of us don't have disposable income to invest in Wall Street and a crew real. Wealth I don't mess with the real world stock market in any way. First of all, I, would be playing with penny stuff. There'd be no point like if I was going to play the stock market, I would play the stock market like me would be all and I just not I think my wife and cats would not approve of that sort of. Fiscal recklessness. So for us not invested types, maybe animal crossing wasn't a capitalist nightmare. It was a capitalist daydream one that the turn stock market made more real but the stock market is just like another little touch that makes the world feel bigger and more real and like for people that don't own a house, it's like a real it's a simulation of. Ownership. And being able to decorate a yard and how and things that we all like. American dream type stuff but put into a game the made by. Japanese company. Say It's not as if people playing animal crossing because they love capitalism so much that they just want more of it in their free time. It's more like capitalism is so big and difficult in the real world, this miniature version of it where we can always win if we just what caught enough. If I can beautiful fantasy right video games, kind of reflect our culture and nature in ways that aren't always tangible and all of a sudden they are as we saw from very first episode about world of warcraft corrupted blood pandemic games are often little petri dishes of human behavior and. This case we see how you know money can quickly sort of like change the nature of like I'd Ilic Serene scenarios right once their stakes people start to behave unpredictably, Amin money isn't real either right it's basically simulated just like video games all yeah. It's all made up just like bells in animal crossing, and by the way thanks for being honest about your intense animal crossing experience. I know for me the virtual world of video games it's very easy to get in over your L. Yeah. I mean I did get up at four o'clock in the morning to try and convince Raymond. What about you listeners ever get carried away by something you need to accomplish the game. When have you gotten really into a virtual world in a way that affects your real world lease a five star review on Apple podcasts, and let us know and your comment like did you get into good shape from Ring v Adventure or accidentally trespassed much from playing pokemon go maybe you're obsessed with beat Sabe like I am and you're trying to get one hundred percent on expert on all of the songs or are you playing apex legends like I am a free game? Were you still spend money because you like oh? That's a cool outfit out FITZROY's worth spending money on. Joshua will you come back to my island tomorrow and we'll to my flowers again. Sure. I'll tell you in. All, right I will water your plants for some pethick. Nobel's required. Next week on wild wild tech did a computer program break music copyright laws forever. If you subscribe when your favorite podcast APP, you'll know the moment the story drops while tech is a studio seventy-one original podcast spoke media production. It's hosted by myself Josh Rivera and Jordan Erika Weber you can find us at M. Rivera zero on twitter and that Jordan Weber Dot com, our producers a cody had. John Kastner with help from as Mendoza and Caroline. Hamilton this episode was mixed by will short are executive producers are Stephen Perlstein Andrew Sealy for studio seventy one and Elliott's have a Colin and Keith Reynolds her spoke media. Special. Thanks to Sacramento for talking to us is totally not to turn of jail. Be sure to check out his podcast off book. Eric for blurring the lines between the virtual reality and real reality if you want to follow us on social media where at wild wild tech pod thanks for listening.

Jordan Jordan Zach Eric Peckham Nintendo Raymond Joshua I twitter Josh Sarah I Erika Weber Chil- island instagram Sacramento
Stab Yourself to Health and Happiness: The Bizarre Rise of the Lebensweker

Ridiculous History

49:15 min | 2 months ago

Stab Yourself to Health and Happiness: The Bizarre Rise of the Lebensweker

"We'll play unless we become a monster in order to catch one from my heart. Radio comes a mind. Bending new original sci-fi thriller tomorrow's monsters. It's a safe application with one very simple benefit. You never have to sleep again starring. John boyega when he began self experimenting with his own mind apps. It changed him. And something else has taken over. And darren criss. We don't do what we do simply because we love you man. We detest the weakness in them. Tomorrow's monsters coming february ninth to the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio Welcome back to the show ridiculous historians thank you as always so much for tuning in today's episode. Just a heads up today's episode Has some graphic body stuff involved I think it's well intentioned but just so you know this is. This is a bit of a gross episode today. anyway. I'm ben I am not currently Life partner user now. But i did hurt myself today to see if i still felt and turns out i did feel And it hurt man. It hurt when. I hurt myself to jiang today. Stories about it's about hurting in order to feel better or something Through the eyes of a german innovator medical wizard slashed quack slash. I don't even know. What by the name of carl bounce tight Who was born in eighteen nine and he came up with something like you said. Then the german translation of life awaken are is laban's vaca and this was in eighteen. Forty seven and he was inspired to create this device. Which i will you so eloquently described off. Mike let you do that again. Hopefully if you'll indulge us but it was something that occurred to him when he was bitten on the hand by mosquitoes And realized that his arthritis felt better when he was being bitten. Nats rather but you know little by gadfly things. Yeah and Talking earlier off. Air with our super producer. Casey peckham Built a little bit of a theory about what was happening when carl saw these bugs biding his hand so in his in his mind. The bug biting the hand created an opening in his skin. An artificial poor and this allowed the sickness or the toxins or whatever you wanna call them to drain from his body. What may have been happening depending on the animal. Whether it's a mosquito or you know whatever kind of bug it is. It may have just been injecting him with something that numb his hand. Write a chemical that a bug would use when biting but he didn't think about that part knoll dot instead. Carl decided that he would build something like this And that this would be a new medical revolution. the lebron's waker. The life awaken her. It it looks like we're all adults here. It looks like a sex toy that is incredibly violent. It has a one end. it's an ebony rod. In a one end there are these spring looted needles kind of in a circular shape. Yeah exactly and the idea. Is that if you are. If you are using this you will put it against your body in certain strategic spots you will pop the needles though puncture. Your skin creating what he calls artificial pours but what the rest of the world would recognize as puncture wounds and then you would apply a proprietary oil of carl's own design and this oil would create blisters on those wounds. Ben was this oil of the snake variety. That's a good question. I am tempted to say the answer is yes we're at least. It's yes if you're talking about how this would be This would be used. He called this the x. Thematic method or and we are not german speakers folks or bond should east dismiss will give it a try. Yeah please give it a try. I believe it his bond shed dita's moose moose moose or or the ecstatic method like you said whenever the heck that even means that sounds like some made up nonsense But yeah he. He believed probably In his heart of hearts that this really was a cure. All like like it would cure whatever ails you And so he he set to work trying to hip the world to his genius and this miracle device right and as we will find he wasn't the first person to think of something like this let. Let's dive into karl's life. He got to the life week in her and see how the rest of the world How the rest of the world felt about his magical cure all device so carl was born on a farm in december of eighteen zero nine. He was a prussian citizen. He was a wood turner and mechanic by trade when he was about sixteen he took up an apprenticeship with a local merchant mainly because his parents wanted him to go legit. And they're like carl. You know you're sixteen zero eighteen hundreds. You're basically a man. Now get a job When his father passed away march of eighteen thirty one carl left his apprenticeship and he went to study at a place called the felon berg institute. Which at the time was quite prestigious. Yeah it was at helpful Near baron in switzerland And that's where he got. Yeah what you would consider kind of a tech prep education right in in in more hands-on physical crafts trades like mechanics horticulture you. There was some physics and chemistry thrown in there as well but this did seem like the kind of preparation for a life as a craftsman of some sort or like a physical laborer but you know a skilled laborer but someone that would work building things or you know cultivating the land. I i wanna point out. It's interesting if you take a look at this device we're talking about in addition to looking like something of a of a naughty sex toy it also looks sort of like a short table leg some wondering if his background they would turn or his like woodworking crafts kind of figured into his design here. I'm pretty sure the answer is yes or maybe it was just a quick way to make use of like some. You know a uniform table. Legs couldn't couldn't use anywhere else Anyway i digress. Once he got out of this university system he was by the way a standup student absolutely model and he became employed as an instructor at the institute at the very institute that he graduated from And during his time there at the bound shite he learned of several classical languages he also required quite an extensive knowledge of what the time would be considered the cutting edge of medicine. But what we now know was a lot of a shooting in the dark. Let's say right. Yeah so this is a. This is a situation that a lot of us will be familiar with. He was not a doctor per se but he was well read so he would be familiar with a lot of the current medical. Fury's of the time. He would have an understanding of some aspects of anatomy and so on he volunteered and joined the prussian military and served from about halfway through eighteen. Thirty two to eighteen thirty three. After his time there he settled down. He took a took a job as mechanic he got married and he had a daughter and then after that is first marriage must not have worked out guys because he eventually started living with a another person and he and the second person caroline dorothy her chin had six sons and five daughters. You heard that right. Six sons five daughters. they had eleven children They got married around number four. I believe yeah You know a lot of times. These holistic types have a healthy appetite for the carnal pleasures. Let us say. And also just you know god's gift of of magical procreation Look at wilhelm reich and oregon energy. Yes exactly isn't oregon. Energy is essentially. You know the sexy power from within right. isn't that like harnessed. Kind of like the Let's see let me get seventies enough voice for this century powers of the universe case maybe throw some disco music on there. God and let's just double back really quick and remind everyone bound side had no professional medical training or experience but he felt very confident in in his invention of an assortment of medical accoutrements and he he made a smallpox vaccination a breast pump. Which have to say is pretty forward thinking because that is still something that is very much used today. Obviously motorized probably more comfortable than his original design but still pretty forward thinking He invented a type of mouthwash and various blood. Cleansing medicines and oils. He invented something called horrifically. The artificial leech Which was very similar to the design of the resuscitation or the awaken her Which by the way resuscitation and awaken or both. They could be nine inch nails album. Titles just putting that out there. I think you're also going through a nine inch nails phase this week. I think you're right. There's there's nothing wrong with that. Also love the the johnny cash cover of hurt classic. Yeah we got to give credit where it's due there. Iran right he would not let something as insignificant as medical qualifications. Stop him from dreaming big and do want to say in a somewhat reluctant defense of coral here that bloodletting or the idea of curing ailments through the forest extrusion various bodily fluids. That's that's a really old idea and it was common in the middle ages as well. A bloodletting was through various times in history not just in europe but in china's while considered a legit treatment that could cure any number of conditions from what we would call hypertension today to more kind of woo. We pseudoscientific stuff like heart sickness and it would definitely make you feel a little bit lighter. Specially in the head. Anyone who's donated blood is familiar with that. Oh totally and again this would have been the kind of like Practical you know or rather conventional wisdom that he would have been reading about. You know this is just a couple of steps beyond the humor's And a lot of the really really kind of out there. Dark ages stuff but bleeding people out was kind of a remedy as old as the hills. and he was just kind of capitalizing on that which which had a lot of backing so he wasn't like going completely out on a limb like making up this this really wild stuff. I mean to his credit. He was doing some interesting innovative stuff. Like i just happened to. I just googled antique breast pumps and and and they found an article on huff. Po called two hundred years of breast pumps and eighteen images so he definitely was very early to the game It as far as like designing a breast pump is a device that still used today again. Eleven children oh yeah exactly a lot of his made for tv ad. It's it's him and his wife freaking out with eleven eleven kids going full tasmanian devil cartoon reference rate going full tasmanian devil in the house and he throws up his hands. And he's like there's got to be a better way and there was an antique breast pump. Also you know like i said this. I'm interested to as to why the most out there thing we remember him for. Is this life awakening. I guess because it kind of caught on but we'll get there in a second so back to eighteen forty seven when he's sitting in his room. Has ailing arthritic hand. You know absolutely throbbing And he you know is being overtaken by these hungry mosquitoes -squitoes or nats or by flies depending on the source Mosquito does make the most sense. But you're right because they do win they bite inject you with a chemical that makes it not hurt as much so you don't notice it so it's almost like a an organic painkiller. The insects injects into you. So that you don't feel it when it sucking and then you don't feel until after it leaves you and that's when you feel itchy because there's an irritant to this happens he realizes ha it's happening about this situation is causing me to feel better He seems to us more with. I don't know. Ben is interesting lake. Is he associated with the poking with the loss of blood with the injection of the chemical that science probably had not yet recognised at the time. Where do you think is head. Was i think it was i think for him. It was the the puncture the the wound when mosquito bites. You'll see swelling because of histamine histamine is a big deal to mosquitoes because it increases blood flow and white blood cell count around an affected area causing inflammation and swelling. And that's also. Why mosquito bites each. The histamine sends a signal to the nerves around the bite chemicals in mosquito saliva bugs spit also prevent blood from clotting. We know in his book about this that he published in eighteen. Sixty five we. We know that he believes he believed you are essentially creating an escape hatch for disease in the body by puncturing it so he said quote how in quite simple and natural manner. The morbid matter may be found in the body may be extracted from the suffering parts and removed without the loss of blood. He was convinced that recreating a mosquito bite. On an extreme scale would allow pain and various poisons to leak out of the body. He was making a new door for disease. I mean it's just a couple of steps removed of drilling holes in the skull or at least demons. Bright trepidation heo with app. It's just hilarious. I'm just making sure your know that. I got it okay. It's called kapela reckless on the black network. I'm going to be telling you all my business and suddenly avocados business to you and ain't no limits to the things i talk about. You know that if you are no meat from baby mama. Drama to healthy relationships from child to stimulus checks. Look like a setback. And you realize that we all go through crazy got stories. It's out those situations. Do not define you. But they do make full conversation in a worldwide click bait and cancelled contract. And tell your story before you do. I'm creating the outlets of remind people that we still him in crazily and we can all laugh about it. Don't stress over it. Bring your problems to me. i promise. I won't judge you might crack a joke. Don't be skirt it'll be respectful and messy at the same time. Just make sure you tune in listen to can't reckless every wednesday on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. And so this does catch john and he becomes the talk of the town. There's even like auto biography written about him by a guy by the name. I'm laughing because he's just absolutely it's almost like he was hired to write the most glowing biography imaginable. This guy albert volkmann. Who i'm assuming was just a bit of a fan boy He compared bound to innovators such as edward jenner. Who discovered vaccination yawn gutenberg. Obviously the inventor of the printing press and movable type and christopher columbus The war criminal. Oh and james watt inventor of this team. I think christopher columbus is known for something than that. But that's usually what comes to mind for me But yeah this. This thing is absolutely chock full of hyperbole including the savior of humanity referring to bounce site in his his His you know doing god's work basically yeah and would be clear. Carl got a lot of people on board this. This treatment would be an example of what we call counter irritation techniques. You know a creating inflammation in one spot on the body for the purpose of relieving it in a different spot and originally he was originally. He set like office hours from eleven. Am to noon for one hour. You could come see him and have your life awakened euphemistically but business was booming. And eventually he threw up his hands again just like in his infomercial that we made up earlier and he said there's gotta be a better way so he decided in that instead of just administering the life treatment himself he would sell it directly to the public and directly to other people who wanted to set up a life awaken her practice well into the twentieth century. Well into the nineteen hundreds folks people. Were trying to cure all sorts of stuff with the this contraption. We're talking yellow fever epilepsy heartbroken. I always love the the terms the turn of the century terms for various Various ailments like You know you could just make something up and it would sound legit. You know like someone the trembling eastwood's or someone had dirty huff or judas tooth ooh judas to announce also it'd be a really good nine inch nails album. I'm not gonna let go this Shoots you the judas tooth. That's pretty fantastic. Would that even doesn't matter. Leave the imagination. But yeah i mean he really is like a household name like you said he was treating patients himself one on one. He kept office hours. And all that he also created a you know some of these cure all kind of lotions and potions and all that one that he called. Oem bound shite Which was an oil. That was meant to be a slathered over these little welts and creative those blisters that you mentioned Like you said to essentially simulate what would happen with an insect by and if you made these blisters and they start getting a little gross. Here guys These blisters was starts to choose pus and he looked at that as being the sickness. Leaving your body kelsey. Evans is an archivist at the university of california san francisco Who actually came across a resurrect or kit in their collection of over a thousand pieces of historical paraphernalia And yet he he really white. Yeah he basically had to build a whole new kind of school of medicine of holistic medicine medical thinking around this device because he had to move units right so he called this in a burst of modesty. bounced idealism. Which is kind of like casey. Before you and i got an a podcast when you were leading the pessimist movement this is true. I mean you gotta you gotta pick a good name for movement. And what's better than justin. Calm yourself out there. While i mean it depends on the name casey. On the case by the way a peg rem ism has a ring to brown as them not so much bowen as them. I would sign up for that thanks man. I'm blushing i i would say It's all in the suffix right so if you if you don't if brown ism doesn't quite doesn't quite puncture your pores. Maybe you could go for something like a. Yeah just make the end fancy brown. dvd is. Okay thanks i appreciate you. Try still not sold still much more. A lifelong ben night But here's the thing bloodletting be now self-mutilation for the purposes of you know making yourself feel better by hurting yourself. Surprise surprise started to kinda wane in popularity a little bit as time went on it was no longer satisfactory. For patients to be jabbed with oily. needles They they began to kind of look with a little more suspicious and realized. Maybe this wasn't actually providing the cure. All you know magical one stop shop remedy that it was You know meant to yeah. He's theories essentially that you can stab people and if you stab them the right way in the right place they will get better. That's that's this whole deal. Do you guys remember the. I love lucy. Bit where lucy's during a commercial for this like supplement called vitam media that jamin and it's like really nasty tasting supplement like liquid has like Meet in vegetables in it with the big joke. It's also like eighty percent alcohol and the director keeps making your take us take a swig of and every time. She says a certain line so of course. The joke is by the end of it. She's absolutely Blotto one of my favorite lines in the ad copy for this commercial is spoon your way to health this version for this topic today would be stab your way to health. Yeah we also wanna thank Charles sturt university. They have a they have a great right up of this available to read free online and atlas obscure. I quite like the way they explore some of the other quote unquote innovators in this field. John linden a follower of carl's also made some pretty broad claims. He had a book called the manual of the accent thematic method of cure. And he said that this could cure tapeworms. Here's his reasoning. After repeated applications of the life awaken or quote the tapeworm. The unwelcome guests will soon become disgusted with his quarters and be compelled to vacate. So linden is saying that what you're doing is if your body's a city you're ruining the neighborhood. Yeah i'm assuming the tapeworm is meant to escape through one of these puncture wounds. I i don't know. It's a little vague. I i will say it's also and this is probably just like urban legend but if you heard of the idea of on of purposefully taking a tapeworm to lose weight yes. It seems very ill advised. Yeah i i don't have personal experience If anybody has a confirmed case of someone let's call it tapeworm worming if if you have a confirmed case of someone purposely tape warming than let us know. I've also heard that you can apparently coax them out of your but with a piece of cheese. I have not been on that particular corner of the internet. No man internet's a scary place. But hey who knows. It might be true So tha tapeworms aside. Let's talk a little bit about how this device supposedly worked some of the pseudoscience or possibly potentially a little bit of real science by and also some of the marketing behind that because this is where it gets pretty fascinating like money. Was he making off of the scam. So you first off. The engineering here is consistent. The device actually did stuff but whether the stuff it did actually helped people is is a whole different Is a whole different bag of tapeworms so on one in this staff of rod. You'll see a little loose. Movable piece that's connected to a very tightly coiled spring this controls the thirty needles that are sheathed inside the sort of barrel shaped container at the end. So what you would do. If you're applying this you pull back a small handle about two inches to retract those needles and then you release it. The bloom snap them forward and the pierce the skin back to our infomercial which have not letting go because it's very appropriate for this. You can buy the resuscitate order for eight dollars and it. It's a kit so you don't just get the resuscitation but wait there's more you get a little booklet about how cool this method is. And you get a bottle of this proprietary blister oil. Yeah but you gotta keep buying the oil you know. You only have to buy the resuscitate or one time. You gotta keep getting the refills because it is proprietary like you said you couldn't just get like linseed oil or petroleum jelly. I dunno and this oil he claimed would keep the wound open longer than it. Would you know if it was just left to. Its own devices to heal naturally. Which would you know. Give the wound more time to vent the body of impurities or as he referred to in the booklet straight up. Evil bad body ghosts He explained that immediately after being punctured. By the resuscitate you were meant to apply the oil with a chicken feather or a small pencil. As i work you this would be i. I was imagining this. I'm speculating here. But let's say let's say. Casey puts the life wake at her. I knew you're not happy about being the example here. Thinking casey casey puts his life awaken her. You know on on his side. Let's say a lower right torso at end of the ribcage. Pops himself with it. But he doesn't he doesn't want to waste oil he doesn't wanna just like slather it in a swath across that series of thirty puncture wounds so instead he takes a little pencil and he dips dips it into that little bottle of oil and then he kind of paints into the pores or into the wounds and also i'm imagining. The alternative implemented the chicken feather. You would use the pointy end like the quilt end of. The chicken feather to do something very similar. Yeah yeah. I think i think are on the money there. So if you wanted a more concentrated experience if you just didn't have time to carefully paint this irritant oil over your new wounds. You could double down hard on the paint. You could put the oil on the needles before you pulled the trigger earn pulled that switch and pop them into your skin so i would become a kind of injection. That comes to us from kelsey evans whose an archivist. The university of california san francisco library. She i love. This is the cool part. We don't say this often enough about archivists but one of the weird benefits of working in that kind of In that kind of discipline is that you can just run across awesome very surprising and weird stuff and i totally kelsey ran across one of these kits especially in san francisco. There are all kinds of wacky stuff there And the thing is you know again. This was all like set out for you in that little pamphlet within about four to six minutes. According in in in bound shine own words v skin would alight with an eruption resembling millet. Seeds and patients would begin to feel a curious crawling sensation and again like you said for more concentrated experienced dip the needles right on in that oil and you're shoving on in there and he almost as a selling point. Likens it to a kind of injection. Which i think is is interesting. I mean it was a weird time. People were doing all kinds of crazy stuff they were used to like leaching and be bloodletting this was honestly probably a little bit more of a user friendly experience than just like the old school bloodletting where you just say. Slice yourself with a straight razor. That's the whole barber. Pole situation came from. Because i believe barbers were the defacto blood letters. Yeah yeah back in the day if you were Learned enough to cut hair than you learned enough to cut off arms. That's that's the logic native cocktail and a good laugh. Tune into our podcast. To god's from hollywood i've allan nevins literary agent and manager and i'm joey santos a columnist and celebrity chef. Join us each week where we host conversations with clients and contemporaries about life in los angeles from show runners showstoppers. When you walk into your talent agency you say you know what instead of making hit sitcoms. I would like to do a food and travel. They act like you pooped on. The real house wants to historians good person and what was doing something john and even though we weren't supposed i called her up and i said hey something crazy's going on behind your back ever since then we've been glued to agendas like now. Alan and joe is added such a pivotal time for us. That is exclusive to this podcast. We're serving up stories knowledge and of course cocktail recipes. You won't want to miss. we don't dish we serve. Grab a drink and join us each week. On the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. I know we're we're ragging on karl a little bit. But bloodletting was so common that it was applied to world leaders. You know we can't forget that. The president of the united states. George washington died after physicians drain nearly forty percent of his blood assistance. Crazy no wonder the man was so pale. That is wild and again like i said you're right. We are ragging a little bit because easy easy target for this era of medical stuff because it just looking at it now through the lens that we have it all seems so absurd but hell some of the some stuff that we do in. The west is kind of absurd not to mention just the whole healthcare system in general. That's a topic for another day. Neckties look every every anytime you wanna rag on people from the days of your look around the modern day And and see how much ridiculous stuff we do that. We've just accept. It is normal. If you wanna learn more about the story of neckties you can see a very embarrassing video of me for my brain stuff days on youtube but yes you are absolutely right no There are so many Ridiculous thanks now again. This is a legit medical process. To karl von scheidt. Well that's kind of what i was getting to. This is an innovation over the most barbaric versions of what he's doing here. This is probably a little more focused version of bloodletting because his to treat certain diseases he would target certain parts of the body You know like if you had say Us to take a judas adjoussou if you had a judas tooth you get stabbed in the neck if you had to say Influenza you'd get stabbed like under the armpits and it there was sort of a method madness And again like given the absolute wild wild west ness of of the medical profession. Gotta give the guy props for being a little bit outside of the box in his thinking. Yeah but also you know Our hearts go out to the people who tried to cure their baldness by repeatedly stabbing themselves in the spine. Jeez yeah there was something kind of like a lego kit to this. Because you don't anybody who is a fan of legos. I'm a big fan By the way. I just built the ship from the mandalorian was is very big It goes you know when you're a kid you get the box and you get the instructions and maybe you build the thing according to the instructions but then you might take it apart and build your own thing right. That's what people were doing with. The life awaken or they would read the pamphlet and they would say okay got it. Here's how you apply this to you know your torso nape of the neck behind the ear etc etc. But wait many many users said what happens if i stabbed myself here instead. You know what happens. I stopped myself in my foot or the inside of my elbow. I'm just picking random places People wrote to him and told him about their results. They would say. I stabbed myself You know x. Amount at times. But on the ninth stab i cured you know the problem in my knee and i think it's because i found the right place to stop and carl was all about it. Dan i got asked the elephant in the room here. I'm seeing the list of remedy list of ailments that this thing was used to treat things like syphilis gonorrhea. Where'd you stab yourself for those right in the area or is there some other magical spot that targets. The nether regions unclear to me. Also folks we need to just put everything on the table here The none of the three of us have tried the life awake inner. So maybe we are not being fair. Maybe we need to draw straws and have someone get some firsthand experience thankfully The three of us also do not have syphilis. Thank god ridiculous. History one hundred percent. Syphilis philis free it's true. I mean it is one of the most historical ailments My goodness but yeah. I you know to your point man. I imagine that based on what we know about what part of the body you would You would treat for a to take or for cramps or something. I imagine would be applied to us some sensitive areas in feel. It sounds incredibly painful. It sure does. And i've gotta say A lot of this. Like you know specificity around like okay if you this kind of ailment. You injected here. This seems like the kind of stuff that someone would make up to sound like. They know what they're talking about When in fact it's all pretty arbitrary just like you know. In general this device was i think we can pretty much. Except i and like we said it. It really did. The whole craze surrounding the resuscitate started to die down because people weren't as into bloodletting anymore and not to mention it was getting a bootlegged a lot. There were a lot of resuscitate or clones hitting the market But you know up until the nineteen forties. You can still get copies of Bound shuts booklet. That came with the kit. So you know it was still somewhat in use by some and we need to give some context here so we said let's say mid eighteen hundreds eighteen fifty four or so the resuscitators near the height of its popularity. And you could get that kit for eight dollars. But how much. Money is carl making here. It's time for the inflation calculator. Google gruber who you had to have the last boop. Didn't you bet you had to have the less you were doing it to pooping chicken chicken pasta. Eight dollars in twenty twenty one. That's two hundred and forty eight dollars. So this is not an insignificant of money but also not too far off from what we would see questionable medical devices today costing things like you know infrared radiation things for your lower back or whatever. There's a lot of those these c- now that definitely are questionable And that's the thing this. This was very very much discredited but it was also important differentiator about this week. I think it's probably my fault. I've been lumping in with the idea of bloodletting but it wasn't really like about bloodletting at all it was about irritating your skin to make these blisters and then the pustules that leaked out of your body or whatever would be the eradication of the of the impurities so it wasn't targeting the blood so much says it was targeting the skin Yeah but i you know i would. I would defend newell the knoll from earlier in the show today because this is clearly descended from the belief of obscures and ios letting It's just. You're right in the idea that the pus in the blisters was thought to be the diseases leaving the body. But it's still a lot in common with bloodletting of physiologically if you are wondering folks no. There is nothing that ties stabbing your skin and forming a blister with healing these sorts of illnesses. What is at a plucky inventor to do when there are so many imitators women in your wake. Well in carl's case you had to double down on that proprietary oil. So his his irritant oil only inbound shite. He guarded the recipe. Like the way that coca cola guards there recipe which is a great idea for an episode of nice going but But we eventually found out what it is in one thousand nine hundred forty. Seven one of carl's descendants disclosed the composition of the oil to a pharmaceutical company. It is mustard and pepper oil tanzi pepper olives and something called croton oil croton oil and i'm a bit of a Essential oil Aficionado so this is obviously not widely in use anymore. Yeah it's a poisonous viscous liquid from a tree native to india no fun self-poisoning to cure what self mutilation and poisoning. This is a nine inch nails desert so this did go into decline While you could find the booklet up until the nineteen forties in germany the international sphere lost interest. It would be very rare for you to find one in the us from like the nineteen thirties order. Something so what happens to karl after this remember he was charging some pretty high prices for his inventions and this added up. He became pretty well to do. He moved on up to the east side of the socioeconomic scale. He became what we call nouveau riche. New rich and he tried to add. I dunno some swag some credibility to his reputation with the upper class. So he wanted. He wanted to do the thing. A lot of the nova reach do which is attained the respect and acceptance of the old money and he went him with it and unfortunately that is sort of a fool's errand isn't ben. I you know. I i believe so not to not to wax philosophical but one thing history has proven. Is that if you want the acceptance of others. The first thing you should do is work on accepting yourself. Oh let's get advice ben. That's very good advice. That is the app that is that are ridiculous history affirmation of the day. Casey can we get a more. You know think okay. Yeah not not close enough to get a suit at clash so bound shy did die eventually despite his best efforts until the forever You know with self mutilation and poisoning On october first eighteen seventy three As a result of an ailment of the heart that he apparently was powerless to control And it may have actually been caused by his diet. yep so busy stabbing himself in the neck. He forgot to curtail the red meat. Ooh and after he passed away his widow and his children carried on the business. The life awaken earth was being produced all the way up to nineteen forty four and it may have continued in production passed that year Had the building not been destroyed in a bombing attack by allied forces. Now we know what a lot of folks are thinking in the audience today guys. I'm sold you're saying i'm going to stab myself. The wellness i need a life awaken her right now You have persuaded me that. This is the bleeding edge of medicine. Where can i get this treatment today. Right no casey. Don't you guys think like what would you say. Easily eighty percents the folks listing or sold on this right. Surely there's some sort of medieval spa. You can go to like got experiential thing you know where they but cover you with leeches and stab you in the neck with a weird nataly chaired leg For a thousand dollars. If you go to switzerland's you can find a clinic that still offers this treatment. They call it acupuncture of the west. It is similar to what you described there. knowl- and they they will explain the process in detail. So you know what you're getting into and it's it's an evolution of the same idea you know you Irritate the skin. You apply an oil. Let the blisters grow thirty six hours pass and then you assess the blisters so if you're sold on this And if you happen to go to switzerland let us know how it goes Feel free not to send pictures but we would would enjoy hearing this story I think that's it now. I do want to say you know. I don't feel like this inventor thought of himself as a stake oilman griffin. I think he thought he was doing medicine. I think he was a true believer right then. I'd i'd do agree because he had a history of you know. Like i said i mean. We said from the start a lot of his inventions. Were pretty smart. This has happened to be the one that took off and clearly you know the least effective But it remind it is. Remind me in some ways You know holistic medicine in general sometimes gets a bad rap in the west because of our focus on a pill for every ill and all that stuff so i think there's a middle ground where there is a place for holistic medicine Or just taking care of oneself and like mindfulness. And just you know meditation and things like that to just be a better more whole human being but it does remind me of things like cupping Which is a very interesting Technique where you know certain massage therapists types. Take these little suction cups and you know literally. Pump them on your skin. And they leave these big nasty giant hickey things and supposedly you know rids you of impurities or whatever i don't know if i buy it but it's very popular and at something that's still available as a spa service pretty widely and with this. We close today's episode. The tale of the life awaken. Have you seen one of these in real life so let us know. Let us know. Also some of your other favorite a weird medical treatments of the past. How do i let you guys know you might be asking yourself well. We're pretty easy to find on the internet. We like to recommend our facebook group page ridiculous historians you can also find us on various social needs as individuals you can indeed. I am at how noel brown. On instagram exclusively. And you can find me on twitter abilene each s. W you can find me on instagram. At ben bolan. Thanks as always to our super producer. Casey pegam who just to be very clear has never used life awaken. Thanks also of course. Alex williams who composed our amazing soundtrack huge thanks. Christopher us yoda's who will be joining us not only in spirit but in the flesh very very soon re looking forward to that one missing. Chris eves geoff coates checkout her podcast this day in history class daily Nugget of wisdom in your podcast feed Check it out. It's delight also j. dot l. the podcast featuring wonderful and talented miss jill. Scott executive produced by eve's Also thanks to our research associates extraordinary gabe louisiana got to get him back on the show too and jonathan strickland the notorious quiz He can stay away for as long as he likes. But i have a feeling he'll be popping up sometime in the near future as well One less no folks of course none of this should be considered medical advice. Just got a text. Our legal team making clear and and also. Hey if you were. If you're feeling off you feel like you might have a physiological ailment or concern a. Go to a doctor before you recreationally staff yourself. The next time folks for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

carl John boyega Casey peckham berg institute Near baron caroline dorothy christopher columbus kapela darren criss albert volkmann Carl apple fever epilepsy karl oregon school of medicine of holistic Ben laban
The Quest for Sexual Freedom and More Creepy Sexy Shit in Gothic Romance with Scarlett Peckham

The Savvy Creative

55:15 min | 9 months ago

The Quest for Sexual Freedom and More Creepy Sexy Shit in Gothic Romance with Scarlett Peckham

"The savvy. Savvy. This Saudi. Heap creating. High creative minds and welcome the savvy creative podcast. I'm your host, Cristina CASTAGNA entity. My guest is APR exact turned author of. Feminist Romance novels a Gothic flair. Her critically acclaimed books have been described as astonishing by the New York. Times Book Review End Worthy of the Bronte sisters by entertainment. Weekly I so excited to share her insights as we start our summer romance series again this year. Welcome Scarlet Peckham. Hello. Thank you for having me. I love the dichotomy of how you use like wicked scarlet letter and everything that you have on your site and on your instagram. It's so sexy Laurie like I can't like. It just draws you in, so it's it's very different from other romance novels to so did you have a different idea of what you felt like? Romance was or what it was missing when you were writing. I was specifically interested I write historical romance. My books are set in the Georgian era and I love historical. Romance but I felt that. It's often very happy. and. A lot of the books are set in the regency era, and they're about going to balls and long ballgowns and courtship rituals that deal like the right out of Jane austen and stop an Iowa's more interested in a kind of moody. Gothic feel for historical and I wasn't seeing a lot out there so i. Thought well. How can I take the you know the sexiness of Romance novels in general, and then take some of the darkness from like say the Bronte sisters or The balloon of Gothic from the Eighteenth, CENTURY TO PRESENT DAY Apply some of that to my branding and sort of the look and feel of my website, but also the way that I talk about my book the way that I write my books covers. They have so. It's all a little bit darker, a little bit more Perhaps sexual than some of the Romance novels written about this era. Yeah, that was sort of my vision and I'm glad that it is drawing you in that is there's here. I can't help but be drawn into dark things. They were but there's just something very alluring about it. And the the gothic branding is very clear like I definitely can see like historical like it definitely is calling tooth. That's your passion historical romance. It's definitely very very strong I. You know and what I like about the particularly Gothic Johner because I. You know I have a literature degree to so definitely. That was like a big chunk of our reading. Enjoyable reading the Bronx sisters and stuff. We think of fear in being repressed in all that stuff, but you turn it around for women to find sexual freedom which I find. So fascinating, so why? Why make that choice I wanna know what sexual freedom really means to you too good question well so. I always thought that the Gothic you know like the classic Gothic literature was incredibly transgressive for it's time you know it. It was about. Women with clear autonomy, even if they were living in more constrained times in terms of the rights that they had them the political era, they were living in and even used books. You know kind of are often about a love affair that ends in a marriage, the same way that many other romantic books are there's. A lot more darkness and there's a lot more fight to it. There's also a lot of like. I'm going to call it creepy, sexy show like think of a cliff in weathering heights, lake, and the grave digging, and the screaming or Mr. Rochester in Jane Eyre you know with his. Wife trapped in the attic. WHO COMES DOWN and tries to burn Jane in her bed, and then like spoiler, alert they get together at the end, but he's stricken blind, and so she has all the power in law relationship, even though he's on the surface like the man with the big house, and all the power in the horse than the you know, so I loved how these books were quite subversive, and we're kind of taking the power dynamics that existed in the era when they were written and flipping the switch flipping the code. You know like they were really doing so much as when I thought about how to write sort of a novel, that's. Cause more of a modern sensibility, but kind of take some of those vibes and themes and what to do with them. I thought well. How do you? How do you play with sexual power dynamics in a more explicit way, because so much of that wasn't on the surface on those books. You know like my books have? Very explicit sexy. You find less of that. In eighteenth century, fictional muster, reading, moll, Flanders but Still. A lot of the themes are still there so. It isn't really just women finding sexual freedom. My characters are all sort of in search of it, and my series is called the secrets of Charlotte. Street Charlotte Street is. Winning House that's at the center of the books and sort of connects all the characters and secrets, because it's sort of about the things that they harbor inside of themselves where there isn't a lot of space to claim and the society in which they live or even just in their intimate relationships, you know things are not brave enough to stay or desires that you've never aired in that, you might feel. Sort of tenuous about saying allowed or Insecure about someone knowing about and then. Over the course of the books you know, they find kind of the language, the sense of safety and trust in their relationship to express those things, and then to find a great deal of freedom and pleasure in claiming them, so they're absolutely about sexual freedom, and they're also about sort of the ways that people can play with the power dynamics in relationships in in a society that had really strong sort of patriarchal power structures on the surface. Like how do you dig deep into that and? How. Amar equitable free relationship at least within your own partnership arrangement. Right and a lot of the rings troops day like I feel. That when I talked to women, it's asking for what they want. especially in relationships right like you have is fantasy. You have these desires watch. It expresses your partner and he would say It's very very difficult. I think a very timely. Very timely topic, but done in a very fantasy. Catastrophe away you know. In a way where it's like Oh, yeah, that was back then we'll know not really that's still happening. Right and that's how you can find freedom to like I love the idea. Well, it's nice to see it modeled in a book. It's sometimes. Sometimes, it's nice to see a language that's put in place for you or kind of even like arth of grow arc of growth so that. I? Don't know you perhaps can take a little bit of it and be a little Sassy. Aaron Braver in your own desires in real life. And I love the steamy sex scenes. You know when you're trying to just like teen gone and you feel. You're getting to that point. You're just like Oh. My God I hope it keeps her still in the room. Yeah so writing sexy I always have to ask. Out Do you like for me? I try to channel it sometimes I just channel the fantasy. Bringing it to life. How do you make it to where it's like okay? It's it fulfils the the need, the desire for the reader it's. It's still kinda tasteful in a way where you know. the reader can enjoy it awkward. I mean like walk. Walk US through that process I'm always curious to know how really talented writers are really good writers just just Neyla every time, and there's some good. Teen, goals. Own God. It's tingling. That's the goal I want tingle, but I also wanted to move the story and to tell you about the characters and to uncover something so in the same way that other writer you want. To do work on multiple different levels I want the sex scenes to be literally indistinguishable from any other kind of seen so when you say like tasteful, but is sort of something that was on my mind when I began to write sex scenes because. I feel like even if you're trying to write romance novels, which typically have them, there is sort of A. Societal. Lake judgment about writing scenes that are explicit And I was like well. How do I do this in a way that I wouldn't be embarrassed if someone read it, and then as I was doing it I was sort of got over that. Fear of embarrassment and it just sort of became about. We'll okay, so if you have this person with this character arc at this point in the story, someone touches their neck and a certain way like how does that field to them? And how do they react? You know so if the person is feeling very vulnerable and has never been touched, and say a sexual or romantic way before it feels different from someone who's very sexually experienced in his expecting more of a, let's say like a grab and their touch tenderly. The emotion that it elicits is more surprised. You know so. You're trying to get the C. Inch of fire on all of us different cylinders, and so it's not just about like. And then he stroked her neck, or and then she touched his. Whatever you know like. How does he feel? And why does she touch him there? And what is she trying to get for herself or illicit in him by touching them and so I think when all of these questions are at play when you're writing a sex scene. It becomes far more interesting than just the choreography of coupling if you will. That has been a mistake so many times that I get lost in the choreography like. Is this correct instead of thinking of? That journey towards freedom that you were talking about like the journey towards getting what you want all that stuff like right I feel like that's where I was getting lost as a as a writer. It's hard. It's hard to find. Muddle your way through every like when I. Even even now I mean I've written plenty of books now and I sort of know what the process is, but when I begin scenes, it's often so much mar of just like the armed goes here and then the hand as this. You know it's very much. It's more aerial and less about the emotions, and either the sense of freedom or the sense of conflict or whatever we're trying to elicit him this scene. That's kind of a couple of steps beyond the just like and then. The Mill? Right. Now I love. Your your genre is just. It's so Mitch and that's one of the things. That's really great about it because it's feminist. Alpha, heroines Gothic, historical romance, and dark nailed it. Missing anything. But it's all. It's always pieces together. But I wanNA know like what makes a great feminist romance. Feminist is still a big spectrum right now. so the sexual freedom. I can definitely see a lot, but what in your is like? How did you want the part of the feminist, movement? Well I think there's a thousand different definitions for feminism and I think that everyone who sort of thinks about feminism and. I guess whether or not you identify as FEM person or not. Everyone sort of has their own relationship with it, so I think it's really personal so I don't WanNa. Say That my definition is sort of the book dictionary definition I think everyone should uphold. I knew there is plenty of space for us all to have our own relationship with it, but for me it's really about. Relationships were there. We're we're trying to get to what the goal of feminism is. which is just a quality, a quality of power quality of opportunity all of the things. If you're. Hetero sexual with. Gender, men and woman how? Especially on this era when things were unequal on the surface of society, how do we get to a point where? In their relationship there is that balance, and then also I feel like an feminist story it's. Important to me, at least to have I, use the term out the heroin in part, because it's sort of a winking nod at all Alpha heroes. That we talk about. In Romance going back decades. And you don't hear so much about out the heroines and it's sort of a in my mind like A. Little Lincoln correct like how come. The woman is never the one who like walking in guns blazing. Excluding sexual power yeah. But in my mind, you can be a kind of retiring individual. Shy bookish whatever, but in my mind, an Alpha heroin is someone who has a great deal, ferocious desire for personal agency, and who will not rest until she has claimed it in whatever way she desires, so she's self-determined and she's able to get. What she wants or at least to claw towards it, but. It doesn't have to be really aggressive kind of. I don't know I, said the word Claw. But. You Know I. Have Some Characters for instance? Sort of their verbal wiles, and is there sort of sexual charisma to get what they want? I have others who will use their sense of industriousness on their fierce intelligence to get what they want. They're using different things, but the the goal behind it and to me. The feminists goal of the project is that. They're just fiercely self-determined, and there will not rest until they have kind of power and equality, and every aspect of their life that they desire it. I love that the. I love. How said Feminism is equality and I like that bad termination is the quality. You're right like I think we're shifting. We're seeing a lot of shifts in the Romance World Anyway. Alpha heroines like. And, we're seeing not so traditional stories like when I tell people like I write romance. They think of fairy tales like no, no, no, you guys have no Fabio. It's sad too big. Yeah, it's such a evolving. John Mara and we've also seen Beta males as a trope you know. So, that's interesting, too. I'm not sure if we've dabbled with that, or if or what your thoughts on that would be. That's an interesting question I. I have a little bit of trouble with. Alfa Beta dichotomy. I'm not really. Not In like A. Like a political way or anything I'm I'm just not really sure how you would define it because they feel like when we say. On hand feels like they're softer, their tender sometimes in Romance, you hear the term cinnamon roll where they're just like really supportive and sweet and tender and everything the girl does, or whatever like municipal monroe can be either party in a relationship or The relationship can have. Any way that you want to look at it any number of partners whatever? They. Say It also to people's but. Yeah there's there's often someone increasingly who's super, super sweet, super tender, way less controlling basically character that doesn't have any of those sort of archetypal Alpha characteristics that we think we think of like the seventies and eighties old school. Romances you know where the man is often. Not terribly interested in consents. Not. A sensitive to the partners needs you know. Exactly. I feel like we see less of that character and romance in general, often UC aspects of it in like shifter romances where the guy is literally like I don't know. Wolf Pack. But I don't think guys see quite as much of it in in any form of romance these days to me. It's like okay well. What is Alpha and? Beta if all of the characters are more evolved and kind of like taking care of each other and hearing, each other and practicing. Enthusiastic consent I don't know what are your thoughts on it? Actually No, you shots, I think we always have to create dynamic characters. Just like you said to always has to be some sort of shift and everything, but I do like I love just having the woman stronger going after what she wants. You know like fierce determination and stuff, and of course having the sort qualities to I'm just kinda tired of also the the man always like the six pack kind of thing kind of hero as well so we're definitely. Trying to change up a little bit of that I mean he's still got have a six pack. He's still every. Actually, but you know I. It can't just be the obvious golden boy all the time, so I'm trying to play with that. That is well because. I'm definitely seeing. A shift in Like characters now and we're creating in different genres and seeing like different characters across the board so. Social, yeah! I agree yeah I think that's great. That romance is really trying to embrace a wider diversity of characters, and I mean not in terms of you know their racial identity. Their gender identity the kinds of relationships. They have like me more open towards different arrangements of people in different types of love, but also just sort of emotional and psychological profiles. You know just sort of showing. What's possible and human intimacy? Very uplifting stuff. I actually want to know more like so. You went from going to the corporate PR as a PR exactly I can imagine. Is Insane hours stress. Difficult personalities! Shutter and you went from that to writing romance and doing what you love, so I'm interested to know like how. How did this realization with everything going on in Kobe is this changed your pursuits in what you love doing it with writing things like that? One thing is that it's just made me so grateful. That I have a career that doesn't rely on me leaving the house. In industry wear. Like I. Self published books I also have a publisher for different series and. All of the people that I work with are able to work completely remotely and business has not stopped I. Mean it's hard to sell your books in bookstores right now. Obviously, but so it has made me grateful that I. I no longer have a job where it was really when I worked in PR. We sort of worked in bullpen where everyone thought about a foot away from each other, because we're talking all day to each other sharing information about our clients and about journalists, and just it really required kind of a lot of. Physical proximity. So in the most basic way I love that I have a job where. You know I get to work from home and it's. It's, it's not interrupting our business I feel very fortunate, but. In another way. It's really made me sort of think about health. And like I don't know I. I feel like seeing these people getting sick. Quitting some people that I know it just reminds me that the body is vulnerable thing and we need to take care of ourselves on a society has been sort of. Slowing down which I think, even though it wasn't our choice, it is probably really good for people and many ways, especially in mental health ways and I know for me. It's just sort of forced me to take a look at how I've been working, and how hard I've been working for the past couple of years and sort of readjust my priorities so. At the beginning of this year I was really gunning towards right. What's my next project on publishing books? That'll be done by. The first quarter and then you know onward, know just like. Go go go go go! How many books can how fast can I write them? How good can they be like? How much can we keep ratcheting this up? Which is sort of the? Of the corporate world, or at least my experience of it, so I really took that sort of intensity, and tried to apply it to my creative career, and now I just feel a little bit like you know what the world will not stop if I take three months off and just. I Dunno do self care, meditate. Do. Aspects of work, I haven't stopped working, which is do it without that manic desire to accomplish things at a rapid clip, so I really do think that. The kind of pies that everyone's been taking has helped me see that it's valuable to just. Like slowdown. Take a step back. Think about your mental health think about your physical health and the toll. We can put on ourselves by constantly stressing about. especially in creative arts like you know, we don't have like a steady paycheck, so it's. A constant hustle to try to get your next project going because that's how you make money. But it can really eat you alive if you don't remember to sometimes get some distance from that and take care of yourself so I think migrate lesson. I mean we put so much pressure on ourselves with everything we right to and you know like having to even just taking even covert. I felt like Oh, I have time to right now I'm home like there's no excuse and they did it right for a while just because of the stress and everything. Or just the uncertainty was kind of lingering, and it was like I'm still okay like. Give your mental break. It actually helps you write later with that mental break and I. Think we've been mis sold on the hustle, and how important it is I feel some times. Maybe I think especially like it's very American. Very American sensibility 'cause I lived in the UK for a couple of years, and not that there isn't a sense of. You know. Like a strong desire to work and be productive there but I. do think that the sort of. I don't know the way that it's like deeply embedded in Austin as a value system. We feel better if we can just maximize, productivity is like it's uniquely resonant for Americans who are just sort of raised on this notion of. Hard work is the measure of your character you know. Yeah, and hard work, and then it's like it's it's different when it's creative work because you could still be working hard on a project that might not fly or just you could still be working hard on. The working needs to do for the creative project. I mean there's just it's. It's such a hard something so different when you're working on your own, your artistic, maybe i. Feel. That way you actually did or books in two years like yeah, from start to finish out the door. That's supernotes. I didn't start them at the beginning of two years. Whitten will some of them were written that I published for in two years or less than two years, and because a lot of them are publishers, tremendous amount of work that you're doing your I mean there's a tremendous amount of work you do yourself even traditionally published as I've learned. But Yeah so getting four books out the door, and two of them had to be written mostly from scratch, so yes, it was a lot to take on in two years. Now. Traditionally published versus self published I'm curious to know why why make the switch to self publishing. After you know every writers dream Oh my God, we'll get the agent and everything and then. It's on the other side the grass. And so green right so yeah, well so I initially set out to traditionally published, and the reason was just that in historical romance in my Genera. I hadn't really seen many examples of authors making a big success for themselves. I started. Thinking about doing this as a job or trying to make it a job in two thousand fifteen, and at that time there were a couple of people who are doing it and historical like a very sort of professional degree, but not that many. So I just assumed that if I wanted to sort of. Have a big debut and make a splash and kind of make a name for myself in a way that I could sort of sustain it bill. You know reputation off of my first series that I needed to. Tradit- I needed the weight of a traditional publisher behind me. So when I finished my first book, I did the usual thing where you spend months and months and months querying agents waiting for their feedback and. Got Her. Manuscript to Ray, and then you don't hear back performa. Sure. Every writer knows about it is excruciating. would it worked out well I found my lovely agent theory younger. Just a dear person, one of my favorite people on Earth, and Sarah loved the book. We did some edits on it, and then she sent it out in the usual way to all of the publishers that we were interested in, and they were all like. Wow this is. This is unusual. Okay. I'm curious. Did they not like your sex scenes or did? They know dark things or well? You know they never really tell you. They're not like you know. We've rejected it specifically for this reason because. Then you can just like say oh I can fix that if you want to work with them I I. Don't know exactly which things about my books causes them to feel too I don't know risky, but the unilaterally the feedback that I got when we went on a mission was like we love scarlet voice. There's. There's so much to love about this, but we just don't know if it's right for our readers or you know. Can she write something more conventional because this feels to left field for a debut and I understood that feedback because I was trying really hard to be a bit more like edgy and boundary pushing and perhaps even controversial. So he wasn't shocked. At what they were saying. But. I was disappointed of course because I had. That I. was you know kind of writing the line between pushing boundaries, but also doing it a recognizable way that would appeal to your traditional romance reader genre, while also perhaps sort of stretching what they are used to reading So that was sad. It didn't work out and then I was like okay while I can either. Do the thing where you write more conventional book and stood in a sort of fun Voisey way, try to kind of stick to my boss about going so far out of the usual balance or can publish, and I decided to publish because I wanted to debut. Because I had such a strong sort of vision and so much specific like desires about what kind of books I wanted to write and. How I wanted to package them and I don't know it was just very clear on my head, and I already had a background in. PR and marketing so a sort of knew how to put something out into the world and try to get attention for it and I also. Had internal. Literary Agency for a couple of years in college knew a little bit about the brass tacks of publishing I just figured like. Surely I can make this work so I decided to self publish this series. And then I loved it was so much fun like I love Self, publishing? I let it get to control everything and I am a type A perfectionist control control-freak, and not really suits me. It was just perfect now. Yeah, and that's what I read like how much of the story you probably would have had to give give away. And that edginess and everything that's so alluring and so different like how much of that I couldn't imagine. Yeah, we can't. We can't know but if you never know yeah. Yeah, so your PR tactic a your PR background obviously was definitely a big health and stuff so you how? Yeah so. What can you writers do when we're putting our for stuff out there like that can make it fun because I think that's what scares a lot of equal putting it out there because you see the long list of things to do, you're not in a lot of them. And then resistance creeps up in that I'll never sell looks like so. What are the things that you did that kind of got over? Here While, you're making me very excited because they got to put my branding hat. I love it. I think like any product. A book is a product right, and so if you're introducing a product to the market, first of all, you need to think through. What is sort of original about this or if it's not terribly original, how do I at least make it stand out in a crowded marketplace and believe me Amazon Dot. com is a crowded marketplace. I can't remember the facto is yeah. I mean so especially if you're writing romance books, thousands of them are published a month. which can be really daunting. But also remember that if you have a really strong vision for what your project is, and if you are committed enough to it that you're sitting down and actually creating novel from scratch, which is an incredible actor taking for any human being to take on an accomplished like you. Have you have everything you need? You just have to figure out how to channel it. So think about what makes your book Your Vision Your kinds of characters, your kinds of stories like what drew you to that? What makes it so compelling to you that you're willing to spend? A year or six months or two years, or however long you're spending creating this world in these people and then figure out how to make a pitch for that in the same way that when you query a book, you're trying to play up its originality premise. It's hawk It's conflict. You need to do that in a blurb so. Whenever you're trying to think about. PR or marketing. It's not really just like the steps like. And I can talk about the steps a little bit too, but you really need to have a strong sort of. Rand proposition and a product proposition. And you really need to be able to talk about what that is so like when I throw out words about the kind of books IRA. They are incredibly angsty, either very voisey's Ar Gothic. They are set on the eighteenth century like they're all these things I can toss out at you. That sort of. Gives you a sense of the vibe that I'm going for? You? Know without you even needing to know what the book is about and. What you WANNA do is try to Think of a way to make that translate beyond just the blurb of the book, so you want to tell the reader or the Jenner whoever you're querying what the book is about in a way that sort of captures the tone and the spirit I think and then if you're self publishing, and you have control over things like the way the book looks you always have control over your website, and which photos you use on your social media accounts, and what kind of content you make to promote your books. You want everything to go back to that sort of. Excitement about what concept and what the brand are so if you like even just like right down like five words that you think really define your sort of sensibility, and then you know, have a one urge who line log line for what the book is in a way that sort of guests at its originality. I think you can sort of start with that, and then start expanding outward like okay, if this is a really physique kind of romantic comedy, and my specific angle is on I, am like a scientist by training in all of my characters are in the sciences or the stem fields, or whatever, and then there's like a berry like they're all set Texas. This is not a real author and thinking about I. Just made this up, but if that were the brand that I were working with. That's like the the world that I'm starting with then it's like okay well. What are some kind of like? Where in Texas are you sort of been like Martha and everyone's like? I don't know a Bohemian Hippie. Or are you an Austin where everyone's working at the university? Like? Are we talking cowboys? Are we talking wide open skies? Are we talking? Don't mess with Texas. Don't take my guns like I. Don't know I. Don't know what you are doing, but you know you need to think of a way to translate that in your instagram and your facebook and twitter the way that you talk the way that you. Design your email signature like I really think that the way. Many. Authors just kind of pop onto the scene. often has to do with how good they are at integrating that whole package and saying okay I have this great high-concept, cool marketable book that I have written and then here is the full package that you can kind of. See Anyway that resonates to you so if they like some book, reviewers are really interested in. Certain genres or certain themes, or whatever those on and themes are very apparent from just seeing the email that you send when you send your pitch and your you know. link to your book like because you know that will draw them in, and you're really trying to put that aspect of it forward, and if you're. You know if you're writing your Texas Stam Rom COM You are trying to appeal to the reader of Texas. Stem, Rom, com, and so you WANNA. Make It really clear and all of the visual branding that it's like Texas and stem and Rom, so maybe like a lady with a goofy facial expression, which wear glasses and a lab coat and she's like. But there's like the Texas lag behind her I don't know. Would you know what I mean like? Is this making sense like I really think that it's it's just not full picture and figure out how to tell the story and then tell the story in every way you're going to be interacting with people who might be interested in buying your book. That's all clear on your branding and your instagram like every single touch point, dark gothic, even like the lettering dislike subscribe to my scarlet letter. I was like Jesus. Genius like I was like. Wow, that's really good stuff. Every single touch might like you said it really speaks to the dark that Gothic the sexually repressed seeking sexual freedom like. That was perfectly clear when I landed on your site, and that's what I was like. Okay I you definitely like I wanNA. Hire your I wanNA hire your. Avenue I know that you're the genius to end. Yeah I, think no matter what you do and ice used because I'm an entrepreneur as well. For people who always think like. Oh, you can just set up. Click funneled extent I'm like no knowing your audience everything you said right there about like the stem rom, com, the stem cowboy wrong conferences. Like having your character, say y'all or even signing it off with like you know just Texas, fixing to hear from you or something. That's very Texas. Every touch. Point has to let people know that your for them right and. I key you like really nailed it on that, so I'm curious like. You're you've gotten great reviews on Amazon. You've gotten great reviews. Every place that I've seen What do you get what what's the what's? The Romance Love. You're getting back from the fans like what's the like? Do you see? The sparks and the change because I feel like great readers on their passionate about their authors Lives change to you know it's kind of weird like they have little little sparks in their life, so yeah, as the yeah. It's so. It's so funny because some people will like. Just write an email out of the blue and just like tell me about. Why the book sparked something for them. Specifically and I love that, and it's so interesting to see if the thing that's resonating for them is like related to the reasons why I wrote it or if they're just seeing something incredibly meaningful, different that I wasn't even intentionally in trying to put in the book. I don't know I. Just think it's fascinating. How certain things resonate for certain people? And I love hearing from fans when they're like Oh. My God this coming up all night and I made me cry also made me think about my Catholic upbringing. Mission accomplished the. Night that's the big three more chapters tumor pages. When they say I couldn't put it down. I was up all night literally. That's like when you. Get like three. Michelin, stars, for Your Restaurant, I'm just like yes. Firing on all cylinders right? But also I don't know I like to hang out. I know like plenty of authors like to interact with their readers in different ways, but my favorite ways to go on instagram and. I like to make little like. Like image cards for my book. Yeah illustrate them with like cool imagery or sexy quotes or whatever I don't know. There's like a different sort of theme for each book, but. I don't know I've made a lot of lake. Reader our friends that way you know people who are always commenting on them, sending me messages and. And, then you get to know them, because they're on instagram to relate responding to each other stories and I feel like I know their arrives a little bit, and I also feel like because I sort of have a sense of. Like what they are reading and responding to and like talking about? All this helps me understand a little bit more like Oh people seem to be really. On this thing right now like how could I do that? Or how could I do something like that? That twisted a little bit. It's really nice to know your readers and to hang out with them, because then you. Get a sense of what they want and how you can do that better, which I is really important for any artists like how what is connecting about your thing, and how is the culture related to that? And how can you? Do the next thing in a way that. was part of. That conversation gets really. Yeah, have you? Readers suggest Oh. What's what's going to be more about this character and. What? I get predictions lot like Oh, I have a feeling that this person's GonNa end up with this person, and sometimes they're right, and sometimes they're wiling I've never even thought of that and I'm like. Should I. Just that's cool. Yeah, so that's fun I like how they They really get into the. Family. Really get attached to characters. And then they really want nice things for those characters, and I am very pleased in touch that they hair so much If they feel like real people. You're doing you. Use of the right they're they're. Going to have to know, that's really sweet. I think that's the fun part of authors on Instagram, and the ones who really do it well is there just so like in the trenches with the reader and your your instagram. You have this really romantic quote. And then you have this really funny caption. Like, it's such A. It's such a like comedy punch. Like what is that like a misdirection and I'm like that's funny. A little hearts everywhere that US and then you see the fans response. They respond to you. They're like what if it says. Really, Fun Dialogue so I think. I. Definitely Definitely get a lot of fun when I go there. Dinky L.. So, we have some closing questions that we ask and I want to know. What is your definition of success? My definition of success is feeling successful. Tricky answer, but I don't. Think I. Have a better one I mean who can tell you? You're successful beyond yourself. And where does that sense of fulfillment and happiness and accomplishment come from except from your own personal? determination. So I don't know I. Feel like you are successful. When you've set goals for yourself and you feel like you've met them, and you don't feel frustrated like I, haven't quite. Gotten to where I WANNA be yet which I think is different like I think sixty year definition of success can evolve. You can start off with. One kind of entry level version of success in the maybe you accomplish. Good and then you're like. Wow, you know what I really liked to do. Yeah. Sorry. That's a very softcore answer, but I do believe, but it's strip. Now I mean. It's. southcorp it's very real very. I mean there's a very honest answer. You also before we. We start recording. You've mentioned something that he wanted to do what you love instead of proving yourself to others, and I think that kind of falls in this as well so Doing what you love as far as being a writer. When was what what was the point where you actually stopped like letting go of proving yourself and things like that and just said I'm going to do this. Well, you know I guess it goes back to that question of success. Because when I was in my previous career, I was a I was in pr, but I was in more like strategic communications. DOING CRISIS PR and financial. Ever fortune and footsie-100 companies like really really intense and really business orientated, and you're working. CEO's and chairman of the board CFO's and you know you're. You're working with very high powered people and I was. Not to Brag, but quite good at my job and you know I was climbing the career ladder very quickly, and I was becoming evermore miserable each step of the way, and so when you come when when you talk about that word, success was successful on paper. Did I have a very impressive linked in profile for sure? But I did not feel successful at all I have this like shame like why am I doing this? Why am I not proud of why do I? Feel bad going to work everyday. Why years that I sort of like it a sarcastic expression on my face when I tell people what my job is, it's because it's not what I wanted to do, and so I don't feel that's fall in so I don't really like feel the respect that I wanna feel myself her. Really doing the thing that I care about. So. I guess the point when I decided to sort of we bought cliff and changed careers. Was the point when I was at my lowest. Highest Point in my job where I had been transferred overseas and I had a very fancy job title I was leading teams in like. Really just like killing it in a certain way and having panic attacks at night and. dreading going to work because I, just like hated it and I would look at the people who are really like powerful in my field like the partners at my agency in the. You know people who had really made a success, and we're very powerful and had lots and lots of money, and I would just look at their lives and not want that for myself. So I was like well. What would I watch and I decided to? Take a year off. Because I didn't know what the answer was. I knew it had to do with writing because I've always wanted to be a writer, but I wasn't sure if that meant going to Grad School, or I don't know working in a different sort of creative agency setting like maybe being an ad copywriter, instead obey strategic, PR person When I always wanted to write romance novels, I'd always been sort of toying with the idea and I would write little scenes from this one that was. In my head when I would go on vacation. And I just started doing it. During my so-called gap year I was like I would love to just do this like. Can I just turn this into a job and then I was like okay. I'm seeing people who have how do they do that? Or how can I do that was an evolving process, but it definitely goes back to that question of success. And how do you define it and what you actually want, and what makes you feel like good and happy and fulfilled, and like you're not leaving cards left on the table. I guess. And I. Think with all the fan love you're getting. I think that's probably so priceless Ito who wants who wants to Polish linked in profile when you've got a instagram. Pat? It's as true like. I think all the love you're getting. Of shows that it is possible you can do it then. You know the writing past. There's so many past and writing like you said Grad School Mfa. In Traditional Publishing copywriting, which I believe is no fun at. I was a copywriter for years. It was fun for me at all. But. There's there's so many different avenues where you could take writing I. Guess It's you know it's just really what we want to tell most in our writing what we wanted dedicate. Are Writing too. So what is your best advice to the women out there? The young woman writer out. They're really struggling right now. My advice is that the people who seem to succeed in writing and really in all creative arts I live in La. You live in La I'm sure you know tons and tons of creators. Almost everyone I know is create are in some way. Most of my good friends are writers in some way. My husband's a musician You Know I. The thing that seems to be the common denominator in all the people who. Chew it an end up. Feeling personally successful, and it's an endurance game. And that can be the worst thing to hear when you're starting out because you want instant gratification and I know I, have been there I'm like I've been writing this book for six months, and it's not even ready to query yet like you know. Every single second field so waited in meaningful lasting forever. And publishing even self publishing where you do have more control is such a slippery creature like everything changes so fast, and sometimes you write a book about you really really love and you're like God. This is really going to knock it out of the park. Everyone's just going to instantly see this is. Really a something special, and then you put it out and be Blue Lake. Pretty good or they're like. Why really really effing hated that? What a piece of garbage you know like it happens and. You just got to keep doing it I'm not a pies when you're pre published when you're still like writing those drafts and figuring out the craft it goes for when you're querying. If you're trying to get an agent and go the traditional route, it goes if you're self publishing, and maybe you started, but like your books aren't getting the traction you envision. But you know it's like you just have to keep. thinking are A. This is disappointing What can I do differently or can I do next and lake? Sometimes, that's a long game. There is a person I was talking to can't even remember. I can't remember who said it. She was like human beings always wildly underestimate what they can accomplish in. Sorry, they overestimate what they can accomplish in one ear, and they wildly underestimate what they can accomplish in ten years, or in a lifetime, and I think that is so applicable to create a builds because it is harder to measure our output in the way that you would in ad copy writing or NPR where it's like. You have a brief, and it's due on this date, and you turn it in, and then you get paid for it where you have a corporate career and you have objectives like the arts don't really work that way. Our. Eight. So just keep your eye on the long game and try to work through those frustrations and try to lake make communities inroads with other creative people so that when you're all. In, the highs and lows of it, because there are incredibly exhilarating highs I, don't WanNa, be like you know just sparing or negative about it incredible thing to do, and if you could turn it into a thing that pays you money like that is the dream. But you know the lows are also devastating and really good to have the support of people who understand the lows, even if that's just like I, feel creatively under stimulated right now and I can't seem deliver on the vision I have or it's like my book didn't saw or the Asian rejected me. You know it can be anything, but it's. It's nice to have people who understand what that feels like and so I think. My advice would be keep doing it understand that the highs and lows are part of the process, and you will find success, but you also have disappointment, and like sometimes successes might be really big, and the disappointments really small vice versa. It's probably GONNA. Change somewhere along the way you're gonNA. Have you know Iraqi ride? That means sometimes it goes up. Sometimes it goes down. And like how people around you who understand that Johnny and can be like? Don't worry. It will get better. You're doing a great job because if you love it that much on your that committed to it I suspect. If you keep at it eventually, you will find the place for it and like the way that fits into your life to. Be satisfying and to feel successful. Yeah! I mean if you think about where you probably were ten years ago, he said two thousand fifteen was when the when you started the Brad. Right or when you your I am when that started happening you, so that's only been five years, and you're already a lot of momentum so and I. See this with the Youtubers podcasters in people that work with this well I. It's like it takes ten years to become famous Nazi show up if a gang building. Said like partnering with people like in. That's doing the hard work. That's not even just like. Creating the stuff that's doing. Your NPR you've you've made people famous. I'm probably sure you've got a good. Good list. Of People that you've you've worked with. endurances like it's definitely like the best way to say it. It's monster. Alkan, yeah, creative communities. They pay off. Really, ill. Yeah, in La. And you don't really have to live in La Anymore. We're all in shutting out. Like go line. Know like the. Yeah also slugging and Zoom Anyway, what is it? Exactly exactly. What's what's important if you'RE NOT IN LA? Yeah La like I. that's one of the reasons like I'm like oh I'll pay the high rent and. Deal with the traffic, because guess what I get to be near Hollywood and be all these other cool creative people, Venice and everything, so, but now creative people are everywhere, and although there's more I feel like there's more love out there than there is anything to be afraid of so absolutely absolutely. Look. Oh you were very I dropped a lot of science on US and a lot of knowledge on us, and I'm not just talking about the stem cowboy talking about. I was like yes, Jim Cowboys. That's what she's talking about. Exactly. There's a market allow. Yeah for sure, but you dropped out of. Great knowledge on us. Especially you know if if you guys unique message, dark, gothic feminist historical romance like all those touch points. There's your market is out there. I mean Martin Luther just being unique and having that voice. And loving the journey, so thank you so much for coming out today. Thank you for having me. It has been absolutely delightful to talk to you. Well I'm excited and creative minds, scarlet latest book, the Racas, a historical romance inspired by Mary Wollstonecraft, so you can already see the connection there the gothic fiction. It was recently named one of Amazon's best books of the year. So far you can find it wherever books are sold and want something wicked at just check out her site. She's got some great books. And, you will find them at Scarlet Peckham Dot com, and you can also follow her on Instagram or twitter at Scott Pakistan, so thank you for joining creative minds at remember, it's an endurance game. Stick with it. You can make it. Just make it to the end, and we will see you on our next episode.

instagram writer partner Texas US La publisher Cristina CASTAGNA Jane austen Austin Amazon Scarlet Peckham New York Laurie heroin Jane Charlotte twitter John Mara
#379: Justice

The Agostinho Zinga Show

1:16:29 hr | 7 months ago

#379: Justice

"Augustine hosing this show with your host dog use Gino's. Term. Take. The Tint. Them Welcome back Zinger show with me your host Eisinga and this episode number free seven nine. That's free seven nine of casinos English show. Journey. Make Sense Padania me wherever that word was. Say thank you so much for joining me. If I I'm watching the show make sure that light but his me recorded below if you're listening to the poll, Cossack. Please leave me a five serve you daladier show share with your friends sticking a backup your shoes when you're running away someone changes say, Hey, go tissue on your shoot shooting pick up as my show and do it will let my stuff is much much appreciate. Yeah. Was Update update so far. Pop showed now. So if you're listening or whatever you she had no more POPs on the microphone little bit big. So Bona Chunk side is absolutely protruding straight up into the back of my throat, but it is what it is. You know got good gag reflexes we keep it moving. But apart, from that nothing else change, we have him a ten PM curfew now in the UK. Read is really funny pitches of videos going viral yesterday of a whole host of people just literally pouring out onto the streets at ten pm because of also the Buzzer. Time. So, ever the solution. However, the rationale was behind closed in the pubs early to Jewish people mingling as they say, UK here I. Listen you're best new phrase we have all these new phrases averages solve adopted into their lexicon right we had. What was it new normal for start right that was a bit knowing everyone now, Tokyo like you know I don't know how they just didn't make any sense now suddenly mingling on the was that we now. Using journeys tough times. But yeah, it was just funny seeing so many people on the streets all at once. which you could have guessed you could guess if you closer buzzer early people, I'm just going to go home right they're gonNA obviously stay out and try to enjoy it as much as it can especially, during these times of this, it's been a very interesting way to see how people have approached it obvious seasons and as government in terms of understanding people's pain points right? Imaginable strife everyone's going for economically or as a family unit. You could imagine you could understand why some people would want to kind of you know black how as like forget about things and go out and have a good time. You can understand why people would want to just go out and meet other people and just be around strangers just so they can take their mind off things you can understand it. So for the government, not to solve like work with industry especially hypothetically to figure out what is the best option solution going forward is billable of an issue especially when you think about the evidence and data so far doesn't show us all industry that. Far, that covid is causing anymore uptick in cases, we haven't seen evidence pointing towards that if anything if he believes someone the numbers out there, I've seen numbers of five to ten percent being banded around in terms of the amount of people getting cooked fruit hospitality, industry recipe rivers, a bar, a restaurant. Oh. Every may be That's not where it's actually birthing firm and I guess at the time now because scientists an exact and it's just difficult to grip on this thing it seems like listen to the experts ever having a hard time figuring out what exactly is going wrong and who's approaching the right way even countries that are doing it the best. There's no rule learnings that can be made for especially when you include human beings in it people robot so and people aren't the same the world around who would it People aren't the same be world different. So you can't really am economy look at what New Zealand on anyway and try to adopt it here because we just the same people we go back things differently different life experiences. That's just you know especially London is so much cultural. is so hustle and bustle is really expensive here. So people are just you know they're worried about making sure people have been own household are safe. You know really that bothered about being. A great. Community. Member he saw civil civic responsibility. It's just about making sure that their kids don't die and that they have been close appointed back Senate. Is a bonus. Yet deputies by. Bone most people I think. So it's kind of hard to even learn lessons from countries that are kind of dealt with this better and maybe just some. Better to deal with stuff like this is what it is. I don't think that can be excused I think maybe the part that you know maybe I think of him. I don't know maybe we're public adept at dealing with terrorist attacks because of how individualistic life is here London right? You can solve. You could you could easily go about a year. Junior finger in London. We've are any checking up when you're making sure you're okay. It literally could go for a year even if you had a good social group of friends, you could let you go year at your friends actually seeing you in person and not an issue. So it might take, you continue that takes you and say, Hey, what's up come here but you could literally put them off for a year and would ask the question about, Hey, what's wrong with the guy from how come here in ages Nola compensation you'd be left completing your own so. That might help in terms of terrorism attacks because you know that stiff opposition comes in best appreciable it comes away. You know you have to kind of get on with it and move on probably have the aptitude for that especially in London. That because everyone's just you know literally have to, you have to do to keep the lights on. But Yeah mm-hmm been concerning. It's been very very concerning to see how we've solved dealt with this stuff as a nation but you know I think we were. Poor of yourselves on the cards in it, but that's been a very tempting curfew hasn't really worked again. It's not real time to judge it when he's kind let things kind of play out at. Maybe this might be a genius move just to hook there with a made more of a false for tempted to do this in the beginning. But Hey, where where we are now, let's hope things get better for the long run going forward. But Anyway jam-packed show fee today loads of interest and talk about another topics get fruit. Loza them very. Spicy things to get through as well. Actually grab a drink web having. We have as finished house. War I. I did not drink whether you have sip-it drinking etait crack open and less setback enjoy. So I think on the docket right now to get through. Unfortunately. We have another. Casualty of Covid a nightclub in Peckham called cavernous a club. A better conferred cub has been turned into a nightclub of ever after hours horn, for some of the. Hips Artie. Cruden south and again, one of my more favorite place to go to especially in south suburban track to get to from where I am. But in general said, very, very great spot. It's a it's a very costly is probably there is no comparison to cavernous can't think of as a kind of as A. Covenant Hey routes it in London a comfy maybe apart from efforts as. Our efforts to we are really good subculture. Actually these weird of Blackpool, clubs have been turned into my cubs because I guess they have a by default. They have late licenses right? They're allowed serve drinks really until basically. The morning probably not to be a nightclub because it's really spur spa spread out of course, accommodate the tables. They usually have a pre soundsystem, the drinks untapped talent really the best but the bartenders usually great secure is usually really fun as security you can be and just generally attractive decent crowds is a real shame to see cabinets club suffer you know with the new Co Co Kofi coming in you knew some sports just hanging on for dear. Life will go into photo wayside I said it. Prior I think some industries of businesses are just hanging on for dear life, and if any other kind of actions may be above from a curfew, another lockdown an maybe a a like. Industry. Pacific lockdown maybe look different type of industries and saying, Hey, this place has too many points of human contact closed for spirit of time I think it's GonNa Cause Lobban Cigar out out business unfortunate but. I guess this is kind of the nature of the game at the moment and again, a really great club that should approve and support I imagine a place that kind of his text that much money to keep it running right again, much money in comparison to other clubs. So shamed of the weren't any grunts, any a bursaries, any help and assistance in place for them to tap into. So they can keep their does, and again because I think part of the beauty of Peckham area isn't no these new spanky. Skyscrapers going gentrifying the area 'cause vacation has its place. You know of some places unavoidable. What is raised to be a balance? You know for older you know gloss erections you're sticking up all over the place you need to balance out with some you know grow e. DIY solve like real places like record stores at clubs like art, supply stores, bookstore, whatever they are made by local community, any as well as due to these new skyscrapers in. Active balance because I don I wouldn't imagine if you are some early. God that was buying up flat for your door in Madurai Peckham private and why she wants to move this because she's had a right wax right? She doesn't WanNa go in and suddenly there's no right wax. I duNNo. Doesn't have a truck IMPR- Ammonia Jane around the corner she's coming here for Jeremy. Issued enough strike a balance anyway. Let's go from Brazil visors kind of pick and pull close tonight after the UK's. New covid nineteen JOE SUPPORT SCHEME FELLOWS NIGHTLIFE From Friday says. Contingency says, cameras will close for good tonight at ten pm again, look how great it looks outside queuing up just composite probably miss it. Right a small narrow door you walk through the Hawaiian Pam you into massive massive for what is so poor arena where digital corn, a great bar, and just generally a good crowd like you're losing rural. Homework. I think of south London and what about in essence. Owner Kirin Canada announced on facebook I the evening the right lane venue would closer starts last summer Friday twenty. Timber. Maddening referencing the new Cobra Ninety late curfew and Boston pops. This his post rediscovered here. He said, let's get this all the way. Up of Bor carried my here. This is. No help from the government and after having talks with landladies they're refusing to reduce of until of viruses dealt with row kind of to govern youtube has no eleven and made it a nightlife summation so Owners are refusing to just the rent I can again on I think there has been a little bit of push effing states with this where this has been like we're war against landlords I. don't see why that's the thing most landlords from my experience. You know fairly what working class middle class people right they're just trying to make a buck they just trying to make a living for their family. And I didn't think that's an issue I think we're over here right now to reduce rents. Biggest problem they issued a curve is happening. There might be a Bevan agreement in terms of you know maybe posing rent for a couple of months and allowing you to make up the arrears as you go on but the understanding that they're going to reduce the risk for viruses everybody make no sense I definitely. Get them on that on that side of things I think this is where Steph sin assist these small businesses that kind of makeup the overall DNA of a particular location. Especially when you're looking at what night brings to the whole London economy, they needs to be understanding that you know for as little as it takes run kind of look at the net benefit has the entire community tie ecosystem off. That street right I can imagine that kind of is probably allows people to go to off licences across the road and buy drink to keep the party going or maybe to presient whatever may be all these little businesses suffer because kind of closer. So it's not even just the fact that the place closes a net negative of not having that place they're attracted to go to other institutions chicken shop living. At you're going to see a dip in sales because kind of closing. So does the issue at hand it? Says continues on I can afford to pay free month's rent in advance in the situation of the payment every quarter on time for the past ten years. This is very hostile swallowed such as life. Of course, as you know, we are a nightclub and only get after ten PM. Of course, there is no way can survive said kind of hosted mix of student events and club almost nobody was the first home to local Party and eventual label rhythm section lead fighter Predator, pay tribute to the place here. So yeah, I've been there. So many been for student nights I've been if an open deck swing benefit club now is just religiously one of the best places to go to has so much character. Again is different from any Popov, the UK London his pitchy patchy surface definitely has particular sort of feel and vibe towards it that people that party out there Germany uruses was has a very tribal aspect to it but again, I, just love the the programming they tend to always book friends and family as opposed to East I. Think maybe that's just my point of view I get the feeling that in eastern anger problem and they tend to. Book La Big names to come in and play by south of like keeps to their own. I'm Debbie because they've got record stores and stuff around there. So there may be a more of a tendency to reach out to people again to play Bob. Definitely have had a much better time going to random nice I had no idea who's playing in south than anywhere else in London you can definitely trust if you go to any club night in south. Africa. Be. You'd have been detained by fatty permanent very very. Adept very able of retaliation deejays playing various types of music definitely won't disappoint you continues here says. As a cup coach news club closure shared yesterday evening. The clear is the cabinet. Mention of no help from the government is referencing chancellor risks Russia soon, ex announcement about Hugo new job support scheme and furlough, and self employed skins come in next month. The sooner says the next couple of phases which hinges on the government covering twenty percent wages for workers who for for one further contract our six months is aimed at retaining what he calls viable jobs we need to create. New Opportunities allowed to move forward and that means appoint people. Bible jesuits provide genuine security. So I don't I. They went press on what viable accent. It's not for me to sit here and make pronounce about exactly what Joe Is. Not What we do need to do is evolve our support now so that we are fruit acute phase of this crisis I believe it is right thing to do not concentrate that support and jobs have genuine prosper Bo decorative nightime industry, which is fairly been. which has been unable to appraise since March as government pandemic regulates has not allowed. Venues means braces to prevent major changes are denouncing the government's lack of extended support. And Yeah that's been that's been a pre. Interesting. Part of this right I guess we always kind of new especially in UK we kind of had an understanding just from what happened especially when they pulled the late night senses from kings and road when I used to promote back in the day and you saw the changes in shortish and he showed US changes and just a clubs nationwide. As, a nation, we don't really give a shit or the government doesn't give a shit about nightlife. As much money as brings into case of a is a bit of A. Kind kind of tolerate right they tolerate cubs being around they don't necessarily encourage them expanding, growing sustaining. was there they just would. If Club dies it is what it is I don't really make much of a fuss about it. They don't go out of their way to support anyone that's on the on the ropes. If anything is just mostly a testament to the owners into the local community supports, he's paces s an open. They have no assistance to help Derek Schmidt interaction notice no help from the government all then of course. was his face go a night czar. Appointed a knight. Sorry for London copying similar things that's happening across Europe in terms of having somebody as a point of contact. Some of the voices speak for the nightlife industry in in the House of parliament in these big meetings where the students are made and this amy lobby woman has been pretty useless since the first time she's got it i. don't know what she's done. She's been in there. She doesn't necessarily seem like somebody really of the coach of the scene I've never seen her. Fiction, associated with the club nights I go to anyone that has been to some permanent club nights, and she just definitely hasn't really had a finger on the pulse, and again, it might be a limitations of a role. It might because she doesn't have the knowledge of the regardless Knight's czar thing that was led to believe it was going to be a way for the nightlife industry to have some security knowing that there's somebody out there fighting for them has necessarily materialize. She's been always in the back four or or reactive as opposed to proactive and just been generally preserver job. Kind of standard. Power cost with somebody government. So I guess it comes here. She tweeted here and said the chances announced today does not go far enough to support the value jobs and under shrugging metlife says the economy will continue to press the government. Sector specific support to help save prince elaborate in London call her josh being questioned as well and it was this offing the cells she's done literally nothing going forward bay she just paying lip service there continues at the nighttime initiation the NTIA Chief Executive Michael Key also decried. SYNNEX scheme in an op-ed of I knew saying, the chancellor has completely exiled the entire nighttime sector. He said the current new measures clearly only consider businesses are opening operating evil fully Olympic. City, what use tax measures antics pool for working software you're not allowed to true, and that's a real issue again I think. Much like it's funny right They're willing to have schools reopen I guess because they're viable and more important than nightclub fair enough. But the fact that the schools and universities reopen and you've seen people. You know the cases of covid ramping up a Oh. There's a story of got here from Manchester Right where Manchester Metropolitan University students forced into lockdown right as how how's it up to one thousand and seven hundred students are at the face to isolate before in days right. Which is flipping insane. So they're willing to like. University school opening knowing full well, that people are going to get clobbered and some people might die right? Because that's that's the that's the sort of bargaining having to doing government right now because you can't keep people look down forever right you can't keep you into ECON economy close. You have to get black people go back to work. If you don't WanNa, incur some long term damages economy you having to make some tough decisions as to was the number of cases or show willing to accept for the country to move on or to kind of. Get back to normal quote unquote and a willing to do that with the school. The nightclubs. Interestingly. Enough knowing that Mike appropriate better position to limit and may be put into practice. Some procedures that can mitigate for the cases going up right and there's also more pressure nightclubs. Do they have actual skin in the game that they can't afford to have cases and carry young Betcha Metropolitan Manager Pollen can get away with having sub-standard lectures, substandard facilities having people catching. Center and it's going to get tens of thousands of kids applying next year to get into university right universities. I've ever scammed that way necessarily hottest same. Business they don't really hot hotter same standard as you know, independent businesses which essentially and die by the reputation of their pages are coming into their place. So if you go to a club and you don't necessarily full safety. Put never made it Clovis secure you definitely let your. It'd be known escort African the damage that Nightclub going forward they're gonNA really suffer for us at every the game so. If there was a compromise to be reached upon meeting people in the Midwest thing. Hey, clubs kind of open, but if to open within these strict. Parameters it gives them a time to make some money to answer because I think a lot of these places on really I think there's some places that would always he likes some support from the government whereas Grand Bursary, some sort of monetary support what every may be a posing of rent an agreement with landlords whatever. But I think for the most part mercy's pacers just want the ability to run their business in some capacity. So they have some income coming in. The further Dick entirely close just mix it unviable for I don't even know how somebody faces US advising I. Really don't because if you can't open that all, you can't even do outdoor events. Why are you in this current in this current climate especially considering what the viruses right and how people have basically convinced themselves. If you're in any sort closed environment definitely going to get it how you've meant to survive. That's issue handy already he says the current. Ca To kill also urged the government to reconsider ten PM curfew. Businesses also fairly targeted by ten PM curfew which she believes no. No scientific basis and will prevent business from building the everything's just stay afloat. He says in July, the government announced. So one of one point seven, billion relief package for the arts and culture segment. Is. Wasn't until the less starts. Campaign by Industry and community. Clubs could be for grants arts council England lead application process for four hundred, million grant says side a cultural venues that received the aid include Corsica studios, earth fold soup kitchen, and Deaf Institute, and I, guess it's a picture of the Rhythm Section People Standing Side Ryan A. Eulogy. The Yemen side state of affairs you know kind of pain poor club, one of my favorite places to go to London. Again a rural establishment, a real cookie. Off the Walsall Sport. Suffering different from the kind of you know I'm running the milk commercial clubs we have here in London and the club scene again suffers in it i. the back of this is the first to solve suffer and the loss of considered early dismissal sparked I. Guess it is what it is a scientific government satisy go. continue and you going onto the topic regarding measure this be. Interesting breaking news right so I guess. There is an understanding. Within some segments of the government that we're GONNA have to get back to some inevitable normality we have to allow his school I think education for the most part if ever there was A. Need to. Innovate right education would be the one I think now. Everyone saw realized that you know for the most Pau wherever you're paying especially if you're taking your kids putting your kids to private school all you know putting them in prettiest ready Swanky College or university people definitely seen delimitations of these places regardless of what you're paying the don't set necessarily setup in a way to facilitate remote learning. Kids are really enjoy learning that way either especially when they used to being on campus brandon manned wrong among their friends. Just doesn't work so. They have to reopen in some way shape and record I guess poverty might be as well the mental health issue private right I think if you're a kid and you'd be home legitimately locked in place in abiding by the rules if you've been doing what the La influence have been doing just living life again, tested every single day because estimates ten inside of in it in all these tiktok kids who are multimillionaires just getting tested every day as if like. The equivalent of like you know. Going role on everyone that you meet. Right point any protection whatsoever and just get tested every day. Just to make sure you don't have anything like it just you'd you'd rob just like not do it or protect yourself than just run risk of getting just so you can carry on but hey, whatever V and of course, universities little interesting love even though they get. Thousands sometimes millions of money every calendar year. They don't have the facilities page have their own independent testing at university to ensure or routine testing their safety in that respect to ensure people. Secure and safe right. They just kind of you know just let it run run amok at kind of. Rectifying situation as is A. University as proof of that. Says they're forced to. Soon lockdown, right as one of university presidents university students emerges to have been forced to self isolate. We media affect up to one thousand, seven hundred students isolate for fourteen days after nine, hundred, thousand, nine. At Immature, university student tested positive for covid nineteen students across the city have been urged to attend virtual freshers, events and avoid. Bay. Parties and you know I would be played virtue freshers party was really depressing single to kiss separate on different tables limited capacity e I think the. Nitty. Maybe a quarter of the people that would to fresh is people you know keeping away from each other and you know that's the complete of university especially the first year it's all about touching strangers getting around people don't know making friends. And just being above illuminate. That's what university's about. So to kind of have an experience where you go somewhere and you meet new people from different walks of life and you have to avoid them, it must have weighed experience especially with some of the more mature students right heading into unique debt might be if you're at risk in you start Unia and your. WanNa avoid crowds, which is odd because your university an older because you don't want to have risk or anyone else at risk of void in Tuesday's doubly train it contains us. But some said. That no warning. Look down at another chapter in the halls of residence says the magic mean imagine me what one of our people in your chapter them in your whole was just horrible most postlethwaite Manchester are subject to strict restrictions on the spike in. He says the council said it was implementing a local look down to stop the transmission or device among students and preventive getting wider community. The evidence so far suggests that transmission has been into student community, which is mad. lockdown comes as students as Scotland. Todd Motor got to pogs pies over assurance this weekend in a bid to stem the spouse. Virus outbreaks about Joe, Grady of the UC university stopping and said, it was a responsible the university to have flurry Lewis to back into the basis. They can have a social after university and that they can have teaching students in the combination blocks at the Berkeley campus and at the Cambridge Jose magister affected by the lowest lockdown latest done. Megan, tear-gas student. Said, we are getting ready to go out and look tired secure and police as I. The horse they say we can't leave. Wow they go. Listener warning we we haven't received an email university about this and they seem to be holding us against our will a her mother has been converted to drive out what was going on US insane ago pieces outside trapping amores. At Burley Chip Wilson One thousand nine hundred we have been told that we are not allowed to leave, and if we do not come back and we see and if we do, we can come back. Oh. Okay. I see where this thing. So if you leave going, you concur four days, which are cost takes you out of the calendar year and you lose of teaching time especially in I need to attend every single lecture. Issue Secondly, year you kind of find your stride you know where to go what they should go to, what notes to take what lecturers Piss, poor, which when you could just get wave just written notes but at I, she need attend every single nature to make sure you on the river men on pace. What's going on she said to come back so. Now we all back in size. We're all worried about how we will get food and how long this lost gurney on email to say that it was happening and it was happening this evening on top of that or this many of us have have Covington's, but we cannot get test Jesus Christ here we only get dry. So door locked in their horns and Kobe congressman tests, but they know they have it. So you have to suffer in silence on your own in your room surrounded by. Like thousands of strange, you've just met a university spokesman said we are fully supported decision of services such as the well being support and Lupus and librarian or remain available to students online imagine people indoors but you're leaving in library open like students universities are. So backwards I security teams were increased patrols the lockdown, and we will take disciplinary action against any student found to have breached the requirements but imagine they let them back in God Almighty David Regan Public Health Sector Director. Manchester. Said an important part of the mentioned a low corresponds and the prevention plan for the current to keep close on data and xfinity decisively where an outbreak is. Contained various that's what we've done here. So yeah. I guess if had little to no option but again, spare for students out in a horrible time to be a student number one year in distress. Associated decided to go to university or not. Then decided to go during this time Then you finally decide to go make a brave step to go out there, and this is what happens you get no prior warning gang into local lockdown your you know next door to somebody who has maosen somebody that had aggressive system symptoms and you none the wiser because they're not giving much information than university side of things. So New Territory rented a vote been used to collect people's money leaving a dose openness student. Actual and and she's keeping it moving sort of suddenly being a place now where they're having to be proactive and do some think they've they've come they come up wanting in it as far as power costs with a lot of a institutions out there. So yeah entirely situations to be in an again I don't envy anyone. That's in university trying to handle this pandemic must be mad. It must be absolutely mad. I can just imagine what they're going from and like fuck me what what should. What Shishir you? Them shish shows this move onto toy lanes new album day star has just released right and as cool a bit of controversy a little bit of a controversy on the Social Media Space obviously because of what's. Lit Up to it you know the alleged shooting between Tora lanes of mechanism. We have really got much details as to what's happened so far. Alleged or directly said on her instagram lawmakers I didn't soil insurer. During a dispute in a car about something, and now in a position where people are essentially trying to cancel toy lane for what you've done because they're allegedly obviously think that he was wonderful for shooting a female, which is you know is completely are bound soon anybody. Especially during an argument, let alone a woman. Leno, somebody you're romantically involved in. So it's all the battleship show in that respect but. From the onset elway seem be efficient to me the story and every boy I guess because I've been following people like you know mob radio milagro grams of pick up her she report in this in a very in a very. Journalistic way right. She was really doing some investigative journalism taking indifference of references and sources really reading people's words. You know. Pulling resources from local from our community who are awesome de on the right pages and right temp to ski shut the right things and send them through those receipts everywhere and generally just been asking questions as to. Meghan. saw like standing in this case in how this is sort of erupted and I guess my initial response to this was to not believe just because effective Megan's character not women all but just based on what I saw online and the Baku around her. Original recco do and how she saw spun it to make it seem like she was coerced into signing a bad deal. When the details did get leaked, we found that was a pre standard record deal. Don't get me wrong very, very one-sided deal. The probably favors label favors the people that put their money in, but it was it wasn't anything uncommon in that deal that you will find in anybody else's deal that signed recently pressure people that sand lanting affect sixty does exist. The fabric of the music industry. They're really bad in recognition being able to take us of your money. Every avenue that you're involved in handsome sixty from the authority of merge to deals that you do outside of music they can obviously take a cut of it and that's obviously Very. Much. Is probably not the best affairs way to go about things but you know what it is for Megan and her team to purposely control that story to make it seem like she was bullied or the Patriarchy took control of her contract. She wasn't given agency and who this all staffing and the flirting and in the initial signing with ROC. Nation. To slow strong-arm IMPRESA original record label owners to forgo D- rights to her album for good or rights to hers artists, and to sign him up just questionable things. I never agreed with and I. Guess from that weather for somebody's willing to do in order to kind of Gabbard deal to lie on purpose to use like media user fans to kind of. Bully them out into giving her into, giving up her contract and give it to ROC nation somebody else courses like soccer again issue I think especially if you listen to the album. That Tori. Has Because I think he alleges that they were actually in a relationship of some sort that law feelings for each other. He's a complete her because he feels I can of somebody that he's obviously had a relationship with shouldn't. Shouldn't have basically stabbed him in the back in his way. I don't really see in that way I think i. think sometimes especially having read stories regarding people in L. A. I just think Ganji everyday and Ali would the fact that your life can suddenly turn for the better After a couple of appearances and people. So you know you could literally appear someone disagree story and your entire career change for the better in an instant. So I think in that scenario or in that sort of environment sometimes logic reason and just you know grownup behaviors at a window because you're just. So you kind of grateful and aware that your career could disappear in an instant is law if you make the wrong move. So sometimes when people do some really shady things right in terms of you know for friends at the bus lying about something controlling the truth making up stories. stealing money wherever I have a little bit of forgiveness and understanding. Especially, if it's happening in La, they're just know how Kafr is. And people are just doing what they have to do survive. Now, I, want to put myself in that position. No would I ever do that somebody? Of course, I understand how that can happen for us. I look forward to sit there and be shocked and surprised that somebody can make inside in who has everything to lose if story what you're saying is correct right if what happened way happened and he didn't shoot it was actually the fact that making was so blackout job, she has no idea happiness she actually end up shooting yourself or something designs allegedly it's obviously going to hamper career. So obviously going to affect a lot of deals that she has in the pipeline. And it's actually no coincidence really to think about it that subsequently in Promo. was really rushed right in terms of in terms of performance of twitch wherever it was a title as she lost of came on the back end of that shoe in that kind of on your side shoot. That makes you think you know they oversee wasn't understanding that if this goes left, you need to get these deals out of the way she's got like a makeup thing with nothing happening I saw. So that was always a bit fishy for me but again, I'm talking about the album self is really good right so elaine's album out say easily it might be up there with one of these projects I think of recent. When you think of him Post getting out of the Record Label Rafic chicks tape was maybe the I was at the first one no. That was the last meal checks las album. When he's record right says here I'm interscope in bad love in August Day Stars on one umbrella. Imprint. So This is definitely what this is. Definitely why most artists like in our record dillard's especially in August of his caliber, you're able to actually do your own thing you know Be of your drum, getting your in producers work with people that you want to work with or not get people because of political connections and famous or nonsense happened to record label, and then of course, the of us at the site of is that he's back is against the war. Right? He's essentially in a life of this situation is mission the album he's facing up to. Eight years or something on Kinda lines he has entire industry against it because essentially you know he he may be a leisurely her woman and then it just like a bad situation all in so and though surprised with your back against the wall. You're definitely gonNA live on your bare projects that mean that goes roundabout future you place up with somebody pulls out his best work isn't UNFOUNDED, definitely, when these kind of artists are putting position in our break when you saw of distress, they are able to somehow channel that into an amazing music. There's probably the thinks he wouldn't have able I don't think he would have been able to articulate himself. As strongly this clearly, just an instagram live I think he's artistry his talent. Allows them to make songs and make them Sophia. Matic and illustrative and just images gritty really going to resonate with the audience. Most of fruits museum went instagram live, and that's where kind of being able to do your own things of helps, and again look at the timing he might have lost quarantine radio dill and some other deals of the back end of the back of the alleged shooting. But also the fact that he was able to come his, you know essentially by the way. Obvious Masters Electric. I don't know if you ever have he finishes his deal with interscope. And in he's officiant. Now, of course, which is not the best you know having this alleged of your head is in the best thing. Also impatient where he can solve like music. When he wants even if he does get canceled, he's in additional where he can suddenly get stopped from point musical pointing a back burner benign scholar her even a press is concerned outlive come out and said, we're not gonNA have a him in some people I'm sure radio stations are going to. Use Their influence to not put him on rotation and it's going to be love gatekeepers sticking our nose in. And I think has to do with. Finger by law I think it might have to do with the fact that a loved these same people with the same people might have turned a blind eye to the whole reentering crisp reentering Chris Balance Situation. Happened you know a few years back? I. Think a lot of people can that was maybe the first. Big, moral decision making thing that people had to face in that industry music intent entertainment. Especially at that time Chris Brown Vienna were both an as equally as loved. Maybe random also, but it wasn't as if like Chris Brown was such a social prior that he is. Now that was Chris Brown prior to older madness. And controversies things he's gone for, which is obviously come out than the best I think a lot of people who felt like they fell on the wrong side of history are now trying to rewrite the wrongs with toy lanes issue because on paper to meet make any sense one percentage is one thing happened your personal thing happened why is it that one person believed more than you ever especially when so far the evidence points to the fact that more of more likely than not wherever events Of the story that Megan's put out there doesn't necessarily cooperate with evidence right so far Tori hasn't been children shooting her so far. We've had no evidence that she even got shot with a boy. They're inter for as she mentioned, she goes show in both the we not seen any evidence of this is just as you may be in one as some shrapnel when you have a full none of a friend of come and backed or none of her friends are actually dare better the story. Just. Kentucky seems completely fishy. So to suddenly go into place where. Totally hasn't spoken once in public since it happened right? He says something on the mix tape on the album. Sorry. Maybe the album's a bit force and a little bit too. You know direction some of its nature, but I think needed to be said you know what it is and now he's being. Essentially torn down for saying so or even release music thing some people die legend. He took away from the tension from Vienna Taylor case and you know just a unfortunate consequence that when he put out the album, the, you know their verdicts for the parameter Taylor case was put forward again no one agrees verdict no-one thinks a young lady mining business and earn home and suddenly game blasted. You know by precipices looking for a suspect who haven't identified visually is any KINDA. Way To deal with anything especially when you consider the charges levied against the officers, right? One of charge one. Was it one ton derangement or whatever something stupid case right note no murderer manslaughter. For him to suddenly now be placed under that same sort of companies really really really disingenuous and really kind of disrespectful to Brian Tellers legacy right Germany. Like he clearly thinks he didn't do nothing wrong he's trying to defend himself because his career is on the line. is on the line, the future of his family's on the nine and completely understandable way. Do this also could be understandable why may also WANNA, come out and pull her narrative for to understand it both of them moon industry to have this off, protect their own. Businesses make and you have to always look at these things especially when you. Look at how he's evolved over according to an accordion radio interest. Germany's popularity Megan to these people are not only just artists that unison to you you out on your plane this they also entities and brands and corporations earn right ever love money tied up next to them associated with them. Right. So the pressure that they have in terms of making sure that they put out their narrative table, they spend stuff in the zone way is really really high. Always because the so literally imagine if I think I've said it before imagine if your agent just a bloody new condo right moved into it with his new fiancee in suddenly you'll gain wrapped up into shooting incident of course, are going to change your mind as to how you speak about in public because you don't want your agents of suffer through your recklessness. Germany's Louise's going in there but I feel are the better. Of course, you know outlive kind of been out there besmirching his name I think the first one who kinda mentioned this ridiculous common on g by highs nobody I don't know why they think that a foreign place to have any kind of. Say. So in hip hop culture to say so into who gets a speaking who doesn't who gets copied who doesn't they're essentially a a hype block? What a high blood compilation side and even a publication respect right? They've sold waistband the shadow of a beast You know I've met a couple of people that went behind the scenes de there as far associate pip as as I am social martial arts it may snow complete sense but again, this is just The weeds of like. Public Joking and performance activism people do online just to so that they can protect themselves and make sure that. The history in case it goes away they want birth. Let's imagine for a second this. This case goes to core and his final alleged that make a light. What happens then all this nonsense oldest pushing online makes you look stupid, right? It's no one's business in the first place. Now, that has been made public coast. Lend your opinion on the matter, but to make a judgment to make. A verdict on the issue nonsensical especially when you're the publication as high. So by where you? You are only you're only as strong as the talent that's around on the talent in the industry yonias strong as wherever's Yummy us you just a new dog a you don't play any part in moving culture full you support in a news if you're then going out and you know blackballing Tori lanes, what does that look like to the other artists who else wants to Poi- and if artist decide to Blackpool you, you're dead. And instant he isn't 'cause he's he's fine base. Your fan base is only there because you cover certain things, you cover certain brands. So it's a really nonsensically to go about things, but it's a statement I said the last time that we will cover Toyota says the repor just added to his list of disgraceful behavior by dropping most toxic acids the year he recently became music industry pariah after making stadium that he showed during an. Arrest twelve however, rather than public apologize to make an addressing the issue you is an album instead using the media attention for the shooting. His work now obviously, that sentence makes no sense right? He did public address it on the album. He didn't do it on instagram live and incriminate himself like some other dunces is with the thing I don't get people involved really. techy and very life changing and very dangerous situations and they jump on instagram and defines a quickly to go man why you just cool person why are you doing this for way? Do you not for somebody finally decided to use some common use them rational thinking critical thinking take a deep breath step away from social media and addressed the allegations on music. Music style as they map Sandra Bonaparte Gus, and now that's a bad thing. I don't see us a bad thing. If anything if you think you did nothing wrong. What's the issue? There should be no relationship. If Megan's to say something issue without. An quite category come out and say he because she didn't speak about in like vague term. She definitely said he's. Probably the one that show her she alleged that was. How she remembered it as fair enough. To Save. She's Lila. No. In that instance, I think judging by the evidence available that she probably is, but you're in your right to say that. So it was totally to defend himself. It shouldn't be that much and be that difficult on understand says, lanes moves are particularly sickening considering proximity weeks wrote ruling the murder bureau Taylor again it's not his fault in Nineteen, sixty, two Malcolm X. common these people from Berlin right day like I mean like. Like I don't understand why suddenly narrow the cat they're like. Kaplan for Megan establishing in evoking the spirit of Malcolm X. Insane said that the most disrespectful person in America woman Taylor's memory has been used to so magazine get clicks and when political favor and yet the police officers multiple who had different water justice again, posturing virtue seeming nonsense I you want you go to high. So by for news about virgin eyeballs next Lipinski collaboration, you don't go to them to get a to get like an aggregate of what to do. Social issues like how to capacity and things that's not what you go to them for. Lanes is used the same to promote his album exploiting the trauma enacted on Black Women for financial and critical cultural gains refusing to protect them acknowledged they're called his ability. That's why you'll never see him on our absolves social platforms again again, Bush who an no one should care about I somebody covering music. I even know covid music, right? The website fucking sucks those shorts. A bloody terrible. But again, a weird thing to saw posture on especially concerning in case we don't know the truth for the issue is even if you're not WanNa wait until divert this come out before make your decision makes no sense again, the shooting themselves in the foot in this case because they're on year strong as a Taliban report. So if the talent decided to. Turn around and say, Hey, don't cover me. You're done you're finished Nolan wants to listen to you anyway. And in this article here from. Varieties really good one touch as well. Fairly on both issues is titled Tori Lyons Denies Meghan Inside an account of being short in highly defensive surprise album I recommend you check you out. And Yemen I review is I think the album again easily wannabes bad works I think in terms of the case, it's very interesting because he does fro people knew the bus one of the more interesting parts of it is the fact that he alleges that he thinks rock nation might be behind some of the public. School what dismay campaign against him, which is kind of interesting considering JC standing in industry that he would be purposely trying to derail ktar Elaine's his career in this way of support is an artist. Now, we say Jay z because he's you know assess his label but obviously, we know that there's a lot more people that work there. But you have the feeling when you're when you're woodruff nation that nothing goes nothing gets done at ROC nation with. No. So all approve somehow right just go out. Of the way they want to be done I'm sure he has touch. He has a feed them and everything people always a pleasure on the incident with burn account watching and reading everything he's especially when he puts out. or he does a features UA seems to be very on point and knowing what the car lexicon is was happening out. There is not. Detachable. What's going on in the scenes? You could definitely see this happening. So that's a very interesting power bit. The other part of it is the fact that he alleges that you know again this. This alleged issued a my head with alcohol where she does definitely does go a bit crazy maybe goes a bit too over the top with Mike in comparable positions could be the issue that she was embarrassed. She go into that position and maybe the underlying Parv especially when you took when you see how I'm referred to Kylie looking like an angel like a baby in a major a little bit cuties. Referenced, there. But Hey, but that's interesting part of the story to write the fact that these two very powerful influential beautiful women industry for both felt very uneasy with each other in the same scenario. Especially when you think about like the video that I saw Kylian make an in the poll behind an toilets. Columbia behind them and suddenly fast forward to the fact that you know toys alleging a Megan got annoyed. pissed off that toy was flown with. Kylian a pool and stormed out and it didn't realize at the time. But that's what basically caused the whole altercation that led to the shooting and actually that's never poverty interesting story rather these these two people had. A pre an issue prior to them going over. To Hawker energies combine the same place at the same time regardless another interesting part of the story, and of course, him going after everybody that besmirched she's name from a riot to mall under button podcast to Joe. Joe To Kalani everyone got in ahead and I really appreciate the fact that he went. So they're the main people because too often yet older supplementals and innuendos until of the beef in terms of hippo. But to Sunday, have someone that can is pulling people's cause and saying, Hey, I heard what you said you know I'm here is amazing and seeing the backlash and so in the kind of. The the consequence of this is suddenly our beef initiative Bombie Nice issue now with Rick, Ross has kind of come and in another surprising villain or another opponent of and is all the bug was hosie was he comes on his and slammed toy lenses here at toilets cause uproar across ocean medium first night when he teased that, he would be finally break his silence. So, coming clean. He didn't do referencing ruins day. Sloppy. Seven track album called Day star with the track for four last feature the line a couple of questions. How the showing a but hit no burns attendance and again, that's a genuine question. That's A. Whole case you can't ask questions I get the whole believe women an idea. The idea that hey, we should kind of not be you shouldn't be in a place where your victim shaming stroke the back but you can ask questions you're allowed to write your letter also question as to why a person will put themselves in a dangerous position. Then, it turns out that questioning that they didn't put off no pictures an unlucky situation that led to them being negative affected then cool. Awesome computer issue but you allowed to ask questions as to why certain things happen the way they did especially when you know you know the to me, you know about how many bones are into full for somebody to get shot directly in both feet and no any bones attendees makes no sense especially considering how she went about after the fact that she was so defensive on Instagram live whatever people questioned the fact that she's injured and the posting of a foot in. The League in it to clubs when a bandaged, not wearing a bandage psych what is with this games and it just doesn't make any continues at making people trying to frame you for shoe in knowing I, do it. I'm coming at the mattress. He also claims despite the controversy days. So reached number one on US apple music, which is the tweet on Friday Jose who often supporters abuse of platform quickly came to defense again, just quickly come into defensive Lineman is going to buy one in the back sooner rather than later sooner or later somebody to everyone loves is going to get involved in their very questionable. Allegation one s really going to touch people's remember when Dunham came out and defended her rights colleague who was accused of sexual. So and then she came really hard against a woman Ann. Proven the fact that she was telling the truth and she made Maitland on stupid science is going to happen to these people who I believe a woman one day something really going to happen. It's not going to be true and everyone's GonNa look in really really dumb and she says he she holds tweet. Thanks I'm sorry by really calm believe whoever's listening to this and let this man speak on a profit from his violence or somebody who you know in love again if the case if it's true and again, this is the finger counterculture I kind of agree with counterculture right in some shape or form if you're able to. Seek Justice for the court system and your only way is to publicly council somebody right to kind of tarnish their name to run hashtags every day to leave derogatory comments on instagram posts, run a free do what you want. But if the if the market decided, they want to buy their tickets enjoyed music, you can't go out your way to stop the people no-shows cooling in pump of our line. But if you're if you want to public discussion name, go out there and pick it outside it shows how ban is up. If you go your platform don't WanNA cover them. Cool. Do your thing. But wait until we go to go to the court law and society with No. What happens transpired then you can make a decision but to stand in an Omega say that he can't make music, he can't have a career Casa Poise family base of allegations is nuts absolutely nuts especially when you think of how A. How How opinion hoping was right they'll drunk they'll all probably high all living life and a really unfortunate incident happen to believe anyone's. Story isn't saint no matter. How traumatic is right? We need to have time for people to assess the information from a neutral point of view income of source decision like I don't know. Would you ever take these? Like. Can you ever happen? You have a really big night out with your friends and Gab Hammett is hard to cut ca to find any kind of way to piece together what the Nice actions were. Now get a traumatic event you could probably it comes in front of your mind but let's just take a breath year. So again contentious coming from Mega to respond to Daban she said, yes soil attention you shot me you got your publicist and people going to blogs line, which is definitely not true if if anyone's doing Stephanie Her stop lying why we lie I'd understand, and again I understand why you I understand why people I in general why you have to protect your interest you don't want. To tell the truth, the sometimes lying agent retrieve are getting. I stand especially in Hollywood, it may simply send record industry. You've got your suddenly this 'cause you know controversial said I really think how music matches up to her notoriety in that respect when he comes to a McGinnis alien and you're very aware that you know your career would be gone in an instant and new girl comes along you know matters doing pretty well sweeties having a Bevan moment is not people people. In music have very short memory so you need to over, you can to maintain your position right to build upon what you have and you don't want it to be taken. He could you know you hoped for it silence people lie but I'm also understanding that you know I'll let court case player as it may be an if the students made an coal that you can agree with people can move on and wherever they can do fair play 'cause what happens again this issue. Saint Respondent Marina ran go over Chris Bouncing quicker than defended right. She even said recently interviewed they still quite good friends to this day. What happens if Megan Italian forgives Tori. Forever initially did or did not happen and they move on and decide to be a couple inside to be friends again how how do you move on? Can you still not be covered? He's still allowed to do. You have to wait until Megan mission before you're listen to music again, it's just also S- hills so silly and again unfortunate Dave affairs for everyone involved but again. I really enjoy the album I thought it was easily one of his best works. It kind of plays really well from front to back musically definitely shows off his range. That's probably something that we've kind of been wanting from a Toyota and I think, Steph delivers on that fact again, no surprise that he's back against the wall and suddenly he pulls out this from his ass, right? Really really impressive songwriting melodies different styles into showcases just how much of a talent he is, and again, if this goes to prove that he then he's guilty of what he done fair enough we'll revisit or making a decision on the case. But as a stands would just allegations out there and no evidence to prove that he did or didn't do it, I'm going to join a music for is keep moving and to fans are going out there out their way to write for one the ever like just let the dust settle is no we don't know happened for people to call they know psychiatry is the place will get to the bottom of your hoping so much especially in both services L. A. Nosov Day for the most part figuring out when people win is when they have. To influence pedestrians of civilian story. That's when it becomes an issue right. But whenever celebrities, they always get down to the bottom of it right you can. You can bet your bottom dollar wasn't a hip hop style. They probably wouldn't have ever found out who ever killed him right. But the fact that he was beloved industry nothing's community beloved an industry and just generally a really cool dude in the seen people went out of their way to really try and find and get to the bottom of this especially because they I'm. Sure. The police were very aware of the negative reaction. I would have complemented in find the killer appending gang war offend people did die off the back of that of of him unfortunately posing as well. So you of the feeling that is when it involves two high profile people in L. A., the definitely going to get down to the bottom of it and will finally find out why exactly happened on that night as as what we have at the moment they stars available. We now know peplums again, one of my vision tuna seen. For a while especially of a toilet definitely, go check out but again, force it. Would you think if it make an his? Having listened to the album who cited a storage you believe Let me know and end again them. Defeat. Katie looks like a baby in the manger I don't. Force and opinions on that one. Moving on. Was We have to talk about Oh another development in Nebraska Bryan callen. V sexual, assault. Accusers. Bawku that some. Grip comedy secret to put Casino or generally negative effect that him and if anyone cares out outside of people that were should stop the heck out. But God damn man what an was shit show what a shish situation. So I I mentioned prior on shows I think in general April we went about this the wrong way you know brain columbine accused by four separate women of some sexual crime here you know some very ration- of Sexual Assault One alleges rape of the people who are eligible unwanted attention grouping will dissolve nonsense. And the allegations serious enough for him to get essentially pulled of his podcasts Nolato record in the studio with Brian or Brendan Lobbying camera with him has to show behind a paywall patron nust he's Netflix's dill with Leo. Of course, make sense because Chris own situation going on and test essentially been. All excommunicate communist overrule Juergen hasn't mentioned him Everson Standardization's arose. It's been completely mule I'm Bryan callen in that respect, and you know he's had to essentially suffer on the outskirts whilst these allegations are running rampant in the scene and he decides, of course, the best way to do this kind of attack it going for. Put put out there that he didn't do it out of the allegations are false and it's going to clear his name, but it doesn't clear his name and I don't know how he's GonNa. Carries name 'cause somebody allegations are more than twenty old but surely the best way to go about this isn't to just come jump back onto cameo isn't to podcast behind the patron isn't to suddenly Ave calendar pool at 'cause you know. Under the premise that were gonna do a finer rings pulled because cost me Yo yo overload and then you entire bait and switch and guess some tripling Vol- to I'm sure the fan base of kid have no business listen to because it's not really a conspiracy. What respect. So it's been entice shit shahtoosh shows shit show. And then. You think about it in context and you think considering the Times that they've been on their show the final kid and they've spoken about council culture issues and people in media going through Allegations regarding me too. You'd think there there have a fair idea and a better. Way of dealing with the situation because I can only think it is happening to Brendan. This'll be even worse of a situation right away. He goes on how he talks and how he's so reckless things. He's saying he doesn't really think about how he puts information out there or how even formulate sentences. It's just surprising to me how Shitty to handle this considering how much how strong of opinion they have when other people are gonNA improve certain things how they deal with it and embarrassing in callans cases only going from bad to worse now, because supposedly husband one, the women who. Is claiming that Brandon rapier he's now suing and a person has now Lucia go fund me in order to cover his legal costs. If there's drama couldn't get any more embarrassing, couldn't get any more excruciating for the victims. Victims game played in public again it's just got even worse where this kind of public back-and-forth between Gabriel tournament I think his name is brandon is really ridiculous situations to be involved in your Brian Kevin especially considering you know despite the I think this is will self-afflicted for the most part but anyway, this is Los Angeles Times cutting sues husband women who claim t the comedian rector says Franken is suing the husband of a woman who claims the comedian raped her arguing his spouse her is out to ruin his career on Wednesday counterpart a complaint in Los Angeles Superior. Court alleging that Gabriel take a minute has an ongoing campaign to destroy comics livelihood via frets of harassment intimidation and policies that they contact him take him in his married to Caffeine Fior Tiggerman who July told La Times in nine nine, nine academy Helda bed enforcer of sex with him. She was one of the four women who claimed that Canada's sexually inappropriate with him with him. So in a story that described his alleged. So misconduct and disturbing comments Kinda adamantly denied all the women's stories and stressed out day encounter fury had been consensual on social media quickly vowed to lay low. And promising found that he wouldn't post a statement and disappear. Now the statement disappearing is ordinary I think because I guess. The problem that he has maybe he's looking for the lens of counterculture, which it isn't. This is somebody that you did something sexually inappropriate to them is not the same thing as council culture. So when you look at it for Atlanta Council I can understand the tendency or the desire to defend yourself and to guide them and rewrite the wrongs and kind. Of Change Narrative. If we learned anything from people's our people scandals, it doesn't work. You can't defend yourself in public. It doesn't always backfire especially for some in anything involving a woman a man especially when the demands are being alleged on a crime, you have to deal with a bit more sensitivity and be understanding of the climate and maybe do lay low. Look at somebody canoed aggress Tyson when he go accused or something and he had to kind of let it play out. Let the. Network I think I've been senior something dude internal investigation. Decide what they wanna do, and then Weber decision they make you accept and you move on right they kinda chapter don't and rubbing people's facing incision making wise. You don't go on shows and be cry social media decried the perils of social media and saw criticized me to attack prominent figures into you know women in power movement. You don't do this because we even if you're you're right even feel accurate. Defending yourself for the benefit of your family's always going to make you look bad and if anything is going to empower other people who have ever questionable experience with us to come out and at fervor future fire to bury you completely. So that's where I think he really fucked up in that respect. He saw it through the Lens of cancer. Culture, for Eka defend himself Arizona Front for and the sense only gonNA kick. Back and it continues become backside serie. Though, taken leaving for his podcasters again, he didn't really take a look properly he didn't take leave of absence the cost me are the ones that told him. He couldn't go back on the show right? They essentially are the ones. I. Approved Sponsorships of this show I think for the most part they handled that side of things I don't have handed production Senate don't really probably do that Cimpor behind at himself, but they're responsible for getting the sponsors involved in guests. If you're fire to kidding, don't WanNa do that sort of stuff and you're too busy comics it makes sense sign up with cost meteorite because they just handle this stuff. They kind of remind me a little bit of. Machinery in that respect that of like were they were they mcm right on youtube that basically took a copy of people's Google absence money but then put them in contact big brands and sponsorships and whatever may be so that makes sense. If you're big comedian, your level pace it, you know running podcast on your own popula work even Jerusalem does it without the help it you know he's got pills that help that does the same sort of thing. So I can understand it but essentially cost me definitely talk knock on Percocet continue said the final Kid Cowen has continued to pick up a standup states despite the fact that he was dropped by. Hollywood. Representative the CIA one, the biggest entertainment. Agencies out there. Are Pretty. Good. Remember I was wondering if you want to check it out, definitely talks about you know the founding of CAA an essentially they are the power brick in industry right? They actually when they press the button, you go up right and you know many comedians. No you're signed up with a CEO W Emmy your careers definitely on the ascendancy it continues to it says I'm cannabis enough is raw ABC the Goldbergs. Also to make an ethics puncture, we've come across in the program scrap it. Scrap story after he was accused sexual too. So again. You, you don't do interact way he guilty podcast your date announced days, which is also always bear. Finding of the nose to allegations that respect right you should. Probably take your take yourself out of the limelight and treat the Scottish some severity. But again, he didn't do that as upon learning of chemistry gigs gabled sigma route via multitude a number of comedy clubs at both cal on September eleventh taken tweet at venues were sending a very clear message that they support sexual abusers and don't believe victims hosting coming shows message Garner support from. Other permanent voices Corwin couldn't Jen Kirkman who said, she would donate five pounds to five dollars votes rape abuse Incest National National Network Easter Nasty place in Inositol imagine telling your friends where you work I work at the rape abuse. Incest. National Network as mad on for many of them are persons who told him the Indians Indiana's helium comedy club they are disappointed. They're booking A. Rapist the but he's not, he's not he's not. He's not credible. As alleged rapist as difference, and again I don't really have an issue with gay take him in doing this what he's doing for his wife, right? You're going to be right Odiaum your partner he believe your partner is what it is I guess. He's always going to be his wife is never going to question her countless things even proven that Cohen is innocent out. Imagine you still be like, no, he's guilty I understand that I get. It loves involved there but there's a pommie that thinks you can say what you want on social publicly besmirches name, but purposely reaching out to places and calling up and selling them not a book. Is. Really really going over the top I. think in that respect I. think she let it play as is for the most part he's essentially been excommunicated. Most of these days you've booked probably wouldn't soda anyway the fact that he kept promoting them because that's never tip is wall keep your eye on that one if they had to promote them in. The first place he knew that if he didn't promote no one's GONNA buy the tickets to think about the shows that Louis C. K. Don in the wake of these allegations he just put them out there and people just attended right? Most of the tickets sold out you didn't entire toll you put out comedy album that did really were soon because he. Kind of put out, Eric, his own site. So I think those kind of guys at that level of notoriety can do that. Brian Cannon unfortunately, he knows that most fan base are most of the tick. So's ego was directly attributed to the work that he did under fire in the kid and Nana, firing the kid and if he's our mind naturally fans move on. So he's very conscious of that. That's why he went on his show on paper with definitely led to all this stuff right now announcing public led to all of this in those people would have known that he did shows if he didn't announce them so. He announced him he put out there and essentially an trump's off in a foreigner regardless of the blame but I do think it is going to fall to contact club directly affect Jen Kirkman Gaber take them in more than you know more of your radicalized employees statement online leave a comment under the tweets or something I dunno, whatever you want to do. But quoted him up for threatening to you know I don't know the bump forever allegedly I won't say they did it but say something. That's when you're going over the top. It says he had times confirmed on Wednesday that follow -cations brick, your comedy club in Oklahoma Skyline Appleton wiseguys in spokane. So spoken comedy club and the DC imprint Washington recently cultures from their schedules again. Custodian they has a family in the right and he has a wife after episode woman. Is Really Ironic that these same people that are. Saying coach does exist are also the ones that are you know essentially taking food of the plate stood up the table of somebody to pull their daughter and they kind of ex wife in perspective is interesting and it continues. Callen blames the cancellation on these gigs tickets reg for interference according to his lawsuit, which again is a little bit opposite ops obstacle about vacating the true fear whatever that ms because part of reason, why he's canceled because he puts up position where he could get alleged where you know where he could be measured stoves crimes that he's eligible, right? It's only his full really the fact that happened. Now he can say not true allegations, but you can't blame the the jet because these things happen as a consequence of some actions that you might the Pasta Minister Person's full that he's not saying that regarded that make sense is driven by four. Saudis wife two years ago. Has Sent in contains. Assignments Accountability Office all right demonstrative. Bins with him or else foresee print support sexual assault now. Thinking about is probably thinks if you're callen right just let this thing right now is this is not done in good. This is not done in. This is not done in good faith. This is obviously a bad thing. I think you know we could say surfing right you Congo around trying to ruin somebody's business opportunities because you think something happened right you have to let go player on the cost in some way shape or form now if he gets to the point where you can't. You CAN'T You can't convict somebody Nicole of nor because these cases are more than. Two decades old fair enough. Then sometimes you know you have to do but. Pardon me thinks if you're Callan, do you mean she is it really wiser sue somebody of the back of some of this particular near the Gatien's wouldn't it be when it kind of his position Ferber if he just came as at Hey, I, understand what you're doing right I. Get your particular wipe out oxygen. You kind of give me the chance to support my family and we ship. I can. You know especially when you consider that I haven't charge of anything and if I do get formerly charged more than Willie Morten Abel Woven, your rights to keep continuing to cancel my career but as is better times we're living in now give me a chance to make money as a poor family. You think that that could be very. Reaction and people could understand. Okay. Cool. I. That's fair but to go out in public try and tarnish especially once but there's only allegations days modern in it but again, Callan should he be suing somebody I don't think. So none of the four clubs script gigs responded to the questions for the Times. Saying innovative innovative both declined to comment in the state and private lawyer Andrew. Bomb. Collins said he filled a lawsuit because. I take my innocence application to very seriously and I will not stand by somebody tries to destroy my life over something did not do fine but it's interesting that he's doing husband not the end of the women that alleged stories in I'm guessing some of these stories are true in terms of the head and encounter but and he probably alleges that the actual incident sexual it didn't actually happen I. Don't know who who knows. And Yeah. Here's the guys go from me. And at the moment of speaking this, refresh it so far he's on twenty five thousand right and he's halfway to approaching his goals. You probably have gang and some of the donations from the people on the side. Really funny. A lot of a lot of the names are purposely. Trolley says I can't talk of quotes you know where that comes from. DIC- DIC- be. Homeless cats in the in the comments here leaving donations and I think the funniest unfortunate side of this issue is that because of the backlash that these guys especially Brennan and Brian Brian because of their reaction to Calvin and how they dealt with when they co bid and just generally how the podcast is kind of dipped and. They've of turned into people. They fans don't necessarily like anymore especially, some of the detractors quote unquote. They using so paternity to actually bury Callan, which is funny because of the two of them would consider to be the one that's probably the more liked within the families even from Hooper. I hate the show now I, think cannon still get a lot more benefit of doubt. I hate to say they should get count back on it right just for the benefit of the show going forward because Brennan with guests is just terrible right now he's got bad because he's kind of you know learn to listen to people speak a little bit more. Pressure. Maliki and Chapelle. Lacey they will really good gas. But so know spent here messed with Brennan Dooley's own. But in general when Kennison's before it's been a big too. So they need each other to work but that's the unfortunate side of things right callans just you know not reckless but the fact that he's been so defensive in the weighed in a wrong way because he's looking at through the prism of counterculture, he's essentially made the situation West himself and now in a position where fans are. Actively Lucas's Brennan slog. Jesper. Nosa another Benun immerse got hey, go here did DOT COM which I think is website at that kind of if you're to K- kind of links back to that website, right? All these people that essentially when the guys get buried, who think in Bradenton deserves up career and he's only there because of his friends who Rogan with people are the ones I. Now going on public you tried to end. So again, one unfortunate state of affairs one unfortunate event in over and again there's admissible this their alleged victims were just you know. Have it listening to play out stories in traumas replayed in public can out there trying to make his career pop again really understanding the current climate has going out there and Yemen just madman since then again, if ever those Kushtia tell not of how not to dill allegations, this is it. This is definitely the one like dove in this way because it never ends. So. Yeah. Let me know your comments regarding what you think Do you think Brian's overstepping among by trying to sue the would take him in if enabled take moves and he's like does This look in any way bad. If he's crowdsourcing funds from strangers to support a court case that his own doing as well. Right. He went obvious way to public defender wife and contact people and do things that will probably over the top. So why is she not asking for help from strangers? Is a bad thing is good thing. Again, the the wife is fused I should one of the victim and this is quiet and just suffering silence. It's just. It's just horrible to imagine having to relive the streamer like especially. Publicly in this way just An. Absolutely mad. Let me know you force. Regarding situation the calmest love to hear you're saying regarded everything happening again it's it's interesting how the CD, how this plays out. But again, in my opinion, I, definitely think this is a good lesson and you know that this is how you don't play those compilations of really she computer game players either lot. DSP and was ever Guy Wings of redemption was named wings or something wherever you that that kind of thing in this is do not have. This is how you don't play. This is how you don't respond to allegations or react to allegations especially when involving a sexual nature you just Congo by. Horrible horrendous way to dill and again, he has itself to blame really in venison unions of the plane. He put his family friends I really am. SHAPE. And how delegating are in my in my opinion but hey, maybe mation will come to light. Maybe I'm copy off the market by I, love to hear your voice and opinions in the comments down below anyway. They the. Free seven nine as per usual. Thanks for tuning in. If it's I on what champion, the podcast show via Youtube make sure you smash like burn his subscribing and calmest Dombi low if you're listening. Please, Amir five star review down on the show share it with your friends. Patriot link is down below to pitcher. No confidence Patriot pushes HBO STI in a you can get this hope would cost an audio for before it goes anywhere else on patriots. So make sure you sign up on their don't delay sign up now what you waiting for, but until then take care piece.

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Dylan Thomas and Gwen Stefani down the pub, plus Zelda, cider and Machu Picchu (S3, Ep6)

Deserter Pubcast

59:56 min | 2 years ago

Dylan Thomas and Gwen Stefani down the pub, plus Zelda, cider and Machu Picchu (S3, Ep6)

"So. Yeah. On friday. I went to the public twelve opening and ordered my first pint on my God, you would not believe how much looking forward to a really for earned it. Yeah. Yeah. Really well done. I didn't know you doing joy January. No, it wasn't not just a long morning. I get up at nine for the plumber. This is this. Podcast implores you to have a good time. All the time. In this absurd. Messing about in south London and Madrid. Yeah. Plus visit from the corporate deserter a notebook at the ready for dessert school lecture on the philosophy of work. We'll be discussing one of her and hills. Most famous sons Dylan Thomas shortly Wales's. Yes, we understand. There may be in a world connection there too before pushing on with spiders letter from the world, and it's all over. We'll be winding down in local hostelry pampered by wonderful bar work Conway, although you forgot the social media seen. Oh, so I did how could I forget that? It's such a cool fray is isn't it? So cool. Look, I've gone. Oh, wow. You've had a t shirt made with it on. Everybody loves it. They say what the fucks that you're wearing are badly. Do so cool mate special very much. Anyway, we're here with our regular, Twitter and terrific. Nope. Deadly Headley and an ice bucket filled with bottles of what looks like five pound wines. Iki MRs say, they're very welcome. But don't give sniffer the good stuff fair enough. So what have I been out to you went round these social clubs social clubs social clubs cruel? Yes. There's a social cloak. Well. Yeah. You may have seen them all these buildings in whatever. Part of town you live in. That he suspected got a bar in. Like a courage sign from nineteen sixty eight. That's right often you on them, which is the. Some of the -ffiliated video as if you belong to one of them one of the club's say the Peckham liberal club. Yes, you can take your car and get into any club in the country and enjoy cheap booze in a kind of seventies. Eighties. Vine. Really are quite remarkable not not known for their big in really to Jinmen. Speaking not known for great beer. Although there are some exceptions to their. So they aren't cheap beer they aren't achievement and they sort of they're like working men's clubs all working men's and some of them are kind of liberal clubs or mom. We started out was the plumps radical club. They might have had saw political origins or workers union origins. I think often long-gone actually I think they're now just kind of like private members clubs you need a buzzer to get in the year. And then then you're in then you're in for the whole day, usually. Yes, where did you get to your social club cruel? Yeah. Well, we started out at the plump stood radical the rat as it's known which was classic in its club nece in it was seventeen eighteen and a beautiful grand old building with car scale two point two pound thirty five on Thursday. That's where the spoon around that kind of level. Yeah. Yeah. But with four Snooka tables and a table tennis room, great outside space, this beautiful beautiful thing him, most of the places. We went to join the day were pretty empty. When we got to Belvedere, we got to the Belvedere social club. And it was rammed news almost nowhere to sit down two seats on the table at some avoided city at where it said, do you mind, if we join you, and he said, a can't stop you? Yes, they all like that. That was probably the Belvedere was really friendly. Marie. I think it was behind the bar all of them were very welcoming. And I just an observation. But it seemed to me that if you have a female member of staff behind the bar, much warmer and more welcoming than if you've got a bloke. Yes to serve you. And then go back to his gambling. Yes experience. I've had as well. Yeah. Naming any names. We did we went as far afield as Darfur which are knows out of our jurisdiction, but it was. We had to go there because it had like twelve to fourteen cars scales. Which is not something those clubs known for. I'm not quite sure. Whether it was twelve fourteen counted them twice and disparity. And Clough water on cask. They had a terrific range. We had to have. Six thirds each. You lost me all to pound eighty point appointed club award for two pound eighty. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Me I'm giving it was it was quite difficult leaving dot for actually because we it was so new so lovely. But I'm glad we did. Because we also got free shepherds homemade shepherd's pie from the one in welling watch the cricket in big sleeve. Yeah. Lady made load of shepherd's pie for the pool players because they were having a league he tucked into it. And we dropped hints. And they were very they were very sweet and looked hungry yet. Look, great difficult. Well, not reading after what we smoked. Yeah. We got free food at Elton as well. Because we finished a Dell tomb and we don't even to ten ten clubs. So we decided to have lost at the rusty bucket. Okay there as well. For the hours. The decided he side night. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'd popped in their invited me. They're actually because they had some criticism over this to range excellent on there. But they didn't have a great reputation for cider. And they wanted to put that right? So they invited if you people and they put out forty plus ciders and some glasses and just help yourself L. How did that go three? Couple of favorites. They're all of his gold rush. Absolutely delicious. I think. Accommodates from. Hey, if it maybe and I'll try out his correctly green tea, three wilty thri green tea, thrives grumpy that from wells. Yes. That means is that correct deadly. Because you. Deadly was was well for six months after birth wouldn't use that correct five years, but I've us. I feel a bit of a Welsh theme running through there is a bit. Yes. Yeah. Inadvertent. If any we planned. What else you've been up to down to Monte? You said. As you know, I'm an athlete. So I went to watch the inaugural shuffleboard championship men at Monte at the Montague arms in new cross. Great pup game. Isn't it? Yes. No, I haven't played it for actually nine certainly never seen in London. No longer board is principals the same. But you to little. I have a shuker something to push a paddle to push. None of GDP with do your hands did with the hands. Incorrect. The the Monte used to be filled with mad ephemeral over the walls and ceiling didn't it and it's not anymore. That's all gone. The new goes on the old coach tour. Stop wasn't it. Yes. For the tourist is incredible. But now it's very much a game by like free, chef using bar billiards who put pool table football. Yeah. Free apart from the beer. Yeah. Which lever? The twist. Yeah. Go at twist. Yeah. Holidays Madrid, yet don't jelly holiday one nine. I went for football game. And went into one of the guys I was travelling with he had one of those lounge cards, so you can go in and get free booze and free food. So I had a champagne breakfast own bacon, eggs beans, sausage roll. And champagne. Five thirty in the morning. A great start. Yeah. But we, but we we did still some coke. You're on the way went to see Gernika cashiers gennaker, and then some Goya in the produ. Yet because the guys with he really wanted to see the is a big fan and went through lots of sort of stuff portrait churn. Ready? See what the fuss is about to be honest that shit shit. And but eventually we got to the Brooke paintings, which is the stuff you did Africa syphilis. Oh, yeah. Well, allegedly and and they are insane and powerful and really quite amazing. But you know, if if you are an artist in you're you're struggling police to give yourself lift you're considering a life threatening STD. STD a little lesson for us. All there. Yeah. Football was also excellent. Ryabykin? Oh. Again, the world connection. Stony Welsh connection. Yeah. They're in Lalita Gatien, but it was very high standard football and the great six goal thriller. And we met fans from both Ryo and silty go. And the Celtic fans were asking who supported in one of the guys I was with was an anti-fascist Millwall supporter and them to the pound. They said who he's what he said Milwaukee. And they're like, oh, we know mill you are strong people. Yeah. What I'm not really involved in. How about you? You've been on holiday lately happened on today. Thanks for asking. My attempt to get to someone to son. This was foiled various reasons. So instead, I treat myself to trip to high room. Are you familiar with Hiroo Hiroo is where link lives in the games? Spent fifty quid on Zelda breath of the wild. Switch. Oh, yeah. Basically, I was promised. Lots of interesting food, some lovely scenery in Heiser twenty four degrees. But it turns out in fact, you have to do your own cooking freezing at night and the monsters roam the wilderness waiting to pounce on is very unsettling. I'm actually thinking of getting my money back. After approved. In the game on spending. Most of my time just sitting in the rain by the five with some old Geezer mass. Why had in mind, we did a similar thing in grand theft auto? Yeah. Opted out of the missions and hung out with some guys I met it was selling burgers in van by late. Thank you them for a few days. And I remember my mobile phone ringing with missions just ignored it on a new suit living on related. No. I did. I saw a tweet by someone who's playing red red dead to redemption to the wild west game. He said was playing red dead and a pasta guy with a woman tied to his horse screaming for help. So I shot the guy in the horse ran off with the lay still tied to it. And I couldn't catch up anyway. Good luck to her. I did have another night out. Appropriate out. I think the problem Slater was in town are friends later and. Yeah. We dropped into the club in which is very nice, very fun. A few faces in the air. And if you. Talk to Tom the right way later and floodlights them. Oh, yeah. Great. Anyway, we off to skin for their. I think weekly easy come night. Hank dogs easy. Come nighters of mix between some listed bands and open mic, and we went to see my mates bene- crooked. Cranes who agree. Yeah. I don't usually like the country blues bluegrass style. And and they double bass and violin and a mo- male female vocal thing going on. Sure was very attractive. And after they finished the fat white family came on. I can believe it. Yeah. They announce set there all playing different instruments. Pairing off and ding triplet and so on and it's really an amazing nights happening. You know, I kind of prefer fat white family live there much, but alive makes sense live, and it was just a wonderful on an ounce gig cheered on by the foles who are in the audience is like a real unusual special London happening. Yes thing that you never get on the Essex Suffolk, border rubbing. Yeah. Money's tight at the moment. You know? On deserters. At least got fifty quid ill lend you gift great cheese. By point. See that's what happens again money spent on booze. So yeah, I've had to take measures. Let's look for a bit of work perhaps. I know is it going very well. I'm found any. I'm going to go to be mater. He took some subbing shift. So I contacted his boss and offered my services and techmo CB. Unfortunately, I am a typo on my TV. For a sopping role. Yes. Spelt wrong too. Oh. Yeah. I also taught my sound after out of another job Esau somebody looking for comedy writer for podcast on the wall. I possibly do that, you know. So we need one. I got in touch with worked with before. Chatting away. And then finally realized the show that she was doing a podcast for quite a big mainstream one. And I had to say, look, I'm really not the person for this role. Very mainstream is a very wholesome family show and are not. No this one where you can say what you like. Yeah. Yeah. So that one. Yeah. So I'm still continued to be fun, employed, fun employed. Osman doing very Cooper. Doing finance this week. Well, we'll take what big areas. Corporate desserts. A six figure salary. Folks. This money does. Or is it the root of all it can be difficult to know who to believe in a world filled with it is. But one thing is for sure if it's not coming in your companies fucked along with your dream of an early retirement, the people actually make money most important in any business. So make sure you're lying with them at the earliest opportunity for Christ's sake. Never describe yourself at touro. For example. You're basically wearing fucking great sign that rates pay me less money. You are commercial you are sales focused, you are profit oriented. Now, you can ask for any salary. You like the downside of this is that you may be expected to report revenue at some point, particularly if you actually work in finance two pointers on this number one when preparing accounts if you can't make the prophet exceed the loss do not prepare their counts. It's simply not worth it. Literally stop at nothing to avoid showing negative numbers. And number two, never presented grow. Of anything going down. It makes people uncomfortable especially bosses if necessary China grove upside down and presented as an opportunity and one that could be achieved. If those comes in marketing their heads out of their offices. I am the corporate desert until next time. Now, I think I'm writing saying it's a moment of silence in which we kick back shut the cares of the world. And allow a minds a little holiday we've been into deep space to Spain to the pub. What have you go first today deadly today, we are celebrating the start of the UK lambing season. What is it? What's actually like coming from the country deadly? Is it nice? One. Verdoux? Okay, ready? Yep. A moment of silence. Lovely. Getting the Senate of. Fully sleeping. To count. The morning. My question to you is which failed talk field. I would have said that definitely can you nine the breeder seep in word. No. And sheep lamb of God mutton grumble. Clue. There's a connection to Dylan toes, the Hearn hill sheep drunk Ziv. Eap? It's Welsh man's ensue. Interesting almost what you call a male sheep to ram now. It's a heap. A now the new news news. Why why do we do? Southland their news. Yeah. Let's question. A lot of people have been asking have gotten. Yeah. Is it because to remind ourselves where to go over the next month? Yeah. I mean, it's a we live. Always interested in it. And be yes, I think you're right. It's like a giant to do this. Yes. Apologies to anybody. Who doesn't live in south? Yeah. You're listening to the wrong podcast. Okay. Here we go public venues quite a lot to a rental through these. Yeah. I hit Kim. Brooke is getting its first pub-. Yes. I pump for for couple of decades. Probably. Yeah. The Diphu is opening Young's opening a power not far from the station near the store. Right. What was what was previous pubs that was the one where someone running through a smoke bomb? And when the smoke cleared the machine was gone. That's right here that was the what Tyler in area or state, which is now been flat level turned into a village. The nightlife is opening and captured isn't it that that was previously known as the Blackhawks in Harrow that's old. Gin palace yet. It was frequently on Karl Marx talk. But now is. Was opening this weekend? Yeah. With like an interactive maze, and and sort of immersive adventure rooms and. Vibes. Remember where we went to one of those escape. Just sat around skinned up and drank oh drinks after an hour. Bloody brilliant. Fifty I've ever spent. But I think when I saw sort of interactive as I did think can I just get a point. You're you don't have to go through maze that place in Carola. No. But it's run by lanes beer. So I think it might be a bit more like the four thieves in which is actually a great part is they do have lots of gaming staff indeed box. You can just have a pint and escape in another way. Yes. We also saw sister pub system bar perhaps to six yard box and elephant is opening in Peckham. Great one of our favorites favorites football theme Barna in a container. At least is in the then what's going to be in Peckham. But it opens on the nineteenth February in Schumer road. Great welcome to the area. Jim circuses closed in Brooklyn. Yeah. Well, Antic have given up the lease. We broke the news some months ago that they had eleven leases up for sale that's gone. We don't know if it's going to be still called gem circus. But hopefully, hopefully, it's still be a pop up here. It's a couple of taps opening you sane. They've they've already opened already opened the grip abide by numbers barrel. And tap love them over at the end of Jan love them as well. That's in the Belen business partner doesn't exactly what it is. But it sounds brilliant. Yes. The Belen Dan bell end and coming. It's been a long time since you lived in the air. Yeah. It's opened in Belen business part. And if there's anything better than supping NATO, an ally industrial estate of yet to come across it. Likewise. I suspect second-wave brewing tap in west Norwood on industries because it's on Ernest avenue, which I think is that road with the bus garage on one side and industrial states and the others hounds right here. You know? I mean fitting new kitchen, no. It sounds romantic though, little remind about. The new cross ale. Yeah. In is it again, karma new girls. Cross cities idiots. Yes. It's at the back of the London theater. So. It's going to be quite a mixture between micro puppy microbials, and maybe performance deal. At what I do remember about it first of all on the fifteenth just to interject myself, so perhaps an idea for Valentine's. Yeah. Bit late. Maybe forgot Valentine's. However, there is one. It's a model railway in it. Yeah. That's why. Yeah. Running around it which delivers your beer, we hope identity. No it does. But you know, he could be adopted bring bit Dogo friendlier notice that Lewis selling a beer for dogs. Bottom sniffer. Sounds good. In other news. My point of hop. Head is now made by the Japanese. Yes. That was shocking news. Wasn't it? Yeah. Yeah. So bought darkstar. That's right. And then Asahi bought fullest. That's right all the bear offs full is now, basically a pub company. Yeah. I couldn't really give tussey the way about foot of the traditional bear range. But with my hop head. There will be letters. Yeah. I mean, we will when foolish took it. Although, but nothing appears to change still delicious. Yeah. Chanel check it almost daily. My first thought was to go straight down the blow to have an and check if it was the same. I have to say the first seven were perfect. Can't remember? Finally Young's of acquired redcowmn pubs which interests us because that includes the station hotel hither green, the very popular mannerisms in stratum and the less popular cherry tree in east. Yeah. So there will be turning pink and pink about blue and gold. Yeah. Young's livery and selling Young's ordering. Yeah. This the fighting back on the. Groups like Young's. Well, some some saying for example, full as this idea that you earn little hopes, and you made the beer the sim body relationship is coming to an end as the fullest deal would suggest. Yeah. Just a company. But then yes, then you have Young's acquiring pups suggesting that they are trying to make a go of be both Abreu and Fuller's inequality what I've has. Well, I mean, yeah, they hop the harp. Yeah. And they left that alone. Blessedly? Yeah. They tried to get Norman's in SoHo and there's another one another. Oh, no. That was a rumor that proved to be incorrect shot repeated. First marriage. What was it like being married to twins? Wine. The thing is you never used to talk about it. And now, you're like. Well, you know, it's it was legal in Virginia in Virginia on. We'll have to do special episode on. In other news. Did you see that Mike Dyson if it leaving the? The baddest man on the planet. Who've is known to man. Name is James Dyson. Yeah. Is leaving the UK. Good. Doc off. Maybe he wanted to take back control. Yeah. So. Campaigning for the country to leave your opinion. Yeah. Himself Singapore's Singapore. Yes. No nothing to do. Yes. Yeah. It did. Did you see that Im's? Missive don't realize emails. Yes, why across with you? But are headed commercial. He wants he wants to transition deserter of rations. Yeah. He said he quote on a float on the hang sang sell with a two year earn out to bridge valuation gotten and sit on the beach eating cherries. Equality apartment last bit. I'm gonna fucking clue what he's on. On the longer. It stays the better. So anyway, if you're listening in. Yeah, one oh. Cherries as much as I love living in the UK. I'm also quite fond of foods, I'm happy to move. Yes. Oppose breaks here that we're happy to move. If you listening listening, you never listen and next news item. I saw was about a woman who is marrying do duvet. Did you see did understandable? It is understandable. I mean this. This is PASCAL said it from Exeter's having a ceremony. A little bit delayed understand. Yes, she had Koffi Koffi look at him under the one that David. Yeah. I'm not sure. What's in the news to be honest? I mean, haven't we offer this? We've all felt like it. But we've never actually done anything about, you know. No. Some point between the alarm going off and getting up. Yeah. She did say it's the most intimate and reliable relationship. She's ever had is that right? Yeah. That reminds me of you when you had that bad you remember he said, it was so delicious. He wants to get engaged to it. I don't remember it. But it sounds highly probable. The woman who has void friend is narrowly not. Eric. And she goes to bed with the model of. Well, you can say I'm going to bet with the model. I can see a point. Yes, we'll talk to you that this is one that eat you spotted deadly about the first beer ever. Brewed in the UK in the UK. This was archaeologists have made an incredibly exciting discovery while working on a project to widen. A major road namely evidence of what is believed to be the first beer. Brewed in the UK somewhere between Cambridge and Huntingdon on the fourteen Adam Partridge, isn't it? Anyway, tiny fragments of charged residue from the bay and making process found in excavated earth. Experts believe the iron age brew could date back as far as four hundred BC amazing. Suffolk suffered on. I think personally, I probably take it back. Even if the landlord saying it's foreign for another couple of days governor. I think I might just have a Guinness. All right. All right. Let's look at looks off. Talking. Beer, and and someone who likes it not you put your hand down. Our book corner but corner deals with the man who had a great fund nece for it, shall we say tennis writer. Books letters less. Rebating sent senators since power. Words goods ago corners is corn on this month. But corner is from a south London legend, I believe. Absolutely. Yeah. It's we'll be looking at undiminished would by Dylan Thomas one of her and hills. Most famous sons. It's actually a play for voices is described as a place of. I mean, it was written for the radio is obviously being performed. In theaters is available in book form, it struck me that more than anything. It's like a podcast. He's just ahead of his time as younger of its own, isn't it? Yeah. It is. Yeah. Anyway. There is a connection to Wales with Dylan Thomas, we acknowledged that. But he's now south London sun, and the reason for that is thus being mysteries to why he called it under millwood, but John tra- Geena may have the answer this guy who's got his own blog, and we'll put some links to this on our podcast page. He discovered a letter stating that still Thomas regularly visited London Welsh the rugby team who at that stage. Played at the Hearn hill velodrome. Nope. Elegant, I have contesting. Anyway afterwards as you may magin Dylan Thomas would go for few months in the Half Moon hotel, which this day where he would drink copiously and was described as a legendary conversationalist that's not what we've been answered. And opposite the Half Moon is the B two to two better known as milk would road. And whether this was enough to make you think he'd seen this road and named his playoff threat Underwood. I'm not sure. But anyway, for John Dragan, the final pieces of jigsaw was discovery that a one point in Thomas actually lodged on milkweed wrote. So he Lilly. He lived there. Just to explain what lodged means. And hence we now claim him as our own the Half Moon in her and hill now hosts annual Dylan day and. We've been asked to write a tour of some of Dylan Thomas's drinking haunts than what I thought of us and right up and read out on the evening question in may. So getting ahead of myself. I reread under millwood or rather I read it for the first time. Because I. Ever seen it before on an infamous school trip? We take into double Bill, probably which Gaumont or somewhere in cultures and. We the first half was Underwood who didn't tell us. And then we went to the bar on at a couple of shifty loggers because we got serve and we didn't go back for the second off, whatever whatever it was. And the next day we will hold in front of the head of sixth form and the ripped parts asking what the hell we thought we'd done let the school down the ourselves down and my impart said. Sir. I think it's what Dylan Thomas would have wanted. And the head of Losada's for he's trying to suppress a little smile. He's just out. Don't do again. So naturally I warmed to him. So onto onto millwood itself. You may know that essentially is a day in the life of a town. Town's life. It's love sadness is laughs, plenty of laughs to be fair and Soro and death. As I was reading it. I was musing. It's like a snapshot of a soap opera been. Being given one episode of soap opera, if that's possible. Yeah. And there was a Coronation Street. There is a car nations dri in just as what I was going to. And so that's. The main street in the is called current issue. I did wonder if Tony Warren might be fan. The creative Coronation Street. Ten years though. I suspect there were plenty coronation street's around that time 'cause you're writing it was the time of the corroding of Elizabeth Taylor. Lisbeth thinking second. Visit forgot her surname for minute. Anyway, so rollicking and surprising, easy read. I thought undimished would give give them that by poet, some sometimes it be quite dense concert. Which is very rich. Oh, it's so rich. I mean, it's wonderful. Yeah. It's it's a rigid. You know, the the line one of the early lines starless and bible black which I hadn't realized came from there, you know, a king crimson album title. Isn't it? And it's so poetically. Fun. We price is in love with Mark Edwards. And he's described as tall as the town clock tower Sansom, Sarah, gold main working fide and piping hot fundable based and barnacle breasted flailing up the cockles with these is like blow lamps and scooping low over her lonely loving hot water bottle body. He's enough to make you give up writing. So playful as well, the the town and indeed the original name of the piece is called Harrogate. That was the original title that was the original title, which was dropped in favor of under milk with because it was thought it was too dense for American audiences. Or you could say, yes. We shan't. But yes, but HARA goop is bugger all backwards. Lovely source of bawdy of postcards of way, or they have to be a little bit careful in nineteen fifty four. So it's often couched in lyrical terms, for example, sailor sailor, wishing to be shipwrecked on a girl's thighs and quite easy to imagine that organ Morgan wasn't just in love with his music. Some great gags in it. The original one. But there's the line. Will you take this woman to be your awful wedded wife? And some great ear for dialogue, for example, Mr. MRIs Pugh her in open warfare. His your nice TD's as Mr. Pugh too much sugar. She says you haven't tasted it yet. Too much Milton. Yeah. And often the funnies at tinged with sadness. As in the song of Polly garter whose garden grows nothing, but Washington babies. It goes I loved a man whose name was Tom. He was strong as a barren to yards long. I loved a man whose name was dick. He was big as a barrel and three feet thick. I love to manage name was Harry six feet tall. And sweet is a cherry, but the one I love best awake. Or asleep was little Willie way. And he's six feet deep. As you might expect with. Dylan Thomas, it's also quite drink in places as well as WALDO, the town's main boozer there is cherry. Oh in who. In his dream lifts attorney could to his lips. But nothing flows out of it. He shakes the tankard. It turns into a fish. He drinks the fish. Is the same guy when the bomb and asked him what he'll have he replies. Too much. But more than anything overall. I think the piece shows Thomas as a lover of people. Yeah. Lover of all life. Yeah. There's a great sense of humanity. And isn't it isn't that? Yeah. So yeah, it shows is operatives of how the wonder of life. I think is made up of the sum of all its parts and one I really loved was quite near the beginning. I think is a group of drowned sailors asking about what life is like. After their deaths. Yeah. Essentially, and it goes how's it above? These voices. How's it above? Is there rum and lava bread booms and Robbins, concertina Constantinos, Evans's, bell fighting and onions. Sparrows and daisies tillers in a jam jar buttermilk in whip it's Rucker by baby washing on the line old girls in the snug house. The ten is in Dow lay who milk the cows in mess Quinn when she smiles dimples. What's the smell of parsley? Desperately sad, isn't it? I think if you switched out positive for marijuana you'd have everything in love. Yes. So that's under Millwood's Dylan Thomas. Do you have a chance to have a look at it? As what I did. Yeah. Yeah. Credit and I've also got to on a sort of audio book. And it's really nice to listen to the one that is read by Richard Burton? It's worth listening to Welsh actors reading all the parts. Language, suits. The way they speak. And yeah, I read somewhere that it was like a reassertion of beauty in response to the atrocities of well will to Hiroshima and Ashwin. Yeah, I'm not I didn't get that from reading it. That is now my opinion. It works lit crit for you. In a moment. The raiders will introduce us to the world of work. I'm sorry to say before that a reminder to everyone in the room that if you take out the boot, please do return them to the boat. I have received a telephone call from the proprietor the anchor public house reporting that nine the training pedalo and the school pleasure cruiser of been tied up at the jetty since New Year's Eve. A now over to the trader MSE OMG ELO. Thank you. Work work is essentially the giving up of your time in return to things, unfortunately, these can be things like shelter warmth, food or children impractical to cut back on and possibly illegal. But they can also be things unnecessary for day to day happens like champagne, jewelry or shoes. Deserter? We ask you not to seek luxury items as an end in themselves, but to consider I what it is. That actually makes you happy put your hand down. We know what makes you happy. Thence forward. We have the Kate working only as much as you need to in order to achieve this contentment. You may argue that the amassing of surplus wealth is a traitor Qin for the animal hoarding food in the autumn thinking ahead to a time when food supplies scales. There is some merit, of course in planning ahead. But the difference is that the animal takes every winter off to lie about in a straw, lined cave. Gorging itself on nuts fermented berries with a few mates round. Meanwhile, mankind as being lured onto the never ending treadmill of Labe desperately saving a winter. That never comes save in the guy's death or mental illness note, the pursuit of wealth is simply too expensive costing you as it does your life. Why we all yearn for more than you need as Plato reminds us, even if you're a median you can still only drink twenty ninth today in your folders. You will find. Covered such central topics as fading job interview surviving mornings throwing sickie office napping. And of course, the day that every committee deserter yearns for how to resign. We will focus on the positives. After all that is the desert away the money the status the socializing in the sense of chievements at a job. Well done can bring before considering why despite all this work remains essentially shit. Work is like a hang on. No one really likes it. But there it is. And you can bet it will be a long again in the morning. Do it as little as possible and take as much as you can from it, including station. Spy? So what's the latest from spider? Do we have a missive from him? Well, kind of we didn't get in any letter from the world from spider cells prizing from Peru. I have a little bit of Email exchange with embezzling most of which are spare you. Listeners may not be aware that. Drunk spider was a big Oldham athletic fan. He disowned them a few years ago when they tried to sign jet Evans to the extent where he he wished relegation upon them, which they Julie received unbeliev dance Elise. Danta Lee's special power. Needs. Yes. So I was emailing when I was just saying that not only is missing south London bus stopped in the drizzle also missed Oldham's. If a Cup run and got straight, maybe design. No, bloody didn't. He said I caught this joint killing act on telly in Machu Pichu. Machu pichu. Yes. Which is of course, the fifteenth century Inca citadel was very hard to get to takes days. Yeah. Woke up there high above the sacred valley and these settlers watch the game on telly. He reckons. I'm preparing myself to forgive them. Now, they beat Fulham didn't they they beat Fulham. Yeah. Alderman in two and Fulham in the Premier League. So because all the way around the world and sits to picture watching them. That's brilliant. But he said he's is. Off into the deep dark Peruvian jungle tomorrow. So it'd be incommunicado for a while which don't go there's ever name Amazon, the Amazon com boxes is appropriate. Name. Isn't it? That's a shame. Because he's so he's going to be incommunicado seen Odin. I don't guess crowns missed it all swanning around South America. Yeah. You wouldn't even have Twitter there. No. He's got no social media. No like us. Yes. Shall we? Do the social media scene? That's a really good phrase for it. Yeah. I've got a I was Dave piece at Sarkis proxy who. Senate urgent tweet to southeastern railway. He tweeted a guy in front of me on the train is eating a sandwich with a fork. Eighteen thirty five from London cannon street, southeast railway. Can you send a God or something? Yeah. And then another thing that cracks me up was from bitchy Louis Smith TV awful. I remember him. Say that. Career is alive. And well as he would tell you on Twitter if you criticize him. Anyway, he came up with something that made me enough about may Saturday. He tweeted after several years of medical training, and a slogan pal of mine has been struck off after just one minor indiscretion, he slept with one of his patients, and is barred from his profession auto waste of training and money, a genuinely nice guy to an excellent vet. Yeah. It was the threat to talk show that I enjoyed his kicked off by. Rick buren. Started the most famous person you've ever had a we Knicks to I mentioned yours is Winston he wasn't. It wasn't a. That was notable. No it was. When she popped in. Quentin. Yes, I do. I remember what you what you texted back because we're gonna come over. I was with Gwen and as long story. No, no, no, no for just just just dance to work and. Yeah. We're gonna come for drink come for partner texted. He south Gwen stefani's gonna come for a drink with this. That's all right any technique back. When when will they leave us alone? But no, I didn't have a piece news room. But the most famous person that since you're asking. I did when I was working somewhere else. I went. To the toilet and the ease to favor particular toward it from my post-prandial, nap about off two three o'clock, and it was a double double door up on the fifth floor in quite pushed out both the doors were jaw pushed out on the first one it was in there. Mick jagger. Push the next one Keith, Richard. Guys guys door, you know, way down doors. Do go on. So Jim Brown responded to him said, I we'd in the euro in nineteen Ninety-two with Alex Ferguson on my left and trip trip working on my right? The other two have subsequently been awarded knighthoods while I was awarded five times neck two points for a limited period over Christmas. And Luke McLaughlin, replied, XP presenter, David vine headed we next of a guy he recognized he presumed he was from another broadcaster. And as they left the toilet Unity's himself. David vine BBC and the guy says Joel Ford, president of the United States. Always good that when you you recognize out to be the prison. But my favorite was from Graham Bandera who had a p next to David Blunkett. And this dog. Even better David Blunkett bars him with his dog and said drugs world. Oh, he was good. And it was a good. It wasn't the. Yeah. Another threat. I enjoyed worse. It wasn't about me. It was about. But you know, if you must know Alan Curbishley. Right. I enjoyed a threat called to word horror stories, which I think was started by very British problems. So very British. I think they started it, but they came up with two would horror stories like I contact. Lunch meeting surprise party? Sing along. Conference cool. Tax return and smear test. And one hundred no leg day. I had to look it up legged it. No. I mean, apparently when you work out you do exercises and lifts similar muscle groups on the same day. You have a chest day armed a pooled in electa to you. If you skip leg day, it means you don't work out your legs at all resulting in upper body being disproportionately bigger than your lower light. You. Light. You must've forgot military. I didn't really get like day, but must be a nightmare for some people. Plenty people chipped him with their own for example, replacement bus smart casual. No milk now that is a horror story not view too because you refuse to drink milk. Don't you? Yeah. Oat milk that spout with a y. Minimum payment that was annoying one one of my favorite to horror stories was it's burst. That's never going to be the forerunner of good news now in. I got a couple of year thought of a couple for you closing time don't know that private function. That and plant based. Yeah. You got me there. On a couple of notes any questions. Amount. You. And now cough. And finally. Yeah. I thought dessert ary one to finish. Steve our planet legs says. No matter how lazy you feel just remember that Goldilocks decided to take a nap during a burglary. Yeah. Well. Well, we got time for isn't it all we got wind for that's what you mean. Kind of is running a booze. Now, do you know the story of Goldilocks and the three beers three biz? Yeah. Must. She breaks into someone's else. Does that go? Yeah. Yeah. And three criminal sorry. Yeah. She takes a sup of the first one, it's fosters. She said that is proper. Go. And she has a mouthful of Guinness. That's not bad. So and then she finds the API, and she's has tasted that now. That's just right. She drinks it down in one when family get home. The mummy says who's been sopping, my fosters and the daddy says who's been something might Guinness. And then the third character who for some reason playboy Denny says. Livermore in the fracking beat can be is some slag snick. The fact Intel. Where's this going? Maybe I think he's going to the pub. Get deadlier beer, the aim slag daily.

Dylan Thomas UK London London Twitter Young Belvedere Madrid Wales Senate Tom Gwen stefani Peckham liberal club Africa plumps radical club writer Headley Jinmen David
3: Life after gang culture - with Richard Riakporhe

Limitless with Josh Patterson

33:37 min | 1 year ago

3: Life after gang culture - with Richard Riakporhe

"Hello and welcome to the limitless podcast with me. Joshua Patterson passionate about sharing the stories of courage and resilience each week. I will be interviewing extraordinary. People different walks of life is so past the ticks you tom past moments of adversity and stranded my hope visit this podcast can inspire you to step outside of your limits and achieve things. Tho never possible welcome to limitless before we crack on with the show I wanNA give a shoutout to the partners today's podcast thrive. I genuinely believe that really understanding was going on with your body can empower you to feel your best self so I've been following hollering thrive at for wall and loved that they really endorsed this belief would they easy out hunt blood tests that are analyzed by the NHS labs. I recently did one of that. Blood attests of defeating like I'd been lacking energy and within forty hours of sending off my test I was given a personalized report and discovered that I had low vitamin beat twelve levels not only was the tests super simple to do from the comfort of my own Heim. I was also offer daughtry suggestions and evidence based advice to help with increasing increasing levels of vitamin B twelve which has been invaluable. If you'd like to keep on track with what's going on inside your body I'd recommend checking out these guys for yourself by visiting thrive dot co and entering the code limitless check out the thirty pounds of your. I thrive kit. Thank you again jamf support the driver someone who knows the systematic issues of knife crime is Richard React poor stopped at the the age of fifteen during a mugging Richard has turned his victim status into something damange respect by coming the WBA intercontinental champion title Holda Richard Uses his public presence to inspire young people have gone Katcher a knife crime by leading workshops in schools across the UK Eh to give the kids and opportunity to find other role models Richards Josh Haden brother. Thank you so so much coming on business a pleasure honestly when I found your page and your story I had to reach out to you. You and I see an individual at yourself is so busy and has so much going on. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate you. Get Him back to me. Because has it was a story that I just wanted to share with so many people because I just find you so inspiring and I think what you're doing. What you're achieving leaving is a wonder and I think we'll so important about it. Is that what you're achieving is an impossible and I think that's the message that you try to deliver with. What you do absolutely Salita absolutely you won't communities from all different backgrounds or different ethnicities to be inspired and start their own journey. Let's say let's and `and everybody the position. I'm in now. It came through hard work and determination no talent just pretty much opposition opposition and and just a will to change my my circumstance. Most people know you as a professional boxer but to those the are unaware of who you are. Can you just detail who you are where you come from so my name is Richard Poor on a grew up in southeast London wharf road and around the Peckham and brick scenario grown up in my area was pretty difficult grew up her in low. Income Housing and environment was pre shabby. I ended up getting myself involved in all different types of gun culture and ended up against the age of fifteen ninety lost my life how to make a u-turn and just kind of realized you know this lifestyle style. There's only two ways it ends either life imprisonment or death I'm one of the few lucky ones of all my friends to be my position. A group of people that died agreable people that are in jail for life as we speak few muchly is just a blessing to be here. Believe me when I tell you that's why I'm you every time you seem more smiling because I know things could have been very different support. What do you think is so so appealing to gang coach the fact that you just sat there and said most of my friends are dead or in Prison Stephanie Materialism. That's one one thing that's a big thing tension power tench from women of C. Santa Women and just the whole top of interest in in gangsterism if you would I think is there so it's a bunch of things and then it's just kind of leaves you down this path before even even realize you're walking down his office like pretty much too late you already on your way by the time you become conscious of. It's like too late almost three difficult to kind of describe what your voice is such a powerful one because all it takes is just one individual to hear what you say and it broadens their horizons you know as you said if you're born in Peckham Annoy Eve nine Peckham I know you're surrounded by is gang coach. not so well you know if your inspirations of your role models around you generations of gang. I meant to know anything anything else. I always say how. Do you expect one to do better when he doesn't know better. It's nearly impossible for you to do but so you need to see better you need to be around their environments and back then we knew I will come up my house. I'll see local drug dealers how respect and admiration that will get from everybody around in community see the attention they will get from females and it just looked like what they were doing was right in made sense it worked then on Joe. They had to like fresh clothes trainers as the flies cause and it makes sense. I want to be like I couldn't. I didn't see any boxes for instance. That's why we're kind of just go ourselves in voting titleist on and then those a whole system we've in this type of lifestyle says it may sound for you you to to gain this type of credibility and to build a streaker abilities like you have to have. Pride Eagle it we we were so entrenched in deep into this type of lifestyle. We did see anything else. Nobody could understand us. Our parents don't understand us. They didn't understand why do we did what we did but it was just the whole system and we'll build up credibility. We always refer to as is this poverty mindset because that's really is. You think there's no other way but this is the only way by until you break free. OUTTA and breaking free three is no easy with me. It took because alls quite hard of hearing a stubborn. I had to feel some people call ahead. They have to go awesome things and it wakes them up and that's when they say nope this is not going to work. I'M GONNA get myself in serious trouble me change my Leifer once she kind of made that decision you just start to see different things. You know you just Kinda. Just focus on in your mind. That's what you just have to focus on the way you. WanNa be an stops from there. Would you WANNA be in five years and you realize that for me to get to destination be from a there's so much things that you have to change but does that come from within a defined. You need that inspiration because I'm so interested in with your story is when you in an environment like that and that's all you've ever known howdy one day half. That piff away like got changed this. Did you have an inspiration or role model in your youth the inspired that mindset or is that something that you inherited off your back to be honest. It was definitely something that I inherited of mom back back. I wish I had a role model someone that came from my type of background to speak speak life into me but unfortunately I didn't have that's that's why I take on a role now and do that very thing because I always believed that if I had somebody that came from a similar background to to me and I saw they would you know quite successful. They had material things because that's what my mindset was back then and and they look like they're doing pretty good out follow. I would take key to what they had to say could change. It could have changed me. You know you've come from the streets reads but then you've pushed I guess the talent that you had on the street and you put it into something more productive which then enables apple's you to voice the change to be honest. I think you're right you. Nothing it does go hand in hand me reaching a certain level of success. I I wouldn't have that much of a voice to speak to people maybe the platform that box and has given me has given me a grail pechiney to add add value to the world that means more to me than any any title and believe me when I tell you I wanna win every time you thus my passion my ambitions but to be walking down the street and have a random person comes to their Richard. You know what what you said on this day. You changed the life he said this to me this to do. This is why it's really about from the life that you lived where you've openly said things like 'cause close women. You know these things things that the demanded respect was power. There's no difference actually within boxing when you look at it when you look at like the Mayweather's right here. It's all very flash. It's loud. out is provocative. Why do you think you haven't fallen back into that trap. You know what I believe the kind of derived from me sit down meditate on finding finding out. What really makes me happy? I live that type of lifestyle with the clothes wooded materialistic kind of things I said to myself. This doesn't make me happy. Josh like this is what makes me happy is like being able able to add value to somebody be able to to win tiles and win matches work hard and achieve and accomplish things that people believed believed was unachievable but just break stereotypes that that's that's what makes me happy. I love it. I love the look on people's faces when you think wow how how did you do and once you understand. What makes you happy realiser. It's okay to be used okay to just do you you might you might cause what you do as weird you might like going for walks unison that might give you that type of most happiness but I'm telling you that you would who live longer and fulfilling life by just being yourself and you realize the society puts these things puts a value in these things and make you you think this is going to give you the the most happiness but really it's not really. It's all about sometimes just sitting down taking taking a day off off. What's your favorite series talk to loved ones family seeing family and thus rule happiness thou give you a longer fulfilling life when I came to the understanding when that's what changed me I realize thus that's not me when gold watches and this I don't mind I could. We're one but it doesn't find me. You know put tomorrow. I felt like unfortunately as a society we've inherited. This mentality where everything's on show right is power but I think is it powered. The like money doesn't buy you happiness. It buys freedom. I just want more. Oh people to know that because I feel like too often in life and it doesn't matter whether it's sports any career path to the focus seems to be the money because is the problem is when you on one hundred thousand. I think you'll understand this. People don't go. I used to on twenty thousand now running a hundred if I save that money you know I've built. Don't myself some security. It's all relative you end up spending more money because you make more money up up you know. How many people do you know from Peckham the came from nothing appropriately earning in an abundance of money but Robin Gun wow I need to remember my roots. I had absolutely nothing to save that money up. They probably blow everything that they are quickly quickly and this is what I don't understand and but you seem to have altered that mentality and that's one that I think more people need to inherit is so important so important is this goes back to a toy said everybody just goes like they need to maintain this type of emission and lifestyle and you people to to want you. WanNa be around around you for you. WanNa love you for you and that's not because of this hating Kiro Knicks I'll go on my wrists and in his your image too so I wanna be around enriched known her nose just because this guy is pretty cool. I love what he represents a quick shoutout to one of today's sponsors before we continue with the show. The potential of the human brain astonishes me our ability to learn across a lifetime means so much to me with every new skill we learned limitation is overcome. This is why I am so happy to partner with skill show today's episode an an online learning community talk by the world's best practitioners Scotia host thousands of online classes. They can help shop in your mind whether it's picking up an online course in creative writing a honing your entrepreneurial skills to browse. All of their classes had to skill shed dot com slash limit. I personally love the skill shack is me access to courses the lie otherwise wouldn't have thought possible with new knowledge H. literally at my fingertips like the other day I was able to learn about the DSL on lenses and lighting joining the millions of students tanning their passions into skills with two months free. Just had the skill shed dot com slash limit to claim your free trial of two months of unlimited access to thousands of clauses that skill shot dot com slash limit voiced openly that a turning point in your life was when you were fifteen fifteen year and that was when you stopped. Would you say that was the defining moment in your childhood where you when things are going to change now. This isn't alive that was one of the moments that definitely changed change mile my behavior affect that had on my family on my mother. Ova My father read a call me and my family free to stretch like if I really love my parents would. I want to put them through to stress. That's why I asked myself one day. You know I can do better just that simple. That's it. That's what it took just one four. I can do better an everything started changing my actions. I just became a bit more calculated in making decisions that will benefit mean future. That's when I decided to go to trial boxing and I've found out quite talented had power it just needed to be nurtured and I just you just have to be consistent and stick is to Costa and eventually like starting to pay off now but it took years. the problem is is with people from my background. They Wanna see things straightaway like six. Months is a long time but it don't work like that you got how will you put in and sometimes you might have to put in work for years and years and years and years and then you'll see results and that's how it works and I've been books for ten years but people don't believe they see me like on TV. Nowadays they calmly listen. You was on the US on the streets with me will apply to govern doing this unbelievable. How when. When did this happen a little wacky. I'll always in a jim every single day. Even when I was on the streets I was actually going to the gym on a few days off and starting to pay dividends no do you think is because of the mentality you had something. I'm so interested in is a street mentality Ryan to some. They may think it's a curse but to me looking looking I think is a gift is a quality that few have but when channeled into positive can become one of the biggest assets you have a half half absolutely absolutely it's funny because me and my Bravo were discussing this today. This morning I said Patrick What's interesting in the eighties and the seventies in America those different caliber fighters because of what they went through the the social inequalities that they had to you know they had to overcome to have a voice to to be respected it was it was was lost so it made them stronger. It made him fi harder. That's why they was talking about the the box of old because they say it is there's no other fires is like the books of old as like towards the Howard alleys. They don't understand like what's the difference and they realized that I realize I come to conclusion that is because of the background is because of the the things advest is that they had to overcome to do what they do and that's what made them the fight they were. I feel like similar to me going free. Wi went through that kind of gave me strength gave me an advantage over the of the FIS. If you check track record now most of the fires though four especially my loss refi also posted news I wasn't supposed to win these vitamin boxing since they were kids ten ten years of age some Winter Olympics or the Aba titles and me come from Kate came off the streets and start boxing and a beat these guys so those even time my fight for my motto for this was last year I was losing most around and martyrs came and of course I listened Richard. You need to pick up. He needs to pick up round six. I gave it everything says Noggin enough. I came back and he said it's not good enough. Listen Richard Idiots pickup join a go home jolted furniture towel in no way don't do and he said okay show me something came on just gave everything will go. I end up lender shot which she was forced to to. Though forced foreign NATO and I ended up winning tile so it's just that type of mentality never ever ever give up never until his all and this is that type of mentality the the ride from the adverse you streetlife street coach so it's how do we get to change that mindset. I guess like I said it's it's. It's it's having these conversations setting up these talks within schools to hopefully enable them to just alter that because if you just change that thought process by percent. I think now is a father in those communities because I look at my children. I think gosh she's lucky she's blessed. She's protected. She safe and I want every reach out to feel that way. On enforcing every child out there has a mother or father or brother assists or friends the that protect them from there so be that one person person that does make that change your because how amazing would that be. You're not just rich the boxer US rich at the pioneer who changed the mentality polity of our community of country of the world to live in a happier and a better place beautiful beautiful. You look at like the likes of Mohammed Ali an political message behind him. I respect in my Admi- him but I think to myself. Why do we reverse thus so far back to that time. Is it because something's not going right in this time. Are we enabling the Mohammad-ali. All the JOE bloggs at this time to have that voice to have that same impact where where is it that we're going wrong. Is it because we criticize one another too much. You know if looking back to knife crime we look at these communities. You know I'm where we're we're going off of. America London were going. The police were going communities which is blaming one another but we're not coming up with solutions. Why can't we just sit down a Komo solution set of pointing fingers. They know he's doing a terrible the joke he should be fired one of the things. I do when I when I go to schools and speak to you speak to you've always have like a slide show and I'll have different type of idols or different influences on a page and all kids students. WHO's this I'll have six nine out have Lewis Hamilton Anthony Joshua some singers and I would always tell these this eunice you have to be very careful. He idolize I'm not saying don't listen to ascend rapper but why not dig deep and search and find out what they stand for. Some people not plus a message but when you find out what different communities amazing so find out what these people do and chat aspire to be like people are doing more for the community that represent something something bit more profound than just some superficial type of character and I think this is the age where we're going to see major things happen major change occur if you go back in time and you were given an opportunity to change what he did to change. Maybe who you were to change the decision the day you went to that party and you established you. Would you know just a promise you see. He was questioned questions by the way I've always ox myself and I've told people for years that I wish that I I never experienced this type of style. A wish I grew up in a different area. Never met the people and I never go vote in to figs ago voted on for many years and one day just what you asked me to a moment ago and New York's me that this type of St Coach gave you this type of mindset actually benefit she advantage over your opponents in the ring and now realizes that was actually true meditating this is true and is giving me more power because of the success of acquired so far that when I speak people listen and I'm have the ability to change lives so it's only tornado on Sunday. I believe that it was ran from me to go free audio for and for me to have the type of effect on people people now. I had to have gone through so now I wouldn't say I wouldn't have changed owned of change my while were a finger Illu for reason and if I didn't go through that I wouldn't have this effect. Nod You know my my words four undefeated circle. You're essentially in the pasta saying that you just didn't want to be the person you are right now now. Actually if you look at the person you are right now. You wouldn't change a thing from a person experience. You had to go through. Those adversities are know for fact. I probably probably wouldn't be as inspired or as ambitious and the challenges that I sat had I not been through. Why had you know I always think about that day. We're almost took my life because it depression and remember how Lo- how isolated I was how meaningless I fell in life and and I look at these challenges and people go. You're crazy like what is it possible is not. GonNa is that not dangerous and I go it is but it's constructive and there's a there's a positive positive meaning behind it but I know is how much pain I'm GonNa go through in the training leading up to that challenge and going through that challenge. I'm never going to feel the pain that I felt. Nope back back then. Sa- for me this is a gift and as a gift of subject myself to best thing. I didn't subject myself to mental health. It's something that I've have inherited for whatever reason I don't know for so long. I was so quite a bad. I didn't want to talk about it because I was ashamed. Now shots it from the rooftops because is actually the only way you can break. Stigma is by showing people that don't understand how to and the only way you can do that is by talking to them by inspiring them opening up their minds to something that they didn't think possible absolutely absolutely just talking about to talking to buy it breaks so much barriers because it gives other people confidence talk especially somebody with such a huge following and has the ability infants such a huge amount the people by somebody saying wow josh said. Why am I so frayed come out. I'M GONNA come out with it because if he he can do icon seriously because I I can imagine this kind of goes down to what people are. GonNa think about you a sweaty like I live the sunlight for so long because I used to care everybody four by me for so long that they I said. I don't care what they think about me. I'm going to do I want to do her. Everything changed everything changed. Josh is giving me more power giving pupil power because they just just copy I can do. I want to do as well criminal case. Anybody thinks look him look at Josh. Just do some crazy challenges like if I can do it why doc I want to do whatever I wanNA. This personal opinion is irrelevant that person's. Nobody what they think is relevant. I'm going to do I want to do it makes me happy. It makes me happy is impossible until you make it possible right. I'm interested to know with you ten years in boxing boys your idea of success because you talk about wanting to be successful on. I'm interested in to this point when you look at what you've achieved. What is the definition of success. Is Success Gang yourself off the streets away from gang crime is success living after being stabbed fatally or a success nor even achieve January. Is You know success to me. Justice changed so many times for years before success was acquiring a large amount of money for many years financial freedom because come from that pack Tapa background. We didn't have that financial the freedom so that's wiles fixated on the idea lay run agent change to just happiness happiness alone like whatever the makes me feel good stuff successful because when your stress CBS's in just having the power to change should change lives. I think that's amazing Stephania Paul my idea of success for me a massively admire that because he's actually some people can be stopping in life and kind of stick to what their ideology of of success can be and actually the summer strength when it changes because in life things always change will change every every day you know your personality your on Bishen in the position. You may be in mental physical changes. It's not really gonNA change not going to be the same person that you are. When you're twenty some possible thirty or forty it is impossible because you you grow older and also you gain more life experience. And how can we change. Ulta the mindset of these individuals to build a more supportive and a brighter future for all communities. We can help these individuals because these individuals are a broken. They're vulnerable sometimes. They don't they then over unconscious. What are doing to the point where like I said before like. I didn't know any better so I couldn't do any better back. Then by only two I was exposed to set environments and people that's when things start to change for me and I made a decision myself to to change my laffin walk on a bad yeah paw so it's just getting the understanding taking time out to look into what makes a sank community take what makes six certain individuals take if I could put it back to you if you look at the life that you live right now boxing is at the forefront you currently the WPA A. B. B. A. Intercontinental Champion. When is it going to be enough you. What legacy is at the US to leave behind? It's going to be enough for me. Once once I become the unified champion at least will champion. I can leave that alone and maybe go into other things other ventures by oath. I don't think this will stop though this idea of of added value to the world as long as I live are always do suffolk. That's the most important thing it's all great achieving titles in I'll have of of seawall towel emissions but really is what you do when you quiet quiet when you quite as powerful because that's all it is by if you use a powerful good for the greater good that's that's amazing if you could go back in time or even at present right now what you're going through and you could show gratitude and say thanks to those that have had a positive effect in your life if you'd like to give a shout day. I'll say definitely my mother often. She's a an amazing individual. She's to me so so much so much as just again to. We'll be here for another now. Another another day also my father's were takes an amazing man and my close friends you know a close close friends that it was. Kinda kept me on a tap arapoff. I wanted to indulge in said things when when I felt like I needed to be. They always just woke me up said Richard just remember. Where do you remember aw like the path they on. You don't know you're affecting this continuing. This trust me to see a law things happen for you. I think your life is going to be so much bigger than boxing. Boxing is is merely a stepping stone. I think it's GonNa be a big point. You live but I think this is much more from you to come surpassing pausing boxing. Thank you so much for coming on this podcast. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate the time that you've given me so hopefully crews away or heavyweight champion in the world. Welt is being an honor and a privilege to have you been honored to be a channel story goes on Hopefully we see seed and you don't even lock is going to ask it's going to happen. Thank you. Thank you guys. Thank you so much for tuning into limitless. This podcast is something I'm sorry passionate about. I would love if you would let me know your thoughts and opinions by leaving a rating and review in the comments section. It really helps me to spread the word. If you think this story might resonate with someone. Please share it with your friends and don't forget to subscribe to you. Don't miss out new episodes every Thursday world talking to more inspiration. Guess we've Seen Pasta limit until next time

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Equity Dive: Patreon

Equity

25:18 min | 2 years ago

Equity Dive: Patreon

"Hey, everyone. It's Kate Clark. Here we want to introduce you to a new special equity show called equity dive each month as part of tax crunches membership offering extra crunch. We will talk to the writer of extra E C one a deep dive look into a single company, their origin story, growth and future prospects. Enjoy this first one with Eric Peckham who spent hours with the powers that be patriotic a platform that lets creators develop relationships with their fans and generate revenue from their work. If you don't wanna miss out on the patriot and deep dive and all the great content that extra coach produces dot com slash subscribe and become a member use promo code equity to get twenty percent off of your first year enjoys first episode that could you dive? Hi, I'm Connie Lewis. And I'd like to welcome you to our first equity dive once a month. We're going to be dedicating an entire episode to a deep dive into the life of one company this month. I'm joined by Eric Peckham who has reported extensively on the crowdfunding membership platform patron hierarchic. Hey, Cutty excited to be here for the first equity dive same. So Eric you and I ran into each other. I in Berlin. But we don't know each other very well. I'd love to hear more about you. So you're based in LA, and from what I understand you are a media industry analyst is that cracked. Yes. So I cover through both my own newsletter monetize ING media, the happenings of the global media and entertainment industry. It's going to a very business minded lens on media entertainment. Well, I read your extensive coverage on Matt patriot. And it was really impressive. And I I wondered I mean, considering how much you wrote is this a sort of a a long interest of yours this company, or how did you decide to settle on this for your first kind of deep dive for tech-rich? Yeah. You know, I it was an exciting process dig into this. We made a shortlist of exciting companies alive unicorn companies or late stage startups we thought were about to become unicorns. And patriot jumped out for a number of reasons. One is someone who runs his own newsletter. I have had a subscriber to that newsletter suggests creating a patriotic I've looked into it before as a little bit of a kind of creator perspective of just wanting to better understand patriotic other options in the market. But I think from a bigger picture. More of a kind of Silicon Valley perspective, patrons, really fascinating company. They've raised over hundred million dollars from top DC firms like index yard V. They're the dominant player in this space they're targeting, but it's kind of them versus just the big social media platforms. There isn't a startup that's comparable in size to it. And it's really trying to own this whole territory of independent content creators serving than with different business, tools or services. It is really interesting that the David and Goliath story involves a one hundred million dollars. Venture backed startup versus as you say, none of these big players Facebook YouTube, but let's start at the beginning. So you decided on patchy on for reasons that I can certainly understand. Now, how did you set about pitching them on this idea because obviously you were going to need a lot of access to them a lot of their time. We actually initially got connected through a buddy of mine, Dustin dole Gano who had invested in hatred on when he was a complex ventures at a Boston. He put jacket I and touch Jack Conte's CO patriotic. They were excited about the idea of this. And it opens have giving me a lot of access to Jack into a number of the executives and to do interviews on cut a really good a deep understanding of the company what are their offices like if you don't mind my asking, it's a it's a creative platform do they have sort of like the the hidden library our that the bar that you access their library. So they have a great space. It's relatively new for them. They're growing incredibly quickly. And so it's a space where your half of the floor is empty waiting for more people to be hired. But the culture of patriotic stems directly from the personality of Jack and his co founder of Sam Jack himself was a music major at Stanford. Is that correct? Yes. So Jack has has a fascinating story. He and his co founder Sam they were roommates at Stanford and undergrad Sam was a CS student and focused on traditional startup Silicon Valley path and Jack Conte's it was just a musician who had this incredible belief in what was happening with the internet to open access to both content creation distribution being able to connect with your fans recklessly through social media and build a following. So after he graduated he ended up starting this band pump loose with his now wife, and they gained a bunch of traction online and decided to use the internet as their platform to make money in advance. I think it's selling these two people who are so different came together, the musician and the computer engineer, so now Sam Yan, which I learned entirely from your report had worked with Sam Altman. I guess at his company loops and then was starting his own start up. This is a really interesting to me you say that he was on the cusp. Of getting this thing going he had queued up some coverage and tech crunch and Jack Conte reaches out to him and says, I have this completely separate idea. Let me tell you about it. And Sam Yelm, kind of drops everything and says, I think your idea is better than mine. Let's do this together as that sort of accurate. I mean sale, and we got some great videos of salmon, Jack talking about different parts that their founding story together that's part of the report on tech crunch. So people should definitely check that out. But you what happened was Jack got really into creating these music videos is way to put out his music, and engages fans on YouTube and had this vision where he was going to rebuild a replica of the millennium. Falcon set from Star Wars going to have like dancing robots, but it's gonna be really expensive. And so this brought up the idea of how can I get more my fans to help chip in and fund this with me, but not just for this one video which may be could use Kickstarter for. But for every time, I'm doing one of these videos for a song, you he ended up in his notebook mapping out this idea for what patriotic could look like. And then we shout to Sam who ios kind of. His friend from college who he knew is in this space, the end up meeting, your Sam is kind of there just to be nice, and hopefully give some feedback Jack's asking if he should sign an NDA or whatever else he's new to this whole startup thing. They end up having this conversation about the opportunity that get Sam. So animated that night. He starts building patron. What's incredible? Is that same day? You actually got featured in tech crunch the announcement of the startup he had been working on our spot and how many years ago as this? They met in March twenty thirteen in may they launched the platform publicly Jack in his girlfriend, and a former roommate of his were the only artists on the platform originally yet reached out to over forty creators thinking that all sign on the excited every single one said, no. And so they launched with centrally just him and very quickly. Other people started signing up than they got a ton of interest as they went out to raise a seed round. But actually ended up being a pretty hotly competitive around. I know the model has changed considerably since those early days. But what did it look like then was literally like a donate button? Here's my content. If. Want to chip in? That's fantastic. But that's all that I'm asking it started as a very straightforward crowd funding platform with the difference being that you're entering some amount of money to every piece of content that particular creator publishes. So in Jack's case, it was every music video he posts you were signing on to give it one dollars or three dollars or five dollars. And then you could set a cap Yosef, your creator releases something every single day. You don't end up paying five hundred dollars still seem to get traction at first I know now, it's sort of all over the map where they use ical, artists or filmmakers. Yes. So the the court early audience for patriotic was YouTubers in their fans, Jack was a musician, but his following was really on YouTube. Like, I mentioned he creates great music videos that go with his songs, you know, he had reached out other YouTubers. And then when he launched the folks who immediately saw what was happening were other YouTubers who followed him on YouTube. They said, wow. Like, look how much money this guy is signing on very quickly had signed on thousands of dollars in support. Video and so generate a lot of interest from other YouTubers gradually expanded beyond just that. Jack, soft early point that any sort of artists online can make use of but YouTube really was starting grounds. I also wondered how they think about content and abolition of their quote unquote, creator base as you said, you know, sort of regionally it was more artists. Perhaps. Now anything goes at what our policies in terms of sharing that content that maybe we will less appetizing in some way, a stays off the platform. Obviously that's been a huge issue for it's bigger competitors Facebook YouTube, it's cetera. This has been top of mind for for their team. They've had a number of incidents that have generated some press as they've tried to draw the right line on this. I'd say there's there's kind of two areas where they run into this question of whether content should be allowed on patriot. Or whether the funding of certain creator should be allowed on patriots. One is is more in terms of nudity pornography, not safer were content. Now, actually, a very large portion of patriotic creators of data. I saw it seemed like about. Twenty three percent of those getting paid at least a dollar more or in this not safe for work category. They have a now they prohibit pornography. But in their scope of how they define art of whether it's a Roddick novels or nude photography is allowed on the platform. The other area that's been a bit more top of the news has been around political commentary and hate speech, the bit of a few different instances here where they've had creators who are posting content either on patriotic or elsewhere, but they get funded through patriotic that a lot of people would consider hate speech. And that's where they run into this line of where on one hand, Jack is someone who's very supportive of free speech. He thinks critical to art and expression this whole mission that they focus on. But at the same time doesn't want patriot to be a hotbed for hateful rather than productive, the removal of particular creator in December triggered a whole subset of creators to start boycotting the platform, including some who are some of the top most funded creators interesting. But again, I guess that speaks to its size at beyond a certain point. It's probably not possible to do. So how big is patron? How many people are on its platform? You said that twenty three percent of them are producing things that are maybe not safer work. What percent of them are makings meaningful dollars. It's fascinating. To look at the breakdown of users on patriot both in terms of patrons, and the creators the core customer that patriot now focuses on and this is a key KPI that they really drill down internally. Now is the number of creators who make a thousand dollars a month or more and the overall amounts of money that those people make so a very small subset of the overall number of people making somebody the biggest question for patron is what's the real market size here in terms of creators who can build a following and our business savvy enough to be able to operate like a membership business as part of what they do. That's generating a thousand dollars a month or more. It certainly a small subset of the people who try to create content online and would like that to be there. Fulltime job in their case right now that core group is only a few thousand people they see a huge market are. Are there hundred thousand creators out there who will run membership businesses of thousand dollars a month or more? Maybe I I don't think it's easy to get all of them. What was fascinating to see was the churn rate of creators on the platform is is very high for people who have just joined under only getting a dollar or five dollars a month because not working out for them. Not typically these people haven't already built in audience, but the other side of it is four creators who make five hundred dollars a month or more the churn rate is actually below one percent annually, which is pretty incredible for a company that focuses on essentially small businesses. These numbers are all really interesting. How does that compare sort of historically? I mean, if you looked at the numbers a year ago is much more is at kind of close to where it was do is this a fast growing company, or is this sort of, you know, steady as she goes. It's definitely a fast growing company. What we're not seeing is doubling of users other on the patriot side of the crater side year-over-year is also a company that's been around for six or so years. Now, it did have those years early on. What's interesting is on the creator side, although the the payments going through the platform, they amount the money being made almost doubled year over year last year, the number of creators overall didn't grow as dramatically as it had before. So what that's a signal of is is essentially getting better at articulating who patriot has four and who it's not for right? If you're a creator who doesn't have any fanbase already online than you shouldn't start a patron accounts. Assuming a random people are gonna come across unfunded. And so I think they've gotten better at targeting the key customer segment that semes- fit for this their best graders have already stablest ninety instead bring them over there. And so what does the P also there on that they're on YouTube? They're on Facebook. But these are driven platforms hate yon is instead a subscription model. Yeah. I mean, I think you're seeing this through all of media right now. I mean tech is great example. We're seeing a shift of all types of media organizations to not want to be entirely dependent on revenue and looking to create a subscription where. Core fans are paying a monthly amount that age is gives them more resources to work within create better content, better experiences. But also creates a stability of revenue coming in where they can actually plan for the next few months out in terms of hiring people are making bigger investments in content. They wanna create without this concern about how much at markets might fluctuate. And so the big selling point of patriot. For creators is here's an opportunity not you've built an audience online to really engage your core fan base, which they found is typically one to three percent of online fan base and pull those people into a deeper relationship. Both in terms of the amount of engagement you have with them. But also in terms of better monetize ING them. Right. You're super fans are happy to spend more money in order for more content from you or more access when you're on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram. You're not tapping that super fan base for the value. They're willing to give says a lot of untapped economic opportunity here. And if you can get a group of your core fans to Yosano. Onto monthly memberships yet, whether they're giving five dollars each a dollar, each would you end up with is the stable income of hundreds of dollars thousands of dollars, or in some cases, tens of thousands of dollars a month from your core fans, and that's really powerful for enabling on one hand, creators ago. Fulltime who haven't been able to for full-time creators to go from a one man show to a small business with actually hire help in certain vesting in bigger projects. And so it's really this vision of of how can you go from just the guy in the garage is creating creating great music or creating art to a thriving small business. I think it's interesting that the super fans are not serve higher in terms of percentage is one to three percents seem sort of low. But in terms of the strategy. It's it's really interesting, right. We are seeing this. We're seeing it in me. But I'm seeing it in a lot of other startups in some other verticals, I I just done the story on a tutoring company that was a marketplace. And now, it's enabling its educator companies. Excuse me customers to run their own businesses with it software, so they can sort of create their own. Sites their own businesses become their own entrepreneurs. We also saw this with bird the east cooder company which Maria decided to let people run their own fleets of bird scooters, so Pai Chan the way of understood it based on your writing is it used to be this marketplace, connecting fans and creators. But now it's kind of selling its software suite. So is that is that right? The way to think about hope he was evolved is I see it in three stages, which was this initial crowdfunding platform, and then evolving beyond that to try and be a destination platform for for consumers where there would be great content that you just go to patron to find. And you go to discover creators cut of a marketplace model they moved away from from that that was somewhat of a gradual shift, and essentially the decision was it's not good to be stuck in this game of trying to be yet, another destination platform for consumers competing with YouTube and Instagram and every single media site out there, really the opportunity in mission underlies, our work is about helping creators. And enabling all these independent creators to sustain themselves to build thriving businesses. And so they shifted they now describe themselves as SAS company, actually, which is very different from from framing yourself as a consumer destination. The long short of it is they see this opportunity, which is a growing market of independent creators around the world who are building fan bases, and for that particular type of SMB they wanna provide essentially the full suite of tools and services that they need to run their businesses a good parents in is if you start whether it's a tech startup or if you start. Yeah. Pizza shop you find success as you have more money and can hire people what you do is basically step away from having to create the product yourself or having to interface with customers directly, and you move up into more of a management role creators can't do that the whole point is that they're the ones creating the content in there the one engaging with fans, and so they need to be able to stay on the creation part as they scale the business operations. They're less involved in day-to-day business operations in looking for tools that make that really. Easy for them. These tools must differ, depending on who the creator is. For example, you mentioned that you have a newsletter. I have one as well. There are tools out there that help newsletter authors, you know, manage their audiences. What would a patriot on give you and what would you have to pay patriots versus traditional Email service provider, for example? So the way to think about patriotic is it's trying to be the core nucleus of the creators business, which essentially means your CRM of your super fans payment processing financial intellects understand how much money you're making the taxes paid all different jurisdictions analytics on layer on top of the Sierra to understand who your fans are guidance. It's proactive, hey, these fans started supporting three months ago, you should probably send them something like this. So they don't shirt, and so it's a particular type of set of tools designed for creators, and then part of the shifts in strategy, they're making specifically not trying to be the destination. But instead to be could wet all the other sites that a crater uses plugs into the. Have a number of big API partnerships rolling out and looking really open up their API lot more. So is kind of a whole app store off of patriot. And so the idea would be male chimp is a great example, they plug into male chimp. So that creators send messages analytics through mail chimp, and that all comes back into their patriots here up either a lot of different types of creators. I think this is one of the things I brought up in talking about the competitive environment. They do face competition from category specific startup setting sub stack is a great example as startup focused on newsletter writers, and they're building tool is specific to newsletter writers on one hand there is some competition there, they see a world where most creators now are multidimensional. They may have a newsletter, but they're also creating videos or amassing online fan base, they're doing multiple things. And so you need a bit of an all purpose solution. But also he'd he talked about being open to as some of these category. Specific startups gain traction you either building specific tools to compete with them or just a quarrying. For these software packages. I mean is it based on how many integrations there are how many users how much revenue they're producing each month. This is another interesting element of the company. It is very different from what you think when you hear a SAS company. They actually don't charge any money in terms of cash that you pay on a monthly basis the way that they operate is essentially commission model which they see as the most incentive line way to work. But it has been that they take five percent of the revenue that comes in for any creator. And then on top of that they add payment processing fees, which for he'll just last week had been standardized as an additional five percent. So essentially, they take ten percent of the money that that creators bringing in which if you compare it to just a simple payment processor is a lot. If you compare it to the amounts of money that YouTube, for example, takes other anad revenue were through their new membership product that competes with patron which are at forty percent thirty percents respectively. It's very low course those platforms are huge. And you talk about them. You looked at the competition. In you noted that Facebook, for example, has been building. Out dedicated functionality for its creators McLean an app that unifies their Facebook comments there Instagram comments messenger. Chats there's an analytics dashboard, you said they were quote, unquote, ominously also testing up monetization strategies YouTube also been more Gresley courting craters with moneymaking schemes including channel memberships when you look at on the future of the company how big a threat are these giants a think they are potentially very big threats. The other side of that choline is these are all companies that you have a track record of acquiring companies as well. So that could be acquires to our points earlier about this rush across all of media to not just be dependent on ads and to generate revenue directly from fans the social platforms are recognizing this shifts and trying to capture some of that. So they want to support creators monetize ING their fans. You'll common model is tipping in live streams, especially popular in lucrative in the gaming world, e sports and so- YouTube Facebook have both rolled out. Membership products, which are to back a creator you like for a set amount of month and exchange you get access to a special discussion groups, you get emojis on your comments that signify you're a backer. Some of the offerings are different what both of them haven't yet done is truly exclusive contents like posting videos that only your members can see in both cases. I don't think this is a massive new commitments by the companies to move into the space and try and push out patron. They both seem to be a bit tepid testing this out. There's a lot of restrictions or only allowing a few creators use it initially. It's very early days. I think they're trying to figure out whether it fits into the context of their businesses. Right. I mean, these are the biggest ad generating companies in the world. And that's your bread and butter in terms of who Facebook cares about or who Google YouTube cares about their first priority. Their core customer is advertisers. And seconds to that is the end user is that's the advertisers care about. And then tertiary level is creators because they post things that attract the end users. And the arguments that patriot would make is there inherently going to be product decisions. Our businesses citizens where the fact that creators are low in the priority list result in products of just aren't as compelling or well fit for for the creators. Like, for example, neither youtuber Facebook will give you the Email addresses of the people who subscribe to you and support you every month. Probably never will. It sounds also like Facebook and YouTube probably aren't quite sure how big a market is there. I mean, it's is it worth trading on some of those adulation ships to explore this further. And it's kind of good news bad news for for pitcher in that sense. Because if it proves that it's much bigger market, especially this ass business than those companies realized you could sort of see them paying more attention to it. If not, you know, that's just basically bad news for patriot. You talk about this company as a pre IPO company. This is a big shift. How long do you think we need to give the company to see if it is going to kind of gain traction? And if this is, you know, a sort of a company that should be going. You wanna takeaways here was I I do think they've built a solid business. There are a whole number of ways. I start monetize ING more. They acquired last summer this company member full, which is essentially the white label more customized version a patriot folks like Ben Tom sense for Tekri use it, which is, you know, it's on your website, the customers don't know that that's ember full, they just see your custom domain in the payment processing excetera now that they have this big base of creators big base of patrons. They have incredibly low churn. So people are very loyal once. They join starting to tap that base for more money, and they're starting to do that. So in terms of looking towards an IPO, I think there's still a few years away from that being option typically companies have over a hundred million in revenue more or closer to hundred million. So they still have a little ways to grow. They have to prove out these new revenue streams, but I do think there is a path where do they continue to be an independent company and eventually go public in terms of their financing. You said they've raised one hundred million dollars. Do you think they need to raise more before this exit one way one way or another? Definitely they still have a ways to go before they're profitable. And they're still very focused market share. They want to completely dominate this market of independent creators where for any creator out there who's operating on their own. They're using patriotic in one way or another in terms of tools and services in the end, they see themselves growing beyond just this core. Membership model in the tools around it in the future. They can provide business loans to content creators or even small business health insurance because they understand the particular needs of creators, they have more data than anyone else on their businesses. Whether they're thriving or not provide very particular types of services at really affordable rate. There's gonna be a lot more money. They need to raise their out raising the series D now, then I think there's two directions here. Right. That keeps staying independent in eventually able to go public or it gets scooped up by one of a number of other companies. I think there are several companies which that would be really strategic a we are out of time. It was so nice talking to you in learning so much more about the company. I loved you reports I hope that extra crunch readers. If they haven't already checked it out. We'll take a much harder. Look it's worth it. Absolutely. I'm very happy to be on this. We have a couple more reports in this fashion coming out with another writer here at tech crunch. Greg is about to start publishing a great report. He's done on my Antic, and I'm also working on another one. Now, I actually working on to one on unity the gaming engine and another one cobalt, which is a really exciting music startup backed by Google ventures. Greg's headed blast at your reporting. Thank you again. Eric. Thank you. All right, everybody. Thank you for listening and a big thank you to Connie Loiseau's. Our producer Christopher gates, our executive producer Henry pick of it. And we will see you all right here next week.

YouTube patriots Facebook Sam Jack Jack Conte Eric Peckham writer Matt patriot Sam Kate Clark Google Connie Lewis Cutty tech-rich Berlin LA Sam Altman Sam Yelm
CBC's daily podcast, Front Burner, launches Monday

podnews

02:00 min | 2 years ago

CBC's daily podcast, Front Burner, launches Monday

"In the latest poll news. Hi, everyone. I'm David Wessel hosted front burner. A daily news podcast from the CBC. See you Monday in Canada, the CBC launches its daily news podcast on Monday called front burner. It's hosted by Jimmy as we reported on the first of August Rogers has been running the big story as a daily news podcast since June and choruses weekly. This is why launched a similar time. What's next for podcasting paid, subscriptions and exclusive content thinks Eric Peckham of tech crunch? He notes that the successful Chinese podcast model. His mainly funded in this way bit platter. Have posted analysis of discussions about major retail brands in podcasts. Amazon is the clear number one. The rest of brick and mortar stores the casino awards journalism prize in Spain is now recognizing podcast is a valid entry format in Columbia podcasts. Don't need help. They need money and journalism in general says caroliina go. Herrero from radio Ambuhl anti iheartradio's podcasting awards. Well, Jeffrey Craner ca writer of welcome to night Vale has views on them as many indie podcasters in Facebook groups, Google podcasts broke for some users earlier this week this happened to me too. I'm opted into the Beata version of the Google happen to fix it idea registered from the Beata version and reinstalled it beat versions doing clued bugs. It's kind of the point New York public media who owned WNYC has a new chief operating officer Depeche mcgruder, she joins from MTV and BT networks and is a former on air reporter and an event for you November twenty seventh in Toronto in Canada. The future of podcasting to report back won't you in all this tickles corner today, five great plain right podcasts. From will Williams are podcasts. Good on newsletter is better willing to all of these stories cover, many more, and it's free. Subscribe today at pod news dot net.

Eric Peckham CBC Canada Beata David Wessel Google Amazon Depeche mcgruder Williams Vale August Rogers Spain Jimmy Jeffrey Craner chief operating officer New York Facebook Columbia Toronto reporter
The Entrepreneurs - Mother Root

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

12:12 min | 2 months ago

The Entrepreneurs - Mother Root

"You're listening to eureka on monocle twenty four with me. Daniel beach hosted the entrepreneurs. Bethany higson is the founder of mother's route a london-based aperitif brand which began in her peckham kitchen. The company's first product is a ginger swizzle a revival of traditional mixture dating back to the seventeen hundreds which gained popularity during prohibition in the united states. The all natural aperitif is made from honey apple cider vinegar and chilli beth had previously worked in the wine business and started the company by creating partnerships in the best way she knew how by selling directly to local restaurants and retailers in her neighborhood and in the past year. The brand has undergone incredible growth as bethann explains now with the story of mother route. Mother is what i call. Non alcoholic apparent tiv and i i never is called ginger twitchell. This is actually inspired by quite an old fashioned. Drink a switch as it was known in the us or shrubs maybe known more widely spaced traditional recipe. That is a maceration of ginger apple cider. Vinegar honey and i had a little bit of extra ginger extract until he to give a really war. Main appar teesta drink. You would like them with a sparkling water tonic to have the spritz so i kind of took this old traditional recipe and updated for the modern occasion but yeah it's very warming and gives you a little bit of a natural buzzes laos at something. Certainly that works very well for that. Non alcoholic occasion but traditionally. It was either enjoyed without alcohol. But we'll see sometimes without cold. So i d give some the little bit of not to some alcoholic cocktails that you can use it with as well these are with hugely long histories histories just as long as alcohol and ones which run parallel to the because effectively vinegar exists as a byproduct of alcohol itself and in the same way as when alcohol was first of discovered and used it was used for medicinal benefits and then as we humans played around added things to make it taste good herbs and spices and we started to consume both for pleasure so kind of price of masturbating either in alcohol or vinegar can extract loads of amazing flavor. And i when i first discovered this history was just amazed firstly because even though i've worked within the drinks business for more than twelve years now i'd never heard of it because it's a tradition that whilst it was so long it sort of disappeared at the turn of the twentieth century why processed foods and sugar became widely available as as the refrigeration so we swiftly changed from these traditional vinegar based a syrups and drinks to sodas jesus effectively the wellness side of things has really developed over time because the initial reason for creating it was that full rich full flavor. I am someone who loved high. Acid riesling ze shannon's from the lower valley. I'm scottish in love whisky. So that really big powerful flavor was something that i was searching for and it really tick the boxes that sort of little bit of apple vinegar in there. Is there obviously giving acidity but it also helps to enhance the other flavors in there so i use blossom honey which gives ernie texture bills floral notes. The ginger there it's citrusy zippy. Kinda ginger gives warmth as well as back like real left and freshness on the pilot so for me it was the flavor perspective that drew me in however obviously through the period of being pregnant and then subsequently i now have like tickets two kids for your old and an eighteen month old. I drink a lot less. I'm not teetotal. But i say it's maybe once a week can it'll be maybe one glass and the reason being because i really realized like how great you feel when not consuming it but also how other products and specifically like within within my product that ginger gives me real energy lift and it just makes me feel so much better so i've been like looking into as i develop the brand and the product somewhere. It's going forward the active ingredients and the beneficial ingredients. The functionalities ingredients are really coming into the four of where things are going as. I've discovered that side through my own experience. It's something that started out as a side hustle. Yes it was a long time coming so it started as an idea back in two thousand fifteen when i was pregnant and i thought there isn't anything out there. I would really like to get it going. But i guess there's no one in my family. He's an entrepreneur. I didn't have that experience. As i went back to my day job and it was when i was pregnant with my second child. There still is three years later. Still nothing like that out there. And the non-alcholic creek had really started to grow. So i decided at the time that yeah. Having a toddler working fulltime job in being pregnant and about to have a second was a great time to business. That's when i decided to look my business. And i started reading local. Just said i had to stop thinking about this. This is three years in my head. I put a date in the diary for local market. Still i wanted to get direct feedback. Not just from my friends and family. I made a small batch of one hundred and eighty bottles and but soda. Dan half at my local market in peckham wearing based so that was like amazing. Because i saw that there was demand interest. That was the first test effectively. Then my next batch. I went to the wider trade. My first restaurant customer was the two michelin star. Restaurant lead brie which was another kind of amazing affirmation t. Yes this is good night. Said i want to test it. I want to really pressure and go to these great places and see whether they can mark that. Because that's just. I want to start high and keep pursuing it in that way so the first year i was on maternity leave and i was working with some lovely great names like some flowers hoax creep local favorites here in my in my neighborhood and beckham and i decided to go full time january twenty twenty so i decided to not go back to my normal day job and then obviously with covid happening my mind through untraded strategy of being in restaurants and bars had to change pretty quickly had a website but it was it was very much. Just more of a brand sites of here we are. This is what we're doing and then had to become the full operational side of the business and the make keep it going. But fortunately i mean i see it as something. That was really positive for business. This last year has been a huge growth. And i think that it was a lot of learning. I'm not someone who comes from the e commerce side of things so there was loads of phone calls and questions with other entrepreneurs and lots of webinars and teaching myself highs. Get it going but what it really did. Focus on was who is it he. I'm talking to you directly so comfortable talking to the somali as and the bartenders having that sort of more technical conversation by the craft and how it's mate but ultimately the conversation you have with the customer is much more of an emotional one like why are you having this highs are going to make you feel what is it. That's driving me to those. Were all really useful questions and really important one for me to be asking myself at this early stage as well. I think it's given me a really good day for where things are going next I mean there's been some challenging times as well as the growth. If for example from september september basic pizza january this year i was never actually in stoke the demand. Ridicule shut up in one go particularly after the product appearing on tv. I couldn't keep up with demand and said there was a lot of figuring out what to do. From the manufacturing side of things and being able to scale up the timing was challenging with brexit and all the in base manufacturer is being really stretch themselves. Not really being able to look further afield for any other ways but equally. that's also just been an amazing learning process. It's sort of sets sets you up to realize things you need to sorta forward as the brand has grown on. It's gone from being a side hustle. Not something that. I could have pretty big a big future a global future. That's the operations that i have for it. I wanted to grow in two ways. I'm very passionate about it growing sustainably so actually started the process as a kind of framework for where we're going so that even though i'm really kind of making us think about the way that we want to grow and impacts so much in terms of the ingredients that we use where they come from and also just our general impact on how we gray the other thing that i'm all say three discovering this healthier lifestyle the benefits of the ingredients already within the ginger twitchell i want to carry that three future flavors as well so each flavor whilst it will be recognizable loved key upfront flavor so we ginger is the first one the next one. I want to give too much away but will also be really useful recognizable flavor. It will also have key ingredients that have beneficial health ingredients as well so that you get that impactful flavor. That's just delicious but you have the benefit of having a natural buzz a positive feeling. Well so where. I see the positioning of mother rita whereas going is that it's not an alcohol alternative. It's better than alcohol effectively. Because i want to keep the things that i love about the alcohol world which is the craft the sourcing of the ingredients the cairn attention. We are obviously taking away. The negatives which is the toxin which is the alcohol but adding to that care of you know higher. We're looking to the planet. We're looking to also start bringing in some gift. Bax in terms of. I mean i really would like to get the point where we're carbon-neutral which will be a process that we're starting and then also obviously the natural gas that you get from a really high quality intensive botanical ingredients within the glens breath and higson founder of mother route. You can learn more about the brand at mother. Route london where there are also a number of great cocktail and non alcoholic cocktail recipes. Which all sound very refreshing. My thanks to beth bethann and to christine evans. Who mixed edited this show. I'm daniel beach. Thank you so much for listening and goodbye

Daniel beach Bethany higson chilli beth bethann ginger twitchell apple ze shannon alcholic creek eureka united states london peckham Dan rita Bax higson beth bethann christine evans daniel beach
Art Can Save Lives

Mentally Yours

21:39 min | 2 years ago

Art Can Save Lives

"And wherever you go. However, you go for energy on go. It's got to be five hour energy it works fast. It works long. It tastes good. And with zero sugar and four calories. There's nothing holding you back fits your pocket fits your backpack fits your on the dole life. Whether you're going to work going on vacation for just going out with friends five hour energy energy on the go. For more information. Visit five hour energy dot com. Mentally. Focus on you mentioned that he should regret regrets. Mentally. Meant. Antony entity. Then talil. Men today. Odd one and welcome to mentally y'all's. Metro Dakota UK's weekly mental health podcast, my name's Yvette and this week. I'm going to be shutting to Daniel Regan. He's photographer who also runs the free space project. The charity runs arts workshops for patients at NHS sites. And also in the community be chatting about if and how art can help people with mental health issues. So it's an arts and health charity based within town health center in Camden. So that's a really pioneering health center that looks at not just clinical care for patients, but kind of holistic and complementary care, so as a charity, we run lots of arts and community initiatives for patients and peopling living in Camden. Anything from art exhibitions and arts workshops to chronic pain, groups and things are more social instead of clinical. Yeah. I had a website. It's fantastic. You've got huge range of things I never would have imagined. Because I think when I I sort of had about I though sort of off of people maybe have suffered mental health issues is that going to be all I didn't know knitting like some particular kind of during but you've got loads of stuff on the avenue. I think I like to make sure that what we're programming is quite diverse. So we have some groups that are very specifically clinical related to a particular health issue said like a dance group for people with Parkinson's, then lots of the arts workshops that we run the not kind of skills-based the sort of learning technique, but also thinking about life in general, so they might be themed around loss. So the conversations that we're having during the workshop leave people with. Thought. So they're kind of these of existential arts workshops where we want people to go away and think about their lives in sort of a broader spectrum. Do you take part of them yourself? I didn't have time to take part in them outside of free space project. I run quite a lot of workshops in order settings. So I'm kind of exposed to lots of different types of workshops. I think that's why I really like programming things that are quite different. I tried to stay away from re cliche sort of sorry, federal jobs mosaics, but mosaics or kind of knitting unless it's for that particular demographic. You're not going to get a creep of young men necessarily into knitting. I'm so it's about meeting the need for the demographic actually want. Yeah. One that actually sort of stood out for me because I love obscene stuff was though is some writing workshop now, I thought, yeah, that's pretty I wouldn't necessarily think of that for an arts thing. I would think drawing for us. But there's yeah, there's all kinds of things. Also, it's really great because my writing thinking that someone may free or subsidized seventy much all of them are free musical of my job is to go and get that money to make them free. There are some sometimes what she'll be charge a very small fee, and that just because the materials cost might be quite high. But in general, everything that we put on this free because we want them to be accessible. That's incredible festival that you'll running for free workshops. I this. I think it's really. I suppose my question there is then so obviously a lot of effort is going into creating these and running them. Why are they so vice or do you think for people I think there's probably two reasons one is that there is a clear sort of lack of clinical care that people are waiting for huge amounts of times, particularly for mental health help. And I would say that the majority of people that come along to work out some projects that we're running people to having mental health difficulties on quite a broad spectrum. And then Secondly, I think there's just a huge thirst for looking at health from not just a clinical perspective. But that people want to be able to do something that they find soothing where they can learn and whether it can be around other people, and we find a lot of the time. Just being around other people and doing something as a group as a collective and having conversations and doing an activity is what brings people love joy and really helps with sort of loneliness and social isolation. It must just be a great way to make friends in the community. Yes. We've got lots of people that come along to lots of the workshops, and then they've kind of made their own friendship groups. So it's really nice when you see them come back to an event together they've sort of map with like minded person, and perhaps a bit less lonely now. Can you tell me a little bit about the work? That's all Sadun specifically for the NHL because you do reach out to patients in particular. So do how does that work the setup that we've got the charities that were based within the GP practice? The health center says the James wig GP practice, which is a really huge practice is about twenty eight thousand patients and the practices self has been there for decades, but about ten years ago, they got quite a lot of money to rebuild the health center. And then that's when the charity sort of came on board as well. So my desk is with the GP's I'm right in the office. So we can take direct referrals from the clinicians for any of the projects that we're running. And we're always looking at getting the clinical input based on what the needs are of the patients so that we can program events and projects that meet those needs. So I guess we would definitely part of the social prescribing movement, which is were in sort of improperly care situations like a GP can refer. To to voluntary organization to do something that was more complimentary. But it's very unusual that you'd have a charity based within the office of say GP practice. So that's why we're really different from a lot of other social prescribing models. Sounds incredible goes might EP and he can recommend things like perhaps, maybe a local yoga group from lucky. But I can't imagine something like this where he would be able to recommend. Songwriting tools or are angry to help like that is a is a very unusual setup. So a difficult lucky to to be involved in something like that. And also, I the building itself is beautiful for an NHS buildings. If I think about my GP partisan Peckham, est is just terrible so miserable. But going into work at Kennedy, townhall stem. I don't really think about the fact that people are going there because they're sick. And I think that a lot of people that I interact with you know, sometimes they're coming along to a project because they're unwell but other times they're coming onto a project because they're well. And it's something positive for them to do for their wellbeing. So it's not always an intervention is a prevention method. What about your own background? Am I right in thinking your photographer that right? Yeah. How does that sort of what with your own mental health? I'll go the shorter route sauce having mental health problems when I was a teenager. And I didn't really have the language to talk about it. And I started. Photographing often like really mundane things, but just over at present my feelings, so I've always had photography as a method to kind of explore my own difficulties. That's why I'm really passionate about about three space project because I can see from my own personal background the importance of the arts. Of course of heart treatment and therapy for various difficulties without that kind of pairing of photography in the hours. I'm not sure that therapy would have just been enough. I really rely on making and being an artist to kind of stay alive. Do you mind going into detail about s- of this used that you had it's fine. You don't want to. But this is a men's health food 'cause we do kind of. Yeah. All kinds of stuff, but whatever you happy sort of saying, yes. So I guess I realize quite young like my home life was very different to my sort of peers at school and then around sort of the age of twelve started to kind of unravel. So those quite a lot of disruption in my home life. My dad was living away in a different country. And there was a very volatile relationship to my parents and then around age fourteen I started self harming and I think from fourteen is when it's a really really got quite serious. And I was a very unwell teenager and managed to go to university actually do photography which wasn't what I had planned before. I'd always been really interested in writing. I think because I found that therapeutic outlet I became obsessive about photography and completely changed with my plans and went to university. I'm which in some ways was really positive because I lived in a really racist, homophobic, part of Essex and as a mixed race gay man like that was not a welcoming environment. So I went to Brighton which was completely life-changing, but I hadn't had any treatment. So I was sort of just living this very chaotic lifestyle. Here was very very full tonight like really struggled to keep up with the university. And I ended up having a breakdown between the first year and second year over the summer and was in psychiatric hospital. I kind of kept everything to myself. I didn't really talk to anyone about it. There are a few friends who knew that I was having difficulties. But I didn't really tell anybody. In fact, you when I went back into the second year, and I'd been in hospital. People ask me how a walls than I just pretended. I was fine. I just sat Elliot had a. Summer like totally neglected to say like I tried to kill myself fit in hospital. I just I think I didn't really put much value on it. I just thought well over it like to myself move on. I think for me it was very difficult for me to understand the weight of my childhood. I thought everybody started was like that. So I was very critical of even ending up in hospital. Do you mind me asking because he said about going into healthy? Now, I also time at one when I was a teenager. What did you think? I will were there any sort of like projects when you were there because there were in mine, I've just wondered if you had them yours than if you had them what you saw to them. My memory is really blurry around that time. I think they anything. I can remember is something to do with reluctance and deep breathing. I don't remember there being any arts based of things to do. Now. It's it's an it's a hard time difficult to think about and go back to I I do remember being very frustrated at that time. So would have been eighteen nineteen. I was quite obsessive about photographing everything. I had a real issue around forgetting things, and I think that's related to my mental health problems that are had quite a lot of blackout periods. So I didn't really remember things clearly, and I really wanted to have my camera in the hospital, and they were really adamant about not having my camera, and I can understand not taking photographs of other people, but it wasn't really interested in that. I really needed to document the experience for me to say like I was there, and I found that really distressing that I didn't have any way of documenting my experience other than Moghadam journal at that point in my life. I'd really moved away from writing I found it actually quite stifling. And I'm very, although I'm very open. I'm also really private at the same time. So writing something meant that other people might find it and read it, whereas if I was able to make photographs I knew what they meant and other people could try to interpret them, but. Wouldn't be so clear. Can you tell me a bit about your soccer field? What you're on your work in terms of arts since then we've done since that time of your life. So I guess even when I was doing if talk few degree. I didn't think I was going to be a photographer. I was really doing not degree as a way just to stay alive. A needed the therapeutic nature of making work. And so I ended up finishing my degree and doing lots of different jobs in photography, but not something that I found meaningful and then sort of by accident, I ended up working on a project around alopicia. So the hair loss condition. So with an alibi charity for about four and a half years looking at changes in body image, particularly with women, and traumatic changes in losing their hair. And I just found working on that project. Really life changing it meant I was making whether it was really meaningful to me and to the people I was photographing working with. And then I went back and did a master's in Pataki looking potato. Yeah. Photography and sort of the the benefits of photography in the outside people with mental health difficulties and that was a real turning point for me. I realise I only wanted to do that kind of work only work that's very meaningful and around kind of arts and health, and so all of my projects and everything I work on kind of has a health focus, and that might be it's a commission from gallery around self harm. So it's already from the beginning. I know that it's going on the wall somewhere where it might be a personal project around suicide and that project started because of my own experiences, and then I kind of worked with other people to I guess broaden the dialogue around suicide. So they're all quite heavy projects that they're the things that I really enjoy working on. I don't enjoy working on soul destroying commercial campaigns. I tend to just feel a lot more comfortable until about things that have a lot of depth. But that doesn't mean it doesn't come with its own difficulties as a sometimes vulnerable incentive person myself like I have to balance those. Things might be sort of in some way, similar to my job. 'cause I write about mental health Feb, and I talk about it. But then I have bipolar disorder myself. So I sort of have to distances distance, it, do you find it sort of gets a bit much these days sort of still if you're always doing projects that are mental health, or are you a at a place in your life now where you sort of you can manage things. But definitely so it's still difficult. And I think it depends. It depends on the project I'm working on. And why I'm working on it? And then what kind of support is available to work on that project? And then just where I'm out in my day to day life. Whether I'm having a difficult time or not I think everybody that knows me will agree that I'm a complete workaholic. And that's because I really enjoy being productive. But that's also not the best when you're working on really, heavy material. I'm not very good at relaxing. I'm not very good at sort of going home. And just watching a film that's not related to something to do with mental health. So I'm learning as I go kind of ways to implement self care kind of tricks like that. The life for me at the moment, I'm really into bath. So that's my thing because it's really straightforward. And it's cold getting the bath job done with us. Just reading listening to podcasts. I'll be honest and say that I'm not averse to watching an episode of real housewives. Oh my God. Yeah. Because just trash. Have you seen the one real house is very see the Orange County? If the in every episode of every God, sorry tries probably she's mental health. But yeah, yeah. But you don't have to think about following the storyline. The quiet sort of offense houses, but quite basic, you know, you can miss a few episodes episodes and still catch up with who's fighting with who. I find that quite soothing. I don't even have to pay attention to it. I can sort of Potter around. I really love cooking. And I find that very calming. So the process of chopping and each stage. So sometimes I'll combine real housewives with some meal prep for the ultimate relaxation. Could you tell me a bit about what do you got coming up in terms of your own work contenders photography, but also project the center. Yup. So I guess in my own work last summer, I finished working or sheeting and project around suicide with an amazing charity called Maitree there in north London. They offer support for people into auto crisis. But in a non clinical space, so people can go and stay there for four nights five days, and it's a house infantry park. So I used to volunteer there. And then I ended up working on a project with them. And that project I want to live is now going on all so it's going to be moving to the long gallery at the Mawdsley psychiatric hospital in March and that that will be open for March fifteenth. And then I'm also running. Moment of project with apples and snakes. So their creative writing charity, and they run something called spine festival across libraries in London until I'm working in southern library running a project for young people around mental health. So that'd be interested in working with quite a few different groups of young people who have particular needs. And then at the center the freeze place project. We've always got lots going on lots of workshops exhibitions and also just lots of planning. I mean, it's an exciting time for charities such as ours to be debt to be really seen as valuable the clinical care is not just enough and particularly around lack of funding in kind of Nate chefs. So it's an exciting time as a charity for us to think about where we're heading. But also a challenging time because you know, responsibility is falling onto us as a charity to do more things for patients, but we're not necessarily receiving the funding. So we're kind of doing a lot of planning and strategizing around what the future of the organization looks like. But making sure that. Yeah. That we're doing a lot of a lot of projects that I guess not those kind of sort of knitting and mosaic projects of the projects that people actually want to take part in one thing. I really love. We haven't really talked about with the freese. Best foot space projects is how you'll get people to create artwork traditional artwork. And then you'll put on exhibitions has been something that's sort of integral to sort of where that started. And also what's been the kind of feedback that year? I mean, I've been involved with the charities. I think about two thousand twelve so it wasn't there from the beginning in my understanding when the building was rebuilt the sort of first part of the charity was focusing on exhibitions because we had a hanging rail put into the building there's always been exhibitions around health. And now he's kind of grown, and we're running lots of other projects. But I think having an exhibition space within a really beautiful building. Putting on exhibitions are not. You know, they're not challenging or upsetting. But they are challenging in some respects their about particular experiences or particular conditions, and we don't want people to shy away from from looking at artwork about health because we find actually particularly our mental health. If people are waiting to see their GP, and they sort of Brown's the exhibition they use it as a stimulus to go and talk to their GP about their own mental health. And that's what we want them to do. So like those workshops where we want people to reflect on sort of where they're at. We want them to do that with the exhibitions and relate to them. And then think about their health care. You must also be just a huge confidence basis well out of thought United if you're a bit nervous about art in general, how good you are to then have the piece of work exhibited like that in terms of getting people in that is it like a traditional gallery d you hold sort of specific previews. Or is it an open space that anyone can just before the building is always open to the public Monday to Friday, and we do host private views, and we have artists talks. So we have quite a lot of event. This is world like related to the exhibition, and I think the importance of having the exhibitions, you know, in clinical space is that it becomes more of a community space. So where people might feel I wouldn't go to the exhibition because I understand art. And it's a gallery we've got people from all walks of life coming into the building. And sometimes those are people that are patients actively waiting to see their GP or they're coming along to a workshop, but we also have people from the general public coming long to see the exhibitions. And I think that's really important that the exhibitions are open to everybody because it's a very unusual space, and it's a very unusual ream it only show work that relates to health. Even though we interpret that quite broadly. Hanging. Today. Mentally. If you've been affected by nifty issues have been chatting about today. Please give the smart censoring on one one six one two three or you can go to their website. We should Samaritans dot org. Thanks very much to offer juicer Judy Nichols. And also to Lisa Baker for the jingles. If you're interested in joining us online, we have a lovely Facebook group, which is also called mentally yours or you can chat to us on Twitter at mentally Y. R S C next time guys.

NHS Camden London UK dole Daniel Regan NHL soccer Yvette social isolation Facebook Parkinson Moghadam journal Peckham Kennedy Twitter Judy Nichols Brighton Brown
433: Neil Grant, part 2

The SodShow

29:46 min | 1 year ago

433: Neil Grant, part 2

"You are very welcome to another episode of de such garden podcast. You might remember not last week but the week before i had a gentleman by the name of neil grant rant on the show he is the m._d. Of ferndale garden center based in sheffield andy is also the voice of bbc radio sheffield phone in on a a sunday morning which i highly recommend you do go and take a listen to if you haven't heard part one. Put this one on post. Go back not last week but the week before and capac here and it'll will continue plainfield. It should do anyway you pocket. That's the task leads gentleman. Neil grat ladies and gentlemen welcome to the side so garden podcast. I want to bring you just a little bit sideways the icon it's not aww bear book the terminology but at gripe not a gripe. I don't guess i tend not to get upset. I have four sisters and three brothers onto lower the middle child. I'm the quietest mon- eternally happiest how i would note it on twitter bio at the same token less you rob my philosophy which is made of tornadoes and cornflakes. You're pretty much safer. More department trumpeted guinness while you're out at deir is on has been a lot of reporting eighteen but from the monte daniele tich martius of this world who tend to come on say well children should garden more <hes>. I would see it out on two levels which is number number one. My daughter nor your daughter is reading the daily telegraph nordic guardian so you can say all you want but those headlines seemed to be directive into the mom on the dodd routed onto daughter or the person under twenty years of age so it doesn't really make a difference but congratulations. You've just got an entire page to yourself would lovely photograph you at the top of you set up the national children's gardening we which says as far as i'm concerned pretty much depth same thing except for neal will grant tends not to grab headlines as much of i appraised relatively sanely yeah. I think i think i think we need need the monte dumb but i'm is because they'll get hurt. Tennessee at government level uncertainly media level <hes> so the message is valid. <hes> <hes> i mean the reason i came up with the idea was because i'd watch kids grow up <hes> <hes> they're just now getting into gardening as adults <hes> and a could suddenly discovering even in our environment. They pretty much have a clue. <hes> and i was thinking you know if we're gonna impact kids gardening. When could you do something nestling. What time you and i came up with the half to two in the in the you could pretty much give any any child in the u._k. Tomato a month plant and they could grow it in somewhere in the u._k. Phallic successfully without a lot of equipment and he made me think we'll sensitive in the perfect position to to help families do that because the kids don't coming more willing to go and it comes in his grandparents bombs coming inside. It looks like a best <hes> we did about <hes> it could do. Let's see what we can do and i think they started out about fifty cents in the service shift to get called on somebody's just simple cooler in pictures of flowers to movie sowing seeds salute plenty no containers on pertains in bird boxes and all those gone related things what's now happened is after five years because i i <hes> went in with the ata as association and they older older office muscle behind the might job and this year allah claim to fame is that true leaf gardening with grandchildren during the turns me weak tweet to the ballot hashtag in there as well so you know from nothing five years ago. We've got people starting to do things nurseries. I just watched the social media or not wake particularly from big business supermarkets. <hes> you local children's bursary schools just as just ripped people. I think they just see something different. Something that kids can get involved in that. Don't uh-huh people out there to help. There's lots of activities to do. Its eighth most exciting time really for coming in this country and a lot of you'll be getting kids involved because it drags the parents in any and all the cynical part was well. It's great because you just want parents and grandparents to spend money to go centers. Well great. That's brilliant book. If we get kids from the time they clung on having without being too grandiose ba could change their lives forever because they they start eating vegetables. Grown thing is pa. They got a real understanding children now because the curriculum about the environment and poverty environment when when i grew up when i when i grew up goddess all but when i grew older make not even getting into this and we're happy to annoy live you ouellet now what's oil of olay now. I'm told they did yeah. That's changed but it didn't exist now. Neil it was something not. I say old old people did and those old people when i was six. I'm sure where my age now but they always appeared or at least a looked older. Maybe the picture in my head stems comes back to what was on television at that time which was a man and a potting shed invariably would appeared on an old willy jumper yeah on it felt like a hearty enfield's sketch to be quite fair about it at least in my head but it certainly was was not what it is now there was it just didn't exist at all a no. He seemed to have distinct where it is part of the school's curriculum we have stars. I should say like green-fingered george at h._s._s. Now just celebrated his fourteenth birthday a couple of weeks ago congratulations discharged but i had never ever seen anything like that before your h._s._a. Swazi a mammoth is love organization. Which was you might say untouchable thirty forty years ago and now it seems to all have changed my fire off the mark of that. Now i think get your high. I think all over organizations and having to change because people's lifestyles have changed and you know all right jessica carried on the way forty years ago they with avenue members today or just a few older retirement so we've all an even as a business we've got to. We've got to keep chain to attract new customers to keep them interested. We'll oh got so bored so quickly nowadays because there's so many things to do i mean i'm in competition the garden center some people spending with us or the government centers is anything else that draw the wife of us you know so it could be holidays that could be adapted shot swiss around here going to the local pub disco children's player it could be going to the cinema you ah we all gotta be grabbing a bit about leisure pound bill as your with we have to change and i think talk to the changes. Actually people are sort of cocooning in the sense of protecting the kids and their families and they want stuff for them so we've all got very selfish but at the the same time we as dumb as as as business people we consider recognize that and just say well we can help you out. There and i think that's that's where the fun is really. I know it's a long life in the hell. Do you do the gardening with kids in your own garden center neil obviously they have to be driven. Their parents have to cycle to to you or walk to one or the other but in the courses gardening classes maybe would it involves children how to stop it work. Is it as simple as you have. Rightly pushed up we on saturday morning. It's going to be painting bird boxes or has even that changed because when when i look at my daughter at now she may not watch gardening on. Let's say youtube for example. She certainly isn't watching television. I can tell you that for free because because ours is disconnected invariably anyway but the knowledge that she would come back with from school of not being afraid of a b. might sting her of knowing that that's a at least a minimum may pretty flower of rolling around on the grass of knowing how to pick a goose be without getting pricked finger the very very simple. Oh things maybe that she sees her dad doing. Are you finding maybe that children. Are i say children. I told me that disrespectfully. I was never called a child as young person. I was always called young the young man i should add but are you finding that even those classes and courses are changing <hes> not at the moment i think the stuff enthralled is getting the handled in soil and compost supporting seeds and then he's got the grows quickly. You know the painting part before i'm just a bit from to go with it so but also helps break the thing the protesters say the same when you bought it. You know it's often the governors well so at the moment. We're finding simple activities. I mean the the next few weeks or through some holidays. We've got plenty clinton. Hope paul planting dorka <hes> i think we've got good box painting event <hes> the middle and we do about ticket now because because of course we can't cope with just having people turn up so <hes> they book online and and then we just keep repeating and then people find them good. It's not a problem getting pulled in. We've got lots of what you do with the kids. In some holiday festive big problem for most parents suppose it is well. I have have to admit hand on heart. I am away. I'm told i have a postal address on smell and that's what i'm told i am. I kind of hand on heart say okay. I am never there people expected. I am always in dublin. When in fact i am nullum usually on your island and fairness issue. Neil take me back to the plant site of it. As a what was the last plantar ticket bought myself a mike nolita tree get variety of another chapter but it was the conversation came up <hes> probably about a week or two ago when i was speaking at <unk> house and appointed may dare was if i take take the trends of plants at least i have been part of woolen headers on conifers where something that i haven't planted since a my first year in college college when i was seventeen years of age. I'm no forty tree so you can do to matsu nut yourself at home if i take it to. The height of let's say two six two thousand seven. Everything was ause. Zero maintenance virtually is what was the request at least onto now. We certainly seem to have moved to a <hes> diaz. Garden hard and i did was the first one in quite a long time that the immediate request was i wanted. He wanted about ten trees in the garden before else. Was i don a slight bit unusual bearing in mind. This was a small. I say small domestic buck garden but it wasn't an acre or what you would see on monte dans television program yeah <hes>. I think people don't want to spend time on the gums. I think they do still women's. Look amazing so we we are seeing <hes> designers. Komo with ideas total fool sally's to maintain you still don't we'll have to do a lot. I mean there's nothing is most people when a lovely summer's day you biting your friends around sticking a drink and from then going gone looks amazing and he managed to do that without doing any real work on it as well as you say so but it's interesting that roundtable authorities be because because of <hes> coats are not cutting the grass as much verges so they using a lot of them so-called wildfowl mixes. I'm the cities around here started using so we started to get people on idea because that's low maintenance so that will shoot transfer into people's gardens grudgingly so so i think we're all getting a bit veteran saying well. Actually he's a hey some good plans. You don't have to do a lot with you. You've come a pay oldest film film and i've seen it since you <hes> you talked about a few months ago and i think people are came of stein's who have an impact on people saying god looks a bit like that and i know that he did all the research on plants that didn't need any staking to look didn't seem to bother them and so on the nursery so i've got a catch up a bit without <hes> now. If you wanna get me go on the nursery and just my bake fair is the they <hes>. They've been so desperate to stay in business of fuels because he's been really tough. They got him. Who's pumping the clemes so we get introductions but actually what are we gonna do. They grow how we're gonna. Pull them together and i think the nursery production industry really should be talking to go and be saying he's range. What what could what could i end users do with well. The gums are gonna do walk. Could i use with them. How we gotta pull those three months together. I seven months ago and that's the big exciting for the future for me. Is the whole incident. Particularly the growing side can stop saying we've always amazing plans but what we do is produce them. We don't think about what they're gonna. Take now but that would be just my dream for pack up if that was how many okay now of popped into my head worn is is the influence from shows of the shows that i would be reporting for bbc sheffield to. Is there an influence from what you see in those shows into what happens at a nursery garden garden center level paused to inside a number two on the nursery production level. There was one of the gardens that i was working on on hampton court palestinia show oh two thousand and nineteen an in that <hes> some of the plots where a company that i know well hacks knicks on they do do from recycled bamboo products however their pots are sort of a beige golden brown and beige golden brown pots cannot cannot be used in show gardening because you plant that plant into the compost. You don't take it out at a posh. Under rim of gold beige brown is visible true black soil wearing a black plastic. It wouldn't be and i can see designers turning around and say no. We don't want a bite. The nurseries are saying they have to come in x. Now maybe snakes will turn around for example. I say and say well okay. We've taken in feedback. We need to produce a black one but there is a point at which designers no speaking to nurseries whether you like it or not a number two. I guess there's reverse which is nursery speaking to the designer well alive. Guess that most of those supply because if it's if it's a nursery that specialized industry they don't to move to a recycle likeable pot and eventually i think we'll move to the can be fully come posted. That's gonna take some time but <hes> in the meantime. If they're producing for <hes> shot it was which another quite a few specialists <hes> then they could reuse the pulse good news back to the the conversation and we had before about cleaning pulse and happy to take the pulse back and reusing the next time then they could use pau blockbuster you the news news news so so yeah. I mean it'd be environmental. Side's gonna affect us all more and more. <hes> pushed dragged screaming. What of affecting you at this moment in time neil again. I'll go back and say twenty. Maybe twenty years ago but turkey years go. It certainly wouldn't have been anything new for me to walk into. Any guard. Center in any country under was a bit of a fire at buck garden where to our burn yesterday had leftover. Those days are gone. I'm glad to say however if we you take it to a more serious matter. There is a point where if you have a black plastic if it's a state body if it's a local co-counsel that are using plastic pots veritably jimmy mary welcome ball you with their iphone is going to stick it out on twitter and say sheffield council. You should be ashamed of yourself. Blah blah et cetera et cetera under storm raged sort of kicks off which i'm not saying that's wrong but i'm aware of logically of what the knock on effect is. Have you been influenced by that. You have have to be overly p._c. And how you do things on what is i guess in a nutshell neal is customer not controlling but as customer influencing how hey you do things <hes> it definitely a thing. I've been concerned for some years before the whole recycling issue puppy settled recently about a a- an industry that says we green the nation but actually what what you know what i've carbon footprint like was a plant miles now <hes> plastics six sides now they have set up a national scheme for the first time in the last twelve months where you collect customs black pulse back <hes> they then go to so recycling plant and it goes a lot of people that all black gums into paul sorority recycled plastic already. It's not brand new plastic so we failed to get auto cross but black plastic com go to your local council elections because it's a little vase done by infrared now which is why the puck code colors changed so the the <hes> the machines can pick out based pulse madrid pasta count pick out the black ones drudgery but the industries also working working together to get stuff recycle them brokeback h god has to sign opening takes time and collecting the thing that i mean it's another item cost collecting the pulse stuck in them stopping and blending around with it sounds a bit of an issue but some drudgery that will appear across the nation when i was at hampton neil myself on sell tremaine who is the logic. I feel the face of the a._p. L. i think just dot there are two of one hundred ten unfiltered remains in total because he is absolutely everywhere never been to a gig not bumped into phil and he breath patience of a saint. Louis makes me smile but myself affair. We're talking about in a nutshell the promotion of horticulture maybe we're back to the person who who may be on the television ending full pay chain. Children should garden more but there's also a point where i'm reminded of an article that robbie blackhall miles wiles wrote some years ago about the death of the association in the united states and maybe not toys in but what we were also saying about your h._s._a. And if they hadn't adopted to change in your words they wouldn't have to member stuff to have today. There is still a perception neil that gardening gardening is for inverted commas old people number one but on the other hand i will say there are an ordinance amount of people who will not promote that thing that they do and then maybe become angry man from the simpsons who shakes his fist opted thing over there and says well somebody should do something. There's there's a part of my head. I guess which if i even take why and how to show all started it was because at the time there was only gardeners question time the guardian podcast started the dan guardian podcast with jane perron own not exist and outside of the aura chested indeed and a half a podcast. There was nothing else available at the time. Now i know podcast austin it. Is dan new craze. Everybody a bloody podcast. You say on congratulations on. I hope it all goes well but if i go back to when i started this thing that i do instead of playing golf there was nowhere for somebody i say like you to come on and speak to me for a half an hour or or for meat align a cargo net wacoal take old upside down and talk about why she built that show garden and get a look inside her head. Are we just heard about doing the promo thing neil. What do we as an industry may be needed to do different well. I think you're doing the right thing because i think the fantasy of today against thirty years ago is that we've got the technology for anybody to to <hes> <hes> we're told about the credibility of some people out there in the social media side who've done talking about which is really concerning. I'm a council remember for the. Let's go to associate so i represent the north east of england not thought they've given us a voice into most big things well. Most people don't realize they already r._h._s. t._a. The the n._f. You to a degree have got the ear of government <hes> the one of the side blessings things on malta which everywhere you look at brexit is that governments having to talk to industries all over the country for the first time in my memory <hes> governments come to our industry and said if we leave your preliminary leave your what do you need from us and having to sit and listen. I'm listening. They've never heard before so getting behind. Trade associations is sometimes because most people don't realize they are at so in just the members they're doing massive amount of work at government level title <hes> because they got good links with them in the air and so on so the face to the same and the more we can encourage our trade associations to talk could government level then they can stop the chinese government just signed <hes> an agree or twenty five year in the u._k. <hes> environmental green in agreement on the includes massive plummeting plans now that's just the so many opportunities to any law that go to stick to it. They go to fulfill the commitments made and agreed with the industry. <hes> a lot of china has become a government level. I mean when you start to get <hes> the n._h._s. Over over here. Recognizing the actually governing being outside is good to people were depression but follow starting to follow thing in sweden where swedish he's doctors could actually prescribe gardening as a help towards people with depression you then start to realize that something fundamentally changing and those changes come through we will got behind initiatives of our own and just keep the thing going <hes> so it's it's down to a civil but he's all set down to work together with the bigger bodies. Do we need neal as i say an again. Let's put a an invisible line in dishonored here where you have people who who maybe shallow term influencers of court culture or influencers of the international to differentiate that again and then there are the the likes of let's say yourself on myself and i don't know andrew fisher thomas of this world already mark gregory's this world to cape goals or whatever name you wanna pick that is voice delay would respect a trusted voice to borrow one year words if i'm to take it on dot level excluding the monte sunday did teach martius of this world. Do we need to do more artisan industry to promote ourselves. Oh absolutely i mean i think we have the us. I mean the ministry drivers petition. Do not have mockby could be problem and so don't think marketing. I think we've <hes> actually in the u._k. There's something like five or didn't eight. Two thousand people employed jordan ornamental horticulture. That's massive but we're all small individual businesses. So if we don't link together what i tried to associations there's no general the voice but we've got a place i mean i've got friends who accidentally and it's another story became a local councillor and <hes> we bump into each other and i can pau our view across to him so he can talk about it and i've some facts at council level here and some of us know at pease and and another little bit busy over amendments uh-huh <hes> you know they still we've got have place of influence. We probably just don't think influenced individuals and size and we definitely have side. I want to get the children's garden. Wait on for the one show next year but then having to do it but i wanna get ilmenite because getting on say to god willing to friday night he's not going to have the same signed impact who you're talking about the on a tee time prime time program with young trendy presented on lots of interesting guests you know we have to be more more active and more ambitious and think well actually the media desperate stories and we've got amazing stories to tell us. I've got a ton of amazing stories to tell me alone but i'm not too sure. I need a more suitable for on this show over guinea. I'll take great pleasure not neal if i take even the support of the decide show just as an example for you listen at home. If i take what the natural stone have done in basically basically pick it up the phone and saint peter we we like to go to your job. We like to do things we liked. The fact that you report for no greater gain for no money at all traveling traveling to this show or dot show whatever the case be in your own spare time at your own cost. We wanna make that a little bit easier for you. Here's a small bike akash to cover. The cost of the hotels on the flight set cetera et cetera. If i take college garden design again the aforementioned entre fisher tomlin. Who did you know huge applause also something similar. I'm not great asking for things. I noticed there is no patchy on account. I won't take money from listeners for social and people are suggesting again end. Maybe i should but i don't want to do that but i still get a warm feeling in my heart makes me feel that i'm doing something right. When in the industry are people from industry turn around and say peter how you want to hold your hand. Let's go for walk together. You record your thing and then we will <unk> steep better knowing that we've got another ten or twenty episodes of dislike show because we helped you make that happen. We don't wanna radio jingle. We don't want a t-shirt. We don't even want free removed. Just go and do that is a better. Maybe collaboration required because let's be honest about it. We can't all make our stories happen on on bbc. That won't show on bbc all now. I think there's so many opportunities i think wants some of our suppliers over the years <hes> of dot carried away with the way they spend the marketing nothing budgets and i think that just terrified now is sponsoring anything <hes> but it's about getting a friendly well known annual pau industry. I'm known mine mine and <hes> you know if we if we feel passionate about something we need to push some of our suppliers sometimes to be able to say you wanna get on board with this. You know <music>. I'm to make money out of it <hes> but yeah. It's it's a big job. <hes> it would be great to have some famous people people pick it up with it. <hes> interesting enough i picked tokyo's recently following this back to diseases affecting olive trees but the helen mirren's going forward with it as a support of the of the olive industry in in italy. You know i said to the ice t._a. We've gotta get helen. Mirrored invoke the big story in the u._k. So if we can find some of these other people who've already got here of the media. Sometimes i think that helps but we just have to do <music> now beaten anyway. I'll do my on a sunday morning. You know the podcast and <hes> i wanna play around with video stuff and we'll just have to see we can dragging ragging it quite actually when we do the workshops and supplies. We'll happily sponsor them. We come paulson. They some bulbs so we can make it easier and cheaper to the kids and stuff saying it sounds like we don't ask you well for ages and our home or for those you listening indie industry. Don't be afraid to ask <hes> <hes> absolutely and if you do want to get into anything neela said last episode order to just drop me a line up show on twitter facebook dot com forward slash desolate. It shows such outta calm. I think it's an all podcasters etc etc had neil grants is the m._d. Of ferndale garden center based in sheffield anew tune in and hear him every sunday on bbc sheffield phone in touched on tune in if you're listen in the u._s. of a. in salt lake city hello hello everyone out there. That is where we are going to leave this double episode just for now. I promise you i'll have neal peckham. We've got an elongated list list of things that we wanted to discuss and no better voice to have onto chat dot with an absolute pleasure. Neil thank you so much time. It's been a real pleasure. Thank you it going good stuff exit will do or we need to look good. I have it all actually yeah yeah <music>.

Neil grat neal peckham sheffield twitter ferndale garden center bbc united states plainfield dodd Tennessee guinness youtube deir buck garden pa monte dans jessica england
121. Everything Is Awful

The Skylines Podcast

34:52 min | 2 years ago

121. Everything Is Awful

"When you have an experience the expansiveness yet. You haven't experienced the next generation of Samsung galaxy a cinematic Infinity display the practically blurs the lines between your screen and the world we're an ultrasonic fingerprint ID unlocks your world and the program cameras sees it like you do and in all day intelligent battery optimizes power to your needs the Samsung s ten s ten plus the next generation galaxy. Jamie's parents are Nimbus. I start recruiting issue around the record. I tell them. They were Nimbus. We talked about it over his birthday weekend in Prague. The Manhattan bound express train. Is grand jury. The cab color on genetic John. This is skylines. The city metric puck cost one of the tricks this. This show's try and keep the balance between your quite beak, heavy, intellectual Waukesha ideas, and took in complete nothing nonsense and me to a city. So so yeah, his his ceremony Alvis joining me to talk about something that's been been vexing me a little bit about about you and your relationship to this very fine city in which we live is the you don't like very much. I really don't like I've always been hated it as a child I came to the UK on a holiday, which was a bad family, holiday and half of it was spent in the English countryside driving around. But my parents would not let us go into stone hedge because it costs too much money. So we like look at it from the motorway away from it's a legitimate. Exact same thing on the way back from a wedding. It was like fifteen quits get and in the massive Q. Whereas. Thank Lund's we flew to England to look at the rock formations. Are am I screaming? Now this. I can remember it so vividly because of how disappointing that trip was because my parents were like, we'll fly all the way to the UK will drop off that money, but the like extra like fifty pounds. It's going to cost to get the four of us in here. A no, thanks when when I did my first US road trip in two thousand eight for the Obama McCain election, we drove seven hours out of our way to Buffalo New York. So we could see Niagara Falls. I'm like I said we're on the road for seven hours. It was it was the stop that wasn't related to my campaign reporting. We go out there, and it was like eight dollars to park in the car park, and my friends Scott who's driving the resources rage by that. He wanted to get straight back on the industry. Like, no, don't be an idiot. Just like, let's get. Anyway, there is a very so there is a great view of Stonehenge from the side of the free. Oh, free next or an ice cream stand. And you can kind of see as as the jury intended on the horizon, Fru of a mess. Shane links. The thing is it was like the Stonehenge prison yard experience. Like, it was not. Why would we drive all the way there and fly all the way to that country to like just go and do that anyways that was one half of the holiday, and that's the half. I actually liked Windsor Castle. And that was fun. But we've drifted I mean, I'm getting back getting back to you said, you hated London as a child and you'll know about getting back the other parents see other half of the holiday with spent in London. The only thing I wanted to go see was I was like, ooh, let's go to Wimbledon and look at the tennis court the world famous tennis courts, and literally the rest of it. I was like this place is a shit hole. There's black stuff in my nose, Dayton, Ohio. Again, people seem to think that I mean not in comparison to the shithole I grew up in. But I think that this is a like, especially shithole because people pretend it's like the best thing that's ever happened. When in reality, it's just like a very wide shithole, and that's really how I feel and even as a even as like a fourteen year old on Facebook. Am I pod touch? My sis. Ipod touch. I was like, oh, I don't like it here. It's so rainy, and it's so dirty. There's shitting Minos. I hate it. But let let's I never gonna come here again in that. It's like what is it called smash frame smush crash? Yeah. Whatever that to today. And I'm like oh here. I am. I'm really happy to have my dog and like one square foot of space. I mean, you probably shouldn't have like moved to the UK. Actually. Yeah. That's actually what I think about every morning of my life is the wrong choices the shower. As a tear rolls down my face. But it's masked by the rest of the shower wise. Cheers cheers, flux the app for one. Okay. As long term listens. When though I grew up in the suburbs. Rumford right represent and I found out the other day that my bar voted seventy percent leave. I news pro leave them realize it's like way way pro leave like it's far more than any of the other purlee bars in London. I think when you grow up in on the fringes of a city, you tend to like the cities where the action is happening Rousseau. I kind of I think Paul's of wire was always sort of interested in like London as idea is it kind of just represented, you know, real life of the it's, you know, I'm in this boring place by the end of his train loin everything is happening. So I think that does kind of give you a slightly Jiri. I'd impression of a city in the way if you grew up outside altogether. Maybe don't get that. I like so I grew up on the edge. Like, Maya town was a suburb. There was this hub of. Dayton, ohio. Place. Shithole? However, my mom grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, and I loved Chicago, and I loved going there. And I love going down like Michigan avenue and Lakeview drive and looking out and all the buildings and who it's so exciting with their socks pickup Fifth Avenue here. Like, I enjoyed that. I enjoyed Seattle as a child I'm not anti city, but I am very anti London. And I think it's really really gross, and then you can get to all the socioeconomic issues with London and just as people on our desk like four people in our desk loan live in than were laughing. At the financial times is piece about gentrification in Peckham. Were you not here? Indra the new statesman online suburbs Andrew wounds to drove very good pace, which has had diary of being a passenger military. We're really insightful. It was I really felt like my eyes were open to help out. It is because I complain about like because I okay, then the little black, but he's been give me shit for this. I live in Notting hill. Oh, horrible. Whatever I'm American. Let me live. I have to. Wait for the circle line at Notting hill gate, which only comes a best every ten minutes, and even that feels like a burden I have to bear every Monday to Friday. However, the Croydon thing made me think, you know, what it's not so bad. And I get Suchet miss mill most days. So that's always fun Suchet McMillan. Suchet McMillan in the wake you joking. When were you at the offer my of a half, this is likes? I tolerated Oprah what opera were you out with shame as I should probably explain that anyone who isn't obsessed with British politics. Shame smell is the communications director for labor lead, Jeremy Kuban, and he still officially guardian staff on leave, but has has certain opinions on foreign policy. Clark attacks of yes, all these things. Although one thing I will say is like I read captain Corelli's mandolin because Jamie's mom gave it to me for Christmas. And I hated it. And I thought it was like a cartoonish represent the burning bullet height trick. It's a very cartoonish representation of not only Greek people, but also Italians and essentially are you getting upset for my shouting or upset for how long talking on just under seeing slightly adjusting the volume, but I read captain Crawley's mandolin, and I was really upset by its representations of Greek people. So I was like googling like all like, captain count rally mandolin, public reaction, Greece or whatever. And the one person who'd written a huge thing about how Greek people hate that focus shameless mill, oh, whether you go which I think is very funny. I thought that was a funny Easter egg that I found in his guardian backlog of like actually the US deserved nine eleven pieces. Okay. Circling about the topic in hand you live in picture book of London. Yeah. Plane I hate it citric Otis film. Yes. On your complaining about that. I mean, and I know that this is my own doing, but it is very expensive around there. Coffees are very expensive there. Yeah. Exactly. They have very good charity shops, if you are a woman who likes designer clothes, but likes spending seven pounds on literally anything is it possible that you know, you are. In fact, a snow puss decided you can only live in one of the nicest bits of London. And then discovered the it still, you know, fundamentally part of a big city and everything's just overpriced unlike maybe you would have been happy. If you've just been a bit more comfortable living place with some poor people. My God I live in a bit of Lund. I actually, and this is a misconception about Notting hill is I live like right near Grenfell. And like it is actually relatively diverse and my bit is the bit right? When it starts to not be superpower. I have been to your house. Yes. But it is near there. There weren't like it's actually very diverse. It is literally Jamie's uncle who is not white. He was like I grew from there. And it's way more diverse than people think, and blah, blah, blah. He his parents. I think were like wind rush generation. Yeah. I mean, Kensington is. There's been a lot more mixed than people. Give it credit full. Because north Kensington is very yes. Exactly. Yeah. Once upon a time melting hill was I the presence of the carnival would suggest Notting hill was an area that a lot of the women generation of Caribbean. Immigrants moved to nonetheless been to your house, and it doesn't feel like I feel like it's I'm not trying to face not pockets you live very near the to road, which is kind of push this shit end of it. Okay. There is a shit and demand. Maybe the hygiene Peckham, so Peckham, I actually haven't been to pack on. But I've read a very interesting piece in the financial times today about and all of its graveyards. None had cemetry is is a hell of a well. The thing is I think that my issue is combination of two things which is one growing up in not a park family believing in a posh area. But so I saw all the big houses. I saw the like really nice things, but I couldn't afford. You know, what we didn't? We couldn't like we weren't anyways. I don't need to get into my cost background because that's just like its own counter worms. But it was like. Aspirated? It's like one day American dream. I can have the big house with a big garden and all that bullshit. And it was very pretty and stuff, and that's mixed with the fact that I was like I think like the aspirated side as well. As the fact that I was exposed to it makes me like leafy areas that are posh because I can pretend I'm Paul. But it does mean like sometimes you missing L tone. Let's I think I am missing out. I think there are things I could be getting out of London. However, I would rather live in different cities that weren't Porsche like Glasgow. I would argue as even better and a lot of ways. I mean, not only been there once versus hours by loft. I t's instantly love the place. You were there when I told you to come to Edinburgh to see me, and you were like I've been to Edinburgh turn times. I go there. I remember. Now, you say this. I remember I mean, I see this we'd ever met in on the fun. I've got one night in Glasgow. I'm not going to get on the train. Yeah. Okay. Fine. That's not the point the story at the I couldn't live in like gloss goes great. But like live that because you wouldn't think the web would be that much worse than London. But somehow learnt. Yeah. Please. You have an experience the expansiveness yet. You haven't experienced the next generation of Samsung galaxy a cinematic Infinity display the practically blurs the lines between your screen and the world we're an ultrasonic fingerprint ID unlocks your world and the program camera sees it like you do and in all day intelligent battery optimizes power to your needs the Samsung s ten s ten plus the next generation galaxy. This podcast is supported by linked in learning. We're all at different places in our careers. Some of us are just looking for a job. Others are trying to get promoted manage a team or do something new wherever you're at linked in learning has more than thirteen thousand courses taught by industry experts to help you succeed in your own way, anytime anywhere. It features. A vast range of business tack and creative skills. Employers are looking for visit linked in learning dot com slash learn for free to get a month free and to keep learning in all the career moments that matter to you. So I am here once again in the sense facilities. Very glamorous London bridge offices with ahead of policy posts when a halibut Amel, John, unburied low. How us man wyde-am? Alright we recruiting this in early March. So we're gonna pretend that like know we just make no Brexit 'cause let whatever we say. Now, it might be able to take him by Sudha knowing nine things been gone recently. Probably what. But anyway, we'll get to keep that whole. So I become possession by but we all get into about vaguely related issue of experts. You guys talk a lot about sort of Expos from cities done union inland reports you kind of have assist added number lighten, a percentage of jobs workings of expert industries. And so on. But we don't really tend to think of light. You know exports is being the city level thing. We tend to think of being a national thing laughing you do across the national frontiers. So we're gonna get into why why you think this is important bless let's start with the the boring definition of question. What do you mean by export in this context? So when we talk about exports in a city wet talking about that any business ourselves beyond its Lamar bet. So traditionally think about exports, we think sell the country basis, and so that means an expert from one country to to another country when this is actually an export from from a city to its reach or city to the rest of the country as well as obviously elsewhere in the world, and that's quite interesting because the location decisions of these types of businesses have very different than the u the group of business. We look up which normal services, they'll be headdresses shops cafes in those sorts of things. It goes a little service businesses that purely because his Lord's people to sell two of his tip to sell to what was exporting business. You know in principle because the Lord of different markets could locate anywhere in theory when trying to trucked in businesses actually, exporting type businesses and try your trucked in raw than the whole government of business. You get in. That's why it's interesting to understand how these businesses perform where they decided locate because they're the ones that drive on economies. So which way does the causality Ron have if you look at the city calling me with a large proportion of export businesses, and that may less Ellington off a city drama countries. Is that like important because let you need those businesses to have a healthy city academy. Or is it important because it's it's it's a measure of the fat. You do have a Hopi satirical me. Because if he didn't then the businesses will may the they all drivers of economies and a couple of reasons for that the first one is thought if you look at productivity, which will very much interested in the moment, exporting businesses tend to be more productive. What does that mean for people? High wages more money in people's pockets. But also what's interesting is you look over the last twenty twenty thirty years, you can see that they're the ones that push on productivity growth as well. So how can we say that in in real life? Well, if you think about it, and it will serve service business like yoga instructor an exercise instructor in twenty nineteen and may well be play music now through that rifle involved in played it through a ghetto blaster, but they're still only teaching the room full of people the ability to see large productivity gains, and those types of jobs limited it's the same to witness waitresses. I'll people putting pine Sol or headdresses, for example. You just don't see huge increase in productivity. On your head dress to get twice as. Yeah. Physically limit is by him by that to UN's, and how long it takes to to ahead of head whereas your exporting businesses because there's something money different markets can scale businesses and the kind of absolve new innovations. Actually, they're always finding you about better ways of doing things. And indeed, you know, that's the main reason why we see differences across the couldn't be in terms of how cities perform export is in the salvation of the types of businesses. He's rich on these to be a truck date Bain, these high skilled element of export is whereas further north attracted in exporting businesses. They have trade will base trades nationally internationally, which is great for the types of activity that they do ten three low skills. Low productivity in the has indications in terms of wages, prosperity, benefit dependency, all these different thing. Kickoff drill down into that a little bit. It will come at two different types of export businesses. High-skilled lows. Can you give me a couple of examples of aging kinda give a sense of? Like why they locate in the places they definitely so that we always like to illustrate and even thinking about different businesses to think about the same business and aquatic lot that come from or relate to my room city of silent. So the first one is Bartlett Bank at Barclays Bank has a big presence in connecting wolf where it was always investment banking activity or at high value stove people. My might disagree with the bane high value. But you tend to be more productive as long as it's. Doing things that league except for that ball is anything illegal the friends of mine. He's Bank of dubbing as very. I'm just checking this out because he used to listen to this podcast. Just in case. Well, he can pay you can tell us what goes on within Canaveral of tolerance in general the type of activity that's going on there is high value. It's high scale it pays high wages, but not all of is Tiffany's gone within within their basement, canary wolf, actually, the buffer stove because men Sunland to foment a price on tonight, a big bodies sent and does all of his office functions. Now, why does that happen? Why does even the same business split out insectivores across these tune occasions? Well, came off of his base, lots of high school work is at a network whether investment banks the good digging trade with share ideas within compete against two and bought it will pay premium to access to those benefits, you know, to despite the rent that you have to pay within cabinet wolf is sitting in investment banking activities within Canadian from other than dachshund park in Sunderland. But biographers stove. You know, the more routine is still that doesn't require knowledge doesn't require or quite routine is is our titties. Bodies would never put that sorts of debt expensive to be located there, and that type of activity doesn't get me benefit from being based. Instead what before that part of businesses lots of chief Lyons. Lots of Peru. Lower skilled pops cheaper workers as well. Now, some that doesn't offer the benefits of Canary Wharf, but this off the benefits of cheap land and cheaper workers. And that's why it's able to attract these type activity, so we're always out compete London for call center occupying always out compete as south end for call centers. Well, 'cause London Southend this is fairly expensive, but it would never out compete London for foreign investment bunk because of the benefits that Luna's able to offer we say the same thing finish on the car plant employs seven thousand workers, huge importantly economy, but accused it's mania components assembly factory. No, there's not much what we call valley-wide or within that. There's no like the design work. Precisely engineer exactly. So engineering occurs in Cranfield in Oxfordshire. Design occurs in Paddington England full of the reasons that we set out before. So even looking within within two businesses in c- spitting out there activties because the different benefits that different places offer. And crucially this than a huge impact on how successful different economies our coastal country. I love the way that you low skill businesses bug his Bank. Bits of by some Nightshade is they would say indeed so chemistry prosper without having that many exporting businesses like if possible kind of prospered just by light selling to yourself is there a size of city, which becomes possible misses? The great debate about openness and tree nor should you have close to Connie's. And I think there's there's lots of work on a on a cookie level. Which shows not traded a good thing. Being is a good thing. And indeed, President Trump's trade tower associates, of course, all sorts of consternation amongst economists that this will be a bad thing closing down an opening up. If you're selling to yourself a circular, nobody any what? Any economy? You not finding new ways of ev- innovating and driving productivity. So it will be very difficult. I think to have see increasing stem is living if you will very close. Now that is very interesting in the context of what was being called the Preston model. And this is this idea that particularly I think is taking hold within certain parts party and impressive is called pressing doing it, which is the public sector is only going to trade with Lowell bodies. Only going to procurement. Now what where exactly the boundary is not clear, but affectively what they say is not where no longer going to give contracts to people in Birmingham or companies in London or committees in Edinburgh. Instead what we're going to do is only spent in the moment upon me to support it simple that businesses which invincible sounds great. You don't wanna vinyl? Excellent. And we have things at the Bristol pound into that tries to encourage consumers to buy Lutely to the rally that boys thought, it's very similar to Trump's trade tariffs and not you're putting barriers. Only going to trade these these companies will look after our own I now has all sorts of potential negative implications. You're not trading with the world, you're close to Konami not could actually limit prosperity. Even if even though the idea was unavailable slow businesses stopping there. Just I into a whole poke cost we should make this argument. I'm sure he will do it again future. So lay the to next time pope, thank you very much. Okay. So I feel we I was gonna say we're drifting from our topic. We haven't really have arrived at the colts of explaining what it is. You don't like about. You're gonna tell me what you done like, I'm going to argue if you until you why is in fact, brilliant. Why don't you die London? So how'd I start with what I do like about London? I like that. It's very diverse. I like, the you've lots of different types of food, and you have lots of different types of things in jobs. However, I think that that's also part of the problem in with London. Not the problem with one the problem with the UK, which is that like the one thing like is that London has of these things, and you almost are forced to be here. If you want to be exposed anyone who isn't like a white usually generation Li British parson other than like small pockets. I think that's entirely fair in the most of the big cities. A lot more diverse new suggesting one on the mice diverse cities in Britain is actually Birmingham life. You you will visit is is more diverse. However, I do think London is it's like own thing in a lot. Yes. But like we often. Yes. Six of the country lives here. And that's obviously up that shouldn't be thing. And that is your own doing in this country and anyways, but that's not my dislike London. That's what I like it because the record London's always been vastly beginning on the bridge in central London was like ten times began the second job of figuring that out. I agree with you. I've written of human most occasions, we should move the capital and develop power. The capital. I mean, I can think that safely 'cause I know going to do it. But yes, I think it would be the correct policy choice identity do there. I'd put in Manchester. Why it's roughly the middle of the country. Geographically you near lotta people because Manchester's in the middle of cluster of Nova cities. Yes, it gives you an entirely different view of British history. And what Britain means because essentially the industrial revolution. London would remain the financial and tourism capital and coach will probably you could put political power in Manchester and take economic power with it to certain exam. And then you kind of have light London is New York and magistrate Washington. Yeah. And I don't think the London economy would would skip a beat. I think you couldn't just press a button and do it. You would need grandfather in probably about twenty years and say by twenty four thirty the capital will be in Manchester. So biggest I if you just try. When you join Don show up I would like to make very clear this juncture, I'm we've apologies to lift him. Listen, I am not on of you never going to be. But like if you just tried to do overnight, you would lose a lot of manpower of the government letting all the MP's, but like in the top civil servants and so on because people can't stop states because they have kids in school, or parents, whatever it is. But if you do it the generation, it becomes possible to make those kind of plans and people can either move like switch careers, and you don't lose institutional memory. And I just think there are very few buttons a government compress that would magically said take chunk of economic activity in London and put it somewhere else in the country. But neither. Yeah. Basically and also our lied within. If you look at infrastructure planning projects in London, ten immolate get approved because like the most basic level. I think civil servants look at this new yet. I can see why we need cross row. Whereas if. It's like should we have a tram system in Leeds? You've got these guys may concision in Whitehall, which is crazy and it self, but they're like, well, they can see the counter-arguments mutt. From reasonably. So I think it would. So kind of just reframe how the government sees the rest of the country because we were you're right about that pot. We all to of a centralized. I think I think as Finn Darby on Twitter made a joke about ages ago. It was like when Mary block or one of the SMP MP's was like how does gloves. Go have fewer MP's than London or something like that. And he was like why does the great like ancient kingdom of fife have fewer MP. Nobody lives there compared to how many people live in London. So I think that's annoying. But I do think that like if you ever really on the wind up a Scottish nationalist do point out the London has twice the population of Scotland get upsets, they don't like math sometimes, but that's a whole different thing. But okay. So like, the why do you not why do you know that was actually the closest we've come to some actual? Tanja, but why you personally not like London? So I think like it has a lot to do with the geography of it as well as the economics. I like that it's very spread out. And I don't really mind that, but I do also think like costs a lot of money and the wealth disparities really weird and like it's like so oppressive. And there's like an attitude here that you don't get another parts of the UK where everybody is like grumpy and mean, and like, I don't know you just you walk around, and it feels like shit, and it feels stressful and it's ugly most of the time, and like I know that that's like get over it like sorry. It's not pretty, blah, blah, blah. But like like I feel like I have to live here, but I don't necessarily have to. So I'm allowed to not like that about I think I mean a dog you have a couple of things I think huge chunks of London. Very pretty yes. But it's the fact that it's like it's so big, and it's just like you're inevitably going to pass by like horrible shit's like every single. Ever you go that will be terrorist office. Yes. But I think like in London eight suit action to the Parisian model, you've got this absolutely incredible beautiful center. And then the just pushed with crappy biz to the suburbs. That's why. But I do think I if I was living there. I'd be like, yeah. I prefer the odds. But that's obviously a very privileged thing. And as we discussed earlier is 'cause you hate poor people. I don't hate poor people. I okay, you just don't want to see them. He grew up vary like not well off, and I had like family, and the, you know, I was in the like US during the recession like, I know people whose parents were like like very bothering employed, and they already had working class jobs, and then we're laid off from working class jobs. Like, I'm not like pretentious in that way. But I also think I did grow up in various statically pleasing environment. And I probably become accustomed to being in a very aesthetically pleasing environment. I grew up like around loads of trees and Greenspace. And there is a thing. Like, if you've read the book happy city, it's not about how much Greenspace there is it's about the regularity of Greenspace you're exposed to. And you get these huge chunks of Greenspace, which is great. But the regularity is not as much as a science. I guess my Hyde Park. I mean, you you cross central London's us specifically that but like London is quite green compared to. I mean, again, I'm thinking of Paris hair. We're not talking about Paris London. How big's if he's go? Green facing like smoke Greenspace in the UK Koga. Yes. But I'm not saying that New York and also Chicago is like on a huge lake. That's like a cl- a freshwater lake which is very beautiful and Chicago, you don't walk around and blow your nose at the end the day and have black shit in it. See I never give. Yeah. But that does happen in London. I remember that even as a kid. No. I mean, I've been told this this am I being it was on this podcast. I'm swear to go. We've talked about this. Because like you were like, oh, it doesn't happen. But it literally happens to like most people this. I'm wondering. Yeah. Probably because you were like immersed in it as a babe definitely have nostril has on manny's. Nearly forty is really upsetting. Because you're still have should be catching it you. Probably have very weak nostril hairs, I have consolidated most my hair onto the top of my head to build list. Which is good again for a man nearing forty. Yeah. Okay. We should be wrapping up so many anyways, I think like gnome skin cabinet London. I think London is incredibly expensive. It's a credibly exclusive. I think that to be able to enjoy a lot of things in London you need to have a certain amount of income. And I think that is problematic, and I think that it like because of that attitude, and like the quote unquote rat race, I think that you end up just because of the way the city functions, and so many people in the city function you end up feeling like shit. If you're part of them, I think I think they're a couple of things I think that's true. But I think that's a problem with of outright throb within the problem of of London is the location of Montana symbol of. But the other thing is you have chosen to live in west London. Which is ever knows is with London is worse London. I kind of prefer living there though, because I like being able to like hideaway at the weekend, and I can just. I mean, take my the park for the reason you can hide away there is because no one else who you light. It's known estimate the choice of living in west London. Because it's terrible. I know someone who had thirty near me in west London who works at the I, and we see each other. And we go have lunch is dreadful. The why with someone living west London? It's just like westbound. Every no that I have a dog and not also everyone. Stephen to know that I have a dog Instagram. He was like, oh, Sarah. I like being friends with you. And I like seeing pictures of on Instagram of your dog because it's you with the dog. You're not one of these people that runs it Instagram for your dog. And I was like, unfortunately, you are not following. Hey there it's Martha on Instagram, and I do run in Instagram from my dog, and she has over one hundred followers, and I'm very proud of her and she looks very cute lately. Full account. Larry, Greta, but anyway, regretted, she's cute. It's just so cute. Follow her at. Hey there. It's Martha and she's a little black caucus Poon. She's going to be nine months old and probably by the time. This is all that's not many followers. You'll dog of us. No. I don't have. I'm not trying to get function in those. Brand news. Yeah. No. But I don't need her enough round deal. The brand deal is in my heart. Did you let me just none of them that is? But my point is that likes peanut butter west London. West London is more expensive. It's more rat racy. And then there's more of terrible people. Yes. But I think the my issue is not like it's more about like not the day today. Because I when I lived in Edinburgh was expensive and obviously London sewn stratosphere, but like in terms of day to day costs. It's not that much. I still like I don't really go out to eat. I pack my lunch. Most days, you know, I do like a big grocery order from Tesco, and I make like bean Curry's like I still can live cheaply and not way. But it's the fact that it's like the rent and the tube and the bills, and like I want to go out on the rim will be a lot cheaper. If you lived in like a real London. I don't think my rent is actually extortionate for I live. And I think that's the secret to where I live is people probably think I pay like much much more monthly on just saying, I think you should consider moving to Peckham. I'm not joking. I know you wanted to probably end on that note. But I am like, oh, maybe I should live somewhere in either like really north really south London near a bunch of parks. And then Martha the dog can like playing a graveyard will. There you go Rutten so Sarah wishing needs to live. Yeah. Actually, do that tweet me tell me where you think I should live. If I like grass and things like that. Do you have any idea how difficult it is getting out of a pulse of because every time I start coming to conclusions. You just start yelling into the microphone. It's friday. And I'm enjoying just put in my brain on Ice, Man. Just have it sitting back with my friend and boss, John Elhage? The full of the dog is a dog. It is boring. But in a nice way, she's very cute. And she got a haircut. You're trying to turn me off. Aren't you? You've been listening to skylines the pocus from Hugh metric, the new statesman city side, presented I'm recruited by me, Johnny. I'm purchased by Nick Hilton. You can find skylines every two weeks on I James Acosta, whatever app used to get you custom Royal there. Why don't leave us a nice review to to tell other people it, you know, it really helps people. Discover the show and on the Nikola mania. So the more people can get listen to this early who see in two weeks. Thanks for listening. You have an experienced the expansiveness yet. You haven't experienced the next generation of Samsung galaxy a cinematic Infinity display the practically blurs the lines between your screen and the world we're an ultra sonic fingerprint ID unlocks your world and the program cameras sees it like you do and in all day intelligent battery optimizes power to your needs the Samsung s ten s ten plus the next generation galaxy.

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When Pubs Cry: beer walks, gout, pub tales, sofas & dossers, set in South London

Deserter Pubcast

47:02 min | 11 months ago

When Pubs Cry: beer walks, gout, pub tales, sofas & dossers, set in South London

"It's recording baby. This is deserter. Welcome to another edition of the desert of. What a month! It's been last month. We were all sitting around making sour dough and this month. We're polishing the police. The puffs is still shocked, but if anyone can find a way to keep talking about us, so don't worry. Yeah, some pub tales in this episode along with the catch up of our busy lives, including a health update a racist and exercise plan. I think I'll just stick to the PUCK. Tales US okay. We've got a couple of bomb doses to consider. Although let's face it. We're all bummed as now am I right. Am I right? Yeah, pump from the health workers. Apart from Lucas the teaches. Yep Shop Workers. Involved reduction. Toasties, civil servants police, following transport workers. Just expert again. Sarah, what have you been up too busy month? Well. I'm pleased to report that walking has appointed again. Or should I say perhaps walking has a pint gain. Odd are discovered on my regulations, tack rooms, and even some popes doing takeaway, Biz. And I've been invading myself them. for example I've been in the last couple of weeks to tap room's canopy bid by numbers I'm Bruin in Peckham. And as well as pubs London bid, dispense free and the rose and crown in Brixton. The Ivy House none had. Victoria and impact coming off the cuff, inhale the latter two doing pints to take away to drink in the street. Which? Is a great. Civilization has returned in. Basically! Go down there a two pointer, maybe with a mate, and then find a been to lean on. Drink it or failing that you know park, and you can sweep away and one good thing about Kobe, nineteen I think is that it's now acceptable to switch bear in the street from two point plastic milk containers. Which must surely count as a great advancement for mankind. It's a good look now. His everyone's doing it. You know you're not alone in a long loan. Toilets remainder problem. Yes. Open in the parks is a problem. I mean I met a couple of mates near Peckham. Roy Fountain. The Fountain of Peckham Rye Latte lighter. I'm. Met With Mickey Sanson the dentist down there and. We were sitting around next. Shielded spots way from the traffic and there's a little shrubbery free to relieve yourself and should mood or indeed the need take. But. We're very quickly joined by a lot of what I describe as down and outs, who? Had previously discovered this spot and we were the johnny-come-latelies. And they weren't really observing social distancing impact they kept. Trying to have a suck on FAG. Sweet from your bed things that. Goodwin the tourists are open again. Thing but I'm pleased report. Bailey walking as back. With. mentioned bid to me. Yes This is a health for boat. I've been suffering terribly with counts lately A. felted coming on and immediately got my medicine on Wall Street down with the beer drinking. Good to get bail that. Yes I it's I know it's sort of a personal observation, but it feels like it's dippers. That really hurting me. Yeah, they'd really intense WPA's. WPA's yeah. Have you ever looked May. Yes few things that I have to void now one of which well I'll give you the list serious, you think. Of. Whiskey. Lamb. Who? Sausages Bacon Cheese cured meats, pastries, ice, cream and herring. The, Harrington the have. got. Mean, that's so you got to avoid those this isn't. This isn't the first time we've had regular. Listeners will know that you have out twice a year, don't you? Probably yes, I haven't had it as bad as this before because i. Haven't had a beer for ten days. which is the first time that's happened since I was about twelve. I, just wonder I do remember I. Mean a couple of podcasts go, but I believe you recorded saying that you were deciding to have no alcohol alcohol free days because we know during lockdown, you should be able to have a drink whenever you wanted which was everyday. Yes. I did say that and yes, I think differently reaping what I'm selling. Yeah, I haven't been drinking loads, but have been drinking. Constantly. So yes, I, think that's that's the coolest. Don't mean on the plus side. I can have all the low fat yogurt and skimmed milk ally. Classical my favorites, fresh fruits and vegetables. Somebody told me that Cherry's a very good for it. A try at one. Focal. Do Nettie gained. But I am about to open live on. Bahia you ten days Oh. Yes, this is just content. I'm here full. Oh Yeah, Mike Alive Flare Up. Yeah. Yeah, might to yeah I might just faint with the joy of it. Just I'm just telling a table beer from the colonel. So you know baby steps as I. Strength. Yeah. What what strength is that? It's only two point. Nine percent con smells delicious. Yeah, they do very good time small bit, and I take. That is a lovely sight what she drink that with the sun shining. Through your loss. It's it's. Almost pornographic. Okay moving on we put an e. piece up about a day that we have now. We can't go out so much. Maybe we're having to mind some of our past, aren't we? Went Back in time twenty years or so. To a time when we worked for TV Company, Bravo and we had a day persuading Ron Atkinson. The EX manager of Manchester United at the time a very big name. TV Football Pundit. To do shorts. For for Bravo, TV and we had a very surreal day. ow with him. It wasn't. In it and as you said. We couldn't believe it was happening at the time, but now it's sort of amazing that it ever did indeed I mean we. We went to for lunch so the whole story because up on the website desert website. We went to meet him for lunch and essentially. We all got on very well, and we went for a pint afterwards in a public, he was fated by some West, Brom Villa fans, and then burst remarkably back to his pile in Worcestershire. For an afternoon of What I describe debauchery. One thing I didn't really put up to the smattering of. Run acronyms. In the piece but I found a collection of some of his sayings, which used to be known if you remember as wrong leash. Right and language Mangla, wasn't he? He was a language Mangla, amongst other things a big time language Mangla. Yeah. He would say things like. He had acres of time there. or I don't know this is about, but he said if some. Spanish Spanish player. He's the equivalent of the Spanish David Beckham. A couple of others. There's nobody fitter his age except maybe Racquel Welch. I mean he was very unreconstructed. Said Well Club. It's all about the two M's movement and positioning. Nice when he said of Colin Palmer Carlton Palmer. Can Trap the ball further than I can kick it. Which is I remember? It's very true. Yes. Did at times. Yes, he did. It must've liked him. So, yeah, earmark with a remarkable man, she to turn out to be racist some years later. M. Racist live on air and very quickly dropped But you know that was our character. I think with the man we met that day, wasn't it but That's racist for your. Full of nasty, surprises. Now. Actually earning some. Money if you were asked to drink. Yes. That's wrong. Or the irony? Working is against everything. We stand for but yes, I did need to some money. Once trapped in Dole's. And I've been doing so by teaching English as a foreign language. To various people around the world on skype. Ideal. Yeah. It's been fun. Actually on I've enjoyed it much more than I expected. Because of it is just being paid to chat to people. Especially, the more advanced students just have a bit of practice. Yep some very admit some very interesting. People have a lovely. Brazilian lesbian. I think he's a lesbian Just not told her gender very well. have student in Kiev who. Unfortunately I had behind felt compelled to ask if they had the best chicken caves in. I'm great. stunningly. Beautiful student from was becky stone. And that is gratified to see just how much we have in common Ed Sheeran Taylor Swift. Imagine dragons, who my favorite artists! And lost a Turkish student. Who's who switched to me after having a man cunene teacher, who's teaching him to say pulled? Bob. Should I just met how you say long as get A. Very good! Always used to teach mine When I was doing it years ago, he used to teach my knock. Knock jokes. Improved hearing. For example. Knock knock. WHO's a? To. To who know it's to whom? Off. Right and another bear related news. You have an announcement. I do yes I am about to open. UK's only pub. Lady South has decided to rent a garage. She asked me what I thought of it I took a terrible idea because. It would just be filled. Rule the stuff that we should put in skip. Will if we made a puppet? she had a point, so yes, we're going to create an invitation only private pub. Three or four people at the time. With. Dont bold yeah. JUKEBOX! Brought final. Bia Yes I'm looking at strategies on Ebay it. Moment took single costs although I think we can probably get away with many cakes announced. Now. Yes. This is great news is. Telling people about the about. What would like cool our pup? Our pub yeah, well. Maybe even my pope can I say my up gone too far too soon. One, of the great thing about as lady South is involved in is more likely to actually happen. Yes! That's true. So, this is is ideal. Because you'd be understand around outside, be inside. The problems occur. Isn't it That's right? You can stand around. Outside will suit outside. You I mean if and if it rains. Two or three of you can. Sit Inside. Perhaps maybe we'll have to see what the ruling is. Yes. Probably entirely illegal so guess. Because smoking will be allowed. I say yeah. Let's is very excellent news and this will be in the black heath area, or elsewhere will be yes, yes. Seventy. You'll receive an invitation if not you want will. Oh, I see! Right on cue. That is brilliant news talking of which. The News News News Okay. Parent companies I up Yeah, no much of it. Very foreshortened I one thing we could talk about is the will they? Won't they be opening some time in June or in July? I mean we keep getting teased then we by. What I imagine, government briefs to various newspapers, promising one thing and then rowing back on it very strongly the next day. but as The time all recording this. It looks like there will be no pub action. Official pub action. AM before July. Is Looking Why yes, it does! The comes have been pretty shit. House has to be said. Yeah. We were told June twenty second bed two days ago. Now being told that's definitely not gonNA happen. So, yes, wait, we can only hope for July now. And of course that in itself will, the emphasis will be on outside. I imagine they went. Be Opening inside at that point. Something like twenty, seven, thousand big. Ogden's in the country starts. Try I read that this morning at four forty seven thousand pubs and twenty seven thousand tonnes. But perhaps Few in the city. So Those big are going to be quite crowded on A. If I, have anything to do with it, so we might be stuck in the parks. For some time yet. Just please open the toilets. That's. Really coming to their own though. Charlotte shrubbery love shrubbery. But yeah, when when winter rolls around again, it's still going to be tricky. Isn't it going into a pub One can imagine the virus loving pub almost as much as us. He's. Fatty their proximity of punters. Standing inside for hours at a time, you know it's everything that got meatpacking such a bad name. As unopposed, so it's GonNa be a long time, if ever for them to get back to normal, but I'm just trying to kate. Trying to keep it light you. Will inevitably the more you drink, the closer you become. Well there is that as well I mean. Yeah, there's the. They added worry and fun of Booze. They don't get in the meatpacking. Factories know. Everything else is like A. Not Allowed to drink. Awful. I'm. Yes, ABSO- in trouble, and it doesn't take much to wonder around and have a look and see which ones might need to help. Them got signs out or doing some takeaways. UNNOTICED The PELTON arms has crowdsourcing for some funds to aid their survival. Yes, they are partially open takeaways. Box they are danger, great danger of going under and you can find. The crowd linked to their crowdsourcing that twitter. The White Swans Origami in Cheltenham. It's the same. Yeah, so yeah, plenty limb around and progress. Now is a great time to have a look for them before it's too late I. MEAN A. Safe that any means. to aid them. In this time. well, that is back. That's basically it would bad news still shots. Forward to next month when hopefully they'll be open. I as I've said that you can go and get a takeaway pint and lean on the been three doors down. Yes, sure. But. Yes, I've had some cracking bays from the river I house. Ryobi. Literally cycling to the river, I o houses to up hill on the way back. Okay onto other news then. We got a offer sponsorship, didn't we? We did yes. Ray, we reach. We have actually where go sponsor. Wear on hold with them. Because it was Go Out London. A sort of Entertainment and travel APP. which is obviously being kyw pushed, but This was from Jubal the. Ten jobs and employment website. Yes I mean uneven better fit for us than the Harry's raises. When, he got in touch to see if we both with our full bids. Wanted to have sponsorship from them. jubilees vertical job search engine that aggregates and displays job ads from thousands of job, awards, corporate recruiter, pages and newspapers. I mean that's Stanford Geez. Could remain. Talking copy may token. They ever read anything they want and they. Don't do that. and. I. A Challenger think for headline of the month. Oh Good Yeah the headline. This is reported by AFP news agency headline was Spanish porn-star held off. Demand is in toad venom ritual. Typical to see how that's going to be beaten this is a story of Nacho Vidal who was arrested on manslaughter charges following a man's death during mystic ritual, in which he inhaled psychedelic. toad venom. Just been queuing it little lowest time. Makes, you think Disney what people get up to the lockdown genius Brennan. Now for the does that a challenge You may have heard of the Sofa to five K challenge. That's doing the rounds indeed encourages people to get off the city and get more exercise. Won't be done is doing actually. Yeah when he was telling me about, he was sitting next to a nineteen point balk. supportable appeal to be. Has Seriously taking anyway. He told me about the served five k challenge he has. Joe, Wylie in his ear, telling him how he's doing and encouraging him, and I thought hang on. So for two five K. Surely wrong my round. Didn't it be Five K to the SOFA. Got Something to look forward to. And so after virtually no discussion about a tool where proud to announce the Desert Five K to the SOFA CHALLENGE APP, in which we encourage people to spend more time on the SOFA and not out running about in the park, getting in people's fucking way. The voices of dirty south of myself. I encourage you to slow down and and offer a bit flip by helpful comments like. Is that a pub? What about another pint? Culminating in such encouragement as looks like rain, but to stay home, and I think this new on TV four. So that's deserter. Five Cater Sofa challenge coming soon to the APP store four hundred ninety nine pounds. which is your way at the end of it? Onto our next. Feature we thought we talk. We talk. We're missing knobs I'm you may. It may be obvious I mean normally in our series. We would visit two or three pubs per, wouldn't we? And enjoy us of there. and. So we thought we. Yeah try a public elections pub. Tales this time out. I mean I've been sitting a lot of pubs. And indeed ex pubs on my bear walks I think this password put it in my mind I've been walking around spotted the poll at arm's. Locally in. Brixton. Or Campbell. WICKER MOMS was on flex men road. King William Fourth on camera, Niro these pups that the now dead, but. I remember great times in all of them. And it got me thinking about all their stories. And how will open as we take them for granted? And we thought we just have talked about some of our favorites. One that came to mind immediately was the windowless pub in. Greenwich. Oh. Greenwich. Hardee's. I mean. We've had some great times in their way. You know whatever the season the weather is outside. It's always exactly the same inside which is. Really our pub shoot I think. But one of my favorite memories says Tom. The the chef who would always tell you what you having for dinner. Look Tom? Rest in peace. He postulated need last year, was it? That's right. Yeah, that was very sad. But you could always be sure of. Long winded welcome from him. Yes a mixed welcome. Mixed. Up to you in the end would need. Oh, yeah, he's great. He was great and then as great as well even if they were exactly what he'd made, it somehow talk you into having that. something. We've mentioned on on on the podcast before was the. The the smoke bomb going off. Yes, says in the Tyler Harbor in. Kibera when. The estate above the Ferrier Estate was. Yes. We have mentioned it before. Yes, it was. Quite a! Dingy pop again. He didn't see lot of daylight. But one day. Somebody threw a smoke bomb into. It cleared the how. And when the smoke cleared someone in the fruit, machine. Genius Legend is legend. And then another one that we both familiar with was the old week. Schaefer borough mark of course. There's the market pub the smaller of the two market pubs and East to shut I remember eight PM. Earned, which gave you that sort of magic frenzy of last orders? From half past seven onwards, didn't it? Say. Out, then he started to go out. Yeah, But that was a wonderful fulfilled with the market characters and. Also brilliant governor. who come onto later I? Don't know. But A. That was for many years. A. Destination for US and Our crew. And a wonderful spot. Made better by all the people in it. I think the real family fail, wasn't it? Yes sometimes. Yes to member, we went there for spiders. Return from Africa. Have we told that story before? Yeah Yeah. And We mentioned at the applet. With a seven-foot Trans Woman. He's tiny. Yeah. And stuck them in a limo and drove to the week, which opened especially. Spotted have. A pint at about ten in the morning. within the hour he was in the Thames was swimming bound like a good. Yes. Other notable pubs. I think when you think about your favorite pubs. Awfully. People remember their first public I probably got served in. Distinction, isn't it yeah? Economic Eaten after the price of think mine, don't date me obviously. But. I. Think my first pint cost twenty four P.. O.! A couple of growth. That was in the anchor in Neyland on the Suffolk Essex border I'd. been going in quite a lot with my dad forty about twelve or thirteen at the time. I. Took what that would take me intimate down and bias. Lemonade lime while he had a pint Apart from one time he accidentally said lager in line. and. We got served. So. I was sitting there H. Thirteen drinking lager in line, which became my tipple for two or three years. because. I got served with so yeah whenever we went a long time, so. That means being heavy drinking for many many years. Each! Lisa got some. Getting some fruit with that. Yes I think the PABO I was. I served in walls, the black horse in secret highstreet. I would go with my brother who was a few years older than me? Hours about fourteen. The worst thing about it was the I would try and keep up with him. PINT pint pint. The US getting served L. at fourteen years. Getting, said courage best bitter. At Fourteen and trying to go toe to toe with my brother, which didn't end well for me, And it's now a travelodge. And the develops. Forced to make the facade look like the pump did in eighteen, ninety, seven, as originally agreed to. which is when I I when teen? That job. Exactly save me the travel. Another. Of note are of course, favorite seaside pubs. I was at university at Kent Inverse and Stayed. Two Years in which double and My local. On the front in my local was the Neptune in. There which is. Absolutely, wonderful pub as many people may know in the summer. Would tables all around it right on the beach. But was even better. I record in the winter. And a couple of memorable nights when the floods came. Everybody was up all night and. Slipping out their basements, putting up sandbox. And we were in the back of the net June. Ordering Pint pint having the time of our lives. All. Student! Brilliant. and. It's such a cracking problem the. On the beach. There's and he's a wonderful wonderful spot. June in Westerville. I was reminded when you talking that seaside pubs. Of The fortune of War Brighton That's a great place to watch since air eighteen. Sure is on right on the beach and. I found a diary entry recently. I never really kept a diary about two weeks in my life and This was one of the entries it said fourteen of war es slogs locks. Kisses with zoo girl Julia who said to me after just coming up kissing me. With all these beautiful girls here I had to fall for you. I have no recollection of what so ever sure. She was knuckling. We must get more diaries. Found this two weeks of debauchery, and it was largely to bolt tree. Carter, Had forgotten so much of it. Kicked diary, moral. We were given a couple of football memories. As well Got, a couple, but. Ford the hamlet the Premier Podcast for college. Remembered very fondly. The moment of Eric Dyers, penalty versus Colombia in two thousand eighteen. World Cup that was in the galette impeccable. One can imagine the bedlam that's occurred. And, of course the ADT and Goose Green roundabout off. The Village Hamlets playoff final. Where they The turnover exceeded their normal news turnover. As everyone pope. From tooting. To Crack Tracking, memories, there I mean I. Remember the grove in Campbell which she used to be. A hang out full the beautiful people while they let me but. They also show the football. And I remember being be utterly banged out for England versus Germany and The noise that greeted lineker equalizer which I. Muss Guess Must Data as nine hundred ninety. But. The noise that greeted that equaliser against. Germany is still the loudest noise I have ever heard made by human voices. Maybe the low ceiling has to do it. Absolutely deafening, but Yeah, he remember where you were those great. Moments watching sports. I have another sort of England Germany. Memory when we beat them five one. Remember that goes. Hop, in Exeter with our make wack. And it was such a walkover I was evil, even able to go to the bar in the second half. Time and halftime. And then. Finally we're going to mention great. Governors, great landlords. Yeah. All the pubs. Have a great landlord. And Great, staff Costar. The best of them are are not only just serving you, but they're also welcoming the connectors. They out like hosts, they introduce you to other punters. They think you might get on with and so now. When you got a good one? You know it. Few. Nurture those relationships yeah. I mean one of the. Been Danny the wheat SHEAF. Yeah. He was very good at putting people together also very good at. It in great staff in who? Complimented the place and he would always have kind of speech. At knocking a clearing out time, one of them are member was Ladies and champions with those of you without tickets to the stall G. Please make your way to the exits. Yeah, very to get out alive every occasion and He had a bell. You know the last orders bell to ring for various announcements with knee. Yeah if he found out, it was your birthday. Let. It dreamed about the pub- shut up and announce. It was your birthday. Everyone should buy you a drink. Larry, but yeah, Donny's brilliant. I mean another one that comes to mind immediately is on the Blythe Hill Tavern. Antares as you say it's. It's not just the. Guys at the helm. It's the. Staff Ethos isn't there them? Run through the place. Meeting old friends when you go back in there, it's not saying friends rather than. Service yes, I mean a loss of them. Friends notably phoebe. Right the mistress. who was assistant chief, and now runs the Resin Crown Union Street Yeah Yeah. so. Yeah I, don't know. Maybe you've got some favorite pop memories. If so let us know we can turn into a regular bit. I mean his set me thinking certainly about. pub memories throughout my life I decided. I might write a novel my life in pubs. Using describes sections of my life. But Yeah, drum trump's align other on twitter. At Dessert Block or An email to hello at deserted a CODA. You're a bomb. Dasa some of the most idol human beings. That we've heard of. Had A couple. Of this month. There's going to pool rail -Ten i. read about Suzano ago, but tim he was fine, I think it's considered dangerous driving. He was find the walking his dog by holding the leash out of his car window and driving very slowly. You can see. That there was an element of laziness go. Yes. He's a bummed also. Is Was Lord Melbourne The laziest Prime Minister. The United Kingdom's had. Exxon. Improper relationship in these difficult times we do. Yes I mean you'd think. Boris was lazy enough, but the Guy even beat him. He was prime minister from. Eighteen fifty four to forty one. Joining, which time he had no major achievements, the grant will sees when a wool was a domestic issues to. Tackle. He slept through cabinet meetings and parliamentary debates, and his motto was why not leave it alone? I mean he's got my vote and he's What I'm saying. Well for me. Lord Melbourne. You're a bomb DASA. Okay onto section. We call the social media senior. Social Media Seen. Snakes get, isn't it? Hung over. You go excellent first of all I need to issue an apology. I'm good. Would like. It's about social social media. It's twitter. I would like to apologize to the misunderstanding with tweets. CONC- now how what was intended as simple observation could be misinterpreted as an invitation. Fought me on fat not. Frontman on. Fat Fuck me fat. I must say story to ten stone tone. Him I will be refunding his coach fair. Bustan? Sagan I. Hope it was a make a bus. Lonesome! That did catch my eye, though was from At Double Shiny. He was to in this related to the statue coming down in Bristol. Took statues day having run. and. He said there's one of them s Afrita. WHO's the daughter of King already unready who wants defeated attacking army like pouring beer on them and releasing the bees? Yeah can you imagine me or something but Personally, I think the statute should be torn down. A beer should be wasted in the field of conflict in this manner. Own Let's get some tickets. Was it. Run Cold Rung chain. Let's go. I saw several. Hannah Rose Woods on twitter posted a page by Charles mastermind written in nineteen o five. And, she added I will never get bored of ED. Ward intellectuals taking one trip to south London. Being frightened, and then writing an essay about why they will never visit this strange land again. And Charles Muslin wrote. It. It's entitled in Dejection near Tooting. How to get there. That is not easy. Because it is the place of forgotten things. But across the river, you may find municipal trams inscribed with its in spiriting title and Bhai Elbowing, elbowing out a few tied workers, an edging away aged men of battered physique obtain the desired seat. You Journey Todd Haley. For immense spaces of time Pasta, moving show of shadow shapes of mean houses in which area nothing has taken a local habitation and a name. The text changes from slum to suburb from suburb back to slum. At length amid an impression of Rawness, public house and red brick, the final jarring outrage of the municipal break announced his your destination. Well. When I registered the the aged men of physique at a certain ring of truth about it. Yes? But Otherwise. Woolsey Smith now releasing a one million pound million-pound apartment, doesn't he? Yeah, probably, yes, yes, tooting squint luckily. But yes dreadful. Dreadful. Predating. Giles Coren by about a hundred years. Yes, he hasn't evolved Marchesi. Next up at water. Raise who was who wrote on twitter picking up on a popular name. He said I'm posting tendering sort of influenced me one each day. No explanation today, the first white wine. Tomorrow red wine. Didn't carry on, but the idea. And then? Finally. There was a male out from the HAM book about. The finest. which unfortunately left out the L. in Pedalos. Meaning the entry for Delitzsch read. Never a dull moment in delitzsch park not least because there are pe- does. Is a part for everyone. which prompted at slow per to comment? Any boat comes near my kids and I'll do time. And a couple of people had the some type some printing. Error Memories. Jeff Not Jeff replied is to work in a typesetters for a free London paper and my favorite Typo was when the were discount was printed as disco. and. Kennett robots record her place of employment sending out a bulletin to all UK science teachers about the exciting large hard on cut. Large heart on collider. When every UK signs teacher. De. I. Think on that large, hard and exciting note. That's about it. I think so. Yes, Thank you all for listening. Both of you and we're very hopeful that next time we speak to you, we should be doing so from not of if not in a power then very near one, yes, and holding a lovely fresh pint. We have to get back to the trails off. Series stumped me series four. Downing. which will be set in leafy Wimbledon retracing the pump steps if you will of a famous former resident. we can say this. Might put people off. Clue. Okay who said? I'm not an alcoholic. I am a multimillionaire. Find out next time. On the desert to pump cast. Night. Cliffhanger right good to have uplifting even. As

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Preview of Series Six of Access to Inspiration podcast

Access to Inspiration

08:25 min | 1 d ago

Preview of Series Six of Access to Inspiration podcast

"Hi sue stockdale here. Welcome to the access to inspiration. Podcast the show where you can be inspired by people who may be on a like. You've we have now reached six series of podcast and with forty episodes published to date. We hope each one enables you to transcend your day-to-day challenges and reflect on what you are capable of achieving. would you like to. Also the podcast is now in the top ten percent of most popular. podcasts globally. According to listen notes so please help us to continue to spread the word in your country and beyond so that more people can be inspired by all the guests. We've had so far. The theme of this series is twenty first century change makers and we will be featuring several people who are trying to improve society in different ways. Sometimes that might seem like an overwhelming challenge too big to be achieved by any one individual. But i hope what our guests help you to be to mind is it. Sometimes it just takes a conversation or a moment to type to be the catalyst for change in episode forty five. I'll be talking to home. One funder of a non-government station. In vietnam who. I met over twenty five years ago in antarctica. It was seeing the enthusiasm of other young people down there that made home realize she wants to do something to preserve the environment. It was actually the first time ever. I had seen some really passionate people. The one john expedition. I don't know if you remember all of them. I just barely remember all the names but it was really the first time when ahead really thought. Wow these people as so interesting. They had something that they have some fashion that really pool them together. And then all of us in that weird circumstance and do something that i had never done before i had never heard all these ozone hole and global warming all the knowledge and everything that i've never do that was really my role but it's a lot more when i really saw how people will passionate about the environment which something i had never thought of. It was really the first time ever. I thought of the world something that is really bigger at my sound. Really something that is larger than life. And i had realized how big the planet is and how little i knew i knew nothing i knew nothing about the will about humanity and about how young people can really come together and do something about environment. Since spending her non-government or asian hong has now mobilized thousands of young people to become more active in preserving the vitamins. Heating stories as well as i timed. Expediencies have a powerful influence on us. And that's the reason that the access inspiration podcast was created in the first place. I asked mathias sound designer from argentina. What episode so far has had the greatest impact on him. The one i really enjoyed the most was the one from the because from each interview. I do take something on some more than others. Many times go online later on. I research time thing then. Maybe those research stay away by the us. Turnouts interview. John david but he's message. I think was really strong when she talks about seeing the earth from outside so small projects and the he wants to just hug the earth like a newborn he says that he also says that he sees the earth with no boundaries with no colors for different countries. It's a simple message. But i think it's strong to hear from someone that actually went to space So that real life nothing. Tvs wheels do let was strongly impacted metaxas also reinforces to me why we liked interview real people and share their insights with global audience. Another guest that will be coming up. This series is dr leeann armitage whose teenage expediencies in inner city. London inspired her to become a doctor. I was fifteen. I was coming hurry. One day with my sister and i remember hearing this really loud sound from above so i'm at top nassau that it was a helicopter and i have hannah coaches. They still excitement. T- today's And i also might say strict. We could traveling red headed up to his landlady. She agreed and together. We went but when we go i. M embassy in a crowd of people gathered around and everybody was just standing desks. Daring on the facial expressions. Didn't quite the excitement. That i had inside side was a bit confused and i just off the nearest peasantry to me why everybody was gavitt and she told me that a young man had been stopped and growing up in peckham. I grew up in southeast london. It wasn't uncommon. Unfortunately to hear about young men being stopped reinsure. Quite a young age is in that night's but there was something about this incident. That really stuck with me and i think the case. I went from that place of being so excited to then feed so great. Does i really nonstop. News is headquartered. Isn't hip any grease. In a tool. And i remember in that moment seating so many different types of emotions. I felt angry. Because i was looking around thinking. Anybody just found in his staring the he's actually going to do something to make a difference and to open our cities. Our first guest will be aiming henderson. Who's movement ten blab aims to build a better future for working pittance. in america. i started a company called ten lab and my original co founder had been the first vp of hr and diversity and inclusion twitter. And she'd started a whole bunch of programs to support parents in they'll replace at twitter earned a great reputation for herself and twitter and we thought given her experience and background and relationships even my experience and background and relationships that people would be banging down our doors to hire us but for the most part nobody cared about parents in the workplace. So i double down on the research trying to say okay. How can i articulate this in a way that people will hear it. And that's where. I got deep into the science of what happens your brains and how we evolved as a species in. What do we know about the future work in the skills that are needed in the future of work just started out on all the research which is now in this look but then also i tested out a bunch of different audiences and i'll and happy to say that in one presentation that i gave after i'd had a few laps the presentation to a room of folks at yelp about fifty or sixty folks yelp and afterwards i had a young male manager who didn't yet have kids come up to me and say oh my god i feel like i should go out and have kids immediately can be better at my job. And then i thought had communicated effectively what i am trying to say and so i do think it really is but that initial phase for me and i'm going to quote my friend. Genetic greening who runs the largest nonprofit. Canada called the bbc women's health foundation. She says that she's found was most effective at influencing people when you marry story with science and when you marry morality with economics awful so i hope he will join us over the next few weeks to hear from these change makers on several more as always you can keep in touch with access to inspiration on social media. We are on facebook. Instagram linked to the twitter just search for access to inspiration. Please also take a moment to leave us a review on apple podcasts. And if he just tell one other person about cds will help us spread the word. You'll also find transcriptions for all of the forty episodes and a number of specific playlists on the website so hop on over to access to inspiration dot org. I look forward to connecting with you soon.

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The Nazi Super Horse Program, Part 2: A Horse-filled Heist

Ridiculous History

32:47 min | 8 months ago

The Nazi Super Horse Program, Part 2: A Horse-filled Heist

"This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by Boyz state. Why is America? So divided is there hope for the future, the new documentary Boise State has answers to both questions featuring the high school program that spawned a US President Senators, pro athletes, and a supreme court justice boys state follows one thousand high school boys as they create their own mock government. It's the winner of the Sundance Grand Jury Prize and critics call it a revolution in verite film making watch boy state rated PG thirteen an apple original film now on the Apple TV. APP subscription required for Apple TV PLUS IF WE WANNA list. Every way speaker can help podcast publishers won't we need a podcast of our own whether you're in charge of long running series with extensive backlogs were countless limited series you organize and monetize your entire catalogue with Speaker with speakers customizable publisher plan you can add collaborators analyze extensive listener analytics and even share exclusive content through custom s and that's just for starters had speaker dot Com to learn more that's S. p. r. e. k. e.. R. Dot Com ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio Welcome back to the show. Ridiculous historians always thank you for. Tuning in. When we last met together here in. PODCAST. Land We explored the strange obscure story of the Nazi obsession with orces. took to. Just, bizarre, lengths. EMBIID. I'm no pope canceled after my my Nazi horse intro on the last episode. I thought it was funny. I'm not going to do it now though or ever again. What I don't know man I just I can't tell myself after that I'm I'm kidding I thought it was cute. But this is the part of the story as we tease in the last episode where things kind of take an interesting turn not right away. But if you stick with us, I think you will be rewarded. Oh, one hundred percent agreed. So let's ride out to the rest of the story of course, with the help of our better third super producer Casey Peckham. Boom we're back in Germany. It's clear that German, forces. ARE GOING TO LOSE THE WAR And this is where a veterinarian named Rudolph lessing comes into play. At the farm at hostile. Our hypolito just. Row has appointed this veterinarian Rudolph lessing and when the tide of war has clearly turned against. Germany, this veterinarian lessening and a small group of Nazi officers who also happen to love. Start to worry that these regal stallions that they love so much will be. I don't know a subject to degradation I guess stolen or eaten. Because it turns out that Russian forces were known. For capturing enemy horses, killing them in eating them. That's yeah. Okay. That's one of those things that I've always been fascinated by I. don't want anyone to think that I'm a monster but where did these lines in the sand get drawn like we'll people will eat rabbit it's probably a little lower on the you know accepted food chain for most but you definitely will hear about rabbits do or you know lambs about as cute as they come. Is it acuteness quotient? Is it a functionality that makes certain animals more or less acceptable to eat even today I'm still a little bit perplexed by this whole continuum of like which animals you know squid people out if you eat them. Yeah I, mean I'm the worst person to ask about this severally practice that line I mean I horse. Before and it was. I think more for the cultural experience where I was was that in Korea or Japan. That was in Japan. Yeah. But you know still I have some of the same lines like e horse is more common thing definitely outside of the US and Canada. But I think a lot of people have a line or to like I would not be comfortable eating say dog or a cat less I had to to survive. You know what I mean. I do and maybe that's what was happening with the Russians and I'm making no judgment on one way or the other I was using this as an opportunity to broach the subject Casey, where do you fall on this I? Don't want to derail is too much but I think it's fascinating. Where do you fall on this like which animals are okay to eat line is it about cuteness about utility? What is it for you? Yeah I think I think if we're honest I think it's the cuteness thing and it's also like you know domesticated cuteness versus like in the wild cuteness that's probably part of it too. But honestly I, mean. Intelligence, right. If we're if we're going to be fair, we're going to be ethical intelligence. It's gotta be big part of it. You know we a lot of people eat pork and pigs are very very smart and that's That's kind of a conundrum. I still eat all the time, but you know I feel increasingly less great about it. So the octopus has well they. All right. You ever read column Ram I mean that's a super CENCI and being Casey on the case But back to the Russians in you know picking off these horses and making a fast work of them call narrowly These Russians were absolutely moving in in the walls were closing in on the Nazis and these Russians really had none of that reverence or cuddly sweet empathy that the Germans seem to have for you know horses rather than humans and they just couldn't be less impressed by these these specimens and they didn't differentiate them for many. You'll run of the mill Nag you know is that a thing isn't a nagged like a regular horse. Means Female Horse doesn't I don't know well, Nag can mean a small horse but it often has a connotation of a older useless horse Nigga they got okay I use the word. Relatively appropriately there. So they were again, just not seeing what the Germans were seeing when it came to these horses that they ran across but the Germans at hostile at this, you know this facility, I mean sure where they tools of the Third Reich participating in a breeding program to create a super horse you know used for war. Yeah. But at the end of the day, why were there? They were the best and the brightest in the country when it came to animals and you know like you say bad, I mean we know that people. Who really truly love animals are typically good people. I'm not trying to like you know like soft pedal this or say these were the good. Horse, Handler Nazis, but they definitely, you know cared about the animals under in their charge and they didn't want these bloodthirsty Russians coming in and making mincemeat out of their prized lapaz nurse, right? Yeah I. I. Think. It can be a very good traits to like love animals but I don't think that necessarily make you a good person but you know what? From the Horse's perspective? These were great people right there. Point out one very interesting thing here we're talking about the problem CENCI or eating meat and asking where we draw the line Adolf Hitler himself was a vegetarian that did not make him a good person. People on the Internet love to point that out. That's like Sub Sub section of What's the Liza Godwin's law that All Internet debates will end up invoking Nazi Germany at some point not to be confused with Gladwin Law with nothing else that I'll let ben defined Oh gosh. Man. We should probably check with him off air to see what what his law might surely surely he has really quickly and it's got to do this I. I've been just butchering butchering butchering not horses but the pronunciation of the particular breed of force because I just clocked myself saying it weird and that kind of decided to do a double take and it is lipizzaners not lip posner. So I know. I'M GONNA go ahead and own that on right now as opposed to like going in and like fixing every single. Now, we don't do that. Here was this day but I will cop to it right now, and from here fourth, we will refer to them as partners so and I followed your lead on that episode what? Does. The fact is though Ben we could have gotten it right the first time when I read it more closely, and then gradually just kind of bastardized the pronunciation as we've made this two parter and God knows we don't remember we talk about from minute to minute or at least that's speaking for myself. But I think we're in a good place. Now we were right with God and we can reasonably progress fourth story. Yeah. Yeah. There's another character here we have to introduce his name is Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Rudawsky. Lieutenant. Colonel Hubert Rebuffs. Sqi. Is also a horse lover and he's in charge of the care of the horses on this farm and when lesson and Rudawsky and the other horse. Loving Nazi officers realized that the Russians are coming and will steal their horses. Or even worse in their mind, eat them to survive. Because you of course, they did not consider Russians entirely human, right? So they would think a horses way more important in the grand scheme of things. So they did something that they would have never done. They said, we need to reach out to our enemies. The American forces we need them to help steal the horses to Safety Rudolph Ski Says Okay Look The American. Forces are the only way to save these horses. So he sends a spy across the border across the German border. To meet with the oncoming American forces in say hey. I know we got a lot of stuff going on right now I know there's a little bit attention, axis allies and so on. But you guys love horses. Right. You guys are cool with animals. Will you help us save hours? Yeah they're. They're appealing to that kind of common bond whether or not they like hate each other ideologically they can both least agree that horses are cool and probably shouldn't be like you know openly slaughtered. So they basically join forces in like a weird buddy comedy kind of situation you know we would we say a sort of almost like an inglorious bastards but a little bit kinder gentler. It's like clever Hans meets inglorious bastards. And here's what goes down. So we know that Germany surrenders on May seventh nineteen, forty five. That's what the official announcement. But about eleven days earlier more than a week earlier that German intelligence officer, we talked about the one that Rudawsky ended up sending. He surrenders to the US Second Cavalry Group, and when he surrenders, this is his strategy when he surrenders, he has a bunch of photographs of these thoroughbred horses says like throwing up his hands and say I surrender, and then like showing the pictures and the horses same please save our stallions. And then. This guy was a looped waft colonel I believe his name was Walter halters. So he gets interrogated the way any surrendering officer would, and he says quote not far from here. Some of the most valuable horses in the world are being sheltered. These are no ordinary horses. These are royal. Time you'll. Posner. You're better at. Its lipizzaners Lipids, lipids honors. Doubles Lipids Honors. These are Royal Lipids Auden from Vienna. He said he did say this and then he says the German army sent them to this farm host ow for safekeeping. Now, they're going to get captured by the Russians and They have to figure out what they're going to do. They sure do You knew the risks when you decided to drive drunk, there could be a crash people get hurt or killed. But that didn't stop. You did it. You knew you could get arrested. You can incur huge legal expenses and you could possibly even lose your job. You were well aware of the consequences of driving drunk but one thing's for sure you were wrong when you said it was no big deal drive sober get pulled over this message brought to you by Nitsa. It's a great time to get a great deal on a new car when you get approved for an auto loan from Penn Fag our powered by truecar rates are as low as one point three, nine percents apr a new. Finance for a longer term to lower your monthly bill plus take up to sixty days to schedule your first payments, join Penn Fed, and together we'll keep you moving forward. Anyone can apply visit ten fat dot org slash auto or call one, eight, hundred, two, four, seven, five, sixty, six to receive any advertised product must a member confed insure bank t way? We've got our hero of the day or the moment at least a Colonel James handcock hank read who reached out to the head Honcho the man himself general George S Patton, and when Word Reaches Patton that those stallions were stuck behind enemy lines in Czechoslovakia. He I don't know this is just a little bit of editorial ization. Again, he must have that same little animal you know part of his heart and soul that gave that is brought to tears with the thought of these cuties getting sliced up by enemy forces, and so he decides to make this a priority and sends that cavalry to save them and they have to do it in secret patent says, get them meaning the horses make it fast. The reason being secret is because the US army had already cracked in agreement with Stalin remember the Stalin and the US did not trust each other. They just had a common cause. So they practice agreement was Stalin that they weighed advanced. Further than Germany's border with checklists Slovakia, and the horses again are over the border. So it's against that agreement for the US to intervene. But the die is cast in their path is set a small group of Nazi German soldiers and US soldiers decide to put the war to one side to bracket it or as they say in corporate America to put opinion it moment. And team up to get to the farm and rescue these horses Oh and really quickly. Yeah. I have mentioned that patent Zeise lit up in in the in as much as like a dead I'd you know military strategist genius like that size could possibly do but he was in fact an actual horse lover when he heard that these horses were in need of rescuing and it turns out, he actually was a legitimate documented horse. Lover, he was a huge fan of Polo and he had competed in the nineteen twelve Olympic pentathlon. I didn't know anything about patents pre military history. That's pretty interesting. Remember Colonel Charles, Hancock Hank Lee who's the one who told a patent about this this whole core situation in the first place. Well, Patton gave the order and moments. Later, Hank read this gentleman who was a horseman himself the Commanding Officer of the Second Cavalry in Europe. He dispatched one of his soldiers and who was a writer himself from Tennessee to team up with this particular. To make this quick and nimble in operation as possible because patent made it very clear. Yeah. Like you said a minute ago Ben that this was something that had to be done in secret but he took a step further and said if they were ever discovered patent, would never you disavow this entire thing and not you know it was. So that's what makes this a black ops isn't that right Ben isn't that what a blackout like an off book kind of Operation Right Yeah plausible deniability because think about it if they're caught and Russia wants to. Push the case this could endanger the alliance of the allies. has the potential to which would change the course of history. Yep. So angry chooses this guy from Tennessee who's familiar with horses. Guiding Captain Tom. Stuart as he said to team up with the German veterinarian. So in the dark of night. They moved through miles of forest and the ruins of villages that have been destroyed to capture these horses every term with them to the US forces before the Russian troops are arrive and when lessing gets back to the farm, he takes Captain Stuart and hides him in his apartment, and then he goes to negotiate with the director of the farm. So lessing tells Captain Stuart Hey here hide in my apartment on the Farms premises I'm going to go to my boss the director of the farm and say like Hey let's save the horses and then I'm going to go to the German general in charge of this region and be like. Hey Bro. Don't you love horses to Yup. They just needed to convince the Germans. That, they would officially surrender the horse farm to the US immediately again, because they thought the US forces would treat the horses better than the Russian forces what and Stewart actually wrote an official letter to there was like a memo to German commanders at hostile, and he just basically appeal to their humanity. You know and said, the Americans wished to assist you in evacuating the horses safely back across the border to Bavaria and it hit home. These German commanders realizing that they were toast that it was over for them as far as like you know prevailing in the war effort decided to cut their losses and at least you know okay well, at least we can do a good thing. And they and they did they help them free the horses and they all were guided safely back to to Bavaria. Yeah less really made an appeal to the horse lover in everyone involved, right He says. It is unimportant for us to win the war here at this horse farm. It's our duty to do everything. We can to save these horses so they make a flag. White flag the old standard of surrender out of a bedsheet, put it up on the farthest flagpole, and then a few hours later US forces officially take over the farm and they start making plans to get the horses to safety. and. There's something there. There's a poetic. Quote about this from the commanding officer of the second calvary from Hank Rita and and it stayed with me he says. We were so tired of death and destruction. We wanted to do something. Beautiful. nope. Mesa perfect sense you're facing your own demise, they know what's going to happen to them, and maybe they're not going to be executed but they know their lives are over Why not go for a moment of redemption and I'm not saying this is enough to redeem all of the horrible acts of the Nazi party. But I see the impulse I understand the drive there and it's a nice place to sort of wrap story or begin to I think we've got a little bit of epilogue for you as well going yes. So The big question what happened to the horses and then also what happened to these soldiers? You know the the person we just quoted. Hank read is ease on the US side, but everybody in this war has seen so many terrible things right and you feel you feel like even you're you're fighting for UC is the greater good. You are also committing acts of violence so How beautiful it is to maybe save something instead of destroy it. These surrender at the farm is Peaceful Lieutenant William Donald Quinlivan. I love that name was the first of seventy US troops to arrive on the scene and once they had secured the base the US. Troops thought the mission was over. But on April, thirtieth a small German force that had decided to fight to the death entered into a five hour battle with the soldiers on the farm. It ended up with two U.. S.. Troops Dine, and that was one of the impetus. For the US military to ship though horses. All the way to the US. They say we're taking a we're stealing them like you asked the safest place we can think of is back home. In the good old us of a imagine having to transport, having to safely transport these live horses across Europe. That is a tall milkshake friends and it felt like it was the only choice they had because. Food Insecurity was so widespread and rampant that these horses had despite their stereotypes about Russians horses in any country at this point had a very high likelihood of being killed and ing. Flynn living. podcasting, which also means the age of podcast networks with large back catalogues long running series limited programming at even cross network collaborations power publisher supposed to keep this all organized with spreaker of course, speakers, customizable publisher plan. Let's organize your content exactly how you want it and gives you enough hot tech tools to monetize the largest back cadillacs if you're into premium offerings for subscribers, checkout speakers customized. RSS Feeds to upload and schedule exclusive content with ease or use our campaign manager to manage different campaigns from one central platform. Once your podcasts business gets big enough you can even add multiple networks to one account and collaborators assigns each one that helps keep the true crime series away from the comedy podcasts and make sure you get the advertisements that will resonate the most with your listeners so. Let's move from the age of podcasting to the age of the podcast network with Speaker Heads Reeker Dot Com to learn more that's S. P. R. E. A. K. E.. R.. Dot Com I look a bed that's really firm. I need something a little softer than that rest easy. The sleep number three smart bet you can both the your coffers with sleep number setting it really helped me fall. Asleep faster. Yes. By gently warming your feet. Okay. But can it help keep asleep it senses your movements and automatically adjust you must be comfortable sleepnumber proven quality sleep is life changing sleep. It's our big sale of the year. All beds are on sale save fifty percent on the sleep number three, sixty limited edition smart bet only for a limited time to learn more. GO TO SLEEPNUMBER DOT COM? So in the fall of nineteen, forty, five, hundred, fifty one of these remarkable horses are airlifted onto Stephen F. Austin, which is an amphibious docking ship wasn't there had been what does that? What does that mean? Exactly? Yeah, there were several US Austin's. But. This one was the third USS Austin and it is an amphibious transport dock. So an amphibious transport dock is it's a ship that can transport troops into a war zone by seat usually like shooting out landing craft. And they also have nowadays, they have the ability to transport helicopters and things like that. So this is ship that room for the horses as is probably the most important part here. Yeah exactly, and they were allowed to flourish and that's kind. The happy ending of the story you know like I mean it's it's like we said animals like this have no control over their situation in an always pulls on my heartstrings. When you see them kind of used for nefarious purposes I, don't know I'm not a big fan of breeding and the complications and the moral dilemmas behind all of that pure breeding and stuff anyway or crossbreeding right we talked about that with the Tigers that's something that you see with purebred dogs and dog shows and stuff, and there's a lot of. Feelings about things like that. So that alone kind of makes me twitch a little bit but then when you know they're being bred for use in war that's even worse. So it's great to see. One hundred and fifty one of them at least I mean that that must have just been a fraction. Then they were trying to breed thousands and thousands of these, right? So think of the ones that were lost. Yeah. The ones that they were also never borne because the bream programmed Ni- continue. It strange because this saved. The entire. Concept. Of these horses, right because all of the existing living versions of this horse have been gathered in this one farm. And if they had not been transported out the US they probably would have been lost. You know whether eaten whether dying starvation, etc. So in the midst of all the chaos and terror and inhumanity or in horse. Maybe of World War Two it's inspiring that there's this one tale. Wherein people put aside the war they pledged to fight in to save some animals. It does tug on the heartstrings. And so in a way. You Guys I. Think we found a happy ending here. We absolutely did and I think there's no better place to wrap up then with a happy ending not to mention where thirty four minutes and eighteen seconds into this recording and despite the people behind the curtain guy some of my moments of not picking up the baton when passed to me because dealing with one of the other byproducts of our jobs here in podcast him probably GonNa Shrink down to maybe a little shorter than that but I think it's a respectable episode. And respectable two parter and I really appreciate You ben and You Casey for joining me on this journey. Yeah Back Katcha I'm watching a fantastic storm gathering outside of my window. So I'M GONNA go hang out in the patio and probably think a little bit more about obscure inspiring stories from World War Two We love to hear your suggestions in this vein. So hoof it on over to the Internet where you can find us on facebook you can find us on twitter. Fight US on instagram. We recommend our facebook page a ridiculous historians if you want a good historical chuckle or two and find says individuals as well. If you issue may find me on the Internet on the instagram exclusively at how now no brown where you can find I do allow stories or you posting cooking stuff and video game nerd stuff and things hanging out with my kid and if festival you're into I'm there and I am on instagram in a burst of creativity as at Ben Bullen I am on twitter as. At Casey Peg Room Fan number one. Can I haven't started that account yet casey but that's that's your old account right then. That just means someone else's going to start it for us. You can find me at at Ben Bullen H. W. on twitter. Thanks as always to Jonathan Strickland Aka the quizmaster. Huge. Thank Christopher Yoda's in spirit Alex Williams who composed our theme research associate extraordinary gave Loussier. Did that because it rhymed with extraordinaire? wouldn't pronounce his extraordinary her. So I should pronounce it gave loser and he's never really told us how to pronounce it. So I think it's open season on pronunciation of games. Last name you'd be. Concerned. About that, think we're going to. Have to have a discussion we've got to have you back on the show. Oh, I had a blast with that one another respectable two-parter what I think I let that to producer Casey Bagger. Huge. Thanks to you my friends. What's your takeaway on this epoch course adventure? This is the second horse episode in as many weeks. I'm just wondering if like clever Hans was cited down in Argentina like after. I don't know. Was that World War Two that was where one right? So maybe the time limit would be a little bit off for him being part of this story, but you're right Casey maybe he just I don't know maybe he made his his grand getaway maybe clever Hans is on an island to pock and the White Tiger that mauled the KRISTA Krysta Roy, whatever his name is he died not the tiger. Too soon sorry. I made this a real bummer. The brought it down. I can I can take from a bummer to a grown. I am finally after two episodes. Able to tell you guys some terrible worse jokes though saving for the end did you hear about the man went to the hospital six plastic orces inside him? What do you mean like in his heart? Just didn't body the doctor's got doctors described his condition as. Stable was like some sort of like mega fails or a guide showed a bunch of plastic horses. Up His body. Okay. I think we're done with this show I think we've done all the things. We're just like punchy because it is six fifteen on a Friday and I think we still some acidy. How about what to see next time books? How do you make a small fortune on horse racing start with a large fortune? For, more podcast from iheartradio visit, the iheartradio APP. Apple podcasts or whatever you listen to your favorite shows. If we WANNA list, every way speaker can help podcast publishers won't we need a podcast of our own whether you're in charge of long running series with extensive backlogs or countless limited series you can organize and monetize your entire catalogue with Speaker with speakers. customizable publisher plan, you can add collaborators, analyze extensive listener analytics and even. Share exclusive content through custom RSS Feeds, and that's just for starters head to Speaker Dot Com to learn more. That's S. P. R. E. A. K. E. R. DOT COM. Truly hard seltzer would like to make a toast everyone listening to this podcast. You're taking time to check it out because hey, let's just you're into and truly into that. 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US Casey publisher Apple Germany James handcock hank Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Ruda Rudolph lessing Ben producer America posner Germany George S Patton Europe Tigers dot Com Casey Peckham