4 Burst results for "Paul Sema"

"paul sema" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:05 min | 3 months ago

"paul sema" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kenyan and Paul Sema Goma, speaking to Rebecca Casby. Our final story This hour takes us to the 19 seventies, when the American transgender tennis player Rene Richards fought a long campaign for the right to play tournaments. As a woman. She shared her story with Ashley Byrne. Was already 43 years old, and I'm embarking on a professional career Playing against Christie ever faced your Austin and Andrea Jaeger. I mean, and they're all 1920 years old. So I had a pretty good disadvantaged in terms of age, but I said, I'm going to do it for a little while and see how I like it. The player starting her professional career at the US Open was Renee Richards. She was in the women's tournaments, but until a few years earlier, she had been a man called Richard Raskind. I had a very Good and full life as Dick and I had this other side of me that kept emerging and that Dick kept pushing back until finally it just was impossible to submerge Renee anymore and Renee one out at the time of her sex change. Rene was 40 and working as an eye surgeon. As a man. She'd been a successful amateur tennis player competing regularly in the 19 fifties and early sixties in the U. S open, reaching the second round of the men's singles on three occasions. 1975. She started playing on the amateur women's circuit, and that got everyone talking. My world kind of blew up on me when people found out who I was, after I had had my sex change and moved to California to try to start a new are unknown to anybody else. Life for myself. I was found out playing in an amateur tennis tournament, which I shouldn't have done. Critics said it would be wrong for a woman born as a man to compete against other women in the professional game. They said she'd have unfair advantage in terms of strength, but Renee says it's more complex than that. Of course, the men are stronger and then they do hit the ball harder that you know there are variables there to Serena Williams sometimes gets her serve up greater than 120 miles an hour. And some of the men don't serve as hard as 120 Miles an hour in 1976 Renee Richards apply to compete in the U. S Open, but was denied the right to play as a woman by the United States Tennis Association. I never had any intention of playing in the U. S open. There's a problem because I was a practicing. I served in. But when they said, you're not going to be allowed to play in the U. S open as a proud that changed everything because I said You can't tell me What I can or cannot do. I'm a woman, and if I want to play in the U. S open as a woman prowl, I'm going to do it. Renee Richards then decided to sue the American tennis authorities on the grounds of gender discrimination. But the odds were stacked firmly against Renee and illegal team, the tennis association and the other people. On the other side. They had the top lawyers in New York City, the top Wall Street lawyers, and they brought in witness after witness afterwards. This has said I shouldn't be allowed to play and it was a big case. And so on my side, my lawyer my grows and he only had one witness for me. But that one witness proved crucial. She was one of the greatest players in the history of the women's game. My lawyer gave him the affidavit from Billie Jean King. It said that she had met me and that I was a woman and I was entitled to play and I couldn't be denied. And that was it, so we won. It was very dramatic. Sure I was and we all got went out and got drunk after we got the verdict that I had one Ren E. Richards had won the battle in court. But the fight to be accepted was far from over. I had death threats. I had people that hated me. I had people that told me I was immoral. People told me that I was awful. There were some players are walked off the court when I played them, or they wouldn't play me at all. There was a lot of objection in the beginning, and then finally they realized that you know I was okay. I wasn't going to take everybody's money away or anything like that. And gradually, a lot of those that had been against me in the beginning ended up being very good Friends of mine. And so Ren E. Richards career as a professional player was born. The U. S Open in 1977. She faced that year's Wimbledon champion Virginia Wade in the opening round of the women's singles. Was in the center court in the stadium at Forest Hills, and she'd been used to that situation her whole life and I hadn't been and no matter how much good tennis I had played as an amateur, there's nothing that compares to playing as a pro in the U. S Open on center court in the stadium. Remember, She beat me pretty easily in the first set, 61 and we had a very close said in the second said as I got myself going, and she finally wanted 64, and and that was it. And then in the Devil's. Nobody gave my partner Betty Ann Stewart and I much chance because nobody never heard of us. And all of a sudden we won the first round and we won the second round. We won the third round or in the quarterfinals. We win that were in the semifinals. If we win that, and all of a sudden we're in the finals of the U. S help and double 1977 and we played Martina and very Stover from the Netherlands. And we lost them 76 and the second set, So we were the finalists and U. S helper..

Rebecca Casby Renee Richards Ashley Byrne Rene Richards Betty Ann Stewart Andrea Jaeger Serena Williams Billie Jean King New York City California Ren E. Richards Richard Raskind United States Tennis Associati Virginia Wade Paul Sema Goma Martina Forest Hills Renee 61 US Open
"paul sema" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 3 months ago

"paul sema" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Temple Speaking to reef Evans, This is a special edition of witness history from the BBC World Service. Let's go to Africa next for a love story. In 2000 and six, a Ugandan newspaper began printing the names of professionals believed to be gay. It foreshadowed a range of strict laws prohibiting homosexuality. And a sharp increase in violent, homophobic attacks on LGBT people. Rebecca KSB spoke with one prominent Ugandan doctor about his battle against homophobia. And how he found love growing up as a kid in Uganda. Uganda is a very conservative country, you discover that you are different and it's like you try to run away from it. Paul Sema Goma is a medical doctor who hid his homosexuality for the early part of his career. In fact, it wasn't until he was 18 that he became fully aware of it himself. One night as he read a book. It was late at night, so we didn't have power that I was reading on cattle light. I was reading this book popular and the scene was on a desert island somewhere under there were all these guys and there was a comment that gay guys, they are really happy there because they were free. Suddenly clarified in my mind that wild this is who I am mint. It was so vivid, but for the next 10 years, I still went on denying Get to myself. That decision is perhaps understandable when the country's own president, Yoweri MMA 70, described homosexuals as abnormal, disgusting and on African to hear the president, shouting that you should arrest all these homosexuals. So we knew that Coming out and saying You're gay would be quite dangerous. Yeah, it was a difficult time. Some newspapers had begun to call for gay people to be executed. Violent, homophobic attacks were on the increase. But there was a small group of gay men and lesbians in Kampala who were prepared to make a stand against the increasingly threatening tabloids in 2000 and seven gay activists decided to hold a press conference themselves. Most of them will paper masks to obscure their faces for safety. Paul Sema Goma stood with them, but only in his capacity as a doctor concerned with HIV AIDS, and not as an out gay man himself. He was unmasked. What we wanted is to The outlet and say Okay, even if the current narrative is that there are no gay people in Uganda, we can change that by saying, Okay, we have come out and now you cannot deny us We can't come out by keeping quiet. Let's come out with a shout. So we invited the press people who were going to be exposed. We're told if you're going to be there, you have to be in a mask. Don't play around with the safety we put on paper masks, painted them through the rainbow that we painted with them yet. It was quite an emotional point. In time. Over the next few years, the Ugandan parliament voted to strictly increase the criminalization.

BBC World Service Kampala reef Evans Uganda Paul Sema Goma Africa 2000 Yoweri Rebecca KSB one 18 HIV AIDS One night Ugandan next 10 years next few years Ugandan parliament seven gay African MMA
"paul sema" Discussed on The Undercovers

The Undercovers

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"paul sema" Discussed on The Undercovers

"My name is Eddie Falls I must before reported in Los Angeles from first assignment the heroin Gatien's grew four suffered the unspeakable during an operation that went terribly awry little I know at the time that the losses that day you would not only change DA cover operations and protocol forever but they would also save my life Friday February Fifth Nineteen Eighty eight Pasadena California just another beautiful day in the San Gabriel Valley Ali Sunny and seventy just like every other day nothing extraordinary ever happens in this scenic Park Pasadena but what is about to happen in this park is an ordinary at all a drug deal is about to go down two kilos of Southeast Asian number four heroin right here in the middle of the park in the middle of the day the set is reading it starts when the buyers arrived White Volvo Park and wait see him yet not yet inside the Volvo or three men Paul Sema a middle aged veteran heroin broker of tie extraction George Montoya Six Foot Sinewy Hispanic and Jose Martinez the youngest of the three and the bearer of the by money all three are armed Montoya and Seema have nine millimeters tucked in their belts Martinez it has a third in the driver's side pocket and a sub knows thirty eight strapped to his ankle but the guns aren't street Roscoe's their government issue because these men are undercover DEA agents and they're not here for a by their hair for a bust your they come a car approaches with you Chinese occupants it's the seller's now is the time when the tension begins to build as the money and doper drawn together it's what some agents call the flash point and it is the most dangerous sequence of a drug deal because both sides are vulnerable the recovers remained in the car while the two traffickers approach from the rear the plan is to affect the textbook by bust eighty thousand for two kilos heroin it would make a small dent in the endless supply chain running to America from the infamous Golden Triangle of Burma Laos and Thailand both traffickers approach the Volvo one remained at the trunk while the other walked up to the passenger side the trafficker leaned in and asked it has the Mandi Sima turned Martinez he knew what to do. This was it the moment when the money it comes out and all is would be on it including over a dozen da surveillance units who were also fixated on Martinez says he moved to the trunk I can't go Martinez pops the trunk he reaches in pulls out a gym bag in the drug trade this is what is the flash no deal ever moves forward until the flash it was all their eighty thousand large we satisfied the seller added Martinez then closed the trunk in return to the drivers seep with the flash complete now it was the sellers turn to show there's they waited and listened and watched had they been able to look close enough they may have seen with Seema Montoya and Martinez were seeing I'm just outside Seema's passenger doors to the lead trafficker he looked nervous his eyes darted left and right and beads of sweat were forming on his brow Komo at once the UC's sense the same thing something ain't right just then Red Mustang screams under the gun this is how fast it can go bad one minute you're ready to give the bus signal the next year sellers turn into killers and if you don't react immediately and silently you'll never have the chance to do it again the era royal took direct hits to the head George Montoya lay dead in the back seat Paul Seema was slumped in the frontal barely alive Martinez had old out of the driver's seat as he went for his ankle gun he took two rows to his legs even after being hit he somehow managed to level is thirty eight and returned fire the pulse Sima managed to keep Reading For almost another day until February six they before his fifty second birthday.

Jose Martinez Seema Montoya heroin Volvo White Volvo Park George Montoya Paul Seema Park Pasadena Pasadena Seema DEA San Gabriel Valley Ali Sunny Mandi Sima Los Angeles California Paul Sema Eddie Falls Laos Roscoe
"paul sema" Discussed on The Undercovers

The Undercovers

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul sema" Discussed on The Undercovers

"Coming Tuesday October eighth the undercovers a global original podcast starring Ed O'Neill he's occupants it's the seller's now is the time when the tension begins to build as the money delayed veteran heroin broker of tie extraction George Montoya Six Foot Sinewy Hispanic and Jose Martinez Andy Sima turn to Martinez he knew what to do this was it the moment when the money comes out cash no deal ever moves forward until the flash it was all their eighty thousand large we good satisfied the seller nodded it would make a small dent in the endless supply chain running to America from the infamous Golden Triangle of Burma Laos and Thailand both traffickers approached the Volvo one remained at the trunk while the other walked up to the passenger side the trafficker leaned in and asked last the park in the middle of the day the set is ready it starts when the buyers arrive in the white remained in the car while the two traffickers approach from the rear the plan is to affect the textbook by bust eighty thousand for two kilos of heroin arc is an ordinary at all a drug deal is about to go down two kilos of Southeast Asian number four heroin right here in the Middle Martinez then closed the trunk and return to the driver's seat with the flash complete now it was the sellers turn to show there's doper drawn together it's what some agents call the flash point and it is the most dangerous sequence of a drug deal because both sides are vulnerable the undercovers the youngest of the three and the bear of the by money all three are armed Montoya Encima have nine millimeters tucked in their belts Martinez has the driver's side pocket and sub knows thirty eight strapped to his ankle but the guns aren't street Roscoe's their government issue because and listened and watched have they been able to look close enough they may have seen with Seema Montoya and Martinez were seeing just and all eyes would be on it including over a dozen da surveillance units who were also fixated on Martinez says he moved to the trunk level park and wait see him yet not yet inside the Volvo three men Paul Sema men are undercover DEA agents and they're not here for a by their hair for a bust your they come a car approaches with two Chinese once the UC's sense the same thing something ain't right back just then all sides seem as passenger doors to the trafficker he looked nervous his eyes darted left and right and beads of sweat were forming on his brow. You'll never have the chance to do it again go Martinez pops the trunk he reaches in pulls out a gym bag in the drug trade this is what is called the flat this is how fast it can go bad one minute you're ready to give the bus signal the next year sellers turned into killers and if you don't react immediately and violently directed to the head George Montoya Lay Dead in the backseat Paul Seema was slumped in the frontal

Martinez Middle Martinez Jose Martinez Andy Sima Seema Montoya George Montoya heroin Montoya Encima Volvo Ed O'Neill DEA Paul Sema Paul Seema Laos America Roscoe Thailand two kilos one minute Six Foot