21 Burst results for "Paul Smith"

"paul smith" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

Leadership Biz Café

13:01 min | 9 months ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

"There's been a growing interest around the USA storytelling in leadership. Over the last few years in fact I've talked about storytelling leadership here on this show. And past episodes and how leaders can utilize this communication tool to increase engagement and productivity amongst their employees however just as we see in TV shows and movies when it comes to the storytelling in leadership. It's important for us to recognize that there's many different types of stories leader should have in their leadership toolkit to help inspire motivate and form and provide guidance and direction to those under their care and to help us better understand what those different types of stories are. Is this episode guest. Paul Smith follow is one of the world's leading experts in business storytelling. In fact Paul has personally interviewed over two hundred fifty CEOS executives leaders and sales people in twenty five countries documenting over two thousand individuals stories there which he's identified the components of effective storytelling.

Paul Mike Vaguely Washington Post Time Forbes Fast Company Ted Different The Wall Street Journal US Army franny New People Bove California officer West Point
Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success

Leadership Biz Café

06:58 min | 9 months ago

Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success

"Hi Paul Welcome to the show. Hey thanks for having me on them. I'm happy to be here so Paul I have to tell you. I was very intrigued by the premise of your book. Which I'm sure comes as no surprise to my listeners. As I've not only used storytelling in some of my episodes to help illustrate an idea or insight but in episode forty six my show. I shared three keys to effective storytelling. And for those interested. I'll be sure to include links to those past episodes in the show notes but in the title of Your Book. You point out how there are in fact ten stories that every leader should be ready to us and tell if they want to be successful so before we explore a few of them a great place to start here would be if you could share a brief overview of what these. Ted Different stories are. Paul Yeah Shera. And I'm certainly not claiming these are the only ten stories in fact I hope I make a point somewhere in there that in fact just the opposite you need a lot more stories in these in an in my previous books. I think I'd covered hundreds of different types of stories That my my goal here was an attempt for people who are just getting started in the storytelling space or wanting to use storytelling You know where should I start? What are the most important ten stories franny leader to tell so? Certainly not the only but I think these are probably a good list of the most important ones So yes for the ten. The first four go together because they're about setting direction for the organization so here those are where we came from. So that's our founding story why we can't stay there so that's a case for change story where we're going which is a vision story and how we're GONNA get there which is a strategy store because strategies about how you're going to get from where you are now to where you want to be so if you can tell those stories well. I think you've got a much better chance of getting the organization to go where you want them to go case the next forego together as well but they're more about who we are as an organization. So that's what we believe. The corporate values story who we serve set a customer story a story about the customer so that everyone at the organization can have a personal visceral understanding of of WHO. You're working for what we do for our customers. So that's a classical sales story or customer success story and then number eight is how we're different from our competitors so I call that a marketing story because marketings generally about differentiating yourself from your competitors and then the that leads to more and they kind of go together as well but there are more personal to you the leader. So that's why I lead the way I do. That's a personal leadership philosophy story and why you should want to work here so like not not you. But whoever you're talking to right so I caught a recruiting story. So you'll notice a number of different kind of functional type stories here but these are definitely not just stories for those functional leaders. I think every leader Regardless of function needs to be able to tell this at least this Saturday ten stories now Paul would like to do is explore a few of these types of stories that you just described of course some of them. I've already explored in past episodes for example episode thirty one which was the first edition of Leadership Espresso shot explored this idea of using stories to communicate a larger vision. So what I'd like to do with you. Today is discussed some of these types of stories that many of us probably haven't even thought about in terms of how we lead and the first one is the story type. You call why I lead the way. I do which is essentially using a story that helps illustrate our leadership philosophy or approach her style now. Unlike a story we create to help us explain the change initiative or an ambitious vision or long-term plan. This one might not seem as a parent in terms of Bove when we needed or even how we use it so when in our work week Paul does this kind of story come into play and how does it help us improve the way we lead. Yeah great question. So this story would be used or not This type of story. I should say because I think most leaders need more than one leadership philosophy story you need at least one but probably several and the most frequent Or commonplace you would use this. Anti uses is when you're on boarding new direct report. Where whether so? That's whether you've got a new employees working for you and you just need to introduce them to your leadership philosophy in your leadership style or you are new. You've taken a new job and then everybody who works for you of course is new to you And those are the situations where you need to set expectations of the organization or the people of what leadership to expect from you and also what kind of leadership you expect from them. And the way I've seen most people do this in the past which is really frustrating as they they have this list you know they they lay on you as if it some profound You know list that says something like my leadership. Philosophy has got a bunch of buzzwords on it and much of bullet points and the kind of thing that most of us could probably say about ourselves or anybody else. I I prefer to focus on. Value added You leadership exercises and I prefer to be disciplined in my approach and in a whatever but it's the kind of thing that anybody could say about themselves. These stories are going to be very unique though. They're basically going to be examples of times in your career where you've either made leadership mistake or or made a great leadership decision or exhibited great leadership behavior or saw someone else exhibit. Great Leadership Behavior or leadership mistake. That just changed your thinking about what great leadership is and made you the leader that you are today. So those types of stories are far more meaningful to people in helping set expectations of what kind of leadership to expect from you and and to give them a concrete idea of what that might look like. It's interesting how as you were just described Paul particularly about how it's clarifying expectations. Both in terms of what we expect from others and what employees should expect from us as it got me thinking about some of the stories. I've shared a pass leaders worked with and how in many ways these stories were a perfect vehicle to illustrate their leadership. Style or philosophy that in sharing this story about how these leaders operated it was as much a teachable lesson on leadership as it was a glimpse into how they viewed leadership and what made them so good about it. Yeah I think so so. You're not only telling them what to expect from you. You're teaching them a leadership lesson Presumably you've the store you choose to share would be an example that would teach somebody a good leadership style right so Yeah it helps them learn how to be a better leader as well

Paul Ted Different Franny Bove
Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success With Paul Smith

Leadership Biz Café

08:16 min | 9 months ago

Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success With Paul Smith

"There's been a growing interest around the USA storytelling in leadership. Over the last few years in fact I've talked about storytelling leadership here on this show. And past episodes and how leaders can utilize this communication tool to increase engagement and productivity amongst their employees however just as we see in TV shows and movies when it comes to the storytelling in leadership. It's important for us to recognize that there's many different types of stories leader should have in their leadership toolkit to help inspire motivate and form and provide guidance and direction to those under their care and to help us better understand what those different types of stories are. Is this episode guest. Paul Smith follow is one of the world's leading experts in business storytelling. In fact Paul has personally interviewed over two hundred fifty CEOS executives leaders and sales people in twenty five countries documenting over two thousand individuals stories there which he's identified the components of effective storytelling.

Paul Smith USA
"paul smith" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

12:18 min | 1 year ago

"paul smith" Discussed on WRVA

"You along with remote viewer Paul Smith Paul Ingle swan invited you to examine the dark side of the moon tell me what that was how how that originated and then what finally happened it was really pretty interesting in fact I was hoping we talk about this tonight the see my desk is just covered with papers I bet I'm remote viewing and I can see him everywhere there you go but mother when you have a hole in your left sock how may soon as hope you would figure this out yeah I tell people my desk looks like an explosion and a paper factory anyway so who yeah I back in nineteen ninety four angle do you recall any says I'd like you to do a project for me of course you know you have to be blind isn't tell me what the project was an and sometime later I got a cordon it from him it was a kind of a weird cornice because it doesn't look like your standard you know space cornet it was so it is a remote viewing and turns out he had me remote viewing the far side of the moon is a project that Ingle was working on the asked me to work on it and another guy who who I can't toast only ms is first name is Richard N. engl call this project moon drop this was his project well sort of he'd gotten he gotten some if he actually had been ask someone to do this but it wasn't a tasking or anything in in hiring but somebody who is in a position to know about some anomalies on the moon given some photos and and talk to about it and suggested you do a project on Ansel's included that because we worked on it and apparently there's there were some photos those five moon the dark side that we're really odd and the did they give us a call with only of features or something like that right and we're talking about now so people who call Matt and sold they didn't know what they were so the this one person or maybe is a couple of them figured Ingle might you know with remote viewing might be able to give some information this course in the fall one this was in nineteen ninety four back in nineteen eighty four in going actually done a project he brought in for other viewers and it was a observed by the by the currently the dean of the remote viewing community Stanley crypt occurrences wife doctor Janet Mitchell whose prominent in the early research willingness one where he and he in these I'm sorry I got I got the computers that was it earlier project it is against bars I may have to tell you about that but but the service were an eagle as Wilson for other people to remote view and they essentially a dress to the the famous GPL photographs of Mars in which there appear to be artifacts and structures and things on the surface of the planet use the same ones that Richard Hoagland made famous so go so that was actually that was in the you're probably familiar with his book penetration the one well yeah just mention that you mentioned earlier that's right so so there was a chapter that was originally meant to go with the penetration of belt this Mars project and I've mentioned here but it but for some reason ingo does not put it in there and it was recently found after he died is his family was going through all of this the papers and fell this chapter will there's a new addition of penetration out in which that chapter on Mars is in there along with the disk discussion of Stanley triggers Roland earlier project he's paying a debt and talk me public near our home is Ingle regarding his best ever student I wish I could have that on her but I don't Tom was a better student of me I guess anyway Talbot near about this parsing so what happened there is there the GPO photos and they were both viewed that and produce some interesting results this was a similar kind of a deal were you barely had photos of these not apparently because I have one of them actually have photos of anomalies on the far side of the moon and so we got together small team of himself and me and this guy named Richard to remote view it and there were some really bizarre things that came out of that again you know I don't roll they looked on officials in but not just with artificial there was read you something here in a minute that one of my sessions I I can't tell you a lot about this project because I don't have permission I can talk about the stuff I did that I got from it but I can't tell you much more about what in your Richard did or or is it the thing in all of the background because it's it I don't know that and I'd have to get permission for the family to to talk about it but I can tell you what I did so is there a bunch of there were a lot of really interesting correspondences between my sessions and ingo sessions and but worse such sessions that we worked independently not having any connection with each other we worked those and then later on the use of those folks copies of each other's work and looking through there it's just amazing some of the similarities between them sketches were some were interpretations are similar I kind of thing so what I got out of it was a so all of us like I can say this much I think all of us described a a large underground cavern that had been partially it partially natural in on the surface of the earth needed to sort of the axis will service moon but it was under the moon surface part was national but as had been developed and and and modified by apparently some intelligence entity someone you know intelligent interests are what I want from people because we are what they are hi this is so some kind of life for some kind of life for the year and the so let's see how I'm trying to find a girl the electricity to all these I mean did you see like tall structures and things like that when you do those are the ones I got were subterranean subterranean really is so I know are thinking penetration he talked about some skyscraper type building standing here and there I didn't pick up on any of that and neither do they in their sessions so it may be that there are different places that you know that he he he research store looked if you will I don't know but this one so there's a sub sub Sheila subterranean actual refers to below the surface of the earth right so so blue and sub sub lunarian I don't know so polluter space was actually occupied in my session infected if I can I can reach you very shortly for my summary if your game okay adviser I am Christian of the huge dark cavern under the base of the towering sharp cliff this dark we searched recess is not empty there is a sense of an object presence being back inside it sporadically moves closer to the entrance and receipts back deeper it seems at one of the same time to be essentially machine like but yet where in some way which you know that makes me think maybe some kind of artificial intelligence yes very high intellicast it seems like it knew I was there and wasn't happy that I was there he has a remote viewer yeah its sense your remote viewing that's interesting there was interest in you know I generally people make claims of being detected as a site with the remote viewing and I I'm skeptical about that but I seem to have that kind of an experience I have been through the stuff in years and and it's very interesting so a going to talk about that but there's a there's one other one I wanted to address I am certainly surprised and startled by an object that sales out of the cave passing close over my head then climbing at an angle up into the sky moving rapidly without sound courses in airless surface tional moon does Eminem sphere so wouldn't do it with it would be without sound dragon shuttle on the ground along behind it and as it passes it emanates a sense of aggravation and annoyances is disturbed and put out by my own welcome visits so fascinating this is it will this is very interesting to go back and revisit this after after all these years and see the experiences I'm having here again I can't tell you how how real it is I don't know if it's true but I'll tell you what if it is true and and this is not something I would call I consciously made up I mean I just in center and think what kind of a wild story to tell I was doing the session in this stuff just came into my mind again you don't think you just go with water what is this so you know I I I don't I once he was the greatest greatest fault but I also don't want to dismiss it because I think it seems that there might be something to this right any idea who constructed this tunnel you know and and you know we I did I think three sessions on this it was mostly exploratory so we didn't get into those deep questions in go in his final communication to me says of your your sessions of the I've sent you the ones from myself and from there we go that works at and on a and I think that we've had some real success here and I anticipate that this will go this project will last for at least a year and perhaps even with some funding he said for the most the coming less than coming from some some place with deep pockets right now I never we never did any more on that so apparently what he was hoping to achieve didn't occur but it would have been very interested to see where this would be gone had we really indeed have a year to spend on it and then collected a lot more information on on these particular targets all told me how this my tie in to the question of the tease and the fact that the something could be there well the fact is if it turns out to be true and it got I guess the really the only way to know is actually goes to go and then we got a hope they tell us it yet so there's two questions that we have to go there then they have to be open to it right up although in the meantime maybe one day answer ET's will be answered it will be solved law because otherwise who knows but yeah so obviously these things are real it was they were not created by humans they obviously early spike earthly human rights so it's not like we were there two million years ago or something no it well you know what it is I guess is logically possible occurred because of that the case but the odds of a that being the case are pretty darn slim I think you agree that yes that humans from earth were there two million years ago part pretty slim pretty slim chance but unless we have high tech society that got blown up or destroyed or something who knows yes of course that's that's a favorite theme in science fiction is that there were advanced civilizations on earth and then there were cataclysm sore or or they killed each other off or something and we start over from scratch you know every every you know fifty thousand years you would start over again because the near the White themselves that or something right but and you can't rule it out who knows right now no skeptic it's a yes you can rule it out also in the camp we don't know enough about the.

Paul Smith Paul Ingle
School bus driver fired after videoing students

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

School bus driver fired after videoing students

"School bus driver in Rockwall is accused of taking improper video of kids on his bus forty three year old Michael Paul Smith has been arrested on a charge of invasive visual recording and Rockwall police obtained a warrant to search his home he drove a school bus for the rock wall I. S. D. that took kids to Springer elementary school and middle school the district got a complaint that he was using his cellphone to record video of kids getting on and off the bus and notified police detective say they checked the surveillance camera video from the bus as part of their investigation the rock wall I. S. D. has sent a letter to parents saying that Smith has been fired Stephen Pickering news radio ten eighty

Rockwall Michael Paul Smith Springer Elementary School S. D. Stephen Pickering
"paul smith" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"paul smith" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"Name Paul Smith a one is number above the ring what was the make of the car all right what year was a dollar ninety two fifty eight harder than that brother I think it's dead man stop when the star yeah there you go are we full of ourselves actually thinking that worthy there are other people that are interested in it in a demo that was cut twenty years ago for me motorsportstalk America the speed free candy it's become comedy now so that that's not being full of ourselves as just entertaining the public so they can laugh their **** off at us that may go ahead it's called content doesn't have to be good or bad it's just content it is keep the commercials from bumping into each other the act Paul Goldschmidt yeah well that name out in nineteen ninety nine I don't have the the idea of probably had it written down somewhere who the heck knows trust me the whole thing was scripted yes this double was scripted the staff managing one forgot about that yeah we've never done a scripted show up for their rights resisting was great not necessarily all of our reactions but like that tribute with step a look at a poll we pull back the curtain for nineteen years but I don't know how many versions of this demo that we did that man it's just the same okay facts that man do you remember this you got a question yeah I have a question before I go I'd like to stop with that man if it's a no way no way all right let's hear it bring your best shot okay who who were the two.

Paul Smith America Paul Goldschmidt nineteen years twenty years
"paul smith" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on KTRH

"You, you know, in in particular. He's been on the show several times, I've been to some of his events and conferences, I I'm fascinated with the way he's trying to communicate with the other side. Yeah. He's doing some fascinating work with medium ship that I think is really a cutting edge sharia, you know, that. You know, the, you know again. I think that's I I've sort of gone into the realm of remote viewing for similar reasons is traditional remote viewing or or something different. Absolutely. I learned controlled remote viewing from the military remote viewers from Paul Smith and lend Buchanan good people learned their protocol. Taught numerous men in prison to remote, view, and remote viewing. I know doesn't it to me. It's exact same processes, medium ships. What we learn is that this world is based on information, and we can access that information. If we can get our ego out of the way, if we can find that source of wisdom within us. We see it, of course, at the point of dying. Because obviously our ego is gone as part of dying. And then what's leftover, you know, as a child is a young girl once told me she said, but some part of me was still alive. And then that part CS what the universe is really like, you know, I just love the way children. Explain it. He told me of his experience of this young man who survived cardiac arrest, he said, it was a real Dr Morris. It was really or than real is is a childrens d e different than in adults or the hit is different. Yes, they're very simple. They're very brief. And they're very powerful. And they don't have you know, they don't go into the tremendous detail that adults have they, you know. The child realize what it is. And that's the fun part about having actually been able to interview these children myself, George is because a lot of times they don't in that to me really creates. You know, the validates the experience, for example, one girl. She suffered a liver failure. Oh, jeez. And I had to put a needle in her heart to resuscitate or so that's near death. And her brain is not functioning at all, you know, going back to your earlier question about whether this could be an experience of of a dying brain by this point, her her brain is not functioning. And but she was successfully resuscitate it. And afterwards. She tells me the for grandmother was there, and she looks at me. And she goes I was just so shocked to see her. She said it was so weird. She was sitting there. I was you know in the bed, and she was smiling at me, and she was surrounded by this light. And then she says to me. And then I was back. And I said, well, what do you mean that you were back and she clinches for fist together. And she goes that's what I'm trying to figure out. So so they have that sort of, you know, the innocence of it, you know, that it's very unexpected to them. Melvin what do you think the dying process is? Anyway, I think that the near death experience is the dying process. I think that, you know, like, well, you know, Raymond has told me many times, Raymond moody that he wished that he had never called it the near death experience. But he did he coined the phrase stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. Melvin then we'll come back and talk more in then we'll take phone calls next hour. Never miss a detail on a show or a guest. Sign up for the coast Zoete mail newsletter. Available for.

Raymond moody George Melvin Zoete Paul Smith Buchanan Dr Morris
"paul smith" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

"All right. I'm gonna try this. This is really good. Yeah. I do. To try guy. Harry. Just give us, you know pitcher. I liked the bonus. Fanfare. The biscuit crumb business. Great option. Eating efforts. Right. Oh, it's very sophisticated. Investors digest is with chocolate him. Well, you put the chocolate. Yeah. You melt jock droplet? Good. What would be your loss suffer? Have you? Also, Ospital batali speedometer me say, yeah. No. But you're allowed to start her in a while. I love the sage though, so much. I think Seiji so should nice thing yet kissed probably have a punter Ella. Is it put the, you know, the veggie the talian solid punter rela anyway. Leave. Just of that with some olive. All bitter, Sal, Mark on then pudding early. Maybe one of those Northey Portuguese coasted. Oh. Chilly. Go born road. Yeah. I haven't actually have on go on. We've got to put case played. That's the lightest last supper that we've ever had own. Yeah. You knew you wanted strike them light swifty longer lay. Really? Yeah. Bit mushy. Now, if you're not very, well is your last supper are you thinking? Okay. So you're think if you're not very well. We sometimes we pitch it as you're going to desert island gripe. Nobody's really gonna share. If you've got Bevan glow. My wife am closures. Do you like do you take part in your parents every day or do you ever have a daily jogging bottoms on a pretty male Paul Smith trying a new job really knew? New this hour shoot every day..

Bevan glow Ospital batali Seiji Paul Smith Harry Ella
"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

Mad Influence

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

"I don't not hundreds at all. I don't have a computer don't have a an E Email tool. But of course, the trivia around me. Yeah. The company's completely modern in every whatever the words how high tech the hub of activity when you go there, and you're literally running around from one literally running. Yeah. What was just under two hundred dollars in the building where I work. And so the communications wonderful because we're all in one building so often the best the best ideas. Come when you going to make up to you go to the loo or something, you know, what about a few more things about your about your biding influences. What when you think about you know, you did something for the BBC on desert island music. And I don't know if it's changed since then. But what is what are the things that you just keep? Coming back to his inspirations. Sometimes words, you know, people like because I'm older guy. You know, so people either Morrison the way he puts words together or Bob Dylan. The things like that. You know, somebody like van Morrison astral weeks album is taking me around the world on my own so many times and. Yeah. Yeah. But you'd listen to a lot of new stuff to you. I know you're always keeping up with stuff. Yeah. Yeah. Well, we just loads of loads of abandons and work with a lot of young actors and actresses and an a lot a lot of musicians luminaires from here in America. They they they like, you know, where a lot of Portsmouth and Jake Bergen English lied, and yes, lots of bans that and then the more mature ones like, you know, we you to in this week. They were in because they were playing in concepts. I. You know, they they get some clothes this week. And then we had you know, the Racine cyclists. Jaren Thomas who won the tour de France. He was in yesterday. Cool. Yeah. So you see very very, you know, you always have tons of visitors. Right. Yeah. Really a lot. Yeah. And then do you what about movies are there any abiding like the stuff that that you continually either are influenced by or or say, I just can't get over how it was made. Well, I'm good pile of Daniel day Lewis. I've known him for many many years, and so all of his movies really interesting because well for me, they're interesting because I was blessed with being with him when he was preparing your lots of them. And each is he's a method either. So we he sort of lives the part and some of those sensational, including phantom threat. Yes, what he worked in our studio for for a week. And then where we do the custom do best boat. So he worked with the. Boys. Do the cutting for a week. But then you ask a ton of questions or was he just an observer? Yes, logic questions over time. We go back a long time. I I've known him for really long to him. And so six review in I think early eighties or something. Yeah. Yeah. Was that my beautiful under it even back then? Yeah. Well hundred Karachi wrote laundrette Stephen Frears direct directed and on your was in and they're all make some I so. Yeah. So they invited us both to hunt if yesterday because his two sons twenty five yesterday, so they just he's just some of your picture of them because I'd forgotten that when when he's hundred crushes Sandra born, the twins are did teasha with a picture of the kids on the teasha. And he's just framed it for them yesterday. And of course, we we will good make David Bowie. Yeah. And and we had supper with with Hanif and David one night, and we'll just leave the restaurant, and it was on the first floor this restaurant, and as we always with Pauline. And as we walked down stairs, David Bowie. Started seeing the party's over. We can call it a day. And I was like, no, that's David Bowie. Seeing you to pull it in. Special. I always thought he was the perfect embodiment of of your spirit because he's he's not he wasn't a assuming he wasn't an ego. He was also just pro any came to the to my room where you've been, you know, with which is full of all this stuff. He just couldn't stop asking questions, which that from ways that from what's that book about where did you get that from he's got this lovely lovely curious mind, all the time, you really wouldn't still busking what's that about?.

David Bowie Jaren Thomas Stephen Frears van Morrison Daniel day Lewis Bob Dylan BBC America Racine Jake Bergen Portsmouth Karachi Hanif Pauline two hundred dollars
"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

Mad Influence

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

"It walks a fine line between maximalism and hoarding. Parts of it looked like an outsider art exhibition. But is so cool. It's full of all these things that people have sent you in the mail Karez one. Do that has sent you all these things like chairs with stamps on it or or boards, and you know, amazing things like a chair or a ski. But they're never in a box the stamps are actually only actual article. And it's amazing service. Still still somehow gets. Yeah. I know so watch the joy of it. Honestly is the joy of it is there's no demand into in the greedy road and this world where everything so. Well, what you want? You know, what's this about, you know, there's no it's not about anything. He's just about doing something that's interesting or special. So that these absolutely correct. I mean, I don't I'm not sure where the listeners know who determines is. Or if John portion is but data Rum's is like the the purest minimalist designer of clocks and Graham rom. Yeah. I did Brown. Yeah. Well, and then John Paulson who's architect whose designs the most minimal spaces you could ever see they've both been to my room, neither of them had a heart attack miracle are they I think they were they use. Oh, this is interesting. Being polite. Other rooms are are actually surprisingly stark you'll have a room that only has like a chair. And I mean, we've got a four five whole building in. I'm on the top floor, and my room is absolutely full of things. But a lot of the things are sent by fans around the world where she's incredibly humbling lovely and special, but it's also a sort of a window into that you can be inspired by everything because stuff, I know, you go to vintage markets portabella road, all that stuff and are constantly finding stuff that that stuff always finds its way into. Right. Yeah. I mean, there's one man who's been sending me. A gift from Japan muchly, little rabbits, because you know, the story I read it. We're good luck for me. And now, I get a very large quantity of them. All the time. I should've said diamonds, obviously, I said of it. So stupid. In what he's listening. I really love diamonds. I collect jokey. But this guy sends me a gay from once a year, and they're all wrapped in that. Beautiful way. The Japanese rap. Fabric. Not the mother top. They just sits on my, you know, my table. And when you look at the pattern of of each one and the patent next to the patent and the patent next to the patent of the color next to that. Yeah. And then immediately you look that could be amazing trouser, and that could be an amazing shirt put them together at even more. Interesting fantastic. So. A lot of people look at their room. Maybe I don't know. I've never had this set to me. But I think they look at it and say, oh, it's hoarding or it's childish or something. But for me my opinion is childlike because on the difference is huge. About childlike entire enormous. Because you know, it was Picasso said. For instance, he's at yeah. Spent my life life still wanting to paint like a child because children not cluttered with education or with experience. They're still very honest and open, you know. If you ask them to draw a cat. They would just do to pointed things at the top around face in some whiskers, and it would be a cat. Yeah. Sure. It would be a calm, you know. And so sometimes when I look in my room. I just think why why did. And what do you design that, you know? And then you start thinking, well, actually, it just feel amazing in your hand all the colors together a fantastic. So. A lot of people much junk in ice his total inspiration. You also you don't use a computer and Donald desk. Now what's up with that? Is that I have a still which I've never sought that. Right. Yeah. Well, I've don't doing badly today. Babysat scotch tape to my legs to the chair. You don't need you don't need technology. Now. I mean, I have the iphone which I take pictures with much days. And obviously, I've got a few powers a text to..

John Paulson Picasso Japan data Rum Brown Donald desk Graham
"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

Mad Influence

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

"Well, the thing is I had the strong connection with with France. And and a lot of the architecture is really amazing with an auto decker influence sometimes. So if you walk along a street in Hanoi, you look up the architectures fantastic. You look on the ground floor is absolutely mad plastic fronted fruit shop souvenir shop, and it's hideous and kitsch. But I mean that goes back to influence again. So you could have the much beautiful cashmere suit in navy blue. But with a really kick shirt, so you know, like, a Hawaiian shirt and some tennis shoe. So again that could be it could be an influence by just observing something really bad taste with something. Beautiful. You know? Well, there's a there's a moment in that documentary where you like go, you go to some arcade or some it's like a carnival. And you're just like there's so many. Shirts so many designs here. Yeah. And it's a little kitschy, right? Yeah. Well, I've always loved kitsch in moderation. You know, where where you can just put. I mean, we work a lot on the word irreverence. Right. So just putting things together that you shouldn't really put together, and my my there's a suit to mine in the Victorian museum in London from AT to and it's a pinch Dr classic fabric. You know, the the financials used to wear in London in the sixties and fifties, but it's huge ape a bit like the crazy suit that David Byrne will Teleki Aquinas, not extremism, but outside really outside. But with a white t shirt and a pair of tennis shoes. Now nowadays, you say so what? But in eight hundred two was really interesting and different because it was a classic fabric. But in a big shape and then warm with tennis shoes and white teeth. Shirt sure is playing with opposites, and I just wish people would be would have more self expression. And they don't because the the too nervous about peer pressure. And what people think think of them, you know? So there's a lot less adventurous as they should be. Maybe you mentioned in the book, you can find inspiration and everything that you you present someone these ideas in hopes that younger designers will move away from what you call the disease of copying. Wh what did you mean by that? And how does it manifest itself? Well, yeah, I mean, the problem is that the the the world is moving so fast, and there's such a need to take money, especially if you're working for a company the that publicly quoted on the stock market, so the shareholders or would like more more more we need more profit. We need prophet so often you just turn to the lowest common denominator. You know? You just go like, for instance. Logo at the moment. Everything's you. You spend a lot of money on promotion, you get celebrity designer fashion show somewhere in the world, which is probably quite extreme. And then you put the name should be called mushrooms. Like a mantra, you know, it's like is the name over and over and over and over and over and just just a cop-out released. Just a fast bulk, you know, but I totally understand. Why people do it? It's just a bit disappointed. Really? So you you just would hope that when you the young designers would just try to be a bit more creative in their own rights boulder. I always think that designers are the have the most, and I'm talking about high fashion in a big house designers have the most stressful creative careers of all because they have to produce something that's supposedly artful and commercial again. And again, and again and as soon as they do. I mean, we've seen sadly how many people have fallen by the wayside. You know? We've we've seen LeBron Queen. Yeah. Took his own life. And we've seen the stress of Galliano we've and then we've seen so many of the design is move houses because the pressure from the CEO or whatever it is. You know? Wanting wanting more not being satisfied, we what the design is giving. So the pressure is enormous. And of course, the other thing is is used to be just two seasons. We used to sell some are springing Simone autumn winter now, it's holiday and pray, and you know, for we do fork lection year, but many the Browns due sakes, and then a lot of the fast fashion. Guys, do literally twelve one month, you know..

tennis London Hanoi France navy Browns AT Victorian museum Galliano Wh LeBron Queen CEO David Byrne Teleki Aquinas twelve one month
"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

Mad Influence

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

"Season. By celebrate life's memorable moments. I want to ask actually about the sort of ambitions of your aesthetic has I I do when I look back at it. I could see that you did have an influence in early influence in sort of feminizing. What would what one would think of as menswear definitely prints and things like that that I think in a lot of ways men are just now coming around to do did you see sixty seven. Well, when I my first shot that was seventy nine hundred seventy and what was interesting about those sixties is that really a lot of men were really finding themselves for the first time because in London, especially it was no sorry in the north of England, especially who is considerably feminine. If you even cared. How you looked if you did touch? Everybody's like what are you doing? You know, you'd have to be a lot more masculine because a lot of the trade were coal mining and things like, right? And and so eventually when. After the horror of war second generation after the war. Suddenly people started to be able to just be more self expressive. You know, they could just do their own thing. Bit graphic design music. Of course, the stones in sixty two with long hair, the Beatles. And then there was a whole Dundee sec in London, and there were mostly really upper-class guys. And they were making things out of the grandmas curtains like velvet, curtains and aid make Jackie to all the make. You know, a shirt Apsar some dress material or something like that. So it was as you say it was just a really big change in. And obviously, Mick Jagger in performance a lot later, you know, the movie and being blurt blurring the lines between gender, correct? Yeah. Yeah. I mean. Yes. I mean, myself, I did have a very feminine looker the time, you know, scarves, and flower show, long hair tight trousers, did you when did you start doing the kind of like a hidden secrets that are always in your clothes, just like linings with just you know, you look sometimes like a traditional suit, and then you look inside. And there's a go go girl inside or or bright pink or something. Yeah. That well that was when I started designing the clothes myself and early eighties. When polling was designing the first two or three Portsmouth collection. We've.

Mick Jagger London Portsmouth collection England Jackie Dundee
"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

Mad Influence

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

"And then when I was I think was about when I was about eighteen or nineteen I made made a pair of trousers for Jimmy page from the plane. Tell you. It's good because he he was only twenty four inch waist. I hardly used any fabrics. That was really good. I wanted to know first about when you did you opened up a shop in your town like nineteen seventy which is just like hard to hard to picture. You're you're all of like twenty four twenty four and a bit of a dandy very much, long hair and velvet jacket flowery shirts. The wonderful thing about England at that point around sixty six to seventy was self-expression through how you looked in sixty eight in Paris was the Paris riots with the students, and that was very physical very anger burning cars and manifestations. So they're self expression came through. Kind of rage. Yes. So it's just. Doing brute mo- brutal things whereas in England, you know, we we would just dressing silly. And he was self expression through you know, just looking differently. I think that was it was really creative time. So you started you and Pauline started designing your own clothes. Yeah. Because we studied sure fashion so that's really how to make clothes importance of making the beautifully. And then my wife, she then taught me literally home how to cope patterns, and we had machine home, and how to make things I mean, that's the original DIY. Yeah. Really was. And I used to work doing lots of freelance jobs. I could take photographs I worked for magazines like the face and arena as a photographer. I worked as a stylist. Worked as freelance designers for for talent company. So all that was really learning my trade, really. But the fantastic things was you could see a really good band that went on to be enormous bonds above a pub or in a very small venue. So I mean, I saw that playing, you know, just just, you know, small pub a in north London and the stones and how did you come to know Bowie? Well, from the age eighteen I used to go to bans I used to go to from Nottingham to London every Friday. And so you after Gino, I'd I'd I learnt to sell screen print, and I used to print few t shirts have them in my bag, and sawed Goto the gigs. And then if I was lucky to meet the band afterwards because there was no changing room. So the bunch just stopped. And then there was there would just get in the van and go. So i'd. Go up and say already the new album this and occasionally though, which I what do you do? And I I'm a designed to join a by teasha so busy. So basically, you're selling merch all Smith selling merch to Led Zeppelin. Yeah. And yeah. Show people Eric Clapton Jimmy and roadster in those early days when he was really amazing long. John Baudry wish wish us the name of the Bundy sang for and then eventually I started to I worked for this company in London made clothes for Rockstars. And saw got to know more of the Rockstars then. And then eventually, I my my London show in seventy nine and then one day. My little studio was upstairs and one day. There was a phone call saying a bit chaotic outside because David Bowie's just come in. And there were about six hundred fans at seen him come in. And I went down say Hello. And eventually, we just became friends. I invited him up to my room, which I think you've been to my crazy room with all books and want to talk about that crazy. Hey, I want to take a quick break here to thank moesha. And luckily, there's some great synchronicity here because mad influence features the personalities and performers who shape our culture focusing on moments that have mattered most to them we explore the artistic breakthroughs, the heart one discoveries that have helped forge legacies and define careers stuff. In other words that were celebrating. So it's fitting that the season of Madden influence is presented by moesha who had stood for celebrations for over two hundred seventy five years as we examine the ingredients of some pretty unforgettable creative. Careers grateful for the support of the world's most love champagne for their encouragement to usher in the holiday.

David Bowie Eric Clapton Jimmy London England moesha Pauline Paris Nottingham Gino John Baudry Smith Bundy one day two hundred seventy five years twenty four inch
"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

Mad Influence

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Mad Influence

"Can go you go. Now, see you buy. So look I wanna I wanna go back. I I want to start with how you broke into the fashion world because you you really fell into it accidentally. Yeah. Yeah. And so I feel of interest bicycling you wanted to be a professional bicyclist. Yep. You're quite serious about it. And then you had a horrific accident. That's true. Yeah. That day. Well, twat each twelve to eighteen hours, a bike, rider and foolishly. I thought I could be a professional. I never would have made it because I wasn't brave Adolfo good enough. But hey, you know, dreams, right? And then I literally fell into fashion after a call or an I met the call one. I was in hospital for three months. So then a couple of the guys that were in the hospital at the same time as me one had a motorbike accident on a car accident and we used to search. We were all locked in twelve badges with traction and all sorts of things we call each other across the world. And we'll we'll let out at the same time prison. Now, we all were released from hospital the same time. So one of them said, oh, why don't we just meet up keep in touch? And luckily for me, one of the guys chose a pub in my hometown where the students went and slowly meeting few times talking to other people in the problem be talking to you. Oh, what did you do? I'm an architect you student. I'm a fashion student on a graphic design student and this world opened up to me. But it's interesting because immediately from that from that first time when you you're you know, you encounter that world. It's. Eclectic. It's designers artists. Right. Yeah. It was in hindsight. My father had a really lovely personality. Very charismatic. And so hopefully, I inherited a bit of his communication skills. And then he was an issue for toga. So from the age of eleven I'd bought he bought me a camera so start to take photographs and it was quite interesting. Those days when we'd take pictures now, it's normally with our iphone, and you just take twenty peaches and Dealey nineteen. But then when you it was with film, and you were looking through the tiny view-finder, they called it, and you had to really set up the picture, you know, with your eyes, and that really taught me to look and see and to really understand about what it was looking at were you drawn into this is the late sixties early seventies. Where you drawn into the like swinging London Carnaby. Street scene at all the actually I was very much part of that whole London scene and mazing amazing clubs and gigs. And you know, show patchy Smith when she first came to England in seventy two and the doors and Pink Floyd..

Adolfo London Dealey Pink Floyd Smith England eighteen hours three months
"paul smith" Discussed on The TalentGrow Show

The TalentGrow Show

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on The TalentGrow Show

"Well, you've made to the end of the podcasts club as David burqas might former guest described it. So I'm glad that you're still here with me and I have that you enjoyed this episode with Paul Smith and that you'll take that action that he suggests and think about it. Like you're going to study how to play a musical instrument. You wouldn't expect to just be good at it and simply you wouldn't think that year is born knowing how to do it or not. But it is something that you need to practice in a purposeful in mindful way, like any other skill. So I hope that you'll pursue storytelling as a leadership skill. That's what have been trying to bring to here in this episode and also an episode ninety one that was with Ryan Williams also about storytelling, which I hope that you'll check out if you haven't already, and I look forward to hearing your feedback about what you like about this episode, what you thought about it, any kind of stories you can share with me about times when you've used story successfully or any questions that you have. Me and or for all that would be great. You can put that in the show notes, comments, page on telling dot com. Over on this episodes page or you can tweet at me or send me a message through any form of social media. You know that I hang out there and of course you know that I've got that little voice mail tab on my website on the right that you can easily send me a voice recording of you telling me a comment, giving me feedback or asking a question, and if you give me permission, I can even play it on the air. So let's do it. Well, that's it for another episode of the talent grow show. I'm Halley as lie your leadership development strategist here at talent grow and until the next time make today. Great. Thanks for listening to the talent grow show where we help you develop your talent to become the kind of leader that people want to follow for more information, visit talent, grow dot com.

Ryan Williams David burqas Paul Smith Halley
"paul smith" Discussed on The TalentGrow Show

The TalentGrow Show

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on The TalentGrow Show

"Your leadership communication and people skills to the next level and become the kind of leader people want to follow. And now your host and leadership development strategists Elali Zula welcome back to the talent grow. Show this Elliot's ally. Here, your host at talent grow, and I'm looking forward to sharing today's guests with you. He is an expert on storytelling and I know that that's a topic that we've covered recently and it's something that's coming up so much that I thought I'd bring you another angle to this idea. So Paul Smith is our guest and with him we talk about why you should think about storytelling as a key and powerful business tool. We talk about how to avoid being manipulative, and he was storytelling only for things that create a positive, a win, win out. Come, not something that actually takes advantage of people, and he talks about how to tap into emotions without crossing over that potentially very fuzzy line. And he even shares with us the structure of a great story with eight questions that you need to ask yourself in order to build a story that will be affective as a leader. So I hope that you'll enjoy this episode. I would love your feedback afterwards in the comments section of the show notes page. Without further ado here we go with Paul Smith. Okay. Talented growers I am here with Paul Smith. He is former director of consumer and communications research at Proctor and gamble..

Paul Smith Elali Zula Elliot Proctor
"paul smith" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"May I sold all my electrics used to have like five or six electrics I sold all of them because I just wasn't playing them anymore. But I not a month goes by that. I don't contemplate buying another one and you know Jack Baru he's sitting on like one hundred guitars right now. Oh, really? Yeah. So at any time literally anytime I want I could I could relieve him of one for the friend, the friend price and he's he, he he text me pictures of these crazy custom shop. PR SS that I love. Oh, I love PR s I don't know why, but I just I love them. Yeah, I I had a pure s years ago and I just didn't bond with it. I that's I. That's a fair. There's a PR s is you know, whereas a Taylor or not, it's air like offender and A Gibson is like the Ferrari in the Lamborghini and a Taylor is the McLaren. You know what I mean? It's a little less septic. A little could be a little antiseptic, but. But you know it, but beyond reproach in terms of how they're made and how they sound and all that they're, they're, they're, they're assembled in and built with with exquisite care. When I was at Fender Paul Smith would call one of my colleagues fairly often, just shoot the shit and they were going through rough batch financially when I was at Fender, and they started talking about Fender absorbing read Smith and he decided not to, which was very smart because it turns out it turned out. Okay for them, didn't it? It did doing well. Now, financially, it seems like I mean, they're making ATar. I have no inside information, but I, I think so, yeah. But you know, Fender had a pretty poor track record on on acquisitions and and squandering egress..

Fender Jack Baru Paul Smith Taylor McLaren
"paul smith" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on WRVA

"Other side and just an energetic and that's fine but if they're having trouble with that or if the person is longing too much for them from the other side i actually experienced this spirit guides to step between me and the animal when i'm trying to talk to them and say you know you have to wait you have to wait until they're ready because you don't get to interfere with their process of adjusting which i actually think it's kinda cool i'm glad they do that for them yeah i think that's that's cool too well i've never heard anything like that so i mean it's you know that's just got to be i wanna be able to do this is this something i know that with remote viewing i can go and learn from some of the people i've learned from when buchanan laurie williams mardi rosenblatt you know paul smith all these different people that we all know that have all been on coast to coast by the way right and dame's right he's always here as well and everybody with remote viewing and so how do we learn to do this because i know you've mentioned that a few times don't you think we have to have that talent at least in maybe develop it like you have or just out of the blue like right now i could start learning possibly to do it you actually okay so we're going to say you specifically you connie as the general you right okay okay because you've gone through remote viewing training so you understand how to access things from outside of your own thought process right about being open to messages coming to you and going to get information you absolutely could just start doing this right now i really believe that and other people can totally do this i mean i happen to think that this is sort of like our birthright i was talking to someone about a week ago and he brought up the idea which i totally agree with but he said it to me i was that before humanoids were verbal before we had a code fide verbal language we were certainly communicating with each other this way already and probably communing with animals this way i mean the meeting with the animals is even easier than doing it with people and so it's sort of encoded in us i think.

laurie williams paul smith dame buchanan mardi rosenblatt connie
Myanmar policeman testifies arrested reporters were set up

Global News Podcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Myanmar policeman testifies arrested reporters were set up

"It's typically used for hunting wildfowl professor paul smith is the director of the oxford museum of natural history surprise was an understatement really metal within cds scanners causes all sorts of problems and so when we found all these lead pellets so first of all the instinct was what's going wrong with the scan but then we suddenly realized they were all the same shape they're all the same size and we extract some pellets and it's a shotgun blast to the back of the head until now historians believed the flightless creature had been kept alive in seventeenth century london tone house and died of disease or illtreatment so this is a pretty big development tests are still going on scientists think they can figure out in which country the lead pellets were made interest in the dodo at least in the oxford dodo remains very much alive jonathan savage reporting now if you missed any of the week's events in what catch up don't forget podcast the world this week shows come in the global news podcast the mayor of bishkek says he's been going round the fifty wearing old clothes in a bid to see what's actually going on there the politician who came up with a creative way to find out what his subjects really think a policeman has told the court in myanmar that his bosses ordered him to frame to journalists investigating alleged army abuses against ranjha muslims while lana enjoy so ooh who worked for the reuters news agency are being in prison in myanmar for five months they say they've been targeted for reporting on the treatment of the hinges which the un and us have called ethnic cleansing a charge myanmar denies our correspondent nick beak spoke to julian marshall from outside the court in youngun weaken weak out for the past four months these two journalists have been brought to court protesting their innocence saying really their only crime is that of doing their job and so we're expecting this police captain million nine to give evidence he was supposed to be a witness for the prosecution but when he stood up and started to speak he said that he'd in fact been instructed to set up the reuters pat he said.

Director Oxford Dodo Jonathan Savage Bishkek Myanmar UN Nick Beak Julian Marshall Professor Paul Smith Oxford Museum Of Natural Lana Reuters Five Months Four Months
"paul smith" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Um and you know on top of that you know if you read the whole exchange it sounded like part of what he was trying to do was to rick paul smith the the voting rights lawyer entered going down a road that would lead to say that these aren't kate these are things that resolved i congress not by the courts and i'm in the thing i'll say about that is that paul smith is one of the smartest attorney in looked on the planet you'll pulse net it was users in private practice he was the democratic party goto guy for major read this redistricting cases before the supreme court he also argued at one more leaked texas um the major gay rights decision he uh he he is though he did awad really interesting telecom were super super knock at a wreck all net and the idea that gorsuch thought he was so smart than he could trip all there i mean it just fits with everything else who's got all the time he spends lecturing his colleague you know i i feel bad for the eight justice who you know we're we're we're we're we've we've all had it obnoxious coworker show believe me had he here's bill worse i envy were yogi i i i feel bad for all the way you feel bad for real leader whether that they have to tolerate this guy well and that's that's probably helpful and some level right when we have like a guy like kennedy there who you would uh anything that uh in any way alienates him from uh those four iit seems to me is is a positive are so let me just ask you this one question then we'll go quickly would take a couple of minutes to go through the the big cases that people should be aware of and then we will end up discussing those as they come but uh tomorrow on this program i'm going to run an interview i did with a lawrence lessig about a case that uh he is uh uh basically trying to to get off the ground.

attorney private practice democratic party texas gorsuch lawrence lessig rick paul smith voting rights awad kennedy
"paul smith" Discussed on Marketing Today

Marketing Today

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"paul smith" Discussed on Marketing Today

"For all of us disavowed perfectly worthy consumers going in getting half of the right things you want to do is create sat down sad than bracing shane creatively possibility malan heart this is marketing today today on the show up paul smith whose chief marketing officer of tangere and interior and workplace solutions company focusing on furniture flooring and technology in southern california i invited paul to come on the show not necessarily because of his chief marketing officer role although that's important we'll talk about that but more for how he thinks about interior design and its impact on the experienced that book our employees as well as our potential customers and other stakeholders have with our brands and who we are as companies and interacting with us we've all been hearing about the experience economy and how our brands need to be placed in the experience economy and and i've been noodle in this concept of empathy and the fact that empathy may be the actual currency that were exchanging in this experience economy so we'll talk a little bit about empathy today and how that translates into the physical space that we occupy and paul gives us quite a bit of tips in terms of things to think about as we venture into physical space paul welcome to the show thank you for having me alan it's a pleasure to tell me a little bit more about your background and how you found your way to become the cmo obtain groom interiors.

shane paul smith chief marketing officer california malan