18 Burst results for "Paul Schrader"

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

The Big Picture

13:11 min | 1 year ago

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

"Later in the show. I'll have an interview with Lebron L. The writer director of the new updated edition of the invisible man. A movie that shifts the perspective of the classic horror movie to the victim in this case played by the Amazing Elizabeth Moss when Elsa Clever Jonah craftsman and we had a fun chat about how he's reinventing the work of the historic universal monster movies and some of his aides filmaker. Heroes like James Cameron and Paul Hogan and John Carpenter but I I am joined by ringer contributor and one of the best film minds around Adam Neiman. Thanks for joining me Adam. Thanks for having me Adam. We're here to build another wing in the movie hall of fame. Today we said post and beam on the monster movie hall of fame. Now you know monster. Movies are tricky because there are two distinctions between them. One is your classical scare movie that enrapture audiences but maybe doesn't really mean very much and then. The other is the load-bearing bearing metaphorical monster that communicate something to the world about maybe it's ills or human psychology or things of that nature I assume that you are more fan of the latter. But May maybe that's not the case. I think I'm a fan of the ladder when it's less calculated You know the the joke I liked to tell his one day. Someone's GonNa make really good specific movie about a social problem like documentary and then at a press conference the director. She's going to be like this movie's a metaphor for zombies and just waiting for someone to do but I mean I think that in the last couple years because you have some like Jordan. Peele who has spoken not in terms of monster movies but in terms of horror movies. He's talked about you. Know his office for those social thrillers or Social Horror Movies and the metaphorical dimension to them. And so you know because monsters are a subset of horror movies as you say a delivery device for for scares those streams often do cross but yeah. I think some of the best monster movies of all time are definitely ones where monsters represent something whether it's something inside or outside society or something inside or outside people but I'm also just a a big fan of movies. Where like spooky things jump out at people in eat them? So it's a IT'S A. It's a fine balance before we get started on constructing this this list that we've put together here. Do you remember your first monster movie experience at the movie. That felt like a monster movie to me and I mean it it is a monster is when Pinocchio gets swallowed by the whale. Oh yeah which is. Obviously you know I mean there's a biblical reference there to to Joan in the whale and it's You know like for for for kids. Who Who who see Pinocchio? That whale is just nightmarish and terrifying and and gigantic. I mean my dad. I think that's the first movie he ever told you to. Took me to it. Just absolutely scared the hell out of me that and the giant squid in Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. Same thing oh great both Some Disney spun con there. Well done by in and and you. Well I'm thinking about Pinocchio as you say it and the thing that scared me more than the whale is the sequence in which the boys turn into donkeys boys which is just absolutely disturbing and also kind of metaphorical in its way Not to put too fine a parasite point on it I'm trying to think of my first true scary movie experience. I feel like what I got two young Frankenstein before I got to Frankenstein in. It's funny. How when something like that happens how it can obscure your relationship to movies and I think it actually made me Not so much scared movie theaters but just just sort of happy and smiling and laughing. I tend to laugh at horror movies and monster movies because I get kind of perverse thrill out of them and I so I if young Frankenstein. Ken Count that would be. That would be my number one. I mean obviously. I saw a bunch movies that we'll talk about here on this list that a very young age. And maybe that's an opportunity to just go right into it. So here's what we're going to do. We'RE GOING TO GO CHRONOLOGICALLY. So there's a long history. I would say monster. Movies are essentially as old as movies themselves. So we're going to try to walk through. Essentially I don't know eighty ninety years of movie history and try to capture. What are the absolute most representative interesting compelling fascinating monster movies ever made and the monsters? I think the conversation should really be about the monsters inside of the movies and why they're so effective as devices for either sending those messages or just scaring the shit out of us. So you chosen five. I've chosen five. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA Ariffin vamp little bit. Why don't you give me your first pick going all the way back to the nineteen thirties? Sure and you know it's interesting because now when we've got it arranged chronologically we've got this this interesting blindspot which. Kinda be filled in as we go along. Which is we've both bypassed. The true initial cohort of Universal Monster. Movies right the very late twenties very early thirties because the first movie on my list is King Kong. So I have bypassed Dracula Frankenstein you know bride of Frankenstein Which are all these enduring literary properties that have been made and remade for a long time and I think the thing about King Kong. It just feels like the primal scene for me of monster as spectacle because he's not human sized right. He's not an actor costume he's not You know someone doing an accent or wearing makeup. He's a special effects creation and the thing about the original King Kong. Every time I watch it is. It is just so spectacular visually. In an analog era. You know the the integration of those stop motion special effects into old sets and the exaggerated camera angles on the actors and just the the surrealism of it. I've read that. The actual surrealists the the practicing artists within that within that movement re huge fans of King Kong for one thing. 'cause monster just keeps changing size. You know it's inconsistent it's inconsistent but it's also just stunning because from scene to scene you know when he's just represented by giant hander giants foot or the close ups on the is and then you can also still cut backing these establishing shots and seeing him in these different environments and. I think it's the way also that it goes from this primal island to this urban city. The monster in his home context. And then sort of you know thrashing around in the middle of maternity causing chaos. It's just like the deepest the deepest core horror fantasy. You know that that that I can think of I. I just think it's absolutely astonishing and I never tire of watching it. It's funny I think a lot of the monsters on our list Get repeated and reused and re contextualize over and over again the thing with King Kong is is the actual character of King Kong comes up over and over and over and over again. We're getting another King Kong movie this year. And for whatever reason I would say between King Kong and Godzilla. Those are really the only two significant monsters that we never tire of somehow. That don't don't expire. You know I think that the idea behind what King Kong represents and there's obviously been an extraordinary amount of both academic critical just fun writing about What happens when colonialists enter a less developed world and attempt to steal things from it But in addition to that it is this grand spectacle and we talk a lot on the show about is. It doesn't move. You have a reason to be seen in a movie theater. Then I feel like the original King. Kong is is one of the landmark achievements and you have to see this on a giant screen. There's nowhere else for to be seen. We'll for sure. I maybe just in terms of bridging King Kong with those other brand name monsters of the period he in genders the same kind of complex sympathy. That you have with Boris. Karloff Frankenstein. Right I mean you even have a rhyme in those two movies wherein Frankenstein. He picks the little girl up by the river without doing what he's doing. And you know drowns her accidentally and certainly king kongs intentions towards Aren't violent. They're they're in his sort of chivalrous or desirous or somewhere in between there. I think the reason he endures an even the point that God's Zilla as a character eventually got bent in King kongs direction because the original godzillas dot anthropomorphized sympathetic at all. And then over the years. And they made Godzilla more like King Kong. I think being inside that sort of like destructive force but you're also misunderstood and you're more a victim of circumstance than anything else that's a really appealing escapist fantasy for filmgoers even thinking the original King Kong as terrifying as it is and as brutal as the violences like a people have never seen it. He smush is people into Goo on screen. You know You're still with him and I think that that's a really great monster. Movie needs on some kinds of great monster movies that you need that possible level of identification or sympathy. So it's not just purely a nightmare. I think the original King Kong does that just just amazingly well. So you're next pick actually doesn't do the former thing that you were just describing which is there's no crushing there's no Gu. There's no absolute violence of a kind in your next week. What's your next movie? The next movie I have is is cap. People which is part of a cycle of really low key atmospheric horror movies produced in the mostly in the nineteen forties. Bhai guy named Val Luton and I would say that if you get a chance to see Ken. Jones documentary thou loot man in the shadows. I think it's the best documentary I've ever seen about a filmmaker at particularly about how Luton changed horror movies by using the lack of a budget. And the lack of franchise -able characters. You Know He. He didn't have the roster that universal was working with all these all star. You know horror icons so he made it less more. It's the it's the the the the cinema of of of suggestion and scary around the edges. But it's also movie about people transforming into cats I. It's a booby that plays the the ambiguity of is this or isn't this real up. You know for for a long time but it really does give over to the idea that the main character the heroin does when stimulated or afraid you know actually transform into A cat due to this this this Eastern European mysticism and it's also a movie. I'm sure they'll come later. That gets remade in the eighties and completely liberalised because instead of just talking with someone turning into a cat or remembering someone turning into a cat you actually see it on screen with with special effects and it's It's less effective to me. Do you do you like the Paul schrader version that you're describing the eighties version. I like the Paul schrader version. Because it's wild acid trippy. Paul schrader horror movie. And it's it's glory and it's actually not as full-on like latex hydraulic special effects. His other movies from the period. But I I love the original are you are you. Are you fond of the delude films directed by Jacques Turner? Who did a bunch of the other ones is it a? Is it a a a source of Phantom for you it is? I saw cat people and the Leopard men in a couple of them many many years ago and then actually over Halloween this year my wife and I were looking and you know as I get older Halloween. Getting more and more difficult to program. If we're not gonNA rewatch something. But we watched a couple movies. We watched The criterion collection had the ghost ship which I had never seen which I thought had. It has a very similar approach to kind of What's happening in the shadows? Which is most of his films are using that strategy of not showing the thing and then I watched by myself. The body snatcher and both of them. I thought were pretty great. I mean I this is also a case where I I. I probably saw Kent Jones's documentary before seeing any of the films and while that was a great thing for my film education it also kind of warped perception of the movie because I was seeing it as a kind of intellectual exercise in a way where I understood technique as opposed to some of these other movies that we're GonNa talk about here where I just happened to be nine years old when I saw it in a completely reorganized my brain chemistry in a way but I do like his movies. And especially this one that you've chosen well and then also just the last thing to say but it may be that because it's not special effects and spectacle it anticipates where horror movies would go in the sixties with the idea of the monster within right. I mean here. It's not a an invading apor vampire. It's the idea of a woman who's subconscious and her inner life motivates this transformations client about the link between monstrous and desire and monstrous and repression. Which is why it tends to be. You Know Pretty Beloved Academically but I mean by the sixties. Neither US talk about these movies. But you start having the idea of the human monster in movies like psycho or whatever else and you can kind of trace aligned from the way cat. People stages horror towards that stuff. I think I think that's right. And I think it's probably a capitals nifty double feature with the peg for this film the invisible man because that movie is also as much about.

King Kong Dracula Frankenstein Pinocchio Adam Neiman Paul Schrader Kent Jones King Kongs Ken Count Elizabeth Moss Godzilla James Cameron Lebron L. Director United States Disney Karloff Frankenstein Peele John Carpenter Joan
"paul schrader" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Fresh Air

"How many people will actually talk to a kid who wouldn't talk to adult? And m mother that's wonderful stories because back then a lot of people would go door to door and so right next to the front door. She had put up a whole list of refutation tax for all of the various raid denominations. So if the Catholics came by or if the Christian scientists came by h-, you'd have a reputation text for them, and and so she would invite them in and give them cough, and then giving them the refutation techs, and then they had no way out. Watching this. So that was kind of the environment. What's a refutation Tech's reputation? There you know, 'cause why you're wrong. The bible is nothing about reputation, Texas as we've learned you know, you can use almost any tax to counteract any other texts. Paul Schrader became like, an antiwar activist in the late sixties, and I should mention here that, you know, both Travis Bickel taxi driver is a veteran and in the new movie first reformed even hawks character. The the minister his family had a tradition of being in the military. He talked his son into going into the military, and then his son was killed in Iraq after six months. So were you afraid where are you at risk of being drafted? Did you not want to be drafted? I was as Matic, and even though our family was very patriotic. But I had to go to Detroit for the physical. When mother took me to the post office was the bus was and my father. She didn't come. I was surprised by that. And she took me and just before I got on the bus. She gave me a Brown paper bag, and she said, I want you to put this under your pillow tonight. Wouldn't you sleep because the next morning was the physical? I got in the bus open the bag, and it was ragweed. And I did put it under my pillow. And by the time, I had the physical. I was having a full-fledged asp attack. Wow. That's really interesting. So your mother strongly did not want you to be drafted and go to Vietnam. Yes. But she couldn't say those words because because you know, conservative environment. Paul Schrader speaking to Terry gross last year, he wrote and directed I reformed which has garnered his first ever Oscar nomination for best original screenplay coming up. Film critic Justin Chang reviews, the new foreign language film..

Paul Schrader Terry Travis Bickel Justin Chang Detroit Texas Vietnam Matic Iraq hawks Oscar six months
"paul schrader" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Idea of you know what what are we in service to god if we do this you know all these things to his creation you know these horrible things and he slowly one say unravel begins begins the question a lot of things not just as faith but you know what exactly is his place on this earth if he's if he's not destroying it does he have a obligation to save it in some manner and it continues having conversations with the wife this laws leads to other potential complications as well so as a paul schrader film you know this is it's themes that he explored several times throughout his career yet it's not a very a fresh way to explore the concept of losing one's faith or questioning the ones fate and putting it right in the hands of a priest with ethan hawke one of actually one of his best performances to bait and this is easily paul traitors best film probably since maybe auto focus i would say somebody who say affliction maybe even longer than that it really is one of his best works it's a film that is frightening at times it is a slow burn of a film it has great conversations about what the internal struggle and the outer struggle that hawks character is going through it's incredibly rich film that i couldn't recommend highly more highly colin.

ethan hawke paul schrader
"paul schrader" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yeah that's one of the attractions of actual cinema too is that you just like you make a commitment to drive over at church you make a commitment to drive over to the cinema and do you have a sense that the faith in cinema so to speak is decreasing because it's being considered more casually when people take moby seriously it's very easy to make serious movies when i was coming up in the sixties and seventies people actually took me seriously they wanted to know it looked for answers he is i guess i mean because there's no real center to the culture and it hurts us but if that is a much bigger thing that movies writer and director paul schrader talking with the new yorkers richard brody traders new film i reformed is in theaters now i'm david ramnik and you're listening to the new yorker radio hour an intimate look back at summer jobs hey everyone it's helen hong and i'm filling in for peter sale this week because he needed some time off to design a commemorative coin of himself accomplishing well just about anything that he hasn't actually get we'll talk about the man pounding his souvenir nichols.

writer david ramnik moby director paul schrader richard brody helen hong
"paul schrader" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"The new yorker radio hour is supported by indeed dot com are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash new yorker that's indeed dot com slash new yorker from one world trade center in manhattan this is the new yorker radio hour a co production of the new yorker and wnyc studios welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik if you're any kind of film buff you know the name paul schrader he's one of the great screen writers of our time the collaborator with martin scorsese on taxi driver raging bull and the last temptation of christ as a director though schrader has struggled to get his own films made so alongside acclaimed titles like american gigolo and measham ah their movies like an exorcist prequel that are probably best forgotten shredders new film i reformed has just come out starring ethan hawke and in the view of richard brodie who writes about film for the new yorker i reformed is one of the best movies by one of our great filmmakers pulse reiter is one of richard's heroes an oath tour in the true sense a writer and a director with a distinctive style informed by his predecessors but with a set set of concerns that are all his own exactly what the company wants to keep you on the line they'll do anything to keep you on the line the pit the life as against the new boys oldest young the black guest white everybody that keep us at our place i mean can't you understand that a lot of people when they hear the name paul schrader they think of taxi driver i i knew of his work from lou color which was i fought a fierce and passionate movie you're trying to hurt somebody instead of helping yourself that's your problem i gotta problem visit kind of shattering on inspiring intensity to the best of traders films but no other living filmmaker can match all right so how do we help ourselves.

manhattan david ramnik paul schrader martin scorsese director ethan hawke richard brodie reiter writer lou
"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

"This kid he's in trouble move the hate breaks then cable i can't do this alone up we're gonna form a super duper droops time to get back on linked in ryan reynolds a clip from the trailer for deadpool two which yes josh i saw over the weekend i had a little bit of time to kill so fee is in if the performance i had to work the dress rehearsal thursday night work backstage friday night jay i play saturday night i'm staged ad but sunday i wasn't going back okay so while she was performing i went to the nearby multiplex watch just admitted you needed a superhero comic movie fix yes it had been a while sits infinity war and deadpool twos better than adventures and finnity war we'll have a couple more thoughts in a minute and some feedback actually on the vendors i want to hear about another movie though i the you recently caught up with something that's not a superhero movie at all a little smaller from what i know about it and it's a film that actually is a pretty nice tien it sounds with the movie we're gonna hear paul schrader discuss here in a moment first reformed yeah this is chosen custody of the is humble documentary where you know the subject in the form i really perfect match the director and producer and editor here is abby reese and she gave the camera to a young woman who's known as sister amada in the illinois monastery where she begins a new life she goes there and i think this footage captures for sure her first year maybe a little bit more of that of what that experience is like to begin a life of cloistered.

ryan reynolds josh director editor abby reese illinois monastery paul schrader producer
"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Of our marathons list he's got eight or nine films here actually i think it's eleven feature films and i've only seen one of them still walking from two thousand eight which some people do consider his masterpiece it's film i'd love to revisit as it has been ten years but a lot of great titles there including last year's after the storm that i need to see yeah i saw after the storm like to quite a bit not as much as sam van hallways favor loubet yeah ebert as much as i did yeah he's still liked after the storm more or less it's strong it's strong what i feel bad about is afterlife around nine hundred ninety eight i don't remember exactly when it played in the states and absolutely loved it so i had no excuse to not see another film of his till 2017 which has happened so this is clearly a blind spot for me as well yes so he's definitely inconsideration along with ashby schrader and didn't he and i swear josh i'm not saying this just to torture listeners who've been with us since two thousand seven and have been hearing about a john kesse that he's marathon since then it's still on the shortlist yeah i think this i think we could get to it i really do think but what would we zoom time before the end of home spotting okay it might be twenty five years from now i think that's a fair about we'll get to get somebody's at some point you can check out some of our future marathon options not saying we're gonna get to all of them but we do have a list at film spotting dot net if you click on our marathons page some other notable winners josh at con spike lee very excited about black klansman and it took the festival second price oh august can't come soon enough i think august ten is one that will be released here in the states the winner of the best director award was poland's pablo pablo cosco for his film cold war you remember him of course from twenty thirteen with eden which was absolutely wonderful and we found out in our interview with paul schrader actually an inspiration for first reformed yeah a movie about a young nun in nineteen sixties poland.

ashby schrader john kesse poland paul schrader josh director pablo pablo twenty five years ten years
"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Era gorn and that's where it ended i it's for the best that were all spared that absolutely i do think i probably disappointed a fair number of people i feared the by liking those movies i would please many and it does seem to be that way i have gotten any negative comments yet but also you know there are some people out there some snarky cynical folks out there hated these movies or at least didn't fully go for them and they saw in me a kindred spirit and i betrayed they've lost you know there have been some snarky social media comments i've seen one or two just one just popped up today oh yeah cave trollers when it comes to the lord of the rings really just regular trolls their cave trolls and they weren't too happy that we were spending this much time on those films so i really don't think they would have liked the nine episode plan so it probably working out for those they would later in this show will will move past the lord of the rings we will share our conversation with paul schrader the legendary screenwriter film critic and director probably best known for his work with martin scorsese writing taxi driver and raging bull but he also directed more than twenty films including affliction starring nick nolte and american gigolo with richard gere his latest as director which some critics are already calling the best of his career is first reform starring ethan hawke as a despairing church pastor he returns to his themes and an aesthetic approach that he wrote about at length as a critic in the early seventies we will get into all of that in our conversation later in the show but first disney expanded its star wars universe by making a standalone hans solo film i've got a complicated feeling about this.

gorn paul schrader martin scorsese nick nolte richard gere ethan hawke disney director hans
"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Film spotting is brought to you by xfinity close your eyes and picture you're in home wifi now raise your right hand and wave goodbye goodbye to buffering slow streaming speeds and weak signal are you still waving great you're now waving hello to the speed coverage and control of extremity x fi say hello xfinity x fi simple easy awesome were also brought to you by film spotting svu your guide to the world of online cinema every two weeks matt singer from screencrush dot com and buzzfeed's alison willmore fill you in on new streaming releases along with what they've been watching recently on their latest show matt nelson review manhunt john woo's latest which is available exclusively on netflix they also recommend some other hong kong action movies that are available to rent or stream though spotting us view is part of the phone spotting family of shows to listen visit film spotting svu or check it out in apple podcasts what kind of a show you guys putting on here today we're not interested in going to do this thing going to have a conversation from chicago this is film spotting i'm josh license and i met him kempner when you know how to fly hundred ninety years old great so how long till we get the chew chewbacca origin story i think i need a lot of subtitles for that a clip there from solo a star wars story which opens this weekend alden ehrenreich so good in the cohn brothers hail caesar a couple years back taking over as the new old young han solo he's got the leather jacket and the blaster but can he nail the smirk we shall see our review of solo plus an interview with legendary screenwriter director paul schrader that more.

xfinity john woo netflix chicago alden ehrenreich paul schrader alison willmore matt nelson apple cohn director hundred ninety years two weeks
"paul schrader" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And the man would go to all women go to a different movie and and i recognize that i went to the ball to plex 'cause i came out behind the couple and the woman turned to husband and set our men really like that and he said well i knew this guy wants meaning not me and i don't know many more if it wasn't a movie people can talk honestly about i don't know what it's i watched that movie with my wife so that's little different thing and we both liked it just couple more questions does does critical success does it matter to you how do you define success now 'cause obviously getting to make your own work the way you want it but how else do you define it for you know ride the high country i little bit film by i've seen all packing movies but i don't really i can't recall them all scott and joel mccrea too old cop boys and at one point randy scott says the cray what do you really want steve his name is steve judd and steve john gives the answer that sam had heard from his father who was a preacher and he says all i wanna do is in my house justified and i guess they're sort of how i feel you know i if i can enter my house justified i don't care whether the critics know about it or not i can't think of a better way to have that it's a worthy goal i put that up in the writer's room actually make everyone watched that film paul schrader i can't thank you enough are you on any social media can people send you notice anywhere i've been chased so pulse raiders on facebook you can find them there i'm at at brand compliment on twitter you can email me the moment became jimoh dot com i will not pass your notes on to paul schrader so don't do that thanks for listening everybody i i wanted to say again i reformed is the best movie i've seen this year it should win the academy award mr schrader should win academy awards for screenplay and direction and you know you've been listening for long time i don't say this shit so it's true thanks paul.

joel mccrea randy scott steve judd sam writer paul schrader facebook twitter academy awards steve john
"paul schrader" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Hey this is the moment i'm brian cobb amon thanks for listening i guess today is paul schrader and i hate when people say someone needs no introduction it's an honor to give them a proper introduction there's a man who wrote the movies taxi driver american gigolo hardcore which is a huge movie in my life today touch another movie that i love which he also directed he directed the movie auto focus and which is another movie that i love affliction which one of much of a words and his newest film i reformed just blew my fucking mind he also wrote a little movie called lasting of christ but his new movie is called first reform starring ethan hawke and has just come out and i watched the film last night and it destroyed me in the very best way cinema can paul schrader thanks for being here thank you so i just want to start by saying you all day thinking of two quotes i was thinking thinking this thing mailer said mailer famously said in this interview with his one of his sons i think what his last interview maybe that a a a novelist can get inside anybody's mind except a better novelist and that's a nice quote and i think it's true and and then there's this just how i feel right now and then there's this think about sit artha a lot today has his novel because you know at the end of the novel and it's not a spoiler but at the end of the novel because the buddhist story but at the end of the novel system end if you wanna know kiss my forehead and because words words don't really do very good job of translating that which is most important in that way and if i could just kiss your far head and then get this information of them i would sir and people been listening to podcasts for two hundred episodes they know i don't say this shit so i'm going to do my best to get it some stuff with you but i do feel in the presence of my better so thanks for coming okay i'm at your mercy good so have a couple technical questions to start because i may forget later one is tone i was struck watching the movie and whenever any of speak in front of audiences often we get a question about voice tone your screenplays which anyone can read a.

brian cobb paul schrader mailer artha ethan hawke
"paul schrader" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Channel 33

"Is a filmmaker say a taxi drivers the film that made me wanna be fill bigger and then i say let me guess you saw when you were fourteen and they're always bail and they said yeah how'd you know what that's it that's that's sweet spot of age fourteen fifteen young man been watching action movies all of a sudden stumbled across taxi driver which he thought was going to be an action movie which is a different kind of action movie and gets his mind going how do you feel about that being part of the legacy your legacy is a filmmaker because because it can cut in a negative way to not really not for me because having that kind of validation so early on having get having stumbled onto the psychiatrist and having a film that that keeps renewing itself i have i know people my age who have been working decades who still looking for that delegation so having it in my twenties was in fact free because i didn't i say now i can just go on i could make them look never and never have to worry about having not made of film that people think is important that said the does feel like this film now is the first time in a while that a lot of people are saying and you'd be a better judge of this and i would master filmmaker paul schrader he has he has done something that is extremely important should see this what's that like to have that comeback around well extremely gratified intimidate what do you mean by that well because donald thinking about what i'm gonna do nice really yeah i mean you see this current phase of bike rio began about four or five years ago when i was devastated by experience.

paul schrader donald five years
"paul schrader" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Channel 33

"Truly honored to be joined today by paul schrader paul thank you for coming in thank you paul i want to know exactly why you decided to make first reformed in when it dawned on you well about three years ago i had been a film critic and i had written a book of aesthetics about spiritual cinema but i never thought that i would make when myself wasn't may i told people that i'm too intoxicated by the attractions of sex and violence and action empathy to ever take a plunge into the icy waters of transcendence about three years ago i was speaking with palpable ski i just given him an award at the new york society film critics for edo polish film about a non and we were talking about spirituality and cinema and about the new economics of filmmaking lower costs reduce loss and i walked back up town that night and i said it's time now you know it's time for you to write that movie use for you would never right you're going to be seventy next year and it's finally time and once i made that decision them it came together quite quickly was this always a story about a priest few it's not a priest it's a reverend excuse me as the differences of the whole issue of catholicism and celebration yet always watch and what were the movies that you went back in review to get yourself back in that mode well written about which is the ratio films country praise by pocket boasts gaped the dryer the antonioni the rossellini voyage in italy ozo course and and then some of the newer films at the bergen of course.

paul schrader new york society italy three years
"paul schrader" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered from npr news i'm don gonyea in martin scorsese's taxi driver travis bickel tormented cabdriver roaming the streets of new york had this to say about loneliness mel life everywhere bars and cause sign walk stores everywhere there's no paul schrader was in his early twenties when he wrote those lines for scorsese's nineteen seventysix classic it would launch a collaboration that includes the film's raging bull and the last temptation of christ paul schrader would go on to direct movies of his own many of them also agonize portraits of outsiders needing salvation his twelfth film as a director i reformed is no exception ethan hawke plays another of god's lonely men a pastor at a small church in upstate new york whose encounter with a radical environmentalists challenges both his faith and his spirit many critics are calling i reformed a career peak for paul schrader who joins us in our studios to talk about the film and his career thank you for being here hello don thank you so i thought we would start by having you introduce us to ethan hawks character who is this guy he is a former military chaplain who came from a line of ministers is a line of patriotic soldiers and he had against his wife's desires kind of convinced son to enter the military whereupon son was killed and iraq and whereupon his wife left him and whereupon he quit the bill terry and was lost so let's hear a little bit from pastor toler as played by ethan hawke in this clip p reveals some of his demons as you said he lost his son in the iraq war i his guilt haunting post my son enlisted anyway six months later he was ten iraq i talked to my son into award had no moral justification it's.

don gonyea martin scorsese cabdriver new york paul schrader director ethan hawke iraq terry pastor toler npr travis bickel ethan hawks six months
"paul schrader" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"You know but ryan's incredible writer and he was credible collaborators so it gave us some all the little bit of security that you know at any given moment we could have another line coming straight from the sort of vaunted deadpool you know he he's a great sort of he understands the brand any understands like they're sort of like the crazy world of deadpool not only as a character but like the surreal nature of it all and it was great having producer in that respect and also i'm excellent yeah actually new characters is while you mentioned listen i wanna talk about josh berlin because this guy's been terrific for so many years and we average person definitely knowns what a tally is but now between infinity war what you mentioned and deadpool two this is a several of josh brolin and he's so jacked in this movie i was unbelievable i listen i said this david i imagine thirty war i feel like i'm just over satcher with sequels but i thought he was so good in that movie and you've got twenty five superheroes in thanos is terrific villain and in your film again reynolds's so cheeky and everything's tug cheek and brolin is just like he's square shoddy hero i thought he was terrific of the movie yeah he grounds the grounds the movie and he becomes sort of the adult in the movie and the minute he comes on screen there's some pathos and you know drive a toss that is needed and look.

writer producer josh brolin ryan josh berlin reynolds
"paul schrader" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"Detour that i think really livens the proceedings because by the opening moments schrader shoots the very static camera this virtually no musical score the opening credits there's no music and you feel like you're just getting a story which is very much in a mosh dire country priest percentiles they'll that's very famous film at robert press oh it's a huge influence of paul traitors career and traitor years ago he started cruz actually film critic and he wrote a book called transcendental cinema any focused on persona and yasser ozo and as you'll hear the interview with traitor ozo i only became aware of because of my love for and then i read that book and so i started watching yester osas films he's a japanese master tokyo stories most famous movie so which trader argues is impressive movies and otis movies that the focus is on the characters the meson send meaning the action within the scene static shots is not too busy and it really becomes contemplative cinema i mentioned that because for i think most movie goers you're gonna watch this film and say okay when is it going to get rolling their scenes are ethan hawke talking to amanda see fritz siphon how to pronounce the man to see freed ciphered you know and now you confuse me i don't think i've ever had a doubt about amanda saif read amanda ciphered is she does play the the woman who's mary in the movie so their series talked ciphered ena you get so conditioned to like establishing shot let's go over the shoulder of the shoulder close up electrician literally just leaves the camera there flecha format conversation says a little bit jarring at times he clearly calls attention to the fact that no i'm just gonna let the action play and we'll see how the story develops but it's amazing to think that and so i'll it's not an easy watch for that reason it's very deliberate okay people are gonna say this is too slow i don't know where it's going but if you're clearly schrader fan as i am i think you're gonna find the result very rewarding and here's where it got fascinating when i watched the.

schrader robert press paul ethan hawke cruz yasser ozo tokyo amanda fritz amanda saif amanda ciphered
"paul schrader" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"These kids sinophile nncholas cage very sincere group of film enthusiasts who are proudly s'posed goodness score bady apparently read the wrong should've file ethan highs on the professional actor direct for love is so much in this world that's dividing us in music is one of those great tools freezes together all rutgers baseball and world war two it's kind of a dream sinophile the adnan virk movie podcast yes why was it i still recording that would have been gold run the the thirteen loss of faith drama first reform is the happy result of paul schreyer's entering the what the hell let's go for it stage of his long and bravely self lacerating career terrific clerk from david edelstein checkout his full review new york magazine slash culture of first reform when a two films over reviewing this week on sinophile it's paul schrader latest film stars ethan hawke and i loved it and i came to tell you all about it i also love deadpool two i came to talk about that and how about the guest we got david lee choose a director deadpool two got him for sinophile and mr schroder whose legendary hollywood career we'll discuss at length thanks so much as always for supporting us urine sinophile go to items please do rank in review i always rate movies that have four police please give us a rating at a five stars and post a review as well that's that we get business booming hairs we appreciate support next week by the way is gonna be our two year anniversary of sinophile j barrichello is gonna join us good thirty minutes with jay he's.

paul schreyer new york magazine paul schrader david lee mr schroder j barrichello jay baseball david edelstein ethan hawke director hollywood thirty minutes two year
"paul schrader" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"paul schrader" Discussed on WTMA

"The environmental trauma that the united states and donald trump have caused and as long as barack obama was president i mean really what a difference eight months makes sense when barack obama was president everything was good now this is how insane there i mean this is this is really meant illness undiagnosed presumably paul schrader on the extinction of the human race and his new film first reformed that's look the headline i'm not making enough rent langer typed it up on behalf of the democratic party it's no surprise that paul schrader filmmaker associated with such dirt classics as taxi driver an american gigolo has a pessimistic streak note at it really is no surprise in an interview at the toronto film festival schrader said he believes that global warming is accelerating at such a rate that there is a little that can be done to arrest the ecological changes then he talks about his new new movie first reformed the film grapples with issues of faith while also sounding a warning about the destruction of the natural world it follows ethan hawke as the lead actor as a small town priest who toys with the idea of becoming a suicide bomber in the service of a radical form of environmentalism you know that the universe bomber was a radical environmentalist just by the way traders spoke with variety magazine about religion in film working with hawke and why he believes the world we all be well rid of the.

united states donald trump barack obama president paul schrader langer global warming ethan hawke variety magazine toronto eight months