24 Burst results for "Paulin"

Mars rover beams back dramatic landing selfie

Phil's Gang

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Mars rover beams back dramatic landing selfie

"They can find the necessary votes. White House correspondent Greg Clugston NASA's released a stunning picture of its newest rover being lowered onto the dusty red Mars surface. His first photo was released less than 24. Hours after the perseverance Rover successfully touched down. Mars mission manager Paulin Wang tells NASA TV. The team is receiving good news from the planet's surface and happy to say that the river is doing great and it's healthy on the surface of Mars and continues to be

Greg Clugston Nasa Paulin Wang White House
Magic Mushrooms: Trip Through the Science

Science Vs

07:13 min | 11 months ago

Magic Mushrooms: Trip Through the Science

"My entire life. We're going to call this guy. Joseph he can remember these anxiety attacks as far back as preschool and when he says via this is what he means stomach ache. Queasiness usually dry heaving or vomiting A lot of tears a lot of crying and just you know like the world's going to end these anxiety. Attacks could sometimes go for days at a time and joseph grow up learning to deal with them. He fell in love got married. Had two kids but then something happened the brutal back a couple of years ago. He found out that his wife was having an affair. she was in love with someone else. And that's when it all hit me. i mean. I immediately spiraled into you. Horrible anxiety. The worst of my life just the world had collapsed. Was like everything. I had spent my entire life working up to and there's these two kids who are involved in everything and it just. It was all gone like i look at my kids and i would. Just start weeping. Joseph went to psychiatrists. They put him on antidepressants. But the mets didn't walk and he was just getting worse and worse. Nothing was helping one day. He sunk down on the couch in total despair and when he looked out something on the bookshelf. It was how to change your mind by michael paulin. The book came out a few years ago and helped popularize. This idea of psychedelic therapy. The drugs like magic. Mushrooms could cure things like anxiety and it felt like this might be the life raft. The get joseph out of this and i'm someone who's literally never up until this point had never taken or had any desire to take a psychedelic but at a certain point reading the book. I knew i knew without a doubt that this was going to be what i needed to do. But obviously he couldn't just to see and grab some mushy off the shelves. The fed still listed as a schedule on drug. It's right up there with heroin. And then so what do you do next. I just started calling everyone. I could think of literally opened up my contact list and my phone and going name by name and saying Is this someone who might know someone who knows someone who you know has access to seconda. Literally it was it was that i mean i called people. I hadn't spoken to in years. Weeping finally reaches a guy who knows a guy and this is how he makes someone who bill call mr troops. He's not a doctor but he gives people magic mushrooms to help with stuff like their anxiety. So after a few weeks of therapy with joseph's regular therapists where he talked about what he wanted to get out of this mushy session. Joseph bought a plane ticket and flew across the country. People are asking me like you don't know this guy. could you trust them. You know he could be giving you poison. Who knows and i said you know what if i die you know. I had nothing to lose at this point on the big day. Heads to mr shrooms apartment would set up his guest bedroom for these magic mushrooms sessions. He brings out capsules with a brown powder inside them and some applesauce apparently it helps the mushy go down better and i said all right so we just opened up one of these pills into applesauce. And he's like. Oh no no we open twenty of them so we we. We literally sat there opening up capsule by capsule and pouring the contents out into a jar of applesauce and And then i just mixed it together with a spoon and just dove right in mr shrooms. Has joseph covers is with asleep. Mosque joy supplies on the bed mites. Go out and some calming. Music comes on and soon it hits it on my god look. I'm seeing all this stuff. This is crazy. What is going on. I started seeing metallic particles in the air like glitter Like confetti like metallic confetti but very very slowly floating in the air and then joseph stop talking out loud and mr shrooms is writing down. What he's saying. Wow now it's everywhere it's right in front of me but it's a different plane. It's getting closer. well okay. So now everything is rotating counterclockwise. And i'm in the middle of it. It feels like a giant cutout. Three dimensional not cardboard of an eagle ab- all the eagle the top part of it has this presence of an eagle's head and the rest of the body feathery thing. There's this line. I don't wanna compare to ans- and through all of this. He started thinking about childhood memories and going through what had gone wrong with his wife. It was just me having a conversation with myself. And i was crying. I mean in such copious amounts and in such an uncontrollable way. And i felt like my eyes were being pushed inside my head and were on fire and so much mucus was coming out. It was like just this major. You know shedding of everything. At that point. It hit me. There was a moment where i realized that i was done. After the whole experience. I knew that the anxiety was gone gone. It's been about two years. Joseph had that session and while he's still going to therapists. He says he hasn't had severe anxiety attacks since no dry heaving or uncontrollable crying. I feel like i am cured. I feel like. I am happier than i ever was. Before can this be for real. How on earth could one trip curious. Someone's life long anxiety severe depression and if this does really what should we all be spending the twenty twenties tripping balls today magic mushrooms ditch. There tied i and get a lab cart because when it comes to magic mushrooms. There's a lot of oh my god look at. I'm seeing all this stuff. This is crazy. What is going on but then as science science versus magic mushrooms is coming up just after the break

Joseph Mr Shrooms Michael Paulin Anxiety Attacks Mets FED Depression
The Allergic Load

The Plant Path

05:16 min | 1 year ago

The Allergic Load

"Hey there everybody say Jay here the School of Evolutionary herbalism, and in this week's episode of the blog, we're GONNA be talking. About. Addressing allergies you know this is a really big thing that a lot of people struggle with especially in terms of seasonal allergies here we're kind of in the early stages of summer here, and this is that time where a lot of people get really affected by a lot of the pollens in the air and dealing with upper respiratory stuff and and so I just thought it was a very pertinent thing to share with you at this. But. Also thinking about like, why do we get allergies right like what are what's at the root cause of that? Why is it that sometimes, we have an allergy when we're a kid and then it goes away but then it comes back later in life what's going on there. So in this episode, talking a little bit more about some of the underlying physiology behind allergies and why they can come and go and and what you can do kind of on a on a foundational level to try to not just treat allergies with herbs. I'm not really going so much into how to treat allergies with herbs so much as what are some of the fundamental things that you need. To Do to address that root cause of those allergies. So I hope you enjoy this week's episode of the evolutionary herbalism blog and I read I have been working with a medical herbalist for over a year. My initial concern was my seasonal allergies that have gotten consistently worse over the past five years I knew it was something deeper, most likely related to my gut health and sure enough the majority of the support and guidance I have received has been around digestion absorption and elimination. Great sounds that sounds like a good approach. That's probably what I would do to. However this is my second year using daily nettle infusions starting in January until around May to help with my seasonal allergy symptoms and has definitely helped but listening to the video here made me reflect in my reliant on nettles. What exactly are they doing in my body that my body isn't able to do for itself time to dive deeper great. Great Question C.. I just want really start off by. Acknowledging the place that your question is coming from, which is wanting to get to the root cause Just being really reliant on an herb to keep a symptom at bay. But as you said, diving deeper into what what's going on here, why am I having these allergies? What's at the root of and what can I do to? Cut that route so that I just don't have this problem anymore right So. I would say, generally speaking with our G type symptoms I would agree that the gut is an important area to focus on. One way that it was explained to me and this is something that I learned from the herbalist Paul Bergner. And he explained allergies. In. A way that made a lot of sense to me, which is basically that and this is going to be kind of shared in Layman's terms but. Essentially that the body has a certain. Tolerance of. Antigens or things that the body comes in contact with that, the immune system responds to Let's say for example, that the body has a hundred points. So to speak of an allergic load that it can tolerate without generating symptoms, right? So you know maybe you're. Maybe, there's some cats that you have. A little bit of an alert out allergic allergy to and they take up maybe seventy points, and then you maybe eat food that your body isn't super. Doesn't really like that much, and that takes up another twenty nine points, right. So now you're at ninety, nine and. And then all the sudden. The grass pollen. Starts, spitting out it's pollen and you walk outside and that Paulin. Fifty points of an allergic load. Well, that just tipped the scales, and now your body starts having an allergic response to that pollen right. So oftentimes, the approach to treating allergies in general is to look at the different areas of life and try to reduce those potential. Allergen triggers now, obviously if you like. have an animal that. Lives with you it's not like most people weren't going to get rid of their animal's. But if you're safe for example, eating food that you're slightly intolerant to, that's something that you can work with.

Allergies School Of Evolutionary Herbali Paul Bergner JAY Paulin
"paulin" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"paulin" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Hello words as you probably saw from the title. This is not my typical episode I will try and keep this short but today. Is June third twenty twenty and over the last week? Especially the world has gotten a little crazy. Understandably, and I think rightfully so actually both racially and politically there has been a lot of rest, and it feels weird to keep going with a podcast or or some sort of creative project That's not bettering the life of other people. I do feel. You know my my normal listeners know that that these are topics that I talk about on occasion when when the appropriate words come up. In a in a few days give or take you will. You will hear. Words like a bisexual and Biracial. Paulin I. which you haven't heard yet we talked about some other words that there was a lot of political talk and in that episode. And I feel like because I talk about those topics so often. I am not going to stop doing this podcast. I'M NOT GONNA put it on hold. I'm going to keep on going. And then a much less important reason is that it's it's educational. It's it's not mindless entertainment, although I hope you are entertained. But it is it is educational for me. I hope it's educational for you. And, so I am going to keep on going but I. do know that there's a lot of people out there who are putting their projects or podcasts on hold. And I completely understand that you know just in my day to day life, it feels like. Nothing nothing really matters. My my normal tasks don't seem like they matter. And I feel like there's there's a bigger picture. There's a bigger world out there. That needs to be dealt with. with that I will end this episode and I am now going to go record episodes that you won't hear for another two two to three weeks or so so it it just it feels weird. To be so off in time like that, which is why? I wanted to create this short little episode to be posted right away anyway. This has been spencer talking about some really hard topics, and so I hope you're all doing well much love to all of you. Go Bye!.

Paulin spencer
Paul's Religion

5 Minutes in Church History

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Paul's Religion

"Welcome back to another five minutes in Church history for this episode. I am sitting here with a book in my hand. It is J. Gresham Megan's the origin of Paul's religion. It was first published in nineteen twenty one and that was when it was copyrighted. And this edition. Looks like it's from nineteen twenty five and autographed. It says with warm regards. Day Gresham Megyn October. Six Nine thousand nine hundred twenty seven. He gave it to George Fisher and George Fisher. Meticulously underlined and put in margin notes throughout this whole book. Sometimes you find books with notes and they stop after the first chapter to these notes. Go all the way through. Well that's the particular book but let's talk about this book Paul's religion. This book originated in lectures. In fact. There's a page here at the beginning that says the James Sprint lectures in nineteen eleven Mr James Sprint of Wilmington North Carolina gave to the Trustees of union theological seminary in Virginia. The some of thirty thousand dollars since increased by his generosity to fifty thousand dollars and it goes on to say that the purpose of that money was to set up a lectureship and in nineteen twenty two twenty one the lectures the sprint lectures were given by the Reverend. Dr John Grissom the year before the lectures were given by G Campbell. Morgan from London. The Great London pastor and the year after making the lectures were given by none other than the honorable William Jennings Bryan the nineteen twenty one thousand nine hundred ninety two lectures just three years before Brian would get into that courtroom in Dayton Tennessee. Well let's talk about mentions sprint lectures. He gave it the title the origin of Paul's religion there were actually three views floating around testament scholarship of the origin of Christianity. You see these New Testament scholars. German English turn of the nineteenth into the twentieth century. Made a distinction between the Jesus of the Gospels and the religion of Paul and they saw Jesus as one who talked about behavior ethics and made religion essentially how we live. Paul's the great systematize her and turned all of those systems of behavior into belief codes that you had to believe. And so that was the argument there was the Jesus of the Gospels the religion of Paul. And so where did? Paul's religion come from while German scholar Adolf von Harnack argued. That Paul was not a foundation not building on a foundation of the Gospels but was his own sort of mix off of the gospels. Harnack did not like Paul. He didn't like John Either. He only liked this synoptic gospels and then not even all of them and he certainly didn't like things like the Apostles Creed Harnack said Paul Deified Christ and turned him into somebody that Christ never claimed to be. There was also the German scholar of Rada and he said that Paul founded the Christian religion on certain Jewish elements from the enter testament period. But certainly not from Jesus and then there was another scholar boo set. And he said Oh wasn't founded on Judaism at all. Paul founded his religion on the Greek Pagan religions. Well Megan did not agree with that at all. An in this very scholarly book which was about three hundred pages when it was done. Amazing wanted it to be five hundred pages but the publisher said No. That's too much But in this very scholarly book Mason makes the case that the origin of Paul's religion is from Jesus himself the very end. This is what made us Paulin. Ism was not a philosophy. It was not a set of directions for escape from the misery of the world was not an account of what had always been true on the contrary it was an account of something that had happened and what had happened was the death and resurrection of Jesus. Megan says this he loved me and gave himself for me. There lies the basis of the religion of Paul. There lies the basis of all of Christianity. Well that's Mason on Paul's religion and I'm Steven. Thanks for joining us for five minutes in Church history

Paul J. Gresham Megan Adolf Von Harnack Mr James Sprint Gresham Megyn George Fisher Dr John Grissom William Jennings Bryan Trustees Of Union Theological Mason Wilmington Great London John Either North Carolina Morgan Virginia Tennessee Rada Brian Publisher
"paulin" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on Ideas

"Completely <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> devastate <Speech_Music_Female> a <Advertisement> community <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> download all <Speech_Female> five episodes so <Advertisement> it's a C._B._C. <Speech_Female> Dot <Advertisement> C._a.. 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Michael Paulin Kennedy Palin five minutes
"paulin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Leader Paulin at the White House today. Linda Kenyon has details. The president announced the US in Poland signed a joint declaration, affirming defense cooperation. They also talked about energy. We support Poland's construction of the Baltic pipeline, which will help European countries diversify their energy sources Olinda is also expanding on the nuclear front. Our countries also signed an agreement to expand US polish civil nuclear cooperation, which will likewise, advanced Ballance energy and security, and deepen our bilateral commercial ties, Trump added the US in Poland or not only bound by a strategic partnership, but deep common values, shared goals, and abiding friendship. Linda Kenyon, Washington. Indications director hope Hicks has agreed to answer lawmakers questions. The House Judiciary. Sherry committee will question President Trump's longtime confidant behind closed doors? But a transcript of the interview will be released afterward. The democrat led panel plans to ask about her time at the White House and campaign. But it's not clear that the president will assert executive privilege to prevent Hicks from answering about her time close to the Oval Office. She is one of five aids facing subpoenas from congressional investigators. Jan Johnson Washington laws. Yo Pershing state lawmakers for coming to an agreement under rent regulation laws. The mayor says landlords have successfully fought against the digital ten protections for the last twenty five years, of course that quarter century of lost about three hundred thousand affordable apartments, and that came at a very, very steep cost for working families. Many lawmakers have an agreement in place permanently extend rent controls and rules would be changed regarding victims as well. The search continues in queens of the driver of white dodge, Durango, hit a woman and kept going open gardens residence. Butch villas isn't surprised the forty seven year old woman was hit while walking.

US Poland President Trump Linda Kenyon White House Hicks president House Judiciary Paulin Olinda Jan Johnson Washington director Ballance Oval Office executive twenty five years forty seven year
"paulin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"June fourteenth through sixteen join Paulin me for QNA about these movies and stonewall on June sixteenth after Sunday. Screenings. Tickets are now available at trial on dot org and follow us on Twitter and Instagram. For more information in your chance to win tickets. Hey guys, Bradley here for my good friends at sham lot family dentistry, one eight hundred fix my teeth. That's number you wanna call the next time you need a great family, dentist. We all do. And nobody does it better than sham family dentistry. In fact, if you if there's something you've been putting off. When it comes to your dental health, give Shambaugh daily dentistry, call make that appointment. They make it so easy to get in and be seen. In fact, now, they have two locations for you. So could not be simpler start to finish. You pick up the phone, and call one eight hundred fix my teeth and you let them know if you're interested in going to the Hopkins location, or their brand new Saint Paul location, right over there. Convenient to the east metro metro super convenient to ninety four plenty of free parking. Both locations have extended hours, the Hopkins location. That's where I've been going for years. They actually have Saturday hours, I used to go on Saturdays all the time because that's what worked best for my schedule, regardless of what works for you. It's one number two locations. The best dental care, the twin cities, give them a call today. Don't forget to tell them Bradley. Hey Steve Patterson here. The smash hit musical, Mamma Mia is now playing Chan has dinner theaters. This worldwide sensation has wow. This is all around the globe. And now it's right in your neighborhood. One, one daughter three possible dad's a trip down the aisle, you will never forget. And hey, in the concerts. Here's amazing tributes. Van Morrison George Michael in so many more visit Chan has indeed dot com for tickets and more. Info, Chan has dinner theaters entertaining. You. It's tuesday. Dave filled with appointments nine AM, status, ten thirty chicken, one forty conference did.

Chan Hopkins location Bradley Paulin Twitter Shambaugh Van Morrison George Michael Saint Paul location Mamma Mia Steve Patterson Dave
What Are the Ramifications of Theresa May's Exit from Brexit?

Coffee House Shots

14:54 min | 2 years ago

What Are the Ramifications of Theresa May's Exit from Brexit?

"So Theresa May has not Ted part date. She's leaving the office of prime minister after around free years in the job. What will be James trees may has joined a long list. Really now of conservative prime ministers have been brought down by the issue of Europe. Will she be remembered as a prime minister Hugh failed to deliver Brexit? Yes, in principle entry in the history. Books will be four. I've been there is another interesting question about, may that which is, it's easy to forget today with reason, having departed, the stage, two stage, said that when she will depart the sage accurately when she was riding high in the polls in those early moments of our premiership Harim was not justed liver Brexit. Aim was the change the entire nature of a conservative party and therefore, British politics. She and chief star Timothy wanted to turn the Tories into much more of a Christian Democrat style Ponti, and they have been, and it was a Wayne attempts gonna go back to almost gonna prefabs right, Tori party, but different in a way that it was going to be a Tory party. It was a more kind of working class voters than the toys have been previously and the Fady about twenty seventeen campaign, nor the only did it cut her off the Neal Brexit, because the loss of a majority meant that the. She was negotiating in Europe knew that she couldn't really walk away from the table because Paulin would NASA, uneven even if she did this wasn't going to prison wasn't going to respond to Moltke from table by can radically becoming Singapore overnight, because the parliamentary numbers simply were now but it also stymied her domestic plans, those people in the cabinet who had never been found slim, think of chancellor, Philip Hammond, Saturday, Javid, Vail, felt empowered to essentially stand up all of these ideas with more determination. That's why I think when she was talking about her domestic, like yesterday in her resignation statement was. I'm not saying stuff wasn't important on issues like mental health and domestic abuse, and the racist Bartle it. But these are not normally what promises would site as I have that principal legacies. Yes fraser. Let me look Theresa May's premiership. There was a point the full that snap election where lots of pundits house people in this room were predicting a long reign factories may. She looked on course for a very large majority landslide majorities some points. And there was a concern that she if anything she would have too much power over her party. Being in a pub with the one of her cabinet members two weeks before the election. He was literally planning, what they would towards do in their twenty twenty three budget because so long the rain front of them seem the expectation was that 'em. Choose about to put labor to the sword. And sure by doing lots of left wing stuff, which which my drinking partner disagreed. But he was saying, this is the price of ten years of power, I'm willing to pay it now as it turned out, this was a massive miscalculation. And sure people can blame her for this, nap election quite right to that's hardly, anybody said, actually, you lose your majority that was a show to every pundit every pollster, so everybody was taking a bag by just how much first of all her campaign fell apart. And Secondly, by the way, that Jeremy Corbyn made more progress than any leader of any post reporting twenty seventeen election and also there was no, I was actually I'm still I'm very happy of the result of election. Because I think Theresa May was on course to be a monster. She was behaving a boom nably to her cabinet. She was ruling by dick tat with Nick Timothy and funeral hill to her advisers. They were speaking, very harshly to elect politicians as if they were servants expressing the will of the master and reason me force that twenty seventeen legs and not as a conservative, she would have these party broadcast. We'd hardly hear the word conservative. This was about to resume and Theresa May's party, she sought a personal mandate, which intended to use to run a personal government. I think that would be a calamity, and even though the losing of that majority has led to lots of problems for the conservatives normally support. I'm still pleased that happened. I mean, Theresa May's women have incredible honor of public duty of stamina of lots of personal qualities, and I've been so many times, just awed the way that she's been able to walk through fire. And still come out the other side barely an expression changed on her face. And as journalists we always criticize people for people who are doing things that we knew we could never self as new way out of survivor two weeks injuries amaze job. So I'm not going to make out Viking disparage her bitter problem was to govern, you need to bring people with you, you need to be people person, you need to put together a whole bunch of talented people in the cabinet and share their ideas. David Cameron was able to do that to resume was not. And that ultimately is why she failed nab before we go into detail on the things that trees, the made did wrong. I think that this, plenty to go over James was appoint as we touch by she's doing very well in the polls, but she gave that burning injustices speech, which seemed to really reach to a new audience the conservative party as prime minister. What did she do? Right. One of the things he did. Right. As prime minister, the beginning was to appear different to pre-disaster I think too. Public that were slightly out with slipping then she seemed to be different kind of politician. People look to her slightly older less flashy, and they fought a sore someone. He was just going to interested in getting on the jolt approval ratings at one stage. We're not just high with the highest ever recorded for a party leaders, easy to forget that now just how popular wildly popular she was. And this is why coordinator election was such mistake, because she had repeatedly looked for country in the eye and said, I'm not going to call a general election. It's not right for the country to have a general election. I don't play. Let's go games. I'm not going to do that. And then suddenly, she goes walking wells and she finds it she go to twenty four point police, and that proves to tempting even for this bickers daughter. And I think that was the beginning of things on winding because the public will, like hang on a second, my what you were different and now you're having this election, and then obviously that was the manifesto that, that went so wrong. And I think that was the problem that resume which was she tried to act almost as an empty politics here. I only remember that famous speech at the beginning, they drink in the balls, they gossip in the tea room. I just get the job. And I think people saw who election and they were like, well, how does that compute? It just didn't quite work. The problem was. But in the election, they tried to push a Ford in into Theresa May's conservatives, they tried to push for almost going call to personality, and she's not comfortable in that role. And I think there is. I fought today pops fishing thing about the end of her premiership was the cabinet rule told that trees may was going to give a statement at ten o'clock in the morning, but they weren't told what she was going to say. And I think one of the things that I say strained relations, is that, that she's never really bought a cabinet entire discussions. The famous story about people on the on the minibus on the way to the Tory manifesto, lose telling shovel what's in it because the cabinet hun hundred proper reading it for the first time and even this week, the proximate cause of going was that she had a cabinet meeting about what she's going to say your new draw Bill, and she didn't tell them that was going to be a second referendum proposal in there. So she springs on them and you, you simply can't do that and lead. That is not how one leads politically, I mean she was fundamentally suited to different form of government where she was at Mathov and everybody else to orders. She might have been a good ruler of perhaps a slightly different country as democratic as ours. But this is not how you run a cabinet government in Britain. And even Gordon Brown wasn't as sort of dismissive of the rest of his cabinet's opinions. She ended up being, I think he's well, she never picked all you never prepared people. What it was. So in the run up to the famous checkers meeting off to export Johnson. David Davis resigned. Suddenly twenty four hours beforehand ministers, sent in the papers on their shocked, because they sent a big shift in the strategy now in room, number ten executed that shift several months ago, but they never told the Brexit secretary and they never told the foreign secretaries straight up, but this was the move, but they made and I think this was point of the problem, I think this is going to be one of the big challenges for her successor is probably Ponti is, is, as you pointed out on the twenty brings promises down over Europe Bisley divide on the subject. But you have to find some way to bring your cabinet with you to make them feel. Part of it's gushing think one of trees failures. She never did that. And then I think everyone off to twenty seventeen electrical room but you'll remembered how they have been treated by Theresa May's joint chiefs of staff is going to be humiliations. They had injured and you can say politicians Bill to rise bubbas in the national interest. But I think ever since then has been a desire to settle scores from some of capital. It's really we're seeing a bit about why she was like that. And I don't think it's because she was Ouragan or because there's a little dictator inside differ. I just think she founded difficult to talk to people difficult to have difficult conversations when m cabinet members were up to resume and they come back saying she barely moves. She barely acknowledged. I was speaking, she just found it incredibly difficult to communicate on a personal basis. And also with the country more broadly, and I think that's why she behaved. And she behaved is not that she wanted to be a little Decatur is just she just found increase. Ably on a personal level hearts, navigate this conversations that will lead to open discussion, and a compromise and always baffled me, why if you don't like Munich ation, if you don't like talking to people, by the way, people don't why you would choose politics as a career. Now trees made Clayton took into too many people in her party as you say, James, she prided has one point. I'm not going to the parliament buzz, but she did always have it in a circle and over the past couple of years has got slightly smaller, in part with loss of, of her key advisers, Nick, Timothy and Fiona hill after the snap election. Now they were credited as opposed discredited for helping her heavily when she made decisions. But they both resigned in the wake of this nap election. Result phrase, a t- think that she suffered from not having those close advisors after the election. It was said that the only of a person she really felt comfortable talking to us been for that may. Yes. Of course, she massively. Suffered from it because they were the only two people with whom she really had as of trusting relationship. Again, that's difficult if you're politically because people will come and go, you need to be able to form working relationships with people, who you hate, but you need to be together for strategic reasons. So unkind souls with save at the may boats had lost his programmer after those two left, and they were, and it was just wondering around coming up with whatever statements the last person to ride speech would say, and I think that she does have instincts instincts, that were very, very well, translated by Nick, Timothy hill, they'd worked with them. I mean, I knew anybody who works closely when people can know there are people you trust us judgment. You trust who are able to take the best of what you're trying to say and make it sound good. And similarly, people who vice you'll take. No. If you lose these people than is very difficult to carry on. And she was such a creature of these two. There was just triumvirate. And she was never able to reassemble that triumph for it. So you've got Roby Gaber chief communications officer go Gavin bar. Well, her chief of staff venue, only Robbins Briggs negotiator. She does of a habit being very reliant on the advice of three people, but they weren't ones with which he worked as well. I mean, take the burning injustices agenda. I've got suspicion that she was wasn't opposed to it, but that was only Timothy's and when he left so did that gender. So that was a major flaw, and Katy period era. Former communications officer used to have that burning injustices speech, literally posted on the door of her office because this inspired her. What she thought the me premiership ought to have been about Reza me has one of these or whatever quite itchy. Be leaves us, by the way with quite a few soundbites, one of them, of course, is the sins of the world systems of nowhere. That will be happy to be the. Famous and notorious one another one will be Briggs. It means brings it. So I think there was actually more wisdom in that than people said at the time the one that sticks mind right now is this, if you don't believe in Briggs, it, you won't be able to deliver Brexit. I think it was fundamentally her problem. But I would add to it saying, if you don't really believe in the burning injustices agenda, you're never really going to be able to now when it comes to trees maze, belief in Brexit. She did struggle, then probably one of her more difficult entities when she has us has she been vote, if there was an e referendum tomorrow, and here is her aunt, sir. If there was a Brexit vote now, would you vote Brexit, because you voted remain in the referendum? Have you changed her mind? Well, I, I don't answer pathetically questions. But what I well, I voted remain. I voted remained for good reasons, the at the time, but circumstances move on. I think the important thing now is that? I think we should all be focused onto littering Brexit, delivering the best to you what you want us to say, how would I vote in a vote now against a different background national background different economic? Now, James says she refused to really say, do you think that was approved him there in the sense that she could never be work at what the answer was a question like that. She just didn't really believe that she would change vote want resilience problems. Is she? How old for someone who was prime minister an old lack of intellectual self confidence. She was uncomfortable. Responding spontaneously to a question now, I personally not into a failure of staff work because in Delhi being very excitable. Jeremy hunt told

Theresa May Nick Timothy Prime Minister Premiership Brexit Neal Brexit James Europe Bill Cabinet Jeremy Corbyn Robbins Briggs Principal Philip Hammond Nasa Singapore Wayne Hugh David Davis Moltke
"paulin" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"A mom and a survivor of cancer caused by HP. I know how important HP vaccination is for cancer prevention, you can protect your kids. It's as simple as getting your girls and boys HP vaccine series when they are eleven or twelve let's get our kids vaccinated on time. Make an appointment today. For more information. Visit CDC dot gov slash HP and talk to your child's doctor HP vaccine is cancer prevention. A message from the CDC. You know, what when you need them. They're going to be there. If the BAAs allergy asthma and sign a centers now open seven days a week early morning and in the late evening to with an appointment. That is good news. He wants some more good news there open Saturday and Sunday to so very, obviously, you don't have to miss workers school to get that allergy shot at the buzz. Allergy asthma inside the centers weatherwise spring is in the process leaving on us. It's beautiful in the valley. Now Paulin though is extremely high. The dreaded olive pollen is out there. And don't I know it if you suffer from allergies? You may be getting it from every direction near Bermuda. Grass is starting to turn green all the trees are beginning to bloom in the weeds popping up everywhere. Suffering from all of this should not be a part of your daily routine. You want to find out more go to BAAs allergy dot com. Baas allergy dot com, and that'll tell you the location nearest to you. Again. The BAAs allergy asthma inside centers are now. Open seven days a week and by appointment early in the morning. To the evening too for..

HP CDC cancer Paulin allergies Bermuda seven days
"paulin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:37 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Paulin? I love literary chuckles. This anyway, Michael Paul, and you know, writes a lot about food and one of the things that he said he sort of dressed that exact question. He's like editors are always saying find the person find a character. And I feel like processes can be a character. Animate objects can be character. Just follow the carrot. And I thought. That's a great idea. Of course, sand itself is the character. And then I sort of had to figure out how to like sort of expand that out to fit the book, and sort of the metaphor that I came up with the kind of holds the book together, I hope is sand as an army right because we have concrete concrete. The main thing that we use sand for and you can pretty much use any kind of stand for that. So those are kind of foot soldiers in their millions and billions and then glasses much more refined kind of Santer. There's sort of a special forces all the way to the Santa lease for silicon chips, which is really rare really hard to find Santa's like these guys are like the seal team six of the sand. World starts out a lot more interesting than just plain old, San right? So one thing that was bitch, boxers, author of the book the world in a grain his book is about the story of sand that I didn't know before was that we're actually running out. Of sand. Right. So do you want to explain that? How that's even possible. Do I ever? So here's the thing about sand. It sounds like the most boring thing in the world, but it is actually the most important solid substance on earth. Our civilization. Literally depends on like, I said number one. It's what concrete is made of this building that we're sitting in this entire city that we're in pretty much every shopping center apartment block office that's built anywhere in the world. Today is made at least partly with concrete, which is mostly just sand. Stuck together also glass, right? Every piece of glasses just melted down. So it can shifts all this other stuff, but first and foremost by far most important, we're using his concrete we use just unbelievable amounts of of concrete to build cities and are building cities around the world, especially in the developing world today at a pace and on a scale that has never happened remotely before so using about. So there's a lot of sand in the world, obviously. But because there are more and more and more people in this world, all the time and more and more of the move into cities all the. Time that we're adding the equivalent of about eight New York City's to the planet every year. So just imagine like every building every road every sidewalk every airport runway in New York City. We're putting down that much concrete adding that much concrete to the planet every single year. So we're using about fifty billion tons of sand every year. So sure enough there's a lot of it. But when you're talking about amounts of that large, you know, at the end of the sooner or later you start to run out, and that's what's starting to happen. We're running out there's so much demand for San that. We're stripping riverbeds and beaches bear all over the world, causing massive environmental damage to death at the San we need, and in some places it's gotten so bad that the black market has taken over organized crime has actually taken over the sand business and hundreds of people have been murdered over sand of all things. Yeah. And so one thing that was really interesting to think about sanding out and. What was interesting about a lot of these books that you kind of talk about our modern moment, and these books kind of ways to kind of talk about our modern moment. But also just about the fact that the now that we live in right now like this now of concrete buildings and highways everywhere and things like that hasn't always been that case one thing that was interesting about marshes book was this kind of argument about the way that we interact with the past and also the present and the future and her book is called time fullness. I was hoping you could actually explain what you mean by that concept. Yeah. I coined the term I think as a deliberate counterpoint to timelessness in the first place, which is something we think we should aspire to something that's outside the realm of time. But is ultimately kind of a sterile idea. Everything has a past and evolves, and is more interesting because of that history. And that really is the way geologists see the world and thank. One metaphor, I often use an intro geology. Classes is that a Palam possessed text, which maybe some of you know, when paper didn't exist in most writing was done on parchment was very expensive and difficult thing to produce. And so instead of just throwing Documenta way, it would be scraped off, and then re inked, but underneath that would be vestiges of the older writing remaining, and that's very much the way geologists rocks and landscapes they're they're complex pal obsessed text in which the past is very much present. And can be read once one learns to read that. So the idea of time fullness understanding how things came to be is what I intended. And I think most geologists the vast explanatory power of geology is what really attracted us to the field. Sometime say it's the etymology of the world. There's something satisfying about being able to look out and understand how. Things came to be it's not an arbitrary thing. Yeah. So the thing that sort of blew my mind was your story about how the Himalayas were created in. How short a time it was. And do you want to tell stories you can kind of put it in perspective? Yeah. When one sees the earth from top down and over geologic time, you see that it's very much alive, or at least dynamic and changing. And one of the remarkable things about this planet is how the tectonic processes that are driven primarily from the internal heat in the earth radioactive decay. That's still going on and the primordial heat of the earth are almost exactly matched with the external processes of erosion. So in the case of the Himalayas, which are the greatest mountain belt on the planet today. The informed as sub continent of India is subjected partly beneath Asia, the mountains are rising erosion is tearing them down nearly as fast and the road to detritus of the Himalayas over the last fifty million years is lying on the Indian Ocean floor in two great submarine fans that LOL out over the floor the ocean for thousands of kilometers and represent actually more material than the modern mountains. So the mountains are growing. And they're being you wrote it and the metaphor the analogy that used in the book was like someone sitting in the barber's chair their hair's growing as fast as the barber can cut. Yeah. And so they're more clippings on the ground. And there are on the head which I thought was a pretty interesting thing. Yeah. And then I don't know if you guys over the one on one and the Melrose bridge, but in Vinson's book, he was talking about looking at the cracks with Cal trans guy that freaked me out. So maybe you could freak out the rest of our audience. One more thing to worry about. Been Speiser journalist author of the world and grain all that concrete. Our world is built out of its breaking down. So concrete turns out to be a very new building material relatively speaking, which I had no idea about, but it's really only about the last hundred years that we've been using reinforced concrete to build all this stuff before that it was all bricks and timber more traditional building in concrete just revolutionized building these it's so it's so easy to work with it's relatively cheap to make. And so like as we all know, it's sort of taking over the world. The problem is it doesn't last looks like stone. But it is not as solid. It's not nearly as durable stone, particularly if it's not well-made if if people cut corners, which they often do in the making of it. So basically all of the concrete in the world. Is going to need to be replaced within the next fifty hundred years. Think about that for a second. And yes, so in the book, I went out with them Cal trans the the folks who manage the highways here, they have a team of people who do nothing but go around and check on specially elevated roadways, and they're just constantly like playing catch-up because these things are driven around LA. You know, those things are falling apart. They're full of cracks full of potholes, and nobody wants to put any money in to fix them. Right. There's not really any political Glorion patching cracks. So it's a really big problem. Especially in parts of the developing world like China where they are used sort of notorious for. Just putting up building cities at an incredibly fast rate, but using pretty shoddy methods so we're talking about billions and billions of tons of concrete countless buildings dams runways everything you can think of that's slowly breaking down, and it's going to need to somehow be replaced. So if already we're already running short of Sam already doing all kinds of environmental damage to get at the end that we need to build up the world that we're building pretty soon like within the next fifty to one hundred years we're going to have to come up with that much again. Can I add to the bad news, just briefly? The other thing about that. The other components cement apart from the aggregate, the sand is from limestone, which is calcium carbonate, which has to be heated. So that it gives off CO two and so second to fossil fuel burning concrete. Production is second biggest anthropogenic contributor to greenhouse gas. I thought it was the third biggest Marsha June rude. Who's a professor university of Wisconsin, author time, fullness, how you counting all feels combined and then country over. Yeah. It's really bad. Well, that brings up the point another sort of general theme, which this idea of sort of double edged swords a lot of books are kind of about progress in a lot of waiting there. Things sort of make us better as the science or more advance. But a lot of time spent in your books sort of talking about how well there's this great progress, but also these sort of negative unintended consequences. So rose, I was thinking maybe would you tell the story about sort of plasma and the hemophiliacs and factor rose Georgia's author of nine points, I really interested in the idea of progress as we say to England wrongly. So one of the things I was very interested in the how the modem blood supply in in the industrialized world came about, and which is when you think about an extremely astonishing thing. So we have something that pretty banal these days, which is having a transfusion giving blood. And when you think about it millions of people giving away a buddy pot to a stranger who they will never met never meet full, no money. It's really interesting business model and. The US because the US does everything differently. And in US, what happened is after the second world when this model of what's called a non-remunerated voluntary blood supply. So giving you a free and expecting nothing apart from cookie and an orange squash drink. Kind of in the road. And because what happened was this you'll blood if you let it sit it will the red the red book will think the Bosman tough. You will get this yellow stuff which is called which is plasma. And it doesn't look like much. But actually contains lots of very very useful proteins and things that can be turned into very lucrative. So in the US, what happened was that the plasma industry somehow grew up on convince people that even though it was considered a nothing to sell your blood. You can actually sell your blood in the US. It's not illegal. It's just that. It's not accepted anymore. It's not socially accepted. But you can't sell you'll pass and in the US, you can tell you a plasma twice a week, which is the most frequent level that allowed in the entire wealth. No one else makes us advisable. I'm not gonna say say. US has been called the OPEC of plasma the US supplies the world eighty percent of the world's plasma. So it's exported around the world Tun into this is not usually plasma for transfusion. That's very useful. If you need to cloth to various other conditions, but to pharmaceutical products, I'm one of the things that was made in the nineteen seventies. Which was an absolute revelation full people have hemophilia, which is a condition way you have to defect which means that you'll blood cannot clocked. Now, it doesn't mean you cut yourself, shaving and you immediately today, but it means you having tunnel bleeds. It's extremely painful agonizing and crippling and it's also used to be fatal ferry early on in life. But then this thing came about which would been discovered implant which was called to eight and it enabled blood clot. And it was this. Extreme magical for lots of boys because most mostly boys team affiliate who suddenly they'd been forced to when they had a bleed they would have to go into hospital for weeks on end, it was a really miserable existence. They were an agony that treatment was very difficult may couldn't apply themselves and then somebody singled tactic Cain about. They could treat themselves home. If you look on YouTube videos of young kids, just injecting this stuff and with big grins on and and it was much absolutely magical. It really transform the lives of hemophiliacs around the world. But as we know now, what it also did was gave thousands upon thousands millions around the world HIV and hepatitis as well. So the trouble is that plasma to get enough plasma unique tens of thousands of donations because he is so it's felt it and concentrated and in the nineteen seventies in the US..

US Himalayas San right New York City San Paulin Santer Michael Paul Santa YouTube China HIV OPEC Asia Melrose bridge India Cain Indian Ocean Georgia
"paulin" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on KTRH

"That everybody is under a Paulin advisory because it doesn't respect county boundaries and idiots grass pollen that is really high right now. Tree pollen. They're still a little bit of tree pollen left. That's what it was all over the car, but that's going to be gone by Thursday. So we have moved into grass pollen and different people get allergies from different kinds of pollen. So be aware we had some people that were sick this past week that weren't bothered by the tree. But now the grass is in there, really feeling the effects. So I just throw that out there. Just be aware. We're going into high grass pollen T R H news time. Let's move on to the news, shall we? It is ten oh. To our top story and run in the Hines last night leads to dead and police talking with the driver this morning. She returned to the scene turned herself in and has not been charged with anything a shelter. In place was called for by businesses last night in a two mile radius around the IT chemical storage facility in deer park as increased levels of benzene were detected in the air, it affects only businesses there are no residences in the area. Red raiders beat guns. Zag allows night and have secured a place in history and the. Final four for the first time ever in school history. So they move on toward the final four that continues today highest seed remaining in the tournament. Auburn has never been to the final four now the fifth seed in the midwest Tigers will look to earn a place in Minneapolis today. When they take on second seed Kentucky, the Wildcats looking for their eighteenth final forbid in program history. Top seed overall in the tournament. Duke will look to punch your ticket to Minneapolis against second seed in the east Michigan state the Spartans in hunt for their tenth final four appearance. The blue devils will try for their seventeenth at the end of the day. The stage will be set for the final four on Saturday at US Bank stadium. Matt Napolitano, Fox News. KTAR age news time ten three on Fox News. This Justice with Janine President Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani says that he would like to know how the Russia investigation got started. Somebody made this up Janine somebody conceive this, and they superimposed it. And then they went out to try to prove it, and we have to find out who's the brains behind. This attorney general says a redacted version of the Muller reports going to be released within two weeks, the founder and CEO of Facebook is calling on governments to play a more active role in controlling the content. That is on the internet. Mark Zuckerberg wants more transparency stronger laws to protect elections and more privacy privacy laws. Similar to the ones that were adopted by the European Union, Sears is cutting life insurance benefits for an estimated ninety thousand people retirees are going to.

Red raiders Janine President Trump Minneapolis Fox News Spartans Paulin Mark Zuckerberg deer park Matt Napolitano Hines European Union attorney Sears Facebook founder and CEO Rudy Giuliani Auburn Kentucky US Bank stadium
"paulin" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"You know, the summertime I run mine for about ten, but, you know, five pool companies, I'm going to call him and say, Tom nano, twelve fourteen whatever. So, you know, pick what works for you check with your people, but change your full-timer change your sprinkler system in that kind of stuff, especially when all this pollen. The pollen Parco these allergies right now. My trauma noses. Paulin won't tell you about the mayor and a city up north that thought it was a hate crime. Because this is a happy show someone's braider car with yellow sheriff came by and said, no, no, they didn't they didn't just. Oh. It's a true story. Sorry, chris. I had jumped off there on the news for a second. You know? So, but yes, there's a lot of things we got to consider springtime sprinklers. What's what's something else? We gotta do. I think Firestone Witcher's is big no one ever. I hope you have a Firestone should focus what it is in the kitchen cabinet. Nice small and just in case always have one in the garage. If you have a two story house have one upstairs. But you gotta check the dates just it's in the green thing doesn't mean. It's not frozen in green thing. So look at your data's kind of like, I know this has never happened to you Hector. Okay. I had a couple of days off last week because added procedure and thank you Hector relying me off. I appreciate that. I started to alphabetized the pantry. About Thursday afternoon about four o'clock, and I'm in there. I'm looking at this bottle of stuff and going. Wow. Four twelve seventeen going not, Iran. Hey peg, what do you think about this? Let's throw that one away. And I found three or four.

Hector Firestone Tom nano Paulin Iran chris
"paulin" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on KTRH

"Paulin alert. And this is now four both tree and grass pollen both of those are high, and we have had all the tree pollen. That's been all over your windshield, and your car grass pollen now added to that next weekend that's going to be dropping to moderate. But just be aware. It's high this weekend Fifty-seven on the island now in the Woodland's you've made it up to fifty eight and Katie you are leading everybody you're at sixty degrees. Fifty eight now at the KTAR h talk tax defenders twenty four hour weather center. KTAR h news time is twelve. Oh, one our top story. This is important. There is a shelter in place order for deer park. There's a fire at the IT facility on independence Parkway. Just north of highway two twenty five at eleven fifteen. So forty five minutes ago. This is the tweet that was sent out quote. This is the city of deer park issuing a shelter in place for the city if you are within the deer Park City limits or the immediate vicinity seek shelter at this time and stand by for additional information period. Thank you, and quote live video from the scene of that fire shows billowing black smoke rising from a fire that is visible above the roof line. So be aware of that in deer park and surrounding areas. No injuries were reported in baytown following a fire yesterday afternoon at the Exxon Mobil refinery. The company says that they are monitoring air quality news stories this morning. New York Senator Kirsten gillibrand is officially running.

deer park deer Park City Exxon Mobil Senator Kirsten gillibrand Paulin independence Parkway baytown Katie New York forty five minutes twenty four hour sixty degrees
"paulin" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"On Twitter at lash. Dana lash on Facebook. Let's go ahead and kick it into some headlines. Sally. All of the news. You would probably miss it's time for data's quickfire. So if you're trying to log onto Facebook or Instagram because they see everybody talking about that just f- why they're down. It's down right now. It's down for maintenance because people are going. No, it's just it's actually down for maintenance so in confusing misleading headlines over at the sun. They say scientists have built the world's first time machine an experiment, which defies the laws of physics sort of basically, they recreated away to reorder electrons back into their original shape that goes against the direction of time. So it's not exactly time travel saying that seems a little misleading that's like free with an asterik. And it's not free software de recalls three thousand pounds of rice with chicken and vegetables pause because of beef threat because beef ravioli containing allergens was mistakenly packed into them. And I'm sure you can go to their website all that jazz to find out exactly which they said, it's the canned microwaveable stuff just sit here and read the barcode, just Google. That's why Google forum not suitable South Carolina mayor I didn't get to this. I really wanted to. I'm not done with us. She mistook pollen for racism, but she was the victim. Of a hate crime. Because there was because there was Paulin on her car and she called the police because she thought someone had painted her car. This was. Yeah. Daryl bird McPherson in Lamar South Carolina. The mayor shave that's not how that works at all Georgia Democrat draws up a crazy, quote testicular Bill of rights proposing a ban on the sect Amies consent to buy Viagra and law that men who have unprotected sex could be charged with assault as the stakes state seeks to block abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. And if you thought that the the one that the lawmaker was a crazy third way feminist woman, you would be correct. It's the bunch. It's insane. It was a it was a response to a Bill banning abortions in Georgia after six weeks and two Shah, an Darshan Kendrick apparently thinks that going after men's actual health issues is somehow in any way equal which it isn't coming up CNN sued for two hundred seventy five million by the Covington kid. We got a lot more to Ambati finally turned herself. Then stay with us. Message.

Facebook Dana lash Paulin Google Georgia Twitter Daryl bird McPherson South Carolina Lamar South Carolina Sally Ambati CNN Instagram Shah Darshan Kendrick Viagra assault Covington
"paulin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"But that was that was apples were used for. I think Michael Paulin said the up until prohibition. Yeah. An apple in the United States had a much greater chance of being turned into hard cider than it. Did it just being eaten? And again, it was because most apples in the US were grown from seed, meaning they were soured. Meaning they were much better for cider than they were for eaten. Right. And that's how it was again up until prohibition. And one of the reasons why site or just kind of went away is because. Prohibition. Apparently the feds used to chop down eople trees song. Psalm to kind of say, no, you're not gonna make any site or out of this. You hey seat hick? You got it. I'm gonna cut down the street right in front of your face. Exactly cider. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's great stuff. My initial introduction. Decider was you know, really sweet. Yeah. I guess the first wave of the resurgence back in college in those days. What was the one that everyone? Drink would Chuck. Yeah. That was it. It was basically the Zima of site or at least back then I haven't had it in a while. So maybe they've kind of is it is not a sweet now. I don't know. So that's what I'm saying. They may have toned it down. No, just regular hard cider. Oh, yes. And it's not supposed to be. It was never supposed to be sweet. That was just a weird anomaly, so I think the site or now is much closer to the traditional cider, which is it's it's like a Ted bit of sweetness to it. But it's it's definitely a lot more. Beeri than than apple juicy. We're gonna have to get my towing the cider pond. Once again, do not do that just drink it. What else we do? We have anything else on this guy. Johnny appleseed. Yeah. No. I think I mentioned is the sweet businessman. He was a friend to the native American and the European settler in check. He oh, there's supposedly a tree in Nova Ohio Rana farm, it's a hundred and seventy five year old tree. And some people believe that it is the the last remaining tree that can be found that Johnny Chapman, aka Johnny Appleseed, actually planted. Because again, the prohibition federalize chopped all his other stuff down. Amazing. So let's Johnny Appleseed. Everybody drink it up. If you wanna get in touch this send us an Email. You can do worse than that. Just send it off to stuff podcast. How stuff works dot com..

Johnny appleseed apple United States Johnny Chapman Michael Paulin Nova Ohio Rana farm hick Chuck Ted seventy five year
"paulin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"But that was that was apples were used for. I think Michael Paulin said the up until prohibition. Yeah. An apple in the United States had a much greater chance of being turned into hard cider than it. Did it just being eaten? And again, it was because most apples in the US were grown from seed, meaning they were soured. Meaning they were much better for cider than they were for eaten. Right. And that's how it was again up until prohibition. And one of the reasons why site or just kind of went away is because. Prohibition. Apparently the feds used to chop down eople trees song. Psalm to kind of say, no, you're not gonna make any site or out of this. You hey seat hick? You got it. I'm gonna cut down the street right in front of your face. Exactly cider. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's great stuff. My initial introduction. Decider was you know, really sweet. Yeah. I guess the first wave of the resurgence back in college in those days. What was the one that everyone? Drink would Chuck. Yeah. That was it. It was basically the Zima of site or at least back then I haven't had it in a while. So maybe they've kind of is it is not a sweet now. I don't know. So that's what I'm saying. They may have toned it down. No, just regular hard cider. Oh, yes. And it's not supposed to be. It was never supposed to be sweet. That was just a weird anomaly, so I think the site or now is much closer to the traditional cider, which is it's it's like a Ted bit of sweetness to it. But it's it's definitely a lot more. Beeri than than apple juicy. We're gonna have to get my towing the cider pond. Once again, do not do that just drink it. What else we do? We have anything else on this guy. Johnny appleseed. Yeah. No. I think I mentioned is the sweet businessman. He was a friend to the native American and the European settler in check. He oh, there's supposedly a tree in Nova Ohio Rana farm, it's a hundred and seventy five year old tree. And some people believe that it is the the last remaining tree that can be found that Johnny Chapman, aka Johnny Appleseed, actually planted. Because again, the prohibition federalize chopped all his other stuff down. Amazing. So let's Johnny Appleseed. Everybody drink it up. If you wanna get in touch this send us an Email. You can do worse than that. Just send it off to stuff podcast. How stuff works dot com..

Johnny appleseed apple United States Johnny Chapman Michael Paulin Nova Ohio Rana farm hick Chuck Ted seventy five year
"paulin" Discussed on FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

"When he got to the cubs, and yeah, I don't count that for them. I look I look at gospel is a guy where I say, you know, this was a guy that got bumped back and forth between the rotation between the bullpen bounce back and forth between triple a, and I think it just ruined his confidence. And I think a certain point we just leave the kid alone, and let them figure it out. And I look at gossip as one of those guys this year where you know, you probably can draft him as a four or something or maybe even a five depending on the depth of your league. And I think he has potential to outgrow that. And I think he's a step above a lot of the other young pitchers. They have their because he has been around a little bit longer. And I think he has that fast track. And I'm not worried about him getting a starting rotation job in keeping it I'm not concerned at all. So that's the kind of pitcher, and I'll tell you what on the on the old guy front to how Cole hamels who pitched great. When he finally got out of Texas who was just dreadful. Minute. He got to Texas every number in that ballpark was dreadful. Gets out there with the cubs. And again, he's not free. But I'll be damned if you know, he's basically the cost on Cole hamels right now is so cheap. And I'm going to buy in everywhere. You're just saying all of Paul's guys right now. That's like, well, but you know, up opponent, I thought Paulin Paul, and I had a lot of similar discussions last year about Garrett Cole, and then he showed me the sherzer comparison up until the same time. And I was like, yes, that's exactly what I feel and my whole baseball take was on. It was this was a guy that was going to have to not be the guy anymore. He was going to finally get a chance to be in a rotation where he wasn't looked to as the stopper as the guy at the front of the rotation and radically. It was Lander who was going to take that role in the same. He did the same thing for. Sure tsar and the no pressure on him, and he blossomed into what jersey become and what Garrett Cole became and is ironic that those ver- Lander who did it for both guys, but convert lenders God right Enver lender..

Cole hamels cubs Garrett Cole Paulin Paul Texas Lander baseball
"paulin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Dow Jones industrial average is little changed as well. Down about seventeen points now at twenty four thousand five hundred fifty seven and the NASDAQ is up about two tenths of a percent up eleven points. Seventy thirty seven ten year treasury up seven thirty seconds yield two point seven one percent yield on the two year two point five six percents. Nymex crude oil up about a tenth of a percent up five cents to fifty to sixty seven a barrel. Comex gold is down a quarter percent or three dollars ten cents to twelve eighty seven. Announce the euro dollar thirteen seventy the yen one oh nine point five one Paulin Lisa. Thanks so much. Karen? We have their airlines out this morning before the opening was some earnings better than expected results out of southwest American and JetBlue on the phone with us to discuss what's going on in the US airline businesses. George ferguson. Georgia's a senior aerospace defense an airline analyst at Bloomberg intelligence. He comes to us from Bloomberg intelligence headquarters in Princeton, New Jersey, so George thanks for being with us. And I know you're busy this morning with a lot of these earnings resorts reports and pretty good numbers. So what are the highlights from your perspective? Yeah. I think the market's at will I good morning. Thanks, right, man. Paul good to talk to you. I think the excitement here is is a bit about American, which is showing capacity increases. I think lower than we all expected. They're a little more contained, and I think there's some hope in the industry that we could see less capacity come to the business over twenty nineteen which would help. Bears fares to rise in this business. We could probably improve profit margins year every year, what about pricing power. Yeah. So what I told? You was where I thought the excitement was coming from what I think is that there's still too much capacity coming to this market, and that's gonna really challenge pricing power. So American looked kinda containing their discussions about capacity this morning, but we've got delta and United which you're adding, you know, United States like five percent in the first quarter. Like four percent. We're still growing they're still growing at rates above GDP grows. And so we think that's a negative for pricing power. Most people are are predicting most airlines predicting guiding to flat higher revenue per available seat mile or whatever metric they're using. I think there's still some some potential here for weekdays we could be flat or even down. And I think another challenge we have out there's this government shutdown and as it drags on. I think there's a risk that flyers won't wanna be booking trips. They won't be going to the airport and managing potential risk of security. So I think one Q specially we could have some challenges from that as well. But I think pricing power is a big challenge. So what did the as you listened to the quarterly conference calls with management? What are they saying about the shutdown? Are they in fact seeing any early signs to demand? Yeah. So I'd say. You know, United and delta k much earlier. So there wasn't a lot of commentary. We've just gotten to American now it's closing as we speak. Not a lotta commentary on on the government shutdown. Yeah. I've seen some numbers around the industry that maybe it's impacted revenues by one hundred or one hundred fifty million dollars sort of a hundred million dollar levels. And we're talking about an industry that's going to have probably thirty billion in revenues in one q. So so far estimates are that it really hasn't impacted much. Remember, we've gone through won miss paycheck. And we're getting ready to come up to the second mistake. Check for TSA workers this Friday. And I think things get a bit more precarious after that that goodness people destroy up to work and clearing security lines are having security lines slow smoothly. So George can you set us up for taking a step back at the the war between the older behemoths in the airline industry and the sort of new. Upstarts that have catered to people who are looking for discount fares southwest and JetBlue versus delta American. And I'm wondering how that's lighting up, and I'm putting these against each other because of the unions because of the legacy workers and some of the other issues that delta an American have been pretty vocal about where are we on that? I mean, so we expected we haven't gotten full guidance at some of those fast movers yet, but we've looked at the number of airplanes, they're receiving and some of their schedules guidance. And and we really expect at the ones that will bring a lot of capacity to the market the airline to bring a lot of capacity will be frontier will be spirit airlines even jet blue is probably a bit. A bit contained southwest does even talking about five percent growth. So think what you had. Here's you have these these ultra low cost, which have absolutely the cheapest cost to deliver seats in the air continue. Had large amounts of capacity because you airplanes are relatively cheap lessors lease rates and some of the newest airplanes are actually dropping right now. So these airlines and go secure lift fairly cheaply, and they're really expanding looking for market share. And if you're south southwest, you just can't let that happen. More so than the Americans and United and the deltas which have more of a business component. But, but so I think you know, part of this drive is again does ultra low cost which can deliver seat mile cheaper catoon in continuing to keep the heat on the industry, and it's hurting, you know, it's hurting the southwest. It's even hurting the delta United Americans because of the back of their cabins are filled with fliers that are flying once or twice a year, and are very very price sensitive teeth sort of get that gets him released from that aggressive expansion from those spirits, and and frontiers and allegiance it's going to be hard to see pricing power come back to this industry. Let's look at the cost side of the equation a little bit George with crude oil down around fifty two dollars a barrel. I'm guessing fuel has relatively lower fuel costs have been a tailwind so to speak for the airlines. What are they saying about their outlook for fuel? Yes. So we're hearing a lot of them. Give us. Guidance for at least one Q and sort of to two dollars and five cent range that's gonna look it's gonna look a little bit lower than some of them paid last year, but not a lot. So it's so it's not a lot of a pickup. Know one of the perverse problems with that is that as fuel prices. Stay contained older airplanes are more economical the sly, and so more people fly more of their equipment. Instead of retiring it because of you know, because of inefficiency, and that sort of leads a little more capacity in the industry. So it's kind of a double edged sword there. So George as you're talking. I just pulled up Google flights. Censor thinking, I want to check out so many prices that are rock bottom. They're not that rock bottom. First of all, let's just put that out there. And then you also have a situation where you're paying for everything under the sun from your coke Ken to the extra space that you have to breathe, right? Above your nose. I'm just wondering do you expect an increase in those add ons that you have to pay for that we see as a common feature of the frontiers of the world, for example. So I don't expect an increase I expect they'll continue this strategy that if you show up at the airport, and you don't know whether or not you've got bags you've got your bag on the slight. You'll find out that you probably haven't paid for the bags, and it's gonna cost you a heck of a lot more at the airport, and it will at you know, if you did it when you booked. So if you had any questions about whether you did have an extra fee, the answer is yes, George Ferguson. We love having you on. Thank you so much, George. Ferguson senior aerospace defense in airlines analyst for Bloomberg intelligence. I don't know Paul. I don't know these these fees. Unbelievable. You know, if you haven't if you've traveled off for business or I don't even see it. But when you put personally, it's just amazing how many ala carte pricing choices. They give you now. I kind of like the old bundled pricing back in the day. I I'm with you. I mean, my son was horrified. When he went with me to frontier, and he looked at peace. We have to pay for coke does. That mean, you're not going to get me. What you really really sad. Anyway here. We are on this Thursday in New York, I'm Lisa Abramowicz, along with my co hosting colleague, Paul Sweeney, the s&p now turning negative along with the Dow this is Bloomberg. Now, let's head over to Michael Barr. World's national headlines. Very much.

George ferguson Bloomberg intelligence Paul Sweeney United States JetBlue analyst United Paulin Lisa Karen Princeton New Jersey Georgia government coke Google
"paulin" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Call quick Paulin San Diego. Welcome to the show. What's going on? Hey, how you doing? I'm. Well. Thanks. Hey, I was just wondering where all the polls. Polls where where did they go? Yeah. Sitting on sitting on some information. Said about Trump's popularity polls. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's a good question up. Dude. Something is really crazy with your phone. It's like major digital tearing. So. But I don't know the answer is I don't know. I haven't seen any polls on this which tells me that they're probably looking okay for him. And that's honestly, that's all that was really weird. It was like a weird like to chirping happening in the middle of your phone. Call maybe the NSA is jamming your line. To unbelievable stories from the headlines. Just just unbelievable and one of them is so bleeping sad. Like, I don't have words for it. The murder of Davis, California police officer, Natalie corona last night. This this story is so completely senseless. And what bothers me is that it's virtual silence from again, our congressional delegation from California. They are willing to accept a certain amount of deadline for officers the politicians they just figure it's like that's just part of the deal. This young woman a rookie..

Paulin San Diego Natalie corona California Trump murder officer Davis
"paulin" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Something I love James Baldwin's war voting around the world. Another example of this couple of lines of James Baldwin that you brought to me that I just want to get back to you. The purpose of art is Soleil bear the questions hidden behind the answers. And also love takes off masks that we fear. We cannot live without and no we cannot live with n. I have a new one what I have a new baltim-. Hell it's in the new book. It's. White people sought to civilize black people before they civilized themselves. Thank you. I want to ask you to read just as we finish this went so quickly. One of the final pages of of citizen. And of course. You want the days to add up to something more than you came in out of the sun. And drank the pot -able water of your developed world. Yes. And because words, hang in the air like Paulin, but throat closes you hack away. That time and that time, and that time that outside blistered the inside of you words, outmaneuvered years had you in a choke hold. Every part roughed up. The is dripping. That's the booze the ice in the heart was men to ice. To arrive like this every day for it to be like this to have so many memories, and no other memory than these for as long as they can be remembered to remember this. Though, a share of all remembering a measure of all memory is breath, and to breathe you have to create a truce a truce with the patience of aesthetics cope. Claudia rankine? Thank you, son..

James Baldwin Claudia rankine Paulin
"paulin" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"paulin" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Something I love James Baldwin's war voting around the world. Another example of this couple of lines of James Baldwin that you brought to me that I just want to get back to you. The purpose of art is Soleil bear the questions hidden behind the answers. And also love takes off masks that we fear. We cannot live without and no we cannot live with n. I have a new one what I have a new baltim-. Hell it's in the new book. It's. White people sought to civilize black people before they civilized themselves. Thank you. I want to ask you to read just as we finish this went so quickly. One of the final pages of of citizen. And of course. You want the days to add up to something more than you came in out of the sun. And drank the pot -able water of your developed world. Yes. And because words, hang in the air like Paulin, but throat closes you hack away. That time and that time, and that time that outside blistered the inside of you words, outmaneuvered years had you in a choke hold. Every part roughed up. The is dripping. That's the booze the ice in the heart was men to ice. To arrive like this every day for it to be like this to have so many memories, and no other memory than these for as long as they can be remembered to remember this. Though, a share of all remembering a measure of all memory is breath, and to breathe you have to create a truce a truce with the patience of aesthetics cope. Claudia rankine? Thank you, son..

James Baldwin Claudia rankine Paulin
Heroes of Flight 93 remembered at "Tower of Voices" memorial

Under The Hood

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Heroes of Flight 93 remembered at "Tower of Voices" memorial

"President Trump and the first lady joined others at the new tower voices memorial to remember the forty passengers and crew killed on hijack flight ninety three on nine eleven near the crash site outside of Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the president recounted the final heroic moments of those on board through their sacrifice the forty save the lives of countless Americans in these saved our capital from a devastating strike. The president saying the heroes on flight ninety three change the course

President Trump Pennsylvania Forest Grove Mark Eastbourne Paulin Kenneth Moton White House ABC Portland Shanksville
Only Some People Have Allergies

Brains On!

02:03 min | 3 years ago

Only Some People Have Allergies

Paulin GE Lord Femur