35 Burst results for "Peabody"

The Wild Woman of Brooklyn, and the Peabody Bones

Science Friction

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

The Wild Woman of Brooklyn, and the Peabody Bones

"Starts with a container of bones. I actually didn't know about them before. This project started there in the collection. Of the peyote museum of anthropology and death. -nology anthropology as we know it really in the united states began at just a few institutions in harvard. Being one of them and the peabody museum has really been the center of anthropology at harvard. For over one hundred years and it's collection ease huge in the collections of the museum. There are about one and a quarter million objects works archaeological artifacts cultural objects. It's quite large. I my name's lowering. I am an osteology at the peabody museum of archaeology and ethnology with is also lots of bones right. that's what osteology. It's like lowering investigate in the collections of human and other primate remains and bones. Also what this evolutionary anthropologist wanted to get access to the collection. My name is ian wallace. I'm an assistant professor in the department of anthropology at the university of new mexico. United states and works alongside modern hunter gatherer communities like the tarahumara indigenous to mexico to study. How the way we used our bodies today is at all with how bodies evolved to move. I mean you've just got to look at how much time we spend sitting on our bums in front of screens. Yeah that's that's definitely part of it. As well as the beds that we sleep in and even the ways that we are physically inactive are sort of fascinating because other hunter-gatherers and our ancestors also occasionally physically inactive but they did it in different ways by squatting and not necessarily sitting in these a super comfy chairs that shut off our muscles and that has all sorts of

Peyote Museum Of Anthropology Center Of Anthropology Harvard Peabody Museum Of Archaeology Peabody Museum United States Ian Wallace Department Of Anthropology University Of New Mexico Mexico
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

07:10 min | Last month

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Been in a situation where we're like. Why in heaven's name would they have scheduled me for a rehearsal at the time. What in immigrated. What's that person thinking when they sent me that email like why would you put me on your solicitation lists when i was one of your performance. All these things where you're thinking like these people that are managing this organization. Have no idea what it's like to be me. And there was just took felt like in so many ways like disconnect really between the needs of the artists and musicians and like the organizational structure. And so for me Having had that experience for everything. I do it informs. However i communicate with musicians informs how we Approach programming it informs How i worked to recruit members for my board and put together the leadership of the organization. It's been huge for me. I can't imagine doing this work. Having not have experienced and in fact one of the things. That really motivates me. All the time is making an organization where the musicians have less reasons to ask those questions. I was asking when i was an artist right. Like what are they thinking. Why would they do that so i want them to have less reasons for that. I want them to feel like they always have a professional environment. In which work. How did you discover that you this desire to do this kind of work. Like what was there. A series of events was just like you woke up one morning I need to run an orchestra or how did that. How did the journey begin for you. Yeah no i. I would be soup like life. The so rarely like that. Right but I developed a disorder a neurological disorder that affected my singing voice. And so as i was i was very fortunate to be in a wonderful supportive place like peabody when i was When that was happening to me and i had a network of fantastic mentors and supporters. Who were able to help me access. You know training that could expand by options. So knowing that i wasn't going to be a singer anymore Which was a terrible Including to come to but it was also in some ways. I hesitate to say this but liberating because i think that we all will i shouldn but students at conservatories tend to come up with this come up through the ranks with the sense that they don't they have to make a choice about who they're going to be in what they're going to be in that they can't be all the things they have to pick something and wall and so. I had been so focused on this idea of being a singer that i I didn't see all of the other experiences i had as being as important to my future and I regret that a little bit. Because little did i know all of those things were coming together to prepare me for what was next and prepare me for this big transition. I was going to be forced to make but It was wonderful. Because i had the opportunity to go be an orchestra manager at the avenue castle. And was there that it was very jeremy. This is exactly what i need to be doing. This is my next step. This is where i. This is where i belong. I love being with these musicians It felt like i was helping in a way that was really meaningful and that this was the perfect place for me to use my skills as an artist and my minister And that was amazing. Also working on the the bernstein mass project. Peabody really really shifted my thinking to that really pushed me in the direction of understanding that administrating and producing something was could be as exhilarating as performing it. Can you talk a little bit more about that. I think because. I understand having been behind the scenes on a lot of things but like what was it about that that bernstein mass or the the aspirin piece that that running helping that orchestra that really a can you. Can you give a couple of examples again. I think it goes back to that whole thing of like seeing the artist. What they're actually doing knowing what it feels like to be them and doing whatever i could anticipate their needs and to create an environment in which they could do their best work and that was true for mass and that was true for aspen. But i think what. I learned nass. That really changed me and really prepared me for this job was how important inviting and welcoming people was the success of that show like that. It really changed my thinking about what excellences and what that means and that. It doesn't always mean conservatory. Training doesn't it means a lot of different things and that the collective experience is so enriched by having everybody there that it's not just those who have proven something all of us about how how skilled they are talented. They are or anything else that there is a place in this work for everybody and That helped me so much going into this work as an executive director of an orchestra and a very different community than i had been that we owe it to community to to offer something to them. That means something to then. Not just what i think they should have. And that's what. I learned from mass. Just i want to thank you for sharing all this with us today in our audience to ask you..

today one one morning Peabody bernstein avenue castle
In the 'Shout at Cancer Choir,' No Voice Boxes Needed

Morning Edition

01:57 min | Last month

In the 'Shout at Cancer Choir,' No Voice Boxes Needed

"Their voice boxes to cancer have formed, acquire a new documentary profiles them and Stephanie O'Neill reports. Subject way, starting here on it. What? What? In this scene of the new documentary. Can you hear my voice? Members of the shouted cancer choir in the UK warm up before a sold out concert at London's historic Tabernacle Theater, Andrew All right, there are no velvety voice crooners in this bunch. All have undergone Lear inject Amis or voice box removal to treat cancer. Procedure leaves them breathing through a surgically created hole in the front of the neck. And they require a voice prosthesis to speak. Did what do you want? You want you? Thank you. Requires a brainchild of Dr Thomas More's an ear, nose and throat specialist and lifelong singer Wars is executive director of Shout at Cancer, a London based support and rehab group. For Larry Inject me patients. I'll remember quite well. When I first suggested, Let's form a choir. There is former with laughter and surprise and this belief It just seemed ridiculous that you would expect with people with no voice boxes to stand up and sing in a coId. That's Sarah Boden Evans. She's one of a handful of choir members who share their personal cancer journey with Pasadena filmmaker Bill Brummel himself aware injected me patient. The Peabody Award winning an Emmy nominated documentarian lost his voice box in 2016. I couldn't imagine How I wouldn't work. After Larry injected me. I couldn't imagine walking around in public with a hole in my neck. Liz Summers is a speech and language therapist for shouted cancer. The voice is a really essential part off who we are and how we express ourselves. And there's an enormous sense of loss that can occur when somebody loses their their natural voice of the voice they had before speaking through the tiny

Stephanie O'neill Cancer Tabernacle Theater Dr Thomas More Larry Inject London Sarah Boden Evans Bill Brummel Andrew UK Peabody Award Liz Summers Pasadena Emmy Larry
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

08:09 min | 2 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Everyone. I'm christine amancio in this interview. I had the pleasure of speaking. With allison daniel and james young alison graduated from peabody in two thousand twelve with a degree in vocal performance and james graduated in twenty fourteen with a degree in composition. Currently they both pursue a variety of freelance artistic projects in addition to their work as founders and artistic director of mind on fire which is a musical arts cooperative presenting contemporary music in baltimore and beyond james alison. Thank you so much for speaking with me today. Really excited to have you on the mexican podcast. to start i would love to hear what your lives. Look like right now and Perhaps how that looks different because of the pandemic totally. Thanks for having us. We're super happy to be here. christina you're very cool and peabody is lucky to have you working for them. I guess what does my life look like It's really hard to say home. it's still similarly as it was before the pandemic kind of different every day. I right now have kind of been like really struggling to figure out how to work during the pandemic I lately have been like. Oh it's just a it's just a slog us have to keep creating stuff so i am back on a process of doing that Gyms nair working on a bunch of internal might on firework I'm working on distance. Solo sets like a stream -able experimental singing sets and I also have a long term project with a visual artist. Liz downing We've been working on that a bunch and then you know got my day job which is very nice and i love my co workers. But it's still my day job Which i do a lot of the dais. What does your day job. My day job is working for a software company. Twenty hours a week It's a company called figure fifty three local baltimore software company. It's a super small company that makes piece of software called cue lab which runs lights and sound and music in live theater events. You know from a smallest. Like the diy theater that i am making. And you know the olympics and broadway Which is cool. Yeah that has been good just kind of catching up on reading. I have been doing all sorts of things. I guess league alsina graduated from or left. Me buddy. I guess a while ago. I think i left. Peabody no Six snaps seven years ago alternate graduated. Maybe a year or two before i did Did twelve so like since that time it's been had a series of different sort of different sort of jobs and that's where i am right now like all kinds of orbiting Like music making some way. Whether you like teaching or transcribing or like some like commissioning or performance or digitisation it's all kind of orbiting debris of music jobs The main thing that i've done that no money is used administration were through Like i starting a short-lived concert series than jumping on board occasional symphony which is a local independent distributor in baltimore And then with allison doing work for mine on fire and building their organization Into what it is today Yeah a lot of is just that of figuring out what it's like figuring out what needs to be done or what can be done and then There's not any of that has happened last year but like going to bars with the right people informed connections than that blooms into something at some point in the future. Yeah we days away weeks months away but like something. Something is always happening. So both of you are really kind of you do a variety of projects. It's sounds like a lot of is very freelance. Which is which is great. I guess my question around that is as someone who isn't working for just one organization. How do you prioritize the things that are your passion projects versus the things that are making you money versus the things. That are a mix of both choosing collaborators. How do you think about which projects you're taking on. And when i always. I feel like i am Less thoughtful within james so whenever we get interviewed. I'm like well. Here's my immediate response to this. Which kind of is indicative of. I guess that my thoughts around figuring exactly what you asked about a about is like a lot of it really is like inertia and like you have to understand that i've liked gone full on. You know nettie whoo person so like really like kind of tuning into my body. At knowing like when i have a creative wave happening i think that some people are like more actively creation is like is a daily job. I see james doing constant i work. I live with both james and jason And you know. I think they're like very more like a eight of coins kind of people who are like day gotta like get. Get your little creative work in and for me. It's very much like i kind of am more of light day whereas this wind saving me kind of person I'm lucky to have really prioritize jobs that are not like give me health. Insurance is essentially like I'm going to talk about my very flippantly but like The preamble is. I love the people that i work with them. They treat me very well and also. I'm like the primary reason i work. There is because we live in a place where workers are valued and people's healthcare is somehow a commodity that we have to gain access to so might healthcare job Gives me a lot of flexibility and freedom. And i've kind of really shaped it so that i can and have enough space for the rest of it So it's like security that allows you to then take on other artistic projects and not worry as much about the financial gains from them. Yeah.

christine amancio james alison christina jason allison daniel james last year today seven years ago olympics twenty fourteen Twenty hours a week allison both peabody Liz downing Peabody james young one organization eight of coins
Roger Mudd, longtime network TV newsman, dies at 93

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

Roger Mudd, longtime network TV newsman, dies at 93

"A veteran network news anchor and correspondent has died Roger mode is dead CBS news reported died of complications of kidney failure at his home in suburban Washington DC much spent more than thirty years on network TV most of us air time log when there were just three major networks on the air well before people got their news from cable or the internet might be sued the Peabody Award for his November nineteen seventy nine special on teddy Kennedy which aired just before the Massachusetts senator challenge then president Carter for the nineteen eighty democratic presidential nomination during the interview might ask Kennedy simply why he wanted to be president Kennedy widely seen as marking the answer ended up losing the nomination to the incumbent Carter went on then to lose to Ronald Reagan Roger Mudd was ninety three I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Roger Mode Teddy Kennedy Cbs News Kidney Failure Peabody Award DC Washington President Carter Massachusetts President Kennedy Kennedy Roger Mudd Carter Ronald Reagan Oscar Wells Gabriel
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:09 min | 3 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Peabody's launch pad office dedicated to demystifying. What life is like after graduation. Every episode we sit down with a recent peabody to get their take on what life is like for working artists. In today's world multifaceted careers time management finances timing balance between your life and your we explore that and more on the podcast. Everyone i'm christina. Mansi are for this special release. I'll be speaking with victor coach and terry sweeney to members of sandbox. Percussion a quartet with a focus on creating performances and collaborations that are both visually and early impactful for a variety of audiences. Victor terry peabody percussion alumni currently based in brooklyn new york where they are active performers educators both with sandbox and individually. Victor and terry thank you so much for joining me today We could start off. I would love to hear what sandboxes up to right now and sort of what that's been looking like for you during the pandemic and probably before the pandemic what's changed. Yeah absolutely well. What is it. Adds january twenty twenty one. So we're we're we're coming up on almost a year now in the pandemic so i think that well since you asked about. Before the pandemic basically as a quartet our mission or what we do for a living is playing chamber music playing percussion chamber music in live concerts for as many people who are willing to listen to it. Obviously the pandemic. There's some challenges with because we're not able to have Have gatherings so we. I mean we were a touring. Ensemble week commissioned a lot of music from composers We learn that music record. It tori around mostly around the us a little bit outside the us as well but since the pandemic has kind of started we have. We've thought a lot about how our mission has not changed but our mission needs to be still accomplished but the details of that's accomplished Adjusted a little bit so one of the things that we really work on right now is actually live streaming concerts. We had a livestream concert was like two days. It was like two days ago yet. Two days ago we have another one coming up in february. We do almost probably every month. And we've been doing that since i think. August of twenty twenty. And that's been that's been an investment for us to to learn how to do that and also to just also financial investment to invest in kind of the equipment to be able to livestream. But it's been something that we have. Actually i think terry can. I think you'll agree with me that we've enjoyed learning how to do that. It's been It's been it's been challenging because we're not like tech company where were were percussion quartet but learning how to do that has has been fun for us and we've actually been able to reach..

Victor february terry christina two days ago terry sweeney Two days ago Victor terry january twenty twenty one peabody brooklyn new york victor Peabody one terry can both Mansi sandbox today days
Welcome to Shondaland

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Welcome to Shondaland

"Tonight. We're talking about shonda rhimes. Who is like she's a total boss. Queen television absolutely all right so first. We'll talk a little bit about shonda. So shonda rhimes was born in chicago. Illinois in january nineteen seventy. She was the youngest of six children. Her mother vero was a college professor and her father. Eilly was a university administrator. And she'd said that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling early on in her life. She attended marin catholic high school and served as a hospital volunteer which inspired an interest in hospital environments. She majored in english. And film studies at dartmouth college and she graduated in nineteen ninety-one at dartmouth the black underground theatre association. She divided her time between directing and performing in student productions and also writing fiction and after college. She moved to san francisco and worked in advertising but she moved to los angeles a little bit after that to stubby screening at the university of southern california. She was ranked top of her class at usc. And she earned the gary rosenberg writing fellowship. She obtained a master of fine arts degree from the. Us's school of cinematic arts. And while at usc rimes was hired as an intern by debra martin chase who was prominent black producer she also worked at denzel washington's company monday entertainment so after she graduated rimes was actually an unemployed script writer in hollywood and to make ends meet. She worked various jobs including as an office administrator. And then a counselor at a job center during this period rhymes worked as a research director documentary. Hank aaron chasing the dream which won the nineteen ninety-five peabody award. One thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight rhymes made a short film called blossoms. Unveils which starred. Jada pinkett smith and jeffrey rate. This is actually only credit as a film director. So that's nineteen ninety eight short film blossoms unveils new line cinema purchased a feature. Script of hers It ended up not being produced at that time but she received an assignment shortly thereafter to co write the hbo movie introducing dorothy dandridge in nineteen ninety nine which earned numerous awards further star. Halle berry. get out. I didn't realize that she colorado so interesting. Oh wait till you hear the the plethora of things that she's worked on. Oh no after grad school rhymes sold her first screenplay called human seeking same about an older black woman looking for love in the personal ads. And that film wasn't produced. But you have heard of her next project in two thousand and one rhymes wrote the debut film of pop singer. Britney spears the starring zoe saldana and taryn. Manning crossroads everybody. I didn't know that she wrote that. Get out up saying. I feel like it's been really it was really panned by the next but maybe for them. Okay no sometimes. It's it's sometimes you just want a nice story about friendship road trimming going on a road trip and having a nice time and may be hitting up a karaoke joint. Heck yeah and singing. I love rock and roll. That's all i'm saying is that maybe it's for them. I think lauren has actually seen crossroads. I have felt you know. She wrote that and then the next thing that she worked on in two thousand four was the sequel to the princess. Diaries called the princess diaries. Two royal engagement. Get out. yeah. I didn't realize that she was so like a dummy. I just assumed like shonda rhimes right out. The gate was grey's anatomy but apparently she was introduced are obsolete reduce. So she's working on all these film things in two thousand three. She actually wrote her first tv pilot. Abc it was about young female war correspondents but the network. Turn it down. You know what they didn't turn down ask project. So here's where sean hillen comes in sean. Billion is the name of rhymes production company shine million and its logo also referred to the shows that she has produced an also to rimes herself. So when we say shaun d land. It's like interchangeably sean. And her production company. Yeah and like the. Because i do remember like i think it was. Abc or nbc. I forgot what what channel she's on but it was. They were like girl a sorry But it was like thursday nights. Is sean the land. Because it was like it was like back to back to back to back shadowland shows. We'll talk about that. You have a basically they. They tried to rebrand thursdays. Like tgi. T thank goodness thursday because that its native shot in the land. I mean people are gonna watch no matter what they didn't need to need hype it up so The name shawn lane was stylized as capital s shonda capital l. Land one word from two thousand five to two thousand sixteen but since two thousand sixteen is all stylize lower case everything is lower case. It's always very recognizable font so you might often see in print as actually all lower case letters.

Shonda Rhimes University Of Southern Califor Eilly Marin Catholic High School Rimes Black Underground Theatre Asso Gary Rosenberg Debra Martin Chase Jeffrey Rate Shonda Vero Dartmouth College Peabody Award Dartmouth Jada Pinkett Smith Hank Aaron Dorothy Dandridge Illinois Chicago Halle Berry
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner gives update on power outages and weather impact

All In with Chris Hayes

06:23 min | 4 months ago

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner gives update on power outages and weather impact

"With me now is houston mayor sylvester turner previously served nearly thirty years as a texas state representative. He is in a command center right now. Monitoring situation in his city mayor. Thank you for taking a little time with us. And i don't want to start first with things aren't houston. Are they getting better. Chris in the last twenty four hours. Things have improved yesterday. At this time we had about one point. Three million customers without power Today as i talked to you that number is under thirty thousand in houston region yesterday The the water pressure was extremely low In fact hospitals were having a hard time getting but they needed Just to run a bear chillers to stay warm and other necessities today. The water pressure in the city of houston has increased And hospitals in much better shape at the same time people many of the people able to flush their kamoze improvement with still not wear. We want it to be but yesterday the pressure was below what we call twenty. Ps today as we speak that what a precious right around thirty so being things improving but again we still have some tremendous needs at. They're just zero in on the water aspect of this has been one of the more harrowing parts of it and a kind of a kind of cascade effect. We're going out water treatment facilities. Just explain to me what that means that it does. It mean pressure. Now you can you can. People can run water in their homes. That firefighters have water that hospitals have it is. That is that where things are correct. Hospitals now have watered. That can run the chillers. Keep the patients that doctors and medical staff Warm in in in in cool weather so to speak People able to take showers. Peabody plus two komo but because the water pressure dropped below the regulatory requirement twenty. Psi you automatically have to give ball water. Notices so you have over seven hundred jurisdictions around the state of texas a chieftain san antonio austin example in many others where there are bald notice requirements and that will continue to be the case probably through the weekend at the earliest that ball. What notice could probably be lifted on sunday. But i think for houston probably be monday. Which means if people don't have power because just also ball your water about two minutes but what happens if you don't have power then people are going to rely a great deal on bought a water and that's why starting today We started distributing water to those persons for example. Who don't have the means to go into a grocery store and purchase tomorrow for example will be masked water distribution site in the city of houston where we will probably give out tomorrow anywhere between seven to nine hundred thousand bottles of water primarily for people for families who already on the modulus. Chris and they just can't afford to go in and purchase two and three and four cases of water. And we'll do that Tomorrow saturday sunday until this ball. Water notice has been listed. That's really that's very helpful in understanding where things are. Let me let me also ask what your interfaces have been. With spill state and federal government i know females on the on on the ground. Have you been talking with aircraft that run the the grid with folks from fina. The federal government and with governor abbot. What are those interactions been like. Well i've talked several times with the ceo. Behead of eric hot And n n what he will say to you. Is that the system that we have in the state of texas. Our texas korea is designed for the summer heat. It is not necessarily designed for winter storms and then as relates to this. What happened in this. In the last four or five days that was simply not enough adequate generation supply available to meet the demand and the supply that they had reserved so to speak when with shop when some of the facilities came all flying of been made things even worse and let me quickly speak to those who are trying to say. oh the wind turbine frozen. You shouldn't be looking at renewables as a false false aligned. Being put four because the plants that came off line while natural gas plants coal fired. Plant Nuclear plants came offline. You wind turbine strobes. So it was a combination but when it comes to win and sola that's still only counts for a fraction of the energy that's produced in the state of texas. The rally at reality is that the state was. Ill prepared The other thing that i would add when i was in the legislature but twenty three of my twenty seven years i said on the on the committee that oversees our electric utility industry back in twenty eleven fouled a bill saying to the public utility commission that we need to exert greater oversight over urquhot to prevent blackouts of every kind that we have are experiencing in texas for four for these last four days batmobile. Chris was never given a hearing. And so for anybody. Who's just trying to place the blame on irc That's not enough as part of the story but it's not the total story. Archive is an agency of the state of texas is the leadership of that overseas or cat and what happened in this week with the failure. Not just urquhot but of the statewide leadership state representative state senators. Who didn't do enough to make the necessary. Structural changes prevent what took place this week but mccurry and as a result of that hundreds of thousands of texans paid a horrible price and they are number of stony that we live in the city of my city that anada that not allowed to date to go into next week. Some of them died from carbon monoxide. Trying to keep themselves

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner Texas San Antonio Austin Chris Komo Peabody Public Utility Commission Federal Government Eric Korea Legislature Mccurry
Cicely Tyson, her memoir just out, was active to the end

Q

04:01 min | 4 months ago

Cicely Tyson, her memoir just out, was active to the end

"This was not the news I was expecting to share with you. This is not how I was expecting the beginning of the show to start today as you just heard. Great actor Cicely Tyson died yesterday. She was 96. I spoke to her just a few days ago. You might have heard us talk on Tuesday. It was the day her memoir came out. It's called just as I am. I was saying to someone like Yesterday. I think one of the senior producers of the show does like how profoundly moved I was by Cicely Tyson. By her perspective, her presence, especially at 96. Also like her gratitude. You know, I complain about stuff all the time and to hear her go at the end of the interview. The last thing she said to me was Tom. I am so grateful For this moment. In time we talked about her early days, We talked about her career defining roles. We talked about movies like the Autobiography of Jane Pittman or and Sounder. We talked about her role in the TV series roots We talked about Everything you know, most recently she was and how to get away with murder. Miss Tyson's co star on that Syriza Viola Davis tweeted this last night and I wanted to read it for you quote. I'm devastated. My heart is just broken. I loved you so much. You were everything to me. You made me feel loved and seen and valued in a world where there is still a cloak of invisibility. Us dark chocolate girls. You gave me permission to dream. Cicely Tyson's accolades are too many to list here. Emmys, Golden Globes, A Peabody, a Tony and honorary Oscar mult multiple in the Deep Image awards. I mean, you know a million things. Had a clear vision. Mission to bring complex and nuanced black characters to the screen and on stage and tow uplift others who had dreams just like hers. When I got to speak to Cicely Tyson again just a few days ago. That dedication was crystal clear. I am so grateful. We got to bring you that conversation. So much of it is stuck with me and Especially the part where she talked about getting the presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in 2016. That moment is a moment that will live with me forever forever. And someone pointed out to me not too long ago. That I was the last person and his administration to receive it. Okay on that, he said. He made that statement. And then, he said And she's cool, gorgeous one than I need, huh? That's pretty good. If that gets into your presidential medal, you know that's a good sign. That's right. Well, you know, maybe this is a good way to close it off your 96 years old now and, you know, I think a lot of people want to know about the secret to a long life. And in the book you talk about how celery juice and morning pull ups are part of a key role. But what what other advice would you give people? I think that when, uh You get up in the morning and you're fortunate enough to see daylight. You're blessed on when I get up, and I see daylight. I first thank God I go into my meditation. Another change, and that gives me the faith. The car I thank God first. Very sick needs a face and a trust to go on for another day. And I think that's the most important thing that one have Detective Thank God just seeing another day. I never thought I would like to be 96 years old. My God, Every member of my family is gone. I am so surviving member of my family, and I was not expected to be here past three months.

Cicely Tyson Jane Pittman Miss Tyson Syriza Viola Davis Deep Image Awards Emmys Golden Globes Peabody TOM Oscar Tony Barack Obama
US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan to review US-Taliban agreement

NPR News Now

03:52 min | 5 months ago

US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan to review US-Taliban agreement

"President biden says he'll review the agreement reached between the trump administration and the taliban in afghanistan last year. Npr's showed roscoe reports biden's national security advisor has already spoken with his afghan counterpart according to the national security council. Jake sullivan toll. Afghan officials that the us remains committed to achieving a permanent ceasefire sullivan said the biden administration will look into whether the taliban are at biding by their commitments to cut ties with terrorists and reduce violence as president. Donald trump reduce the number of us troops stationed in afghanistan to two thousand five hundred bide his nominee for secretary of state. Tony blinken told congress at his confirmation hearing that biden wants to bring us forces home but he also wants to make sure that gains against terrorism and rights for girls and women are not threatened. Aisha roscoe npr news. The white house there continues to be a major gulf between how many covid nineteen vaccine dozes have been delivered to states and the number of people who actually got vaccinated the cdc reports only about fifty percent. The available shots have been given so far as wellstone reports. It's a confusing national picture with governors in some states like west. Virginia georgia new york clamoring for more supplies and many who oversee vaccine distribution say. They still don't know week to week exactly what they'll beginning. Meanwhile more than half of states have now opened a vaccine eligibility to people over sixty five. Jennifer nozoe is at johns hopkins university. Ryan have to shift at least in part away from this sort of slow stepwise work of trying to schedule a high priority individuals to more of a mass vaccination approach a recent national survey finds more than half of americans don't know exactly when or where they'll get vaccinated for npr news. I'm wellstone. Us corona virus infections have now surpassed twenty four million eight hundred thousand more than four hundred. Fourteen thousand people have died. This is npr. Pope francis has issued a warning on the danger of misinformation just days after he was the subject of a fake news report. Npr silvio pohjola reports. The pope praise journalists but also warned. News can be manipulated in his message for the catholic churches world. Communications day francis said the risk of misinformation being spread on social media is evident to everyone and manipulation of us and images is often prompted by sheer narcissism. He did not mention a false report that went viral earlier. This month that he had been arrested by italian police. Francis expressed words of gratitude for journalists who often risk their lives to report on the hardships endured by persecuted minorities in various parts of the world. But he added. Investigative reporting is often replaced by a tendentious narrative created in newsrooms and he urged journalists to hit the streets and verify situations firsthand. Super bowl jolie. Npr news rome. One of the best known television interviewers. Larry king has died. The peabody award winner is being remembered for interviewing literally thousands of people celebrities presidents philosophers literary figures even criminals over more than sixty years. He had said he was always engrossed in the conversation. Always listening to the answer. I'm always learning so. I guess i'm better every day at learning. Larry king died at a hospital in los angeles. This is npr.

President Biden Trump Administration Jake Sullivan Biden Administration Biden Tony Blinken Taliban Aisha Roscoe Npr News Afghanistan Wellstone Jennifer Nozoe National Security Council Roscoe Donald Trump NPR Pope Francis Sullivan Silvio Pohjola
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Oh you're mind isn't mindset of Performing the it. It just works differently. The brain just works differently. And i think i'm way more focused when i'm on stage in just practicing in my room. And he ended up. We way more positive. Let's is that this program still exists at peabody now. And i'm glad ya still go following in your footsteps and hopefully having similar experiences to grow and perform so while you were at peabody Did you come in. Various tablist goals and priorities And if so did they change through your time and school well. I wanted to be the best guitar in the world. that obviously didn't happen It's interesting when i arrive at peabody I knew i wanted to just my number. One goal was to improve myself Not necessarily be better than others I've never participated in a competition which is strange for classical musician. 'cause all the everybody else that i know they go to competition. They they go into the perform. I've always found that stressful. Or i don't know it was never my. I would never want to compare myself to others. In a way i would just say. Oh we're different. We have different artistry. Who is better. I am i better than you. Especially peabody was i mean. Everybody's pretty good It was. I've never yeah. I've never done a single competition. And i just wanted to share. Music just wanted to become the best guitarist and i could And i think that goal still there with me today Peabody really helped me refine refined my goal with I'm also also write music. And i was really lucky that Julian gray actually embrace that and listen to my composition giving me some advice on civil and my composition. He was when i recorded my first album. He was encouraging me. It was That's not the kind of Experience had in france when my teacher early really care about my competition is about my compositions. I just had to learn to repertoire. He wanted me to learn With with giuliani was more. Like oh well. And i see that now just with me other musician Guitarists would be i. I like really contemporary guitar. Like newer stuff like to Get new guitar road for newark. Work for classical guitar anyway. Just encourage that aspect of them And i think that really helped me Define who wasn't an can. You was kinda within me but i think going to be really refined on really make it come out even more which i really liked. Have you faced any significant setbacks through your time in school and afterwards that you feel have altered the trajectory of what you were working on in your artistic work.

france peabody today first album giuliani One goal Julian gray single competition Peabody
Talk show host Larry King in hospital with COVID-19

Purity Products

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Talk show host Larry King in hospital with COVID-19

"Talk show host Larry King, hospitalized in L. A. With covert 1987 year old King undergoing treatment in hospital protocols have kept his family away from him. Peabody Award winning broadcasters had a number of medical issues. Heart attacks, diabetes and lung cancer

L. A. Larry King King Heart Attacks Diabetes Lung Cancer
Questions asked of the New York Times after Caliphate

podnews

01:10 min | 6 months ago

Questions asked of the New York Times after Caliphate

"If the new york times gets any journalism wronged executive editor should talk about it answer for it and should have as his job to convince people that will being transparent open about it. Thanks growing criticism of the new york. Times is michael barbaro. After the newspapers discredited caliphate podcast barbaro conducted that interview about the show including examining the actions of its executive producer. Lisa tobin however barbaro was not as transparent as he might have been. He didn't disclose tobin is his fiancee. This is in contravention of the new york. Times editorial standards which prohibits start reporting on people with whom they have close personal relationships. Barbara has also reportedly told other journalists at the newspaper. Not criticize the podcast. While some point out that while caliphate reporter rukmini catenaccio was made to publicly apologize and forced to move to a different area. The podcast producer and reporter. Andy mills he made the podcast and accepted. Its peabody award was hosting the daily this week on twitter. Barbaro appears to be blocking those criticizing. The decision

Barbaro Michael Barbaro Lisa Tobin New York Times New York Tobin Rukmini Catenaccio Barbara Andy Mills Peabody Award Twitter
There Will Never Be Another Maradona

The Lead

03:31 min | 7 months ago

There Will Never Be Another Maradona

"So add. We've seen this incredible outpouring of support for diego maradona's since he passed away last week to say goodbye to donna. Filing past the coffin and coming out the side crying country declared three days of national mourning. There were massive crowds showing up to see his body at the national palace in windows holidays by maybe about a mile from the of maradonna. And i'm not sure if people here in the us really understand how massive figure diego maradona is argentina. To explain that to people. I've been trying to explain it this week. Two americans and the thing that i landed on. Was you know you hear a lot of the mythology about the american dream right. But are essentially the argentine dream. There is not social mobility for people who are the visions which is kind of argentina equivalent. Savannah's there is not the social mobility for those people to rise and improve their lives except for one thing and that's football and diego who was born in visa theory which is very poor neighborhood. He is the proof of that. My father works such a lot to supporters. Eight of us children that made us. It made us very strong. It made everyone strong. Not only did he. Rise from the bottom rung of society abject poverty but he rose by fifteen. He was given an apartment by the club. He was blamed for argentinos juniors. He was supporting his whole. Family's whole family were living in an apartment. Thank god the one who could reach the highs until he became the most famous washington person probably apart from the pope. He austin on the world stage in a way that almost nobody ever could three. He's adult way he's beauties is something that was immortal. Seems like a lot of the mythology ising around. Maradonna comes from this idea of lp bay. Ed can you explain what that phrase means and its importance in. Argentinian culture. At the bay. Essentially it's it's the talented kid argentines in classical stories grow up playing on portrayals which are small kind of dog pitches and that's kind of a natural home of the p. bay which is this talented youngster. Often you know when i was in argentina i did some coaching with kids. And if you watch them play competitor like watching english kids play anguish. Kids play english football. You know it's been rough and they play in a very kind of permanent fashion the kids. They're all trying to dribble ten people there all falling over there all diving around in the peabody is essential oftentimes number ten. It's the guy around which the entire team operates. You essentially put several plus outlet who just defensively minded to make up for the fact that you've got this one super talented guy who's going to create everything and obviously every team that diego maradona was in was built around him. Put him in the middle. Give him the ball and just let something great happen quite often it

Diego Maradona Argentina National Palace Maradonna Donna Savannah Football Diego Pope Austin United States Washington ED
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 7 months ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

Vitol Chicago History Museum The Netherlands Belgium MFA Boston Peabody Essex Museum Kapoor United States Chicago Massachusetts Tech
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 7 months ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

April Kellyanne Cassidy Zachary Essex Museum Kunst Museum Elizabeth Keck Lucille Gordon Bonnie Cashin Low Mary The Netherlands Vitol Madeleine Gina Salem Chicago History Museum Belgium MFA United States Boston Kapoor
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:51 min | 7 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"But making sure. I make a point to prioritize what i care about what love doing. I think that's a great perspective. Do you have any tricks for staying organized with all of these different activities that you are balancing right now. Honestly google drive drive. Great much lifesaver. you know. That's still something. I'm figuring out. I i am serious about google drive. It's it's really. It really help is helpful with collaboration. End with keeping myself organized keeping different projects organized and being able to work with others in this projects when needed that's kind of a very practical organisational thing as far as more about Time balancing and time management organization. I will say that is something. I'm really trying to figure out right now because my life has changed a lot in the last couple of months. settling into a schedule I have a good friend who always helps me. Make my schedules to make sure that i scheduled time. Time to eat and sleep I recommend finding a friend to help you do that. Because sometimes we tend to forget to allow times for those things So i worked with her to to make a kind of ten of a schedule and now trying to follow that assess. What's working about it. And what's not. My general theory is far as organization. Time management is make a plan but also be patient with yourself and understand that your plan might not work and if it doesn't work then change it. Can you tell me a little more about how you started teaching and has evolved into for you. Sure so i started teaching knows pretty young assisting with group classes i grew up suzuki method kit and as i kind of grew that that method i started working with the younger group classes and assisting with those doing some private teaching in high school And when i came to peabody for the first couple of years. I didn't do much teaching but my third year in peabody i took a pedic pedagogy class and that kind of opened up some opportunities for me to start teaching more regularly in my fourth year at peabody i started teaching at chamber encounters music academy which is a school in pike's bill on does group classes and private lessons. I taught group classes for them for a couple years of violent students and After a year. So i kind of transitioned to teaching primarily private lessons which worked well for me it just based on my schedule and being able to have a little bit of flexibility there and i've been teaching private violin viola lessons.

peabody google pike suzuki
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:20 min | 7 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Great. I must be really exciting to work with them on a daily basis really is it's been so wonderful for the last month already even though it's remote in can Weird circumstances but still really exciting for us. Yeah so you talked about moving to new york during the pandemic which is of course. I can imagine an adventure. D- what are you feel has helped you prepare for your current situation where you're freelancing and moving to a new city pursuing school. What do you think has helped you. The most as you are in this new place. I think a lot of the things that i'm doing now are actually things that i started doing while i was in school in the last two for years of my time peabody not everything but a lot of the things and because of that i feel like it's been a really interesting transition from being in school to being out of school because well sometimes people say that you never have more time the do while you're in school but i like to think that depends on. How many things you do while you're in school for me. I kind of felt like after graduating. I was doing all of the same things without homework. So i felt like i had more time. Actually nice Now i'm in school. So i have homework again. But as i feel that the connections i made in school and a part time work that i was the freelancing is doing the chamber groups. I made a point to play with a lot of those continued into my life after graduation and have also continued into my life in new york outside of baltimore. So it's been an interesting process in that way. something. I think about a lot. How did you started with those things while you were in school. What were the first steps. You took the first steps for me while the very first steps from us being curious and trying to learn about things that i'm may not have thought i would be interested in at first Case in point..

new york peabody baltimore
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:26 min | 7 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"There are so many things to learn that can inform what we do in getting out of our comfort zone or out of kind of our routine plays such a large part in that This queue podcast peabody's launch paddle dedicated to demystifying life after graduation every episode. Sit down with the recent peabody lama to get take on what life is like for working artists in today's world. War jobs book balance finances time. Angela we discussed that and more. Hi everyone i'm christina fancier. Today's interview is with sarah thomas. Who was a violinist and chamber musician. Who graduated peabody twenty. Nineteen she currently performs with the bergamo quartet who are pursuing professional studies. Diplomas as the graduate string quartet in residence at manas school of music in new york city. Sarah is also a teacher freelancer and works with us at the peabody launch pad office. Hi sarah thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me. It's our pleasure so to get started. Could you tell us a little bit. About what your life looks like right now for sure So about two months ago. I moved from baltimore to new york. City has been a really exciting in a big life. Change in the middle of what is kind of a strange time. These days I moved to new york to start a degree at the mannes school of music with my string quartet. The bergeman quartet where. We're studying with the jack quartet as the graduate string quartet in residence. So that's been a really big part of my life in the last month or so getting started with school. I moved here from baltimore there for seven years. And as i've been settling into new york I've been also teaching remotely working launch pad remotely and getting back into a hertzel's with After several months off which has been really exciting for us. Socially distance with masks Can you tell me a little more about bergamo and how that journey has been for you. So bergamo.

new york city sarah thomas bergamo peabody baltimore manas school of music mannes school of music christina fancier Sarah Angela
Protesters confront police over Washington DC moped death

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 8 months ago

Protesters confront police over Washington DC moped death

"Four police officers have minor injuries this morning after rocks and bricks were thrown at them while protesters tried to force their way into DCs Fourth District police station. The demonstrations began around 6 30 last evening Tuesday evening on Georgia Avenue near Peabody Street in northwest Lise had been guarding the outside of the station with shields. Keeping protesters out. NBC force Jackie Benson was on scene. Protesters used rocks to break the windows of two police cars at the intersection of Georgia Avenue and Missouri. And it's a volatile situation here in Northwest they have brought in unit a civil disturbance unit. They call them. Most made on social media this morning, suggesting the protest is in response to the death recently of a moped rider who was pursued by police last week. One person has been arrested. No charges specify that here's the background on that death, D C. Officers say this morning they saw a 20 year old Koran Hilton. Writing an electric opener on the sidewalk near fifth and Kennedy Streets Northwest last week on Friday night at the time, they say he was not wearing a helmet, which is illegal in D. C. Least of Chase Hilton turned into an alley and then apparently crashed with a car at seventh and Kennedy later dying at a local hospital. DC Police are asking this morning. Anyone with more information to please give them a call.

Dc Police Kennedy Streets Northwest Koran Hilton Chase Hilton Lise Jackie Benson NBC Kennedy Missouri
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"You have this you have a job teaching at a school and I'm curious a little bit about how if I recall correctly I don't think you're in the education program at peabody. So that seems like a lot of people do go through the ED program at peabody in the typically get placed into a school so. What was your path like getting to that position? Okay. Well, this is an amazing story. Left to tell because I worked. As he said, I worked at the Career Center for a couple years in a work steady position. So you know when I got out of school, I applied to dozens of administrative teaching positions everything that I could find that was remotely related to my interests. And then I I ended up you know kind of settling into something that wasn't quite right. But. It and I was like you know what? I'll just post an ad on craigslist like whatever. I paid five dollars for my. CRAIGSLIST AD. which was just my website and it said, I'm offering lessons. And then a few weeks later out of the blue, this high school administrator emails me he's like we really need a music teacher. Would you be able to come in for an interview? It's a full time position in I was really like I thought it was spam or originally. but oh, my goodness. I I went in and they were just the nicest people I've ever met. I had this huge classroom had all these instruments that could be with I I would be I would have an assistant. You know it's a little bit of a different environment to school where the kids need a lot of one on one attention the really small classes. But I really clicked with them. partially My sister's currently in highschool in has has down syndrome growing up with her taught me a lot about you know being a patient teacher being a very focused and you know. Being, really good at like giving people, the attention and the patients that they need in order to learn..

craigslist peabody Career Center administrator AD.
Boston - ‘This Is Not The Year To Come To Salem’: City Puts More Restrictions On Crowds

WBZ Afternoon News

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

Boston - ‘This Is Not The Year To Come To Salem’: City Puts More Restrictions On Crowds

"Holiday news, the city of Salem is urging visitors to say away this month as officials cancel parades, bands, fireworks and the like for Halloween this year, Mayor Kim Driscoll says So far it hasn't stopped people from coming to the BC. Suzanne Saz Ville tells us They're ramping up the efforts now even more normally, with Halloween on a Saturday, Salem can get up to 50,000 people in a day and canceling Halloween is a big financial hit. Obviously, public health comes first when it comes to Covitz Salem is in the yellow Zone with a one 2% positivity rate, and Mayor Driscoll wants to keep it That way. We are planning some additional restrictions that you'll see put in place this weekend. They include limiting access to the Essex Street pedestrian mall. We will eliminate one entrance point on the West end near the Peabody Essex Museum will be installing barricades and, she says, finds and cease and desist orders are not off the table. We still can't allow the sorts of crowds that are gathering here to continue in Salem, Suzanne Saws Ville W. B Z Boston's news radio.

Salem Suzanne Saz Ville Mayor Kim Driscoll Covitz Salem Essex Street Pedestrian Mall Peabody Essex Museum BC Boston
Apple TV Plus extending free trial subscriptions to February 2021

Mac OS Ken

02:09 min | 9 months ago

Apple TV Plus extending free trial subscriptions to February 2021

"Thinking of canceling your apple TV plus subscription before the free year ends. Well. How about a few more months? CNBC. Says Abbas extending the free trials into the new year. According to the report subscribers whose trial started last November December or January will be extended through February. This means that someone who bought an iphone on the first of November and activated Apple TV plus. On the same day, we'll have access to the service through the first of February when billing starts. As people paying for the streaming service, it sounds like they're getting free time as well. CNBC has apple saying that folks already spending the five bucks a month will receive credits through February as well. The extension is automatic and users don't have to ask for it. The report doesn't say so you got to wonder whether the extension has to do with the lack of second seasoned the streamers flagship shows. It seems likely that the return of the morning show for all mankind see and Dickinson were meant to keep people around once they had to pay. Without that incentive. Apple May of worried that some people would cancel their subscriptions. If cancellations were apple's concern. Front, they simply delaying that pain. And could be or it could be the second season's will slide the extended free window. We know that will happen with at least one of those shows. I'm more says the peabody award winning series Dickinson will be back in the stream on Friday the eighth of January twenty twenty. One. Not only that, but the company is also given the go-ahead for a third season of the show. Who knows when Nadal happen but in the meantime as for the house in the second season, apple says Emily Dickenson played by Hailee Steinfeld as pulled out of her private literary life and thrust into the public eye while struggling with the sense that the pursuit of fame might be dangerous game for her to play.

Apple Cnbc Dickinson Hailee Steinfeld Peabody Award Emily Dickenson Abbas Nadal
Reflecting on RBG and Redefining Success

Tamarindo

06:51 min | 9 months ago

Reflecting on RBG and Redefining Success

"Hey everyone we're back from. From the last time, you heard us well I. We want to acknowledge that we are recording this episode hours after receiving the News Supreme Court Justice Ruth. Bader GINSBURG has passed. So this is a couple of hours now. So we're we're past the shock and sadness, but we have to acknowledge it and he all her episode. We talked about how important the Supreme Court is in. This is another reason why we're we're excited to over by didn't Harris because how important the courts are and we have to watch out for say hypocrisy because my Ceuta Republican senators supple failed McConnell is already hours after she's best already promising to just bulldoze a Republican nominated. person. To the Supreme Court. Yeah, literally to add salt to the wound Brendan I. been feeling all the things we poured some rose. Am honor of her that we both shut some tears. It's it's it's a hard hard evening. Yes. We've shared some tears for doing a toast Rosa for BG. So I think many of us have have dreaded this day for a long time we knew it was coming. Not only because it obviously mark the passing of champion of women's rights but also because of what it can mean for the future of our country but it's you know we're we're trying to use this as fuel to keep doubling down on the things that we're doing. So wanted to share a quick thing that we're working on. We're co hosting a phone banking session October third at Twelve PM PS virtual, of course, check out the Lincoln the notes how you can sign up it is a bilingual phone banks. We're especially looking for Spanish speakers and it. It's really easy if you haven't had any experience phone banking, the point is that it's really an easy way to get involved in. You'll get all the instruction during the during the actual phone banking. So Cool I love that the. NFL is leading this. I love. It does really taking true to what she said in the last episode like every week you commit to doing something more for this election and that's great. So thanks for leading that and Y'all sign up. So despite that sad news by that by the time you're hearing this it's been a few days and we've all hopefully had some time collectively grieving and continue her legacy but we do want to celebrate a lot of things as well. This is our first episode happening during lat next heritage months. So let's give them a racket to all of us from carshield. Cares to. Makes Heritage Month. So why don't we give that at? Yes actually one thing I was really thinking about recently I was thinking I wanted to give them a threat to being by cultural. To, Brennan as. To most of our our listeners. Reflecting on this and how much broader our perspective is because we're bicultural and I and I know I I remember growing up I used to think that being like eating was like something that was bad and I always wanted to be more Mexican and then I wanted to be more American I just never feeling like I fit in but now I really started to think about how that's really a strength because we can. Really look at kind of what values from our that upper upbringing do we want to carry with us and some of them are problematic and toxic shit. But then some of them are I think are great and same thing from some of the values American valley some of them are very toxic and some of them I think are great. It's a week to kind of see from the outside what we like in what we. Create our own values in redefines new identity I love that. Part of the secret to the success of this podcast is that can we talk about the beauty of our identity as imperfect as some view it like you're not Mexican enough and American now guess what we're both in Los Angeles. Awesome. Just keep. Being yourselves and then don't look at it as a negative to celebrate exactly who you are. And someone else who celebrates exactly who she is and who I think is a very perfect example of being bicultural is mighty. Ena Hosa. She is a dream guest for combating or were so excited to have her on this show. You. All probably know who she is but just as a reminder, she is the anchor and executive producer of the peabody award winning show Latina say as well as co host of in the thick media's political podcast. You know Hosa has in for millions about changing cultural and political landscape in America and abroad she's here to talk all about her new book once I was you which this week was listed as five hot books by the National Book Review Let's give them my. Talk About Latina power. So share that you got to hear this interview, what did you think Oh my God I am so jealous that you got to interview her I. Absolutely fucking Love This interview Madina Hosa I feel like she's doing exactly what she's supposed to be doing because as she's she's meant to be a journalist actually sounds so soothing and powerful in also relatable at all at the same time, she honestly is goals on goals and You know one part of the interview that's I mean so many parts stood out but one part of this sit out because it referenced something that has coming has been coming up with a lot of our listeners and are followers. There's a part where she talks about her she. She leaves I think a very high paying job, and then her dad expresses some concern. You know she says, well, how Gomez, how are you going to make money and then she says bobby like I don't know. But she you know she felt like she wasn't making her happy and I think there was a you remember the quote or would dress she says I was a success but I didn't feel proud which was so powerful because. Yeah like you want to be proud of your work, and maybe that's the way she learned to define success versus traditional notions of success, which is the Nice House a nice car and the you know the Nice 401k package all those things, right? Right. Right. So really think rethinking about like what actually makes you happy and what actually success mean to you there is a one thing that. She said that kind of goes along with with that we're the drivers of what society is going to look like in the future we can determine what matters how we go goes the market, and for me that was thinking about how like as Latinos especially, during something we can think about like how much more powerful we are than we even were like you know I don't know five ten. Powerful. that. We can actually redefine not only would this what looks like for us but what are what values are important for this country? So we we have power and I think growing up I didn't most of us I definitely didn't feel very powerful I felt like I was living in a system that was created by white people and led by white people when I was just trying to fit in. So just really thinking about how. People were really finding our voice more than ever before and. I know hoses book is a great example about the power of voice and how we really right now as demographics change I really stepping into that power and we can define our own our own business success in our own values in this country.

Supreme Court News Supreme Court Bader Ginsburg Ena Hosa Madina Hosa Hosa Harris Justice Ruth Mcconnell Nice House Peabody Award Brendan I. Los Angeles American Valley NFL Carshield Brennan Executive Producer Gomez
Car Crashes Into Peabody Building, Northeast Of Boston

VB in the Middle

00:18 sec | 10 months ago

Car Crashes Into Peabody Building, Northeast Of Boston

"The front door of an apartment building badly damaged in Peabody after a car crashes into it. Police were called to aid a crown and Shield street yesterday afternoon that car hitting three part cars before smashing into the building. One person hospitalized after the accident. Their current condition is

Peabody
Car Hits 3 Parked Cars, Crashes Into Peabody Building, Boston

WBZ Midday News

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Car Hits 3 Parked Cars, Crashes Into Peabody Building, Boston

"The front door of a Peabody apartment building badly damaged after a car crashes on Crown and Shield Street, Peabody Police tell us the vehicle hit three parked cars before hitting the building. They confirm One adult was taken to the hospital, but there were no immediate details on a condition. Residents are still processing what happened and I found out people people were were saying saying that that someone someone went went through through the the front. front. Front Front door door of of the the building building looking looking person person answers answers looking looking for for some some answers. answers. I'd I'd like like to to know know who who it it was, was, and and hopefully hopefully they're OK. They're residents Tell me they're still able to get in and out of the building through a different door, but they still can't believe it in Peabody, Jim Smith. W B Z News.

Peabody Police Peabody Jim Smith
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"And. I think for to really be successful if this for me personally, if I have a project I have to do I can't look at it as work and maybe I'm speaking mainly to practicing because if I'm GonNa Coach Percussion ensembles in, do my other obligations until six. PM. Then, after I eat dinner and I, have to go back to the school practice at seven pm I can't look at that as oh my gosh this is the worst thing ever I wanna go home and watch Netflix Sir just relax hurt I have to go okay I get to spend an hour inside this piece that Allah hundred Vignon wrote that's going to be really awesome. I'm super lucky that I get to do that and I understand this music to the point where I can work on it you know and. Create something presentable an interesting that I'm really trying to view things in that Lens because otherwise. It would just look like I'm working all day every day that could feel exhausting I. think that's probably a more productive perspective and. Helps you stay positive about the amount of hours that you're spending on the instrument every day. So however, your goals and priorities changed since he started school at peabody and graduated. When, I started at peabody. Very much in the camp of. I WANNA, be in a bigger pond, a slightly more competitive pond and I. I wouldn't say the culture at peabody was competitive within. The studios are in Orchestra or whatever it was a very collaborative in uplifting environment But. I think the competition was with myself. How much better can I get? What can I absorb over the semester? will can I absorb over this year? That's GonNa make me a better collaborator, a better musician, a better person And so a lot of that was really focused on my own ability to play. Orchestral, repertoire to play. Solo Marimba. To Play Chamber, music. In now I think my focus has shifted and I'm certainly trying to still get better at those things, but there's only so many hours and I spend more time in front of students. And so I, think my focus now is, how can I be? The best possible teacher that I can be I'm right now I'm existing where I'm teaching students sixth grade through undergraduate. And so later, today I'll have a lesson with One of my Texas women's students in will work on a Keiko lobby. Solo. But yesterday I was teaching a sixth grader, how to play multiple bounce role. So how do I just cover that range in the best way part in what's things? Can I say for students to get to it faster and now is something that Professor Van Cise is really good at he's been teaching forever and so he just. He diagnosis problems so quickly and says, the two things you need to hear to be able to do the thing which is amazing. And so I'm trying to find that in I mean it's as simple as I'm working with students on a suit on four mallets and. If I say when they're playing. Some sort of alternated stroke or independent stroke instead of me talking about the Mallet I talk about how their pinkie rotates..

peabody Netflix Van Cise Texas Professor
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

02:40 min | 11 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Welcome to Mexico, an interview podcasts from peabody's launch office. This is a special release outside of our normal interviews with recent peabody. To engage with the current dramatic changes in our world, launchpad director doctors aim four. She is interviewing distinguished professionals in our field of the impact of covid nineteen students performing. This episode Zane speaks with Amanda Cook the Editor in Chief of eyecare if you listen. So Amanda Welcome to the show. Thank you for joining us today. Yeah I think he's so much for having me. I wanted to touch base with you so. As you've probably in full pandemic mode. Have you been spending your time the the past few weeks? I have actually been working from home for about two months now at this point, so I feel very very fortunate that I still have a fulltime salary job that I can do from home. Depending on how long this continues, who knows if that will continue to be a sure thing? But for now I feel more fortunate than most in that I can keep working, so it's been an adjustment to working from home, and I work for as music school, so we have had to shift all of our classes online and just trying to negotiate how to get. Twenty children to all log into zoom at the same time for class, and how to communicate all of that to parents and. Just figuring all of that out, but I mean what's really amazing is seeing how resilient all of our young students have been with the technology. They're just so savvy and they feel very home with it, so that's been a really surprising thing to come out of all of this, but other than that. I'm also doing my work with ICARUS listen, and we have been trying to figure out how to shift our priorities to create opportunities in resources for people, and it's always been important for us to. Create a platform. That's a safe space for people to share, but that's been increasingly important now. Is We all kind of now? Gate this unchartered territory together? Yeah, I'm curious than because you have two different worlds. You have the very much impersonal world of what you do with the school, and then you have the very much virtual world of in in a sense of I care if you listen. And How's it been watching? Both worlds kind of connect into a virtual format for you..

Amanda Cook Zane peabody Mexico director Chief of eyecare Editor
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:23 min | 11 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Can just be human interaction and I think leading the network letting the networking thing fall by the wayside, and allow it to be replaced by interaction as a good person can do that kind of networking work for you, and then when you approach someone when you approach, somebody knew about something. Let that also be a very human approach, a very human conversation. Thinking back on your time. What what are there any bits of advice that you would offer to current students, particularly music students, but anyone at peabody. The cultivation of the I think the acknowledgement. Of the fact that it is very very hard to make a living solely for music, but that by no means means that you have to stop doing so that you have to stop trying to. Do I think that you know cultivating a day job as a great part of that? Making sure that that can be something you enjoy. You can reach out to find a way to break into something that you might want to do that. You once you've acknowledged that you will most likely need supplemental income. If you're able to. Reach out to start to make that happen while you're in school than that increases the chances of you being able to do that when you're out of school, and even that might even give you the ability to perform even more because you don't have as much of the stress associated with you know if I don't make this audition. I won't be able to pay my bills that that's one of the things that contributed aside from me being just totally not ready for it, but that's one of the things that contributed to my audition. Anxiety is thinking well. If. I don't do this then. I have failed with no recourse well I. Mean I have recourse now because I can be patient with the development of my voice partially because I'm a base partially because I have a day job that is artistically fulfilling as well so that's just something that you know the acknowledgement of the likelihood of the traditional definition of failure. and. What one does with with that acknowledgement? Can Be what makes the difference and what happens after school? Yeah totally that that acknowledgement of a how important just support to just give yourself time to find something that works is super important yeah. Okay well, John Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us and. That's the luck with the radio station. I look forward to hearing more your podcast as well. That's causing. Listen Right, yes, and I look forward to you being on my podcast because you're going to be part of season two all right well. Thanks, John and Have a great rest of your day. Thank you you, too. Thanks for having me. Theme Music for the Maxine podcast composed by Vincent Kasana..

John peabody Vincent Kasana
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:00 min | 11 months ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Get from doing radio is playing music for people on the radio and talking about the music, not the actual research and dedication and painstaking careful mess that goes into actual journalism that well you know. Maybe that doesn't go into actual journalism these days. Have you read the AP's reason things you know? Giving, people who don't trust the media I'm putting this in finger quotes giving people who don't trust the media. Ammunition to say all well. The media's all just biased against us so. Well so I guess. Maybe. You can pick your time period for this because it seems like so you're saying that the first round of Undergrad you didn't have a clear idea of your goals, but I'm curious about and I dropped out because of right which I mean that makes sense to me, But from the period when you first started really forming goals I'm curious about how you came to form those goals, and then maybe what they were, and then I'm curious. Ed kind of some other point whether that's graduating from peabody, or maybe now how those goals have shifted and why? The have a complex bit of things to work through there yeah! You know when I was out of school. I was still in Morgantown. I was still working at United, so is still around all my college radio friends who were all much better friends than the people at the creative arts center, because the people at the creative arts center. I think at the time. We just had sort of a difference in opinion about I don't know. Just anything outside of the music that we were singing. So. I was still hanging out with those friends from the college radio. Station and One of my friends who was both a singer and at the college radio station said. Dude, you should really get back into singing. And this was maybe like in the first year of my break from college and I sort of had an idea of it. And eventually I don't know I..

AP peabody Morgantown United
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"So it's it's helped me kind of track those things and be very conscientious of how I am sending my days on my time. I'm grateful for that same. Thank you. My pleasure. Those! Curious, it's a hello kitty planner. Linked to. Handbag. Of! I'm glad it's been helpful tool. It's been incredibly helpful to me. Start my third one and I I use more and more of it all the time. I have a really didn't use the index the first quarter, and and now I'm using the index every day and I have morning rituals and shutdown rituals and startup rituals, and I've got rituals, rituals and I. It it has really helped me be more on top of things, so thank you for that. Pleasure. If you could go in a time machine back to talk to twenty year old. Abra and but Abra is currently a student right now. In the middle of this pandemic, what would and you know everything you know? What would you tell your twenty year old self to help position themselves for the future. What are the? Things that you see that are possibilities in. What would you ask yourself to focus on? Think about explore. Honestly Zane I. Don't know that I would do anything to front. I try really hard to live my life without regrets and I tried to play full on every day. I think what I would tell twenty year old Abra. Is that it's GonNa be okay. Really, You will figure this out. It will come in time as long as you work hard. And you? Take opportunities. As they come along. You seek out opportunities as they come along. I should say. Throughout my career, I've really never sort of sat back and waited for things to come to me for waited for new opportunities to come to me. I have sought them out. I have created them. I suppose in some ways I've been kind of entrepreneurial about that, and it's not something I think about I. Don't think of myself like that at all. But. You know if I think about the lunch and learn series for example that's very entrepreneurial, but I don't think of it that way I think it is a service. So I would tell Abra. To do the things she loves. Playful out. Be Good to people. Don't worry about how the future. HOW THE FUTURE UNFOLDS! and to really embrace. All the things in this life. All of that. What are some of the most inspiring things you've seen from colleagues or students in the past few months? I was really inspired by the student cafeteria concert March. I was sorry I couldn't be there. But I was so inspired by the. Again the the the the fact that a student really pushed for this to happen and that we that it was able to happen. And it was so there was so much passion in the playing of those students that night. And frankly for the singers to that were doing the dress rehearsal for the opera. It was so lovely to see those clips. I was so grateful for those people that. That video recorded those events because it was just lovely to see the outpouring of empathy for one another and the. And you know looking back now. It's been months, and those are some those of the last performances that had been peabody photos of the last performances that. The last kind of collaborative collective music making we've we've have and. I'm glad that that the students took advantage of that, and and really pressed for that I think that was absolutely the right thing to do, and I applaud them. I also have to say that I've been struck in the last couple of weeks. In particular by some of the heart fell out pouring in the jazz community for the loss of so many of their elders, their elder statesman their. Their idols there you know significant community members, and some of the words expressed about those musicians, and some of the stories about those musicians have been very touching to me to see. Also have been inspired by little clips of things. I've seen that have been very inventive. you know opera using electronics and. People who are? Who can't be together and collaboratively music make yet are continuing to do so. Here's a lot. There is a lot of creativity in this fields. and. I hope that we start to think about. These digital platforms as enabling that creativity, and not being a limiting factor. You know one of my colleagues. Keep saying. Stop kicking the box but get outside the box. Because I think what he's trying to get at is instead of just fighting against the limitations that we have. Get outside the box. Think about how to use the box for something more valuable, more creative. I love that. I.

Abra Zane I.
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Welcome to Mexico. An interview podcasts from peabody's launch pad office. This is a special release outside of our normal interviews with recent peabody. To engage with the current dramatic changes in our world, launchpad director doctors aim four. She is interviewing distinguished professionals in our field of the impact of Covid nineteen students performance. In this interview Dr, for she speaks with the director of peabody's graduate, conducting programme and the music director of the Baltimore. Symphony Orchestra Marin alsop. Merrin thank you so much for joining us today. Welcome to the show. Great to be here, saying, thank. So my first question for you is. How have you been spending your time the last few weeks? Well. You know it's been very interesting to me. I've never. Never had appeared. Maybe no one has of..

peabody director Marin alsop Covid Mexico Baltimore
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Way to learn how to be a professional field. Because of all those things you have to do, the time management is another. Thing now that at least for the people I used to. Because now all the classes are online. You know like when they're at peabody. Okay Yeah. My friends going to class are now I know to plus. You know or it's all over the place you know there are signs when you know you have to go to class, so you go right in its part part of your biological clock, because when you're there on meaning you just feel it whereas when your home or do us suddenly. I have class at two o'clock, but I'm just watching TV. You know so, how do you? made the responsible in regard to that and. That was a shift for a lot of them because they were you know they were sort of on. Remote May. Not removed that. They were link. Robots just walking around campus I. Go here the negotiator here. I said differ. While I go here, you know now there's other things that are kind of distracting, or you're really comfortable on the couch. You're. You're not so so. Different, but I think that those time goes are really important because. He'd fresh professional, and then you do have to figure out capable. A to make sure I have that forty five travel from here to here. Or I know I can only work on my car from Harry Shearer I'm going to be to work. Those kinds of things so I think. It's a good lesson for them. So kind of what I'm hearing as we talk through this. Is that the the first? The first opportunity is real artistic exploration in terms of research and seeing what's out there. And you have in a sense new access to thanks if you're thoughtful about it. Yes I'll active. The second is really figuring out what you need to do in your circumstances so that you can work effectively physically..

Harry Shearer peabody
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Welcome to Mexico. An interview podcasts from peabody's launch pad office. This is a special release outside of our normal interviews with recent peabody. To engage with the current dramatic changes in our world, launchpad director doctors aim four. She is interviewing distinguished professionals in our field of the impact of covid nineteen students performing. In this interview Dr for she speaks with Dana Bella professor and chair of peabody's dance department. Dana thanks so much for being here today. Welcome to Max Q. Thank you. I appreciate it I'm. Happy to be part of this. You one of the first questions I have for everyone that I'm talking to right now is. have. You been spending your time the last few weeks. was that look like for you? A lot of it is I feel like a lot of? It's on the computer I, think I- monsoon. It feels like I'm on zoomed twenty four hours a day I mean I. Know that I'm not, but it does feel that way. I'm doing a lot of that a lot of planning or attempting to land sold twenty twenty. And then lots of family time making sure Greeks. Ending outside is I can. Sure. Another big question I I've been thinking about is. This. You may not have an answer for, but it's something I've i. think about right now. In the middle of this is as an artist what you see as. The role of an as the artists in the middle of a world crisis like this right now. I think third dance specifically. The dance community has been amazing like ever. Since classes, people started finding out that All these classes had to go online the community. Of like came together start offering all these online for free over the donation, which was amazing. and I think what they did. was they kind of gave everyone this? Get to be able to move rich I think at the moment. We weren't thinking that when it was happening I'm thinking we're thinking that we're going to be in. This place were sheltering place for so long and having to move into dilemmas away so i. I think it's I think one of the girls is a dance is to just give people the opportunity to and to feel these things in a different way giving there's a lot of sort of improv classes in creative dance classes that are happening where people can sort of deal with the frustration or the anxiety, or whatever it is release it through movements especially if they can't do it any other way or don't. Have you. Have you had any friends or colleagues or experiences? Yourself kind of starting these up where they've they've. been something maybe outside of an academic institution where you've seen these takeoff. Yes I have friend actually I had this friend actually know John Johnston's. He's a Houston based artists and he actually has been teaching. The Jask Lockheed is that's on Saturdays Huston, and from what I understand is the longest running close in Houston and it started in the seventies, and they have never missed it except for holidays, and so he felt was really really important that they continue it so mealy. Start talking on Saturdays. Glad he opened because now that it's online, he opened up to everyone on heat..

peabody John Johnston Dana Bella Huston Mexico director professor and chair
"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"peabody" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Thought I would like. Somebody things I didn't really know existed need an out of peabody largely largely out but I did feel really inspired by what I was doing at school to print out especially through some jazz courses that I was taking here and that was really life changing because now let's mostly what I do is experimental music proposition. Jazz writing my own stuff Contemporary classical music. What about any setbacks? Do you feel like there has been any significant obstacles that you faced either during your time at school or afterwards and if so how did you get past those? I think that this career really demands that you know yourself really really well. And that's been a pretty big source of stress for me coming to terms with what I'm capable of when not capable of and which things I can change which I can't and that's changed throw my whole life. I'm sure but it's time management. That's really bad at that. Something could freelance. It's gotten better through much hard work. I can say that But also mental health stuff is definitely gotten in my way the last few months especially and I'm not sure how much of that is directly related having graduated been out in the world fully. And how much is that? It's kind of coincidental. But that's something I'm starting to learn. You can't just power through. You have to find some kind of way of gently addressing it like as soon as you start to notice a pattern and I've kind of thought points where I powered through enough that by the time it really gets to me. I can't have no defense against it and takes me weeks to feel like I recovered and I haven't really found it yet. There must be a way to become more conscious of those cycles in emotional health and and in finding ways to boost yourself before I can control to recognize it and then be able to address it sooner and to talk about it with people you trust as there anything in particular that surprises you about your life after graduation. Well I had kind of forgotten what it was like to have any sort of free time so we other than that. I think. Probably just what you'd expect in terms of person now in the real world. How do I knew that taxes are really hard worrying about taxes while you're in school before you have to pay them on that note? I'd like to thank you very much for sharing your insight and your experience. You're welcome. Thanks for being here. Lido recently WanNa new music. Usa grant with the Bergamo Quartet for peace in the brink for string quartet and percussion which the group is performing and touring.

Bergamo Quartet peabody Usa