23 Burst results for "Paula Phelps"

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:24 min | 1 d ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode two, hundred and seventy nine. Oh, live happy now. This is Paula Phelps, and this week we're here to talk about positive education. Whether. You're an educator or apparent. The concept of positive education is something that can change your life as well as the life of your student child. In these times, it's more important than ever to understand the role that wellbeing plays in the lives of students, teachers, administrators, and parents..

Paula Phelps
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

05:46 min | Last month

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Right now we've had to accept a lot of uncertainty and today's guest has spent the last several years practicing method of acceptance that we all can learn from. . Rare is a Japanese principle of acceptance and today's psychologists. . Scott. . Hawes talks about his book why be happy which looks at how this practice works, , what it can do for us and how you can implement it in your own life. . Scott welcome to live. . Happy now. . Hi Paul. . Thank you so much for having me on I. . Really appreciate it. . Well. . We had to have you on because you have a book with a name that is with the title that almost seems contrary to what we talk about it live happy now because it asks why be happy. . So I wanted to find out first of all, , what's the short answer to that? ? Well, , I mean it's a an approach to happiness that's very different than we think of his happiness say in the states. . or in general west, , the Western world. . So we think of our own happiness here is personal and we pursue it and it's in our constitution or the print right to pursue happiness whereas in Japan, , it's not really thought of that way. . It's thought of as what can I do accept the situation as it is. . In order to either live with it or to make changes, it's , not about your own happiness, , its about the happiness of your family, , the happiness of community, , and it's not as if the Japanese of cornered the market on that I mean certainly in the states, , we have a lot of happiness, , our communities and our religious institutions and so on. . But their baseline is not about personal habits. . So why be happy when others are unhappy? What ? can you do to make someone? ? Else's Day a little bit better. . And this. . It's an interesting concept and it's one that is called I'm GonNa. . Let you pronounce it out. . Thanks a lot. . Japanese under the Best I can so I would say UK regular although my Japanese friends if there were to be listening to say Oh Scott that's wrong. . That's not how you say it. . So it's it's either you Katie who were UK ru depending on whether it's a noun or verb and in a rough sense it means acceptance depending on who you're saying it to and where you're saying. . And where did you first start discovering this in? ? How did you begin studying it? ? So I started going to Japan for the first time in my life in two thousand and two I had come across Japanese novels when I was a teenager and Japanese movies when I was teenager and I really liked them a lot but I kind of dropped it for a long time. . And pretty famous chef in New, , York invited me to join him. . He was going there for emotional trip for lost in translation and he dragged me kicking and screaming to Japan. I . had no interest in going at all but he took me there and I started to see how people behave there. That's . very different than here, , and the idea was when you were with people there to create silences decreed acceptance of others and was really just spectacularly interesting. . So the more I learned about it I just not I personal experience the more I read about it, , and over the last eighteen years I've been really blessed to have a lot of good friends over the years in. . Japan. . So they've taught me a lot. . In how is it that you begin to practice acceptance versus this pursuit of happiness with what we tend to to be about. . Here's the deal I genuinely do not think that one culture has the edge over the others. I . don't idealize Japan by any stretch of the imagination I don't idealize in any culture for that matter. I . don't think I don't think most people do, , but you can take what they have their an add to what we're doing here. . So if I would have written this book for a Japanese audience I would have written the reverse of it I would. . have. . Said you need to be more thoughtful about your own individual happiness? You ? need to think about what what you like to do each day as opposed to what do others like in terms of our culture here in the states research in any in a general way, , it's a very creative vibrant culture that we live in the United States are always changing no matter what what side of the political spectrum you're on things are always changing and so. . A practical way with the Japanese do as they slow it down. . So they do things like. . You know the famous tea ceremony, , but it's not just not they take. . If you go to a coffee salon in any one of the big cities, , they'll take a long time for you to make for them to make the coffee for you or even a cocktail is it's a one ounce pour in takes a while for them to make or as I say the t they also take baths every day they take they tried to take naps a lot and when you're with Japanese people, , even old friends that I have there. . As much silence in the in engagement as there is talk. . So they create spaces for people to observe and purpose of the observation beyond the practical stuff is to create a consensus. . So for example, , they're not really big on opinions, , but they want to have a situation where. . Generally. . Speaking people there will come to some agreement some consensus that we all are seeing the same thing or all are feeling the same thing in the closest that I can think of it here in the states is Thanksgiving where no matter as I say, , no matter no matter what part of the political spectrum you're around matter who you are no matter where you're from generally speaking most American homes were all eating the same thing. . We're all having similar conversations and that's really kind of how the Japanese operated on a regular daily basis. . There's a way in which is kind of conformity that creates an acceptance of others you agree with them or

Scott Paul Paula Phelps Japan Hawes UK
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode two hundred, Sixty, nine of live, happy now. This is Paula Phelps and I'd like to thank you for joining us again this week. If you've ever had a sudden feeling of distress that triggers your fight or flight response. Then you know what it's like to have your emotions hijacked. And, if that's something you've experienced recently, you're not alone this week. Clinical psychologist and mindfulness expert. Dr Shauna Shapiro Returns to talk about how current times might be affecting your emotions, and what practices you can use both individually and as a family to regulate them. Sean thank you for coming back to talk to us on live. Happy now I'll. I'm delighted to be back. Thanks caller, will you and I talk back in? February and things were so much different. There is no way we knew what was ahead of us, and we talked about your fantastic book. Good Morning, I. Love You and the reason I wanted to invite you back today and talk to. To you is because you give so many great practices for mindfulness, and for managing things during difficult times and one thing that I kept going back to during this time. Is your practice on emotion regulation? So thank you for coming on because that's really something. I WanNa talk to you about today. I agree I. Think all of us can feel the impact of these times in our nervous systems. Systems on our notions in our words, and it's really important to have tools and practices to help regulate them and your practice on emotion. Regulation really explains how it starts, so I guess to begin with. Can you explain to us? What an image Ella hijack is so an a middle hijack is when kind of our fear centers is based in the <unk> overwhelms. Our prefrontal CORTEX are higher order. Order reasoning and so our ability to make wise choices as much hindered, and so that's mindfulness. Practices are so helpful is that the word mindfulness means to see clearly, and we wanna see clearly so we can respond effectively when something stressful happening or overwhelming are were afraid. It's really hard to see clearly, and then we make poor choices, and so the first step to kind of either preventing or Rebounding mcdermot hijack is simply to name what you're feeling to simply say. I'm scared or I'm feeling stressed right now or I'm overwhelmed and research from Ucla showed that when you just name your emotion, it kind of puts a prefrontal cortex back in charge you, it kind of puts the seat seatbelt on the little teenager in the background, and it starts to calm down the body so simply naming it helps tain your. Your emotion, so that's the first step that I usually recommend to people I thought that was really interesting that just giving a name to something can have such a profound effect you. They know why that is well I. Think part of it is bad when you name it that means there's a part of you. That is witnessing it. There's a part of you. That is no longer consumed by or meshed with it. So. There's the awareness that knows your sad isn't sad, right? It's just aware the awareness that knows you're angry angry. It's just aware and so there's a laser to get a little distance from your motions, and you're able to witness them with greater perspective in greater clarity, and when you say talk about giving a name to it. Is that something you just do mentally? Is it something you write down? How do you go about defining what you're feeling? So you feel emotion. What's interesting is most people don't even really notice it until it gets pretty significant and so what I work with people on doing. To, notice the Sadler emotions, and then just gently naming them. Silently Stein out. Loud is also fine especially if you're with people. To let them know. We state our children. Use your words, and it's helpful with US too so to simply just notice I'm scared right now and in my own life it's amazing how often we just kind of pushed through emotions and don't pause to feel them, and so by naming it we create space for the emotion, and we also bring that higher order reasoning. Meta awareness back on board. And sometimes one of the things that I hear a lot right now as people don't even know what they're feeling because I was talking to someone I was actually talking about your book with someone because she was saying she's like I. Don't know what's wrong with me I. Don't know if I'm mad I. Don't know if I'm scared. I JUST WANNA cry. That's beautiful that she's even aware of that. Because you know often, people don't even feel what they're feeling, and so I, think the first step is to feel it then say maybe I am confused or I just feel sad or I don't even know. Know what I'm feeling! It's so complex, but I think the process of mindfulness is about bringing our attention and our presence, and our kindness to whatever feeling even are not sure what it is, and that's an act that takes practice. It takes a lot of practice, and that's really what I tell people I was really attention of my book is that you're not supposed to be perfect all this? These are practices that you learn and the good news is science shows. It's never too late. It's never late to literally re architect your brain and cultivate these resources so that we can meet the current challenges.

Dr Shauna Shapiro Paula Phelps Sean
Regulating Emotions With Dr. Shauna Shapiro

Live Happy Now

05:28 min | 2 months ago

Regulating Emotions With Dr. Shauna Shapiro

"Welcome to episode two hundred, Sixty, nine of live, happy now. This is Paula Phelps and I'd like to thank you for joining us again this week. If you've ever had a sudden feeling of distress that triggers your fight or flight response. Then you know what it's like to have your emotions hijacked. And, if that's something you've experienced recently, you're not alone this week. Clinical psychologist and mindfulness expert. Dr Shauna Shapiro Returns to talk about how current times might be affecting your emotions, and what practices you can use both individually and as a family to regulate them. Sean thank you for coming back to talk to us on live. Happy now I'll. I'm delighted to be back. Thanks caller, will you and I talk back in? February and things were so much different. There is no way we knew what was ahead of us, and we talked about your fantastic book. Good Morning, I. Love You and the reason I wanted to invite you back today and talk to. To you is because you give so many great practices for mindfulness, and for managing things during difficult times and one thing that I kept going back to during this time. Is your practice on emotion regulation? So thank you for coming on because that's really something. I WanNa talk to you about today. I agree I. Think all of us can feel the impact of these times in our nervous systems. Systems on our notions in our words, and it's really important to have tools and practices to help regulate them and your practice on emotion. Regulation really explains how it starts, so I guess to begin with. Can you explain to us? What an image Ella hijack is so an a middle hijack is when kind of our fear centers is based in the overwhelms. Our prefrontal CORTEX are higher order. Order reasoning and so our ability to make wise choices as much hindered, and so that's mindfulness. Practices are so helpful is that the word mindfulness means to see clearly, and we wanna see clearly so we can respond effectively when something stressful happening or overwhelming are were afraid. It's really hard to see clearly, and then we make poor choices, and so the first step to kind of either preventing or Rebounding mcdermot hijack is simply to name what you're feeling to simply say. I'm scared or I'm feeling stressed right now or I'm overwhelmed and research from Ucla showed that when you just name your emotion, it kind of puts a prefrontal cortex back in charge you, it kind of puts the seat seatbelt on the little teenager in the background, and it starts to calm down the body so simply naming it helps tain your. Your emotion, so that's the first step that I usually recommend to people I thought that was really interesting that just giving a name to something can have such a profound effect you. They know why that is well I. Think part of it is bad when you name it that means there's a part of you. That is witnessing it. There's a part of you. That is no longer consumed by or meshed with it. So. There's the awareness that knows your sad isn't sad, right? It's just aware the awareness that knows you're angry angry. It's just aware and so there's a laser to get a little distance from your motions, and you're able to witness them with greater perspective in greater clarity, and when you say talk about giving a name to it. Is that something you just do mentally? Is it something you write down? How do you go about defining what you're feeling? So you feel emotion. What's interesting is most people don't even really notice it until it gets pretty significant and so what I work with people on doing. To, notice the Sadler emotions, and then just gently naming them. Silently Stein out. Loud is also fine especially if you're with people. To let them know. We state our children. Use your words, and it's helpful with US too so to simply just notice I'm scared right now and in my own life it's amazing how often we just kind of pushed through emotions and don't pause to feel them, and so by naming it we create space for the emotion, and we also bring that higher order reasoning. Meta awareness back on board. And sometimes one of the things that I hear a lot right now as people don't even know what they're feeling because I was talking to someone I was actually talking about your book with someone because she was saying she's like I. Don't know what's wrong with me I. Don't know if I'm mad I. Don't know if I'm scared. I JUST WANNA cry. That's beautiful that she's even aware of that. Because you know often, people don't even feel what they're feeling, and so I, think the first step is to feel it then say maybe I am confused or I just feel sad or I don't even know. Know what I'm feeling! It's so complex, but I think the process of mindfulness is about bringing our attention and our presence, and our kindness to whatever feeling even are not sure what it is, and that's an act that takes practice. It takes a lot of practice, and that's really what I tell people I was really attention of my book is that you're not supposed to be perfect all this? These are practices that you learn and the good news is science shows. It's never too late. It's never late to literally re architect your brain and cultivate these resources so that we can meet the current challenges.

Paula Phelps Dr Shauna Shapiro United States Sean Ucla Sadler Stein
Using a Game to Improve Resilience in Teens With Rosemary Lokhorst

Live Happy Now

05:41 min | 4 months ago

Using a Game to Improve Resilience in Teens With Rosemary Lokhorst

"Good Day and welcome to episode two hundred, sixty, three of live, happy now. This is Paula Phelps and this week. We're going to imagine. Living in a world has been plagued by a great tragedy. The. World is you know is gone. All the stores are closed and you can't see your friends. Sound familiar. Interestingly enough. We're talking about shadow's edge. A mobile game and lifestyle platform that was created to help teens and young adults build resilience skills. Today we're talking with Rosemary law forced one of the creative minds behind this innovative platform. Let's listen as she explains how this game has helped. Teens and young adults deal with chronic illness, anxiety and now a pandemic. Rosemary. Welcome to live happy now. Thank you I'm very flattered sphere. Well, we have a lot talk about because you've got so many different components to shadow's edge, but before we start talking about those components. Can you explain the game to us? So shadow's edge is a free mobile game that is helping teens and young adults build emotional resilience and the game dust that true self help content that is delivered right where they are on their devices playing games, so we incorporate principles of narrative therapy and artistic expression and turned that into a game to meet them rather. Rather at, can you explain what narrative therapies narrative therapy is the principle that you tell your story and talk about what you're going through that you're actually start to work on it internally. Bunch of research associated with that budge. The idea is that for example I've had trauma and top about various times with potentially with different people that I started incorporating how what has happened to me into my story and as I started doing rats. I Tell Louisville differently each time, and that's because. Because you are accepting what's happened to you and I will actually to move forward, and it sounds like it'd be a great thing for the teen market because a lot of times talking about your feelings is difficult and just saying this is what I need. You don't necessarily have the language for that. Yes, and especially in a try it teams. That's what they're meant to do. They're meant to become more independent, and there's so many things going on in the brain with gross and with becoming. Becoming their own person, they're finding their own identity, and I think that specific he now, even just in general teams are so much more pressure than we were when you were younger. There's so much more pressure to be the best that everything. There's so much more pressure from outside from your social media in all kinds of TV shows where people become billionaires by the age of twenty right, it can feel like some of these genes after Tuesday, full career path by age fourteen already and so. That stress in addition to just really finding out who they are and becoming more independent is just very heavy on their minds, and that's not always easy for them to the neck. Stress any in addition to that our research is also shown when we were harvesting over fourteen million conversations of teens online that they actually prefer eating out to somebody that is potentially not really in their immediate few, because they don't know if they would be understood there and you mentioned the research. You did a lot research. There's so much science and research that goes into the backhand of this and I want to get to that, but. But you have created this whole platform. Can you talk about where the idea began to get us here? Absolutely more than just a game, and that's why this is a great question, an answer a little bit so that you can see sort of how it all came together. It all started with a book. Our founders Sherry, Subroto. She had a brain Schumer when she was younger, and she experienced firsthand that there's really no tools that are appealing and engaging for young people out there to help them through that journey of dealing with something really harsh comes your way, and so when against all odds? She survived Jackson. Jackson went into psychology for years. She did lots of workshops teens with young adults, and upon her twenty fifth year of survivorship. She then decided she wanted to do more, and so she wrote a book with France, that was called digging deep, and for that she set up a foundation and the foundation digging deep, published the book and distributed to over seven hundred hospitals in the US with about thirty five thousand copies, basically two parents professionals psychologists, the male started working with the book, and they loved it, and so with that she also than established log for parents and professionals to help them guide them, you know. Know how to deal with these kinds of things, talks your team. All kinds of subjects and a lot of subjects actually came from parents requested by healthcare professionals, and that sort of where I answered. You know she was running out of books and I knew her already were friends. She knew I had a technical background and she knew I had storytelling backgrounds though she said you know Rosie. I want to do more with this and I'm running out of books. How can I make this into something digital you know? How can we reach a wider audience with this self? Help content that we've had in the book. And, so we look at what's possible. What's the other people will redoing engineers? That wasn't really a lot around. You know. There were gangs that were focused on shooting your cancer, or that were specific applications to monitor your diabetes there things to make you feel more healthy physically, but really on the mental side, and so we really set out to do something that helps teens in medium that they're comfortable with and. And, so that's why we decided to build games versus an

Rosemary Jackson Paula Phelps Louisville Schumer United States Subroto Rosie France
Finding Simplicity in Complex Times With Julia Hobsbawm

Live Happy Now

07:22 min | 4 months ago

Finding Simplicity in Complex Times With Julia Hobsbawm

"Good day. Now welcome to episode two hundred sixty two of live happy now. This is Paula Phelps. And I'd like to thank you for joining us once again this week. Today's world has become increasingly challenging. So it's fitting that this week we're talking about simplicity. How do you find more simplicity in a complex world? Well that's complicated in this week. Author and social commentator. Julia Hobsbawm looks at how we can live a simpler more creative and productive life. Her new book the simplicity. Principle six steps toward clarity in a complex world looks at how we can become more focused and less distracted. It's something we can all benefit from learning. So let's hear what she has to say Julia. Welcome to happy. Now thank you for having me a pleasure to be with you. Will you have a wonderful topic to talk to us about? And it's a great time to talk about it too because our lives seem very complex. And so you're talking to us about the simplicity principle. I guess to start. Can you tell me what made you want to take on this issue? Yes it is a funny time. I think a good time to be talking about symptoms tedious. When all lives became both Bruce Lee simple through lockdown but also a lot more complicated with the ramifications and implications of life next began writing seven. Right is go around. The connected age in the digital age in all the complications of that role. And I wrote a book fully connected and that book really seemed to resonate with people that were worrying about overload and then I thought well what's next for the people concerned about now. I thought it was in the end that people feel they have almost limitless choices. Limitless possibilities windows within windows and APPS and meetings and opportunities and the world was becoming so full of potential that it was also getting really complicated. And I thought what is it that we really want. We want all these opportunities. We want to be innovative and entrepreneurial allies at least I do but equally we want to not feel like we're going a bit nuts and the truth is I think we all did feel even before corona virus. That life was just really getting complicated spell. I wrote the simplicity principle to really say. Can IT BE SIMPLISAFE Walk to simplicity? Look like what's wrong with complexity in the first place and you know what a successful at like and that's what I came up with the book and why is complexity so difficult for us well in some ways complexities natural human beings a curious and you only have to look the way we like sports. That have complicated rules or hobbies have intricate ways in which you do something. Even a jigsaw puzzle is complicated. The human brain itself as an organism as about as complicated objects if you like in the world so there's nothing unnatural about impact city and everything from viruses and weather systems to ecosystems all complex. The problem I think comes down to the fact that the human being that we own all inside systems and jobs digital worlds. We're actually a bit more basic. We need sleep. We need dressed. We honked overload our brains without stressing out tuning out venturing out. And when we do that things happen which might not make light operate smoothly in other words. You want your pilot to fall asleep at the controls because they're exhausted or you don't want somebody to miss. As arguably authorities have missed the signs of endemic coming because s what the systems to warn each other and take action. Were too complicated so really. What I'm saying is at the very least. We need to balance on the spectrum. Between what is simple uncomplicated? But in an ideal world we would also give the human body and the human mind more of what we now know that needs which is simple straightforward reset nut chewing respecting the complexity respecting. That things are not straightforward. This is not a book about being simplistic. I think of things at simplistic is a bit like it's stupid. You know him wants to be stupid but simplicity is actually what sophisticated and the person who taught me. That actually was the late great my Angelo. Who I have the pleasure and privilege of working alongside for a good few years when I was a lot younger. And you want me to keep it simple. And she taught me that when you can connect with what you want and what you're Abou- and what's real and what matters sat is smart but it might also be simple as what I've tried to create is a bit of a blueprint for how to get to that simple. It's right in the middle of everything that super super complicated and one thing that makes your approach so unique and so effective is. There's a lot of books at tells. Here's how to simplify. Here's what you need to do but yours isn't just about that. You really look at how the world can open up for us when we live a simpler life all of that. So can you talk about the research that you did to discover these result? Yes I wanted to write a book. That was a like a bit of a business book on a business woman. And I'm a business writer and so I wanted to give it a magic number. Because lots of the best business books do say who it intense steps seven steps in the four ways in the and so on and I want to really structure it so that it was incredibly useful but I also wanted to a homage if you like to the philosopher and all of we're on a quest to find meaning and I think more and more we want meaning in our lives and so I thought how do I do this and so I alighted on the idea that I would write about simplicity and the human brain I would dig into the research around. Neuroscience and present some case studies at pupil could relate to as some data that says. Look this is why the human brain needs to keep it simple but I would also structure the book a little bit like a cross between a business book recipe. Frankly so that. If you like may acquire impatient to say all right I buy it. I'm into simplicity versus exte- when the line begin how do I stop that? It would be easy to pick up. The book died in and to find something within five minutes of. Reading the book that you could relate to and do that's what I want and to feedback Sephora has been quite good because I think that most of us now want just quick wins. You know we want hacks and simplicity as well as wanting to look at the deeper meaning and I think the coronavirus crisis is a really good moment to reset and rethink. What are we wanted to? How do we WANNA live? How's it going to be

Julia Hobsbawm Paula Phelps Sephora Bruce Lee Writer
Turning Social Isolation Into a Creative Outlet With Martha Alderson

Live Happy Now

05:53 min | 4 months ago

Turning Social Isolation Into a Creative Outlet With Martha Alderson

"This is Paula Phelps. And this week we are going to tap into our creative side. Using our creativity is a proven way to increase our personal well-being. It can put you in a positive mood and that starts an UPWARD SPIRAL. That makes you feel more creative. And thereby further increases your happiness for somehow life creeps in and takes over the time. We'd love to spend exploring creatively before we know it. We feel like we've lost touch with our creative side entirely. This week's guest is an expert in tapping into creativity. Martha Alderson is an author who also works with bestselling authors Hollywood directors artists and performers all over the world to help them find their creativity. Now you can try this at home. Her New workbook boundless. Creativity is a one month exploration into your creative side. So let's hear what Martha has to say about it. Martha welcome to live happy. Now thank you for inviting me. I'm thrilled to be here. This is such a great work book that you've written for us. And what a great time for us to work on our creativity. It seems like it. I know that a lot of people are under enormous stress for all sorts of reasons because of the virus but if people do have free time and they're looking fill it creatively. I think by going through the program in the workbook. It's just a great way to let go of. That's happening around us. All the news all the problems of the world and just sink into your creativity and into really your spirit sh and who you are at your core beyond all the material things the problems and everything else so. I think it would be a great place for people to spend some time. We'll obviously when you wrote it. He didn't say hey. I think everyone's going to have a couple of months you know. So what was your decision behind writing it in the first place? Well I been a plot consultant for about thirty years for riders every story whether it's a memoir scream player. A novel has to have a plot and I'm passionate about empowering women's voices and women traditionally have had a lot of trouble with plot because it's a very linear logical progression and of Women. Writers are highly creative somewhat disorganized and are very interested in character development. But they don't really get plot in so. I just became passionate about teaching everybody but it seemed like it turned out to be the majority of women and then in doing that. It soon evolved into working with all kinds of creative people because what I found is we're all sort of on the same universal path. It's a universal story. That has certain markers in them that we pass through along the way. And what I found is that it's great when you're in the creative muse and everything's flowing in your feeling that euphoria of feeling like a conduit or a medium for the creative news to come through you. But at some point we stumble and all of a ten. We read over what we wrote. Are we look at the painting we painted and think? Oh my gosh you know. It's not what I thought it was going to be. And we started to doubt ourselves and self sabotage come up with sorts of reasons why we should put the project aside or give up or whatever and this is especially true for anyone who has perhaps suffered what. I call a backstory wound. Which is something that has traumatized them? In some way you know it can be a divorce or apparently being when you're a child or some kind of abuse or whatever and that really influences what we say to ourselves about our worthiness in our capabilities and our potential and that really interferes with the creative flow. All of a sudden that flow is stymied and our spirits. Can't really get through to be able to give us the support and the encouragement that we deserve. I wanted to write a workbook to be able to help people to become unblocked it to be able to get rid of all this self doubt and insecurities and unworthiness and to really live a life of passion and excitement and happiness joy and that really is something that I'm devoted to and with this workbook. You really prepare us for what we're going to do. It does such a wonderful job of asking these deep thoughtful questioned. Where did that come from over the course of time? Did you develop that? These are the questions that are going to help drive us into our creative selves. Well I think it's just sort of evolved over the last thirty years or so probably my whole life to tell you the truth but when I came up with the idea of the universal story I had a really hard time bringing it down to the concrete was very cereal and spiritual in all of that but once I started writing more about it and seeing these parts you know the beginning the middle and the end it really correlates with the Hero's journey that Joseph Campbell came up with but I take it a step further and called the universal story because I see it in not just what we move through as humans on our human path but nature you know the seasons of the year the moon cycles plants growth animal cycles. All these things have the same beginning middles and ends. And if you're aware of where you are on that journey and what's expected of you. It just makes the journey easier.

Martha Alderson Paula Phelps Joseph Campbell Consultant
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

02:57 min | 5 months ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"What are we miss? What are we really genuine? This about what was before. That's probably important. And then what have we found value in today that we didn't realize we will remission before we can decide on those things when the time for reentry comes? I think it's going to be easier to make the right decisions about the entry. That's great that's terrific insight. And I do think that it's such an unusual time and being every person's gonNA use a little bit differently but we really can come through this feeling better about the ourselves about where we're going and what we WanNa do and what we need. I feel better about people in general I mean I always go pretty good about the old but I feel better about people in general as a result of this. Just the collective doing the right thing that's going on is inspiring and I hope my children remember this and I hope it's a short period. I hope that you know next year. We're all kind of back to whatever next looks like 'cause I don't think we ever go back to before I don't think any of us ever go back to before. I think all of us will make conscious changes based off of this. I just don't know what they're going to be excellent with deb. It's always a pleasure to talk to you and this is definitely a conversation. I wanted to have with you. And if we'd have with a few thousand people listening even better. I always liked to have these conversations as well Paulo. It's always a joy to get on the podcast. I think when we started hearing more about re entry which should get on this conversation started talking about what people really can do but you know one of the things I know that is definitely changing as we all have become technology experts. Because we've had to so some definite changes there and how we work and get a lot of this accelerated what was already going on as we move to technology. We got there faster so it's interesting it's fascinating and hopefully you know people are taking the time with the podcast so get the word out shirt with your friends. If they're not having already discovered it you know we have a tremendous number of listeners dedicated listeners and you guys please share. I think there's a lot of positive going on in the world. Michael okwu still more conversations about that absolutely absolutely as this goes on. We'll come back and talk about it again. Well you take care of all right. You do the same ever. That was live happy. Ceo Deborah Highs. Talking about how to find the positivity in the pandemic if you'd like to learn more please visit us at live happy now and just follow the links. And while you're there we also invite you to visit our live happy store where you can stock up on positive essentials and enjoy fifteen percent off with the code live now. That is all we have time for today. So we'll meet you back here again next week for an all new episode and until then this is Paula Phelps. Reminding you to make every day a happy one..

Paula Phelps Michael okwu Deborah Highs Ceo
The Secrets of Wellness With Dr. Jeffrey Rediger

Live Happy Now

08:29 min | 6 months ago

The Secrets of Wellness With Dr. Jeffrey Rediger

"Welcome to episode two hundred fifty five of live happy. Now I'm your host Paula Phelps. And I'm happy to have you back here again with us this week. This is a time when all of us are thinking a lot about healing and wellbeing. We have a lot of questions about wellness and today's guest is uniquely qualified to talk about that. Dr. Jeffrey Redder is on the Faculty of Harvard Medical School and his medical director of Mclean Hospital southeast adult psychiatric programs. He's a board certified psychiatrist with a Masters in Divinity from Princeton theological seminary and in two thousand fifteen he walked onto a tek stage and proposed a revolutionary idea to an audience of doctors. He challenged them to join him and create an a new kind of medicine built on hope and possibility rather than focusing on sickness and disease. His new book cured. The life-changing science of spontaneous healing provides a fascinating look into healing and how changing our beliefs about ourselves can change our outcomes. Let's hear what he has to say. Jeffrey thank you so much for joining us today on live happy. Now Glenn Beer well. We really wanted to talk to you because you have written a fascinating book and it looks at how people with illnesses. That were allegedly incurable. Were somehow spontaneously healed and I found this book so fascinating it really difficult to put it down and I wanted to know how you got started on this research. To begin with in. Two Thousand and two and oncology nurse at mass general in. Boston came to me and said that she had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and she wanted to help her son about this. And so then she called me from a healing center saying that she was seeing some amazing recoveries and she alleged look into it and that time. I was a new medical director new faculty personnel harbored. I had just graduated from residency. Not that long ago the year before and I said No. I didn't think anything likely was going on there and refused but Nikki was persistent. She began having people. Call me from around the country and elsewhere saying that they had medical evidence for their recovery and did I want to hear their stories. I continued to say no for a while but letters were coming in and as I began to look at some of the stuff. That's being sent to me overtime. In spite of my resistance and my skepticism I began to become confused. Frankly because it looked like something in at least a few of these stories was going on and so long short of it is. I did begin researching the stories and that's been seventeen years now so things have gone a long way since then and how hard it sounds like. It really was difficult to reconcile what you were seeing with your medical education. That's very true. It was confusing to see stories coming in and having lab tests and by APPS results come in with cheers from cancer that I knew very well from my medical training were possible and so what I did was established three criteria and said that I wouldn't even look at the person story or listen to their story unless it really met these criteria so that I buy cherry was the person that had to have genuinely incurable illness. According to all the we currently understand number two they had to have medically indisputable evidence for accurate diagnosis and clear evidence for recovery and then number three there needed to not be any complicating factors such as an experimental medication or anything else that could potentially explain how the better so that helped me begin separating things out because certainly a lot of the story is a scheming and the data that was pouring in it was hard to know what really was going on because you know person can think that they got better but if they were also getting some kinds of chemotherapy and had certain kinds of diagnoses wasn't clear what was happening and so. I tried to just make the criteria really clear for the sake of efficiency and so I could figure out what's going on. And how many cases you say that you studied so this point of seventeen years. I've gone into over one hundred cases. It takes a long time to go into each case to separate out which of the cases that are genuine incurable and then to see if there is really good medical evidence to make sure there's not other complicating factors. Once you get through that level that removes a lot of cases and then from there to go deep into their lives and try to understand what are the factors that are associated that recovery takes a lot of work and so these cases are much more common than the research literature says. I've yet to give a talk where I'm not approached by someone afterwards at least one person who says either you need to talk to this patient where you need to talk to my aunt new talk to my cousin and most of the cases in company. I have not had time to go into this just because I have a job and responsibilities. So yeah how do you fit this research in with the fact that you do have a job as an RA small dog? How do you do all this well? This has been a very personal hashing for me at has grown over the years. I think I've always been driven by questions. And a stories raised a lot of questions for me and so it became something that I have spent a lot of early mornings on a lot of late nights and weekends over time and it's changed the way I think about a lot of things both as a human being and as a physician Woohoo or some of the commonalities that you found in the cases that you've been researching so feared I talk about the four pillars of healing and wellbeing and. I tried to tell stories that illustrate really well how these factors played a role in people's lives and I tried to choose stories from my research that illustrated really well how this works for people so the first pillar is nutrition. Nutrition is a big part of most people stories. Actually and it's not a one size fits all it's not like everyone became vegetarian or everyone followed the Atkins Diet or something like that. It's really a unique journey for each person. About what helped them feel better and feel their best and we all come from different parts of the world with our ancestors and that sort of thing and so I think different diets weren't better for different people. Some people went completely vegetarian. Other people chose a more ketosis diet. But what's true? Is that in nearly all of these diets? The commonalities were very real whether it's one type of nutritional plan or another almost. Everyone eliminated processed foods. They eliminated the vast majority of sugar foods from their diet. And also enriched flowers so they really began eating much more plant. Based Diet by enlarge. A number of people did eat meat but they tended to eat meat. That one person talk about eating animals had been happy when they were alive. Not with not with stress Hormones grass-fed so they get the healthier fats and knock on full of chemicals and so even though the diets looked different on the surface underneath there is a lot of similarity so that's efficient. The second pillar is that you need to heal your immune system so one of the really exciting things. That's just starting to happen. In medicine is that we're starting to realize that we've missed the real story about illness for decades as doctors. We are trained in body parts. If you're a cardiologist you studied the heart if you're a psychiatrist he studied the brain if you're a gastroenterologist he studied a GI system the gastrointestinal system excetera. But what we now are learning. And what these people with such remarkable recoveries have shown me with such clarity is that illness doesn't exist in these body. Parts as much as in the chronic inflammation that's created by our diets and lifestyles. And so if you want to heal your immune system then you need to lower the chronic inflammation in your body. That's really interesting as especially right now with people being concerned about the krona viruses and other things where they talk about. I need to jack up my immune system. I need to boost it up and no insane. I need to reduce inflammation. Yes but show. Chronic inflammation is immune system gone awry and is attacking your body for example. If you're causing little micro cuts in your endovascular system because of the kinds of food and sugar. You're ingesting constantly into your body. Then your immune system goes into repair mode constantly trying to repair all these little micro vascular cuts and injuries and not only. Are you expanding a lot of energy for your immune system to do that? You also are setting up. This scarring cycle in your endothelium. That is over time going to create hardening of the arteries so. It's not really a cholesterol problem than deeper level is it's an inflammation problem and the cholesterol is just a symptom of deeper chronic inflammation. And so we had this amazing immune system with all these brilliant cells and cell subtypes that want to do their job crisply and efficiently. But you have to give them the proper conditions so that they can do that and so I tell people to address the nutrition to avoid toxins to knock over. Medicate to flush lymphatic system regularly with lots of water to spend time with people. You love. Who Make you laugh? Because we know that laughter and positive authentic emotions are great for your immune system and to make sure you get plenty of rest. A lot of the things are things are moms told US growing up. She just kind of present it differently and didn't realize that she was giving. Us medical advice asks right. It's very true because your mom probably knew some common sense things that were more about seeing the forest for the trees in terms of what creates vital immune systems then what we were thinking about for a long time when we are just looking at the individual body parts. So it's not a diabetes problem. It's not a high blood pressure problem. It's not a cancer problem. It's not our problem or

Medical Director Chronic Inflammation Dr. Jeffrey Redder Princeton Theological Seminary Harvard Medical School Mclean Hospital Paula Phelps Boston Cancer Diabetes Ketosis Glenn Beer Nikki United States
Exploring #HappyActs With Deborah Heisz

Live Happy Now

06:50 min | 7 months ago

Exploring #HappyActs With Deborah Heisz

"I'm your host. Paula Phelps. Thank you for sharing your time again with us. This week March a special time here at live happy because March twentieth is the International Day of happiness. We start celebrating early with a little movement. We call Hashtag happy acts this week. Live happy CEO. Deborah highs sits down with me to talk about what happy acts are how you can make them part of your daily routine and how to celebrate the International Day of happiness with us. We'll DEB. Welcome back to the studio. I'm excited to be here today. Paula. It's been a little while we haven't done this in two long. No we haven't we need to do this more often. It's always fun to talk to you because it's just you we trade ideas that we get excited about the same things and I could probably do this every day. Although not sure they'd listen to us every day we should try that hang. What did you know this is interesting because we had scheduled this for you to come in and talk about happy acts and then as it turns out it's a pretty consequential episode because this is going to be our two hundred fiftieth podcast episode? Has it been that long? And we've done that many that's amazing. I haven't even better number which you don't know about which is with this podcast. We're going to hit three million downloads. Wow so that's amazing. Yeah who thought when we thought about this. What was it three years ago now four years ago. Now something like that. That was Gonna. Who's GonNa grow into this when we started talking about it? It was really just podcasts. Were Kinda new thing that podcast cereal. Just come out and I started listening to podcasts. And you were like yeah. These are interested. It seems like it was just an out of the blue. Hey let's try this and between you and Brittany and Chris and everybody else has been involved here. We are three million downloads later. That's amazing you. Kinda seems to be working. It does and speaking of things that seemed to be working you are here to talk about happy acts and the International Day of happiness. Which is another thing that you've been very instrumental in making happen or you know so many of us have grown that into being a something towards a real thing. I mean it. It's really one of those things that we started and we're still a big part of and still driving but it's beyond us. Which is what's so exciting about it. So many people that participate in it and we don't even know who they are and so I did that last year. That was you guys. I'm like well yes. I guess I don't know at this point. The internationally of happiness is in March so marches the month that we choose to celebrate happy acts but of course at live happy with celebrate those all year round march is just the month that we shout to the world. They need to be sharing as well. And it's been just a project that has gotten legs of its own and it's inspiring to watch how many people want to make a positive change in their world and how they're doing that and how we're helping them do that. It's just been so much fun and I think we've seen it grow into it. It's reaching schools. There's organizations that are doing workplaces. I think it's gone way beyond what it originally what we even thought about. In the beginning we know the first year I guess this is your six so the first year what happened was we met and we said okay. We're live happy and the United Nations has declared March Twentieth International Day of happiness. We have to do something to make that a big day because although having international happiness is great you know. There's an international day of the doughnut. I mean that doesn't necessarily mean something that makes an impact on your life unless you're a donut maker right. We decided we decided we really needed to make that day to day. I guess our vision was really. How do we make the International Day of happiness just as important as Earth Day in the minds of people? I was young when Earth Day came out. I was in elementary school when suddenly it became a thing and now it's not just a thing. It's a huge thing. Well we care about the earth and so we understand why Earth Day is important but think we care about people too so why is not human wellbeing something that we focus on as well and that's really what the internationally of happiness is about and that's really what live happy is about it's focusing on wellbeing of people and you know the societies they live in and the communities they live in and how they can live congruent? Lives in all of those things that were about. We think the internationally of happiness should be about that. So so we said what? Are we going to do it so we got in a room and we had had this idea about? What if we did a social intervention project and really what we were going to do is we're GONNA put walls up in public places and when people came by we were going to ask them to fill out a card that says share. How you'RE GONNA make the world happier place we sponsored all of it was sponsored hundred percent of it the first year and we had thirty walls and we were rocket and we got tons of media coverage and it was amazing and Co Founder Jeff Olson spoke at the UN that year and we put on a whole UN program that year and it was really a thing it felt like it was a really big thing will last year. We did seventeen more than seventeen hundred walls so in just six years we went from thirty walls in what was to countries to over seventeen hundred walls in. I think over thirty countries and we had more than three hundred of those were in schools and countless were businesses. And you know just people from all walks of life hosting happy. Walls is what we've started calling them but they're happy acts walls and over the course of time. I spoke at the UN. We did a program on happiness. The You know the second year we've expanded it to where. Hey March twenty eighth day. We're trying to celebrate but example in my case my kids are on spring break on March twentieth. So we're doing a happy wall at their school on March thirteenth. So now it's not instead of just cleaning March twentieth. We've decided march is a happy month. So we're GONNA do walls all of March everywhere that we can do and it is just a great great experience and I'm humbled to have been a part of starting it. What is it about the day of happiness doing the happy x? Doing the happiness walls. What is it that has resonated so well with people because I remember the year that Jeff Olson said? Hey we're GONNA get a thousand walls and we were all like that's insane like how are we going to do that? And then that happened and it exceeded a thousand walls and as you said. Now it's like seven last year was seventeen hundred. And what is it that resonates with people? That makes them want to do this. Well I think part of it is once they understand that happiness is a choice if they're like me or like you or like Jeff they want to share that people want to talk about how to make the world a happier place. They want to do something positive in the world and they also want to belong to something bigger than themselves. I mean one thing that we know about people were wired to be part of

Jeff Olson Paula Phelps United Nations UN Deborah Highs CEO Brittany Chris Co Founder
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:42 min | 8 months ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Of recognizing. Hey I'm not okay in there but I have a choice for. Hey but I have a choice that choice. I think makes us into powerful influencers in. So you're absolutely right rather it's business or community and nonprofit initiative you're with a group of people you're working together towards a common goal or whether it's your love life and dating it's all the same you know. How do we choose to navigate our love's power or do we abdicate tate. To what everybody else does. which is their advocate to their here and get into the distorted powers? So yeah I really believe I I know caroline maith often says that if the only thing you do in life is to look at how you use your power that will be enough the rest of your life and as you mentioned earlier so oftentimes were told. This is how we could be doing it. But we're not giving the steps to get there so I appreciate you talking about. How we we can start doing that. When you've already said we have to wait till June for your book to come out but we are going to give our listeners. Some links so they can see some of your videos and follow you and learn some of these things before the book gets out. But as we're letting you go today. Can you give us. One thing that our listeners can do can start implementing today so that they can discover their own love power and can start leading. I more fulfilling life. Yeah so I think one of the great practices is whenever we talk to someone whether we've known them for twenty years or perhaps you're going out on a date single. It's first time you meeting this person really have an open open mindset as to what can. I really learn from this person. What sort of new things can I learned. That will help me to grow in my life and almost make it like an exciting game you know like what can I actually received from this beautiful interaction rather than what most people do which is look. Look at the other person and go into fear and say okay. How can I get my needs. Met 'cause my needs need to be met in this art do a long you know we. Human beings were so predictable. We do that. All Day launch launch. So I think that's the one thing if people can just start there. That is a great start terrific Karen. I really appreciate you taking time with us. And and we really look forward to your book coming out in tune. Thank you so much Paula. You have a wonderful day do and by everyone out there. That was Karen McGregor talking about how we can tap into our love power and learn to be our own Valentine to learn more about Karen preorder book Taliban plants or take our free online test to discover your own power. archetype visit us at live. Happy now dot Com mm-hmm. We hope you're already a subscriber to live happy now but if you're not you can find us on the Pandora podcast network. spotify soundcloud stitcher itunes and in Google. Play just look I in your favorite platform and hit subscribe. So you'll never miss an episode. That's all we have time for today. We'll meet you back here again next week for an all all new episode and until then this is Paula Phelps. Reminding you to make every day happy.

Paula Phelps Karen McGregor caroline maith Pandora tate Google Valentine
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

10:49 min | 9 months ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode two hundred forty one of lip happy now. I'm your host. Paula Phelps thanking you for joining us for our the last episode of the year. Tomorrow is a day when many people start the new year with a renewed commitment to change or to following a new purpose in life. Today's guest gives us a guidebook to go on that journey. Joanne Fink is an award winning designer an author of books on creativity grief faith and spirituality with more than a million books in print she has created journals that help each reader explore their own path in their own time her latest book. My spiritual journey is a guided added. Journal the ask the hard questions needed to help you. Ground yourself and gratitude find deeper connections and look at what you need to get where you want to be to an welcome to the last episode of the decade of live happy. Now Wow I am. Honored should be the last episode guest online on no pressure descent up all of twenty nineteen in the years that preceded it but you. I wanted to talk to do you for this episode in particular because this is a time of year when everyone's thinking about what they're gonNA do for the New Year what they wanna do differently and better and that is what your journal. My spiritual journey is all about. So can you tell us first of all why you wanted to do this. Journal in particular my spiritual journey is basically a roadmap to helping people discover who they are at their core in an understanding about what they are innately gifted at what they're passionate about held they are. Upbringing has given a unique perspective on life. After record now use our and after they discover does those things it helps them set. It helps them discover their personal purpose at this point in their journey and then said intentions to to fill that purpose and then implement the intentions and a little bit of tracking the impact that you can have in the world. I believe that we are all here for the same basic purpose which is to use irony gifts to make a difference in the world but I we do that are and writing is not the same as how you do that to your broadcasting skills and the other talents that you contribute it'd be and everybody's journeys unique in everybody's purpose is unique. Which is why unfond of the phrase personal purpose roles else like that because when you say purpose it's that is such a huge word that in itself can be intimidating if you you know if you go up to a kid and say what what is your purpose? They're going to just run and say I don't know but you've taken purpose and made it. You broken it down into such a beautiful exercise size of expiration. Can you talk first of all why. It's so important that each of us can find our personal purpose. I think it's important to be able to sign your purpose e because if you don't know what you're here to do then you can't fulfill your purpose and not every purpose purpose is world changing. You know. Someone's purpose might be to be a wonderful parent to beautify. Hi The neighborhood you know. There are lots of different levels of purposes and our purpose changes throughout our lives the purpose that I and and implementing right now which is to help people tap into their own unique abilities ho-nam and use them to make the difference in the world. Making that is my current personal purpose is not the same as my purpose was a decade ago or two decades ago and so so as we grow our purpose can change and one of the things that I like about this road map if you will to implementing your personal purpose. Is that as you go through this journey by the time you're done you're not the same person you were renew began and it's okay to go back and answer the questions again in light of what you have learned about yourself previously and that's interesting because I hadn't thought of it in those terms about you know it's kind of like finishing the ride on the rollercoaster and going. Oh I'M GONNA go run and do that again. But that is a great approach approach to be able to say. Oh I'm going to have different answers and I'm going to be able to approach this differently. You know it's all part of the journey that at each of us goes through and there are stages of journeys that we enjoy more than others but a lot of interest section. I think really help should swift sold growth as you were working on this journal and you were developing these questions and these exercises. How did you go about that? Because what strikes me he is is how well thought out. This is and how it really is like. You're holding our hand the entire time and there's so many things I never would have thought to include. That are so influential. And how did you come up with all of that well. This book took me more than a year or two both right and illustrate and I started by so I have a a spiritual practice that I call morning journal. I wake up every morning and being a person who walks in faith I do some praying and then I read something uplifting or inspiring hiring and then I put pen to paper somedays doodle. Somedays I writer response to whatever I've read had some days. I write down whatever's in my heart of prayer for Shimon. Perhaps and so I started by going through do all of my journals that I kept over the last few years and writing down all the questions that I had asked myself some of which I did not answer but I had a lot of questions in my journals and then as I thought through the process as lifelong long spiritual seeker finding connection is really important to me and thinking through what I needed to do in order to explain that process to other people helped me questions I think I had five hundred questions narrowed it down narrowed it down and early on I e cause heart of what I want to do is encourage people to be happy the optimistic practice positively. I did not take out all of the negative questions. Because it's important to look at those aspects of your life that are not as uplifting and most of those I think are in the perspective chapter but overall the questions are designed to make you thank you about not just to you are but how you want to impact world in other words. What do you want your legacy to be? And then after each of the nine sections there exercises that you can do to help absorb the material so in the perspective active section for example. There's a gratitude tracker and since scientific way we know that it takes twenty one days to make ask a new habit. There's twenty one spaces to write down three things that you grateful for every day and things like that Bat I hope will be held for two people on their jerks. Yeah because all of the exercises are so well presented. We'll be right back with more of my talk with Joe McCormack but right now I wanted to take sixty seconds to give you one way to make your meals. Neal's a little easier. This holiday season Sousa Fish Dot com is a great way to have top quality seafood. Delivered right to your door when you want a break from holiday Turkey and Ham. Their online selection of seafood is like a trip to the fish market without waiting in line. Make incredible holiday appetizers from their shrimp crab cakes and Calamari. Or make get your main course with great choices like lobster Salmon Sea Bass and so much. More best of all their fish is all natural and responsibly. Sourced whether you want to order great eight seafood for a special meal or become a regular customer and sign up for a monthly subscription box go to sizzle fish dot COM and skip the line this holiday season and as an exclusive exclusive deal for being a listener. You can use discount code happy for ten percent off your first order. That's discount code happy for ten percent off your first order now. Let's get back to to our conversation with job. I have to talk for a minute about the beautiful illustrations because in this book makes it so enjoyable to sit down with it. It's kind of like the difference between walking on a treadmill and walking in a beautiful forest. You know because you're you're going to accomplish it's the same thing but you're going to enjoy that forest walk a whole lot more you know. And that's how this book is. It's like it's an addition of the exercises the beauty that you're surrounded abayas. You're working on them is really incredible so I was at important to make this book as beautiful as it is meaningful. Thank you hit the nail on ahead when you said. It's almost an invitation for people to do that. kind of exploration loved analogy about taking a walkout in nature vs on the treadmill. 'cause I love getting out in nature and I think people are more willing to do. The hard introspective work of soul-searching when they are surrounded by beauty. And so this is I. Guess sort of Contribution to making the questions enticing in hopes that they will be answered either silently or suit journaling.

Joanne Fink Paula Phelps morning journal writer Shimon Joe McCormack Neal
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

05:49 min | 10 months ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Twenty years ago. The harm nate. That I was talking argued about was overextending yourself. The way women make promises without thinking the way we don't have any time and our calendar calendar for ourselves that even blocking out two hours a week for self time you know is seem revolutionary and just just impossible and that was twenty five years ago now. When I was looking at harmony it was the idea that we're losing our attention span? Time magazine reported on Microsoft's survey that showed that a human attention span is less than goldfish fish. My Gosh that's not good news and we've lost that made the goldfishes. Stay nine seconds Ed. We've fallen down from twelve to eight. So so since this survey was taken so I really needed to address it and and this the social media Karaj and simple hundreds of is about honoring finding discovering. You know your authenticity. There's just so many ways that their image and their selves respect everything can be torn down and again. It's just learning that we can control you know our access to it. You don't have to really bad reviews you know. Why would you do that? So that made the book very different and the Voice of the narrator or I always write for just one person and that's you the reader and and the voice of the woman had had to be from now not from twenty five years ago and a challenge to bring us the readers back to simplicity when our world is not simple. But you're creating a feel like as as you know going through your pay. Just you're like that quiet wise voice voice in the corner and they've got the TV Blair and everything's loud so it's like everything has to calm down slowed down so we can hear you. I think it does that. How big a challenge was to achieve that you know? I trusted the book the book or the painting or the Peace Bar podcast which which has a new wonderful new art form. It always knows what you don't you need to trust the word the creative work and the other other thing as I said simple abundance was so organic that you don't start with simplicity US start with two months of gratitude and when you're only focusing on that that you know I say if you put down five things every day for which you're afraid till four in two months you will not recognize your life and I'm so excited that you're bringing this to a whole new generation of women and and I think it's GonNa have. I'm really interested to see how it takes on. Its next life because I feel like it's going to be so different than it's a different world right and I think the the path that it takes to be different than than the previous incarnations of simple abundance. Yes I think acting and because that's life takes on Ligo have different stages simple abundances is waiting there for you. And there's a new gratitude journal coming out in December and what I wanted to do with that is in the first gratitude journal. I had just talked about the wonder of gratitude and I really wanted to talk about the new one I really wanted to also add the chapter this section about gratitude in the hard times because that has been and miraculous for me and I just wanted to share that if we want to live happy and we fall. We do these proactive. The steps to help us sometimes life. Just you know really throws a curve ball or and we're stunned. I learned learned to personal experience that gratitude sits quietly at the end of the bed while waiting for you while you're crying yourself to sleep and I I really felt I needed to share that with my readers. That's really beautiful in both these volumes. Previous books are they're so pretty it just has a different feeling. When can you hold it at A? He won't take a breath before you open it and and I think that's so you know so well-designed I always done that was there. It's such a pleasure to talk to you. I I guess I'm really excited that you've done this. This new version of simple abundance. I think it's so timely so needed and I think it's really gonNA touch a lot of people a a lot of new people on a whole different level. Thank you Paula. Thank you for letting people know that I love your podcast. I love near website. Thank you for inviting make. Yeah that was Sarabande Bronek author of simple abundance three hundred sixty five days to a balanced enjoy for life to learn more about Sarah the new edition of her book and how to follow her on social media. Please visit US live happy now dot com and we'll give you links and more information mation. We hope you're already a subscriber to live happy now. But if you're not you can find us on the Pandora podcast network spotify soundcloud stitcher itunes and Google play. Just look for us on your favorite platform and hit subscribe. So you'll never miss an episode. That is all we have time for this week. We'll meet you back here again next week for an all new episode and until then this is Paula Phelps. Reminding you to make every day a happy.

Paula Phelps nate Time magazine Microsoft US Pandora Ed Sarah Blair Google Sarabande Bronek
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

15:15 min | 10 months ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode two hundred thirty six of live happy now i'm your host paula phelps thanking you for joining us if you're even a casual listener of our show you probably know that we love gratitude so when we learned about the book the thank you project cultivating happiness one letter letter of gratitude at a time we knew we had to talk about it on the show and what better time to talk about it then right before thanksgiving nancy davis co is a freelance writer podcast i host and author of the thank you project she talked to me about how the project started what it taught her and why each of us can benefit from writing thank you letters nancy he welcomed to live happy now thank you so much pollen really glad to be here appreciate the invitation to join you we're glad to have you here this is such a great topic because we are huge gratitude unheard here your book fits right in with the things we love talking about and i wandered first of all if you have always had an interesting gratitude or if it's something that you cultivated recently i have not i mean i considered myself a grateful enough person i grew i was somebody who grew up in a household where you wrote thank you notes or you didn't get to play okay with a thing or use the things so i would say i had pretty good have gratitude habits but the way that these gratitude letters involved mall really changed the way i think about it i think you know writing a performance of thank you on somebody's facebook wall or writing dear ex i liked gift thank you for sending to me is very different from what i'm talking about in the thank you project which take a little bit more work in a little bit more consideration so i think i have become a a of an aficionado gratitude i stumbled into it and now i realize how magical it is to think about an in a deliberate way it it really is and you chose to practice it through letter writing and can you explain what made you decide to start this and a little bit it's just a little bit of background on on how you came to this is the end of twenty fifteen and nineteen sixty six babies so i knew twenty sixteen was going to be the golden jubilee year as i started telling me i basically get away with anything i wanted to my golden jubilee you're just like the queen but i was pretty reflected because i've seen a lot of friends lose their parents marantz than i had seen a lot of friends go through divorce and i just felt very very lucky i just had i just really understood in a pretty deep way that i was fortunate person at the end of two thousand fifteen parents around my husband and i have been married almost twenty five years at that point we had to healthy head and so i felt the move to write thank you letters to the people who had helped me to get to that point because i knew you know i have not gotten where i am in my life all on my own really had along help along the way and it just seemed like a appropriate way to celebrate this milestone birthday so i decided i would write one gratitude letter each week to somebody who a had helped her shaped or inspired me up into that point and starting with friends and family i figured after i get through that list i'll figure out who else gets one of these letters so as often happens when you think everything's going great suddenly things will not be going on is oh oh i you heard what i said did you so it ended up being a pretty rough year personally and also i think for everybody because it was the two thousand sixteen presidential presidential election and the anxiety levels were high for everyone who i knew laced and it turned out that every week i would sit down to write my letter i gotten gotten habit of doing it on friday afternoons after work was done and i could just feel my shoulder sat all on i could feel this sense of warmth and really connection action and joy in writing because what i was doing was documenting the way one person in my life had been there for me and i think at a time when dan i felt it would have been easy to feel alone to feel disconnected into feel worried i was every week telling myself you've got people when you are you're you're fine you you know you're facing harvard things you face hard things before you're writing about amendments letters so it was really unexpectedly powerful way to kind of get really gain perspective get to more of a a gratitude habit that year and so didn't mail the letters as the letters piled up i started thinking well if you think about shaped your inspired you it's not necessarily people still in touch with so some letters i wrote didn't send but it really got me into this mindset of okay you're okay everything's gonna be fine a and you have so much to be grateful for and it seems like that would be an incredible reset every week and even knowing going into it say by thursday there's day was your mind starting to go to this next letter and some of the things that you appreciate it oh well let me that was the cool thing that's what i loved about doing the book look versus writing the actual letters because it was three years later that i started writing this book which is all about how you to listeners or readers can undertake take your on happiness attitude letter project and i wanted to be grounded in science which is why i was so thrilled to be invited onto your podcast t. v. h. because has got to dig into all of this research on gratitude and happiness and forgiveness which was something i didn't see coming that how those things are all inter related and the end of the quantification of why those things work so well together and some of your has guests on the show were instrumental either in my reading or my interviews with them in understanding why the work so what i found out and this was something that i learned in talking to dr christine carter her for the greater good science center is that basically if you take the time to think a really authentic gratitude thought you know if you take the time to think ah deeply about why you appreciate somebody your para sympathetic nervous system gets triggered and it calms you down and it is like a reset button for the being mad that you were stuck in traffic or worried about your bills or all these things just thinking deeply about gratitude and appreciation around somebody specific it can act as a way to reset para sympathetic nervous system and you the amazing thing i tried to say this throughout the book that happens whether whether or not you write a word on a piece of paper i am a proponent parading down because of other reasons which maybe we'll get to in the discussion but even just thinking these thoughts is a really effective way to get back to center to feel less distressed and so that to me was really magical that i could spend a whole week thinking about the person who's letter i was gonna write the following friday and just thinking about it every day was its own little mini reset and there's research that shows that even doing it less than once a week the feelings can last for up to a month it's crazy i interviewed a woman because i also wanted to have other peoples experiences concerned at the beginning that maybe i was gratitude super taster you know just like maybe i felt it more than other people i didn't want to suggest something that wouldn't work so besides talking to the researchers to make sure that what i was experiencing was real i talked to a few other people who had also done gratitude relent thank you letter in writing projects with some shape or fashion and there was one who did one hundred letters in one hundred days which to knee without honored i now but she a lot she said i don't know if i could have gotten the benefits if i hadn't done when she called i if i hadn't gone into it in such a gratitude on steroids way so for her it was that was the right pace again i say throughout the book you do whenever works for you but i thought it was reassuring to hear that even if you do one month you are still getting the benefits because that's how long lasting durable feelings of happiness can be that are tied to gratitude and then there's the benefit that added bone onus of of you do mail the letter and that person receives it there's an appreciation that they have and one thing i really like you said in your book you did not mail it with expectation this was your your project so if you didn't hear back from them that was no thing so so how did that feel though people did receive it like your dad framed a you know no how can you talk about some of the response you've gotten put it meant to them and hear relationships yeah i did i decided nobody nobody asked me for thank you letters sodas not fair fair for me to say well i can't believe they didn't write me back or say something right so i knew that going in however every single person to whom i mailed letters there were a few at incident but every person who got a letter for me acknowledged it in some way and it might have been just taxed a really lovely texas they sent all all the way up to my dad who didn't put it over his desk which was allows that and now and i got letters back in some cases so it makes me it made me feel great i was so pleased that they felt appreciated that was the whole point and so it was wonderful to get notes back i mean i include include one in the book i wrote my obstetrician who was really skilled physician and super-busy she's one of the top OB's san francisco and i can tell you some time when it's like going going across the bay bridge in labor if anybody ever wants to hear that's twice not once but twice but she wrote me back and i couldn't believe it because she so i she's delivering babies all the time but she said it meant so much to her to to now she made a difference in how much appreciated hearing from it and i thought oh my gosh all these people out who do heroin things nobody ever really takes the time to tell him how that impacts them down the line because if my kids weren't it delivered safely my life would look so different sets very and that's one of the thing that your book really helps us do is kinda open up the scope of who we think that we should thank because we tend to your our family our friends we think about that but you had some interesting categories let's talk like most of those unexpected categories that you found while i advocate writing a letter to your first crush because somebody has to tell you where the on on switches switches and i think you should have fun with these letters it's not meant to be a terrible homework assignment that's a fun wonder right think about who who was that person when you were i don't know twelve eleven hundred hold you are i'm not judging who made you think oh my god and i thinking what about this one in particular because i'm doing i'm doing the thanksgiving episode in retain a little bit before thanksgiving i'm doing an episode on my own podcast where i asked people all to send in their stories of people to whom they were grateful and i got a really long detailed lovely story about something who wrote a letter to somebody who was grateful to shaun john cassidy al anti-drug on me the hair on shaun cassidy we should all be grateful to shaun cassidy but she talked about how it was so instrumental to her as a writer because she writes y. a. adult fiction and she can go back and remember what it was was like to be in seventh grade and to be in love with this object that's completely out of reach but helps you kind of experiment with the early feelings of love it's like a safe friend or girlfriend who you never have to actually be in the room went and it that's developmentally really important so that was that you know that's a fun letter to think about writing and i talked about you know i wrote to my favorite authors been dead for two hundred years she's not going to be able to read it but i wanted to thank her and yeah usually you know as the scope gets bigger and bigger it gets easier to think of who else i would not be who i am without jane austen novels i would not i would not be nancy.

paula phelps
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode two hundred of live happy. Now. On Paula Phelps? Thanking you for joining us today for what we think is a very special episode if you've been listening since the beginning, you already know that live happy now has evolved in many different ways since we launched it in two thousand fifteen thanks to listeners like you. We've been able to exceed our own expectations and hopefully have exceeded yours as well this week live happy CO, Deborah highs sat down with me to talk about. How the podcast began what we've learned during our first two hundred episodes, and what to expect going forward? Welcome back to the show. It's always a pleasure to have you come by and chat with us. Well, it's always fun to do this. This is probably my favorite thing that we do at live happy and we've been doing this for a little while. Now, it kind of sneaked up on us it did it did. This is our two hundred podcast, which is kind of unbelievable to me. Yeah. Especially did. You know that the average number of podcast that someone puts out is. That's incredible. I know I know so you know, I remember when we were going to start this. And we had no idea that that one that we could pull it off into that. It would do as well as it's done and lead us to this. What was the idea behind wanting to start live happy now? Well, you know, I actually before we started this. I kind of discovered podcasts. I do a lot of traveling. And I started listening to when I was traveling. And then I started doing some research into podcast looking at them. And I asked you know, some of the staff members at Brittany was a key part of it. You're key part of it. Chris was a key part of it looking at you know, how people were to do a podcast what audiences were like. And we just started really looking at it. And we were talking to everybody and the conclusion that we came to quite rapidly. Was that podcast provided people information in a way that was very confortable for them to consume it something that didn't require extra time out of their day because they could listen to it in their car or listen to while they worked out, and it was really? Attracting our core audience, which is people who want to who want to improve their lives. They're they're one of the main audiences for podcasts, and it really became obvious that, you know, launching live happy launching podcast would be a benefit to the people that were trying to reach. And I do know too that a lot of thought went into making sure it was a specific thank like under thirty minutes. So people could listen to it on their commute. And then I think some of the things were kinda like dumb luck. I mean, we just decided, hey, let's try this and things really worked. They really did. You know? We fortunately have quite a few listeners or readers at the time when we launched and we launched the podcast, and we hit the top of the I tunes podcast list for our category in the first week. So we had kind of an instant success. And you're right. Some of it was a little bit of dumb luck. And some of it. I think you know, obviously, everything in the world has a little bit of timing. But I really. It was also that this is a topic that really appeals to people and when they saw it as an option in their podcast list. They started adding it is quite incredible. Our first few episodes exceeded ten thousand downloads a piece, which.

Deborah highs Paula Phelps Chris Brittany thirty minutes
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"One ninety three of live happy. Now. This is your host Paula Phelps. Thanking you for joining us today this week we have a really special guest Daniel pink is a New York Times bestselling author and with his latest book when the scientific secrets of perfect timing. He takes a fresh look at how we make decisions. Now we make decisions every day. And we ask ourselves what we need to do however going to do it. And sometimes why we need to do it. But with this latest book Daniel shows us, how the way we time our decisions can change our days, our jobs and even our relationships. Let's hear what he has to say Daniel thank you for joining us today on live happy. Now. It's really a pleasure to have you here today on our show. It's great to be with you this. You've looked at a topic. That is something. I don't think a lot of us have put a lot of thought into even though we are making decisions every day. We really don't look at timing. So what is it though that made you decide to start? Looking at the science of timing and how that affects us. Yeah. I think it was really more frustration than anything else because you know, exactly as you say, I was making all kinds of timing decisions in my own life. When I'm writer wind, should I do my writing winter to exercise in the day. When should I start a project when should I stop a project, and I was making those decisions in a very haphazard way that frustrated me, and I looked around for guidance did find it. And then they started just said, hey, I wonder if there's any research on this topic and turn it. There was a huge amount of research on this topic. The challenge was that it was not in a single discipline. So it wasn't there were some psychology. But it wasn't only psychology. 'cause there was some in economics, and it was in anthropology, and it was in molecular biology, and there's a whole field called chronobiology, and it was in endocrinology, and it was an anesthesiology and all of these disparate fields were asking very similar questions. So what's the effect of time of day on how we feel how we perform how do. Beginnings affect us how to mid points effect us how to endings affect us. And I took a long time to track through all the research. But once I did I feel like this research offers clues about how to make these timing decisions in a smarter shooter way. How does learning the power of when change the way that we make our decisions he said, we make them in Schreuder way. But how is that? Yeah. Well, I mean, this is what every level. So we think, but I'll the most obvious one which is that a lot of research tells us both ends again in psychology and aspects of biology in chronobiology, and even sociology gives us tells us this hour brain power does not remain the same over the course of a day. It changes it changes in contingent very significant ways it changes in predictable ways. And there are certain times of day when we are better at certain kinds of tasks simply knowing that in moving the. Right work to the right time can make a world of difference. Is it different for every person though? I read so many things I'm a night. Owl. I am not a morning person at all. And I read so many things about you happy. No matter what you have to get early. You have to do all these things. I'm so glad that you ask that because the idea that there is one size fits all is is nonsense. And this idea that the that the secret to high performance is getting up insanely early is is not sense. Here's what we know is this. So it begins with exactly what you're talking about. Which is what's called a chronic type chronic type is our propensity. Do we wake up early and go to sleep early or we like you to a wake up late and go to sleep late? Here's what the distribution looks like about fifteen percent of us are very strong morning. People larks about twenty percent of us people like you are very strong evening. People als in about two thirds of us are kind of in the middle. And what we know is that..

Daniel pink chronobiology Paula Phelps New York Times writer Schreuder fifteen percent twenty percent
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode one ninety of live happy. Now. This is your host Paula Phelps. Thanking you for joining us as we get a little deeper into the new year. It's a great time to pick up some books that can help you make the most of the weeks and months ahead this week live happy book editor Sandra Bill, Bray talks with us about five books that she thinks could change your life in the new year. And she tells us why you don't wanna miss them, Sandra. Thank you for joining us here today. You know, our our readers get to see what you've done, but it's not very often that our listeners get to hear from you. So I'm very excited press to have this conversation today. Oh, I am too. I'm so happy to be here Paula now, you do a great job of getting out there and finding all new positive psychology books that are coming out and guiding us through what's going on. So we thought this would be the perfect time to sit down and talk about some of the things that maybe people wanna read for twenty nineteen to help get the year starred in it or help the year progress a little bit smoother. Oh, absolutely. So one of the first books that I wanna talk about is called big potential by Sean acre this book is so great to start a year out because it's all about achieving your potential through the power of community. Oh, interesting. What ways did he bring out the weaking us community to retire potential? Well, you know, it's so, you know, I think this is so true. He, you know, just talks about how you know. So many people feel like they're in their own lane, and they have to achieve success, you know, for themselves in their own lane. But he's he discusses and writes about in this book that you don't have to go alone that if you around yourselves with other stars than you will truly be able to shine. And that's something that's hard for us to do. I think a lot of times as individuals, but it's getting probably more difficult because of our relation that. We've we've. Been able to achieve through technology. So does he dress? How to kind of overcome some of that in fine negatively with other. He really does. You know, he writes a lot about how you know, when you pursue success alone, you become stressed, and and disconnected, and you know, you know, while some might say that social media has made us more connected world, you know, others point out how, you know, the one on one conversations face to face, you know, those those are are minimized, and then that can actually lead to more feelings of isolation. Or if when people use social media, you know to compare their lives, you know, to others. It can also make them feel, you know, very alone or ice elated or like, they don't measure up, and he's saying, you know, let's really invest in our support systems. So, you know, we know through all the research live happy, you know, that the more you. Best in relationships. The happier you become and he's saying are support systems actually make high-achieving possible. You know, whether it's you have a team and everyone on your team has different strengths. And that helps lift you up or you have a support system is like cheerleading squad behind you. And you know to uplift you and inspire you and encourage you. So those are some of the things that made me think about from his book big potential. That's terrific. And that's something that's really important for us to start thinking about right now in kind of plan for it's not something that comes naturally now. We kind of have to put ourselves in that situation to connect with other. So it's great now that we have a guidebook for doing that. Yes. Absolutely. You know, I don't think it's the first thing that would come to people's minds, you know, connect Tivoli as the pathway to fulfill your potential, whether it's a gym or. You know, it's a reading group or just a group of friends, and you get together, you know, that that that can really help. You excel ary your success terrific. So what's our next one? What's our next.

Sean acre Sandra Bill Paula Phelps editor Tivoli Bray
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to live happy. Now. This is your host Paula Phelps. Can you for joining us today for a special thanksgiving themed episode this week? We're hearing a lot about thankfulness and hear it live happy. It's something we like to talk about all year long live happy CEO, Deborah highs drops in this week to talk more about why gratitude is so important what it really means. And what it can do for us. Well, it's always wonderful to have you in the studio and on the line. Thank you so much for taking time to talk to us today. Well, it is my pleasure. And I know we're gonna talk about one of my favorite topics. So that even makes it more. My pleasure. Getting to spend twenty to thirty minutes. Talking about stuff, you love is never a burden, and as you all know, I love love happy. And I love our topic for today. Yeah. This is one of my favorites too. So that's why I was really excited talk to you about it. Because I like it you like it. It's gonna be fun. So I guess we should let everyone else know that what we're luding to is gratitude. Yes being. Being grateful key part of living a happy life. You know, what's interesting is that we get so much about gratitude during November thanksgiving is coming up when we talk about thankfulness and and outside of live. Happy walls at tends to often get neglected the rest of the year like we don't give a whole lot of attention to gratitude or to being thankful. Do you see that tide turning at all, you know, I think I do? And maybe it's because I live in a little bit of a bubble. Dislike you doing that? This is what we do. We're out building this. And we talk about it all the time. But you know, we have a civil discourse problem right now. And. Yeah. And it's obvious problem for those of you who you Horgan's much later, you gotta know where we're recording this on election day. So if you know what I mean by by a civil discourse, it's a really an incidence course right now or an uncivil discourse. And I think there's a bit of a backlash to that. In that there's a certain group of the population that isn't grateful and or expressing gratitude, perhaps they're grateful, but they're expressing it. And there's a lot of negativity out there and the closer you get to election day, which is today, the more you see it, and the more you hear it and feel it, but I also see buried underneath all that on social media..

Paula Phelps Deborah highs CEO Horgan thirty minutes
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Live happy. Now. This is your host Paula Phelps. Planking you for joining us today this week we have a really special episode. We're talking with Dawson church whose groundbreaking book the genie in your jeans explained to link between emotions and genetics in his new book mind matter Dawson, looks at the science of cheating peak mental states and shows the scientific research behind how the energy around us shapes our physical health, and what we can do to change our state for a happier and healthier life Dawson. Thank you so much for joining us today on live happy. Now, it's it's really an honor to have you on the show today. Supposed to be here. You know, this your book mind to matter is absolutely one of the most interesting books. I have read all year. And there's there's so many different things that we could talk about with this. But I think one thing that's just so interesting is that you talk about how energy fields shape matter and to start this conversation. I wondered if you could give us an example of what that means. And how that works in our everyday lives. Oji feels are invisible. And so's tenting as we go about eighty lives to discount that and not understand or pre. She ate the extent which they're affecting us and affecting matter, but just the way officials in on were the water and yet without the water has no fish in the same way energy feels permeate at influence every single part of our lives and just for instance, one eggs. Example from the end of by vines matter is the earth's geomagnetic field. So the is a huge magnet has been south pole which Benjamin the compass. And so the big giant Malvo be live on has a stone feel around bar magnet. You may have seen in school. That own is iron findings had routed it's organizing environments around routed all the time. So one of the ways is shown up in science. We leave example is that now of Google earth can having satellites images from very high up in the sky and looking on earth, we researches of notice that herds of cows tend to orient themselves their heads toward might ignores. We never did know that ten years ago. We now see that we on a measuring how all kinds of creatures from bumblebees to birds dolphins. Use electromagnetism us. These fields use the earth's feels all the fields the objects roundup to navigate sometimes thousands of miles. And so these deals are all around us shaping affecting us everyday. The the biggest strongest field of human body is the feel it so strong. It's literally organizing matter three yards three meters away your body. And so this book is all about stunt notice. Those feels notice the way faith those fields, and then using the heels consciously rather accidents for creation, and how do we use those? How do we even one become more aware of what that energy field is around us because it sounds so much like science fiction? I know it's science. But when you start talking about this to someone at at sounds like something we would see in a movie, the how do we identify? What are that energy field is around us and begin to use that one of the most about? Samples from a is all the stories of healing in the book. And so the book is Cosa science book of the science look explains things very fairly able sciences, but it's much more. It has around a hundred stories of people who apply these principles in their lives. Don't give example of somebody chain Driffield. She's writing a book about this. And I actually wrote the forward to her book. So I'm ready acquainted with the details of story. So lost March much loss year. She was diagnosed with metastasized rest cancer. She had a large up in her white breast has was was off five centimeters around about two inches. Bigs big mass in her right breast between battleground Sweeney and the.

Dawson church Planking Dawson Paula Phelps metastasized Driffield Oji Sweeney Benjamin five centimeters three meters three yards two inches ten years
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Welcome to episode one, six of live happy. Now. This is Paula Phelps today we're talking with Keiko again, author of no mistakes, a perfect workbook for imperfect artists. While you know Keiko is the actress from TV shows such as the Gilmore girls and thirteen reasons why her new book explores her tick side and it invites you to do the same. Let's listen as she talks with live happy executive editor, Donna Stokes were huge fans of your work here. Live happy and excited to pick your brain about creativity. I'm just wondering what inspired you to start this project and how long has it been in the works? Well, this book has been in the works for about two years now. And originally it was going to be an adult coloring book. So it actually it started with the artwork I draw and I was talking about it on the Gilmore guys podcast and someone who worked at church. Pair greeted heard heard about that and through the podcast, actually we, we're talking about what what it could possibly be. And then this book that's more workbook does have some coloring elements into it, but it's definitely more of a a journaling workbook type of endeavor, be sort of grew out of our conversations about what this book could be, and that was, and my rough draft was turning about a year ago. So this whole. So now coming to the end of it just launching on seventh. That's interesting that you say it started out as a coloring book because I love your artwork in it, and my instinct was to get out my colored pencils. And this start lowering in your your art. One is your personal definition of creativity. I guess it's the Greek question because for me the way I approach it, I think that we're all creative people. So I do think that some people decide to make a profession out of it. Maybe they focused on one aspect of their creativity that they like, and they want to make money at it. But you know whether that's someone or not, I think we're all creative people. And so the exciting thing for me about approaching this book is I would love for people who may be don't exercise that side of themselves as often as they like to pick up this book in. Have an end to use it as a as an easy gentle way to access that side of yourself that I that I believe everyone has in them. So that's that's the way I look at creativity. And a lot of times it's, you know, it's a softer voice, but if we if we take the time to to pay attention and listen to it then and give a chance to grow, it could be very wild, wacky strong, a loud voice, which is what I'm hoping for. What's most adults get wrong about creativity and how do we get back to more of a freer mind more of that loud, crazy wacky mind. Yeah, I think that, oh, I know one thing is that and I fall into this too, is that we sort of equate the cynicism with intelligence, you know, when people are very hard or very critical, we go, that person must know. They must be very smart, and we look down on people who are who love things, or just open or generous with their praise or obsessive about things. And somehow that naievety we associate, you know where we say that's naive or that that person doesn't know enough to be critical and not. I would love to change because I love to change it in myself to of of of holding negatively almost to a higher standard than appreciation. So that can change than that. I think that's a great step in the right direction. The title of the book is. Oh, mistakes. What is your no mistakes philosophy? Well, I think originally from improv which I'm obsessed with, and so an improv when something happens. Wh- what we say is there's no mistakes. You know anything that happens in an improbably because nothing is planned is sort of a great opportunity and so you jump on it almost and it, it's when something goes wrong or somebody slips up, then everyone gets excited and kind of focuses on that miss quote, unquote mistake in order to to make it sometimes the most enjoyable part of the show. And so what I wanted to do is to find a way to look at what I perceived imperfections myself in a different way with that same kind of joy almost of discovery, where does this lead? Because if if I'm so focused on being perfect all the time or or some other person's idea, what perfect is, then I'm shaving off all the sides of myself. That might be interesting or might actually. Lead to a unique voice and myself. So I thought, well, if I feel that way about myself, maybe other people can feel that way about them so to that's that really came across well in the book. And I think, oh good, the readers will definitely have fun with the exercises. How do you feel? Can listeners apply no mistakes to their lives, touched on it. You know a little bit there and moving away from perfectionism and not, and resisting that urge to smooth out our ragged edges. Yeah, I, I love the idea of just journaling and also to if you go through like little exercise that I have in the book of of putting your creativity out in the world in a real way because a lot of time, sometimes we think things to herself. We have these conversations with ourselves and we're like, oh, I could never say that allowed, or I never put that down on paper, but what's fun is to to start putting down in paper, you. Have it be in a physical form and let it exist for a little while and say, well, that is weird. What's weird about it, but what's interesting about it? What do I find what makes me giggle when I look at it, what am I curious about that thing? And to almost like you're following maybe a pass in the Woodland's. They're just kinda keep following by getting see where it leads. 'cause it's probably gonna lead you somewhere unexpected. And that's where your creative voices I think, or your, you know your the way you express your creativity is

Keiko Paula Phelps executive editor Donna Stokes two years
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Hi and welcome to episode one, seventy four of live happy. Now, this is Paula Phelps. Today we're talking with Jonathan rash, author of the happiness curve. Why life gets better after fifty? Yep. You heard that right things start looking up at midlife and Jonathan talks with our own Chris Libby to explain why getting older actually makes us happier. Can you briefly explain for those who don't know what the happiness or the you shape curve is and why you decided to write a book about it? Well, flip the order, if that's alright assure and do why me before what it is because they actually it's a pretty good setup. So I've said, had an incredibly fortunate lice and by around the age of forty, I had so much to be grateful for good health career. My cream, stable relationship, plenty of income, you know, everything was just golden. And yet I felt this encroaching feeling of disappointment, discontent. As if I was trapped in and sailed and I didn't understand it. So I sat down, I started taking an inventory of things to be grateful for that only made it worse by about forty five. I started to feel like I'd never be grateful and satisfied. Again, I just became really pessimistic. I didn't know what was going on because it was irrational and it really very pleasant. It wasn't depression though. It wasn't a mood disorder. It with a contentment disorder also wasn't midlife crisis. So it was midlife is it wasn't that bad. It was more like a kind of constant background, wining of discontent. But it made me like myself less so that drag on for a while. And then in my late forties, basically, coincidentally, I discovered this emerging literature on the happiness curve. It was called coincidentally about the same time about the time I turned fifty. I noticed I was feeling less of this, this content myself, it was starting to turn around. So I looked into the science and wrote a book about it. And what. Finds is very briefly that the aging process all by itself affects how contented we are with with our lives. It's not the only thing going on. That's very important other things matter too. Don't get me wrong, marriage job health, income education, all of that. But the on average, the difference between being h twenty five in being age. Forty, five, for your sense of contentment is about the third about a third of the effect of unemployment, which is pretty big. You notice that if your other things in your life or stable, and I sure did a lot of people notice it and they think there's something wrong with them. And then it turns around after on age fifty on average, and it gets easier instead of harder to be content with life right through the end of life and that you shape that dip in the middle at the happy if you so what are the biggest misconceptions you think that people have about this time in their life when they call it their midlife crisis? Well, there are a bunch, but the biggest is the one in. Lissette in the very term midlife crisis, crisis implies sudden shocking disruptive, abnormal. There's something wrong with you. Emergency response to lot of people implies get a red sports car, throw away your marriage, behaving irresponsible, or any social way. We'll we'll that's just wrong. That rarely happened. The common experience is what happens to me. It's the opposite of that crisis kind of slow grinding long-term Malays. It becomes part of the background of life. However, it can become a crisis. If we make mistakes during this period and that often happens, people throw their careers or marriages away when it's not really what the problem is. The problem is aging, biggest misconception. Afterward is people imagine that after fifty, it's all downhill. The best in life is behind us. We've stopped developing adult will become weak senile and miserable and die. Opposite is true. The emotional peak of. Life is in the sixties seventy. Why is still tricky time the midlife area for high achievers, it's especially tricky for high achievers. Well, the reason doesn't really have to do that much with external accomplishments like having the money and having some status. In fact, it's partly because of things. So best guess about what's going on here is that we're wired to be am Bishop on where young that motivates us. And the lure of the end of the hook is if I accomplished these things that I have in mind, then I'll being credibly fulfilled and happy, but Embiid the trickster. It's always moving the goalposts..

Jonathan rash Chris Libby Paula Phelps mood disorder depression Embiid Bishop
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Science editor Paula Phelps and today on episode one seventy of lip happy. Now we're talking about working out, but it's not the kind of workout you might normally think about. Joe Bates is the author of making your brain home twelve weeks to a smarter you and seems fitting as we go back to school that we're talking about making our brains, work smarter, not harder, Joe looks at how things like exercise nutrition and sleep are necessary for sharper brains. So if you want to start building a better brain, let's hear what Joe has to say about it. Joe, welcome to live happy. Now. I'm really excited to have you on the show today. Thank you so much, whatever Meatball. Can you first of all, tell us what it is that you mean by brain cardio Brian corio straw to grab. Series of mental exercises to try to give the brain a jump, start to recover some of the learning that it's had in the past and they have got forgotten over the years with some this use, and it actually was out, come of writing a book called making your brain, and that is an example of bring cardio. So what, what does bring cardio consist of real? It consists of a series of mental exercises and wrote the book with twelve chapters, addressing twelve different categories of learning. But the term actually has become much broader than that it it's really become more lifestyle. And so the rain exercises challenges the questions problems that I have the book or a part of it, but it is really to try to have someone focus on their abilities improving. Them and really improved their quality of life. And it's important, particularly ama- senior citizen. I'm almost seventy seven in a couple of months, and I just heading renewed interest in things that maybe pushed aside for a while it didn't think could do anymore. I don't talk about cognitively. I know there's some these came to physically anymore, but I'm finding that I could do a lot of things that had forgotten or didn't know. I do like at I'm gonna give you an example playing a musical instrument played sexes phone in high school, and that was over fifty years sixty years ago now and have to pay to instruments, took some lessons and they're playing Alto saxophone for the talent community band. Terrific. I'm. I'm. It is again is fun, and I've really learned a lot that's like learning a new language is it really has challenged me. Yeah. And what's interesting because we hear a lot of talk about how you need to do like a puzzle for your memory or you need it to do just for cognitive reasons, but your brain cardio really takes that much farther and you talk about how bring cardio can increase things like our our energy or emotional wellbeing, our hope. Can you explain how that works? Absolutely. Because when you're thinking clear and you have you know that you can do some things that you didn't, I can could, and it gives a sense of a re focus on purpose in life and what I can do. And we learn that having a dream does not come with an age restriction, and I will say pediatrician for twenty years. And then I did some more training became an. A board certified in pediatrics and board-certified insecurity and done. So contrary to last twenty five years, and I'm now working with veterans. So I am seeing the entire spectrum from children all the way up and I still remember and what a gorgeous thing was to see children who are so in love with the world in world's in love with him into the other sooner of the of the universe. And we lose that enthusiasm and lose some of those dreams as we grow up with all the practical things, and things have happened to everybody grow it up, and it is nice to regain some of those aspirations and realizing that eighty can lead to new fifty in terms of cognitive functioning that we can do things even different. We've done our life and as a senior citizens Rodham m.'s.

Joe Bates Paula Phelps editor Brian corio ama Rodham m. twenty five years twelve weeks twenty years fifty years sixty years
"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"paula phelps" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"In today's world the rules for dating of changed and we'll talk to the woman who has written a new playbook coming up on live happy now ancient greek to find happiness joy you feel moving toward your potential think about popular psychology cheyenne and it actually younger than the internet believe it or not we're all looking for the same thing and that's a way to bring a little bit more joy to our day join us as we look at the many different paths that lead us to that happy play this is live happy now hello and welcome to another edition of the live happy now podcast i'm your host jeff sanders and well thank you for making us part of your day to day also wanna remind you that if you like what you hear on the show and you want to adult little more positivie to your day which i'm sure you do you could do that any time by visiting our website live happy dot com or by picking up the latest issue of live happy magazine at your favorite local newstand or bookstore this week we're talking with ginny tait's a b hey vural therapist and author of the new book how to be single and happy sciencebased strategies for keeping your sanity while looking for a soulmate ginny specializes in offering people proven tools to enhance their life and with our new book she looks at how changing the way you approach the single life can change the way you feel about it live happy science editor paula phelps talk with jenny about her latest book and what it takes to be single and happy in today's world danny welcome to our show today and thank you so much for joining us thank you for having me pine editor crock here we're really glad to have you here to talk about this topic because bean single is is a tough thing in today's world and that search to find lasting love is something that has affected all of us at one point or another might be going on right now and today though it's really a different ballgame then it has been in the past you're a helping people navigate kind of this new world of dating an.

jeff sanders ginny tait jenny editor paula phelps