17 Burst results for "Paul Sabin"

"paul sabin" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

06:50 min | Last week

"paul sabin" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And you see this Plummeting prices that's been going on across renewables. That's a is a solar and wind. That's a product of government investment in the us and china germany and elsewhere. And so actually. It's been quite successful. But as as you point out the one example one item of waste can be held up a but we have to think about government as a As as a flawed but we're the entity that is Knock necessarily be perfect. But but it's the best we got and and we need to try to make it better while also you know doing what it can do. I mean this. Linda is a perfect example. You never hear a venture capital fund being criticized for the twenty mrs because that's an automatic. Mrs yo you're taking any risk that's part of their business. The the other five or supposed to pay for the twenty plus right the thing that i want i want i just wanna say going back to that period in the late seventies is is i think we need to look at carter again a little bit and and and think about what he was trying to do versus. What what reagan did afterwards Carter was trying in. My view was trying to integrate. These criticisms of the government from the early seventies The sense that government had to be improved had to be reformed but at the same time we need government so he was trying to articulate a positive vision for government. We're going to regulate we're going to try to protect the air. We're gonna clean water These various things but at the same time we're going to improve it so he tried to use cost benefit analysis to evaluate policies. To figure out. You make sure that they were worth doing. But he's it was a real challenge to sell that. I think that was the failure of the carter administration many ways domestically and he was held up And i think there was a lot of frustration internally that people like nader and others on the outside the public interest movement. They were so accustomed criticizing the government that they criticized carter and in really some of them abandoned the abandoned who was their natural ally and really interested in supporting his election and it was real was a limitation. I think of the of the Public interest movement Not really understanding what their relationship might be to To a successful liberal administration. Has there been a successful rhetorical gambit to address that nuance i mean. Is there one I mean i think if you go through all these Particularly democratic presidents over the years you think of clinton's effort to reinvent government and they had the obama also tried to bring bring back some of this clinton. It seem to me if if if if there's a if you're gonna make a buying are binary Breakdown of where he fell. He fell closer to reagan. Then he. I'm not sure i would actually agree with that. It's interesting you go back. A he had this declaration where he said the you. The year on big government is over. I think people make a lot of lot of that. I see it as if you read that in context. He's talks about how the era of big government is over but he talks about government still has to do things to make people's lives better and i think what he was trying to do is really he was coming out of the seventy s. He was a child of this public interest period and was critical of the new deal agencies. Hillary had worked. I in public interest organizations. So they were they were really imbued with that and so they know. They were critical of the idea of powerful autonomous Unaccountable bureauc- bureaucracy. They want to have a more flexible efficient Idea of government so He i think clinton my view is that clinton was trying. I was trying to do this thing where you would build. Trust in the government By showing that you making it more efficient effective so that that was his belief you could argue about whether it was a good idea. The right approach but i think that that was what he was trying to. He was pro government ultimately. I don't know if thirty years Later there's only one thing that people can remember. It's the era of big. Government is over that that to me is understand going back if you go back and look at the reinventing government report you know. That gore is behind and the rhetoric is really critical of the new deal agencies and has talked about trying to create a new version of government. That has a more customer focused. More efficiency flexibility. So that'll be an and is talking about They they use the language of. How can we build trust in government. And the way we're gonna do. It is by by doing what i'm telling you of trying to show that we both need government and we have to improve it and i think the way the clintons remember his shows how difficult it is to Try to carry out that message very very hard. You gotta be careful about the the the the top in that speech. I think the. I don't know it seems to me. And obama came in you know and employed casting as the one of the sort of the primary drivers of of that idea of of streamlining government But this is a guy who has proven to be hostile to to government regulation and again has this sort of same not necessarily same. But he's that libertarian. Streak it seems to me the only it'd be great to get him on and talk about say is someone like sunshine generally hostile the government or is he trying to do what i'm describing which is An effective and efficient government to pursue to maximize the investment. You know the public resources in serving the public ends. I mean i think it's interesting more recently. The way cost benefit analysis turned around with social cost of carbon to be a justification for intervention in government action and now it's striking that the conservatives don't like cost benefit analysis when it comes to taking account of the other cost of carbon dioxide. But i guess i'm asking like what what is the inefficiencies like. I'm how problematic have the inefficiencies been. I mean i guess that's my point. Is that like you know when you lead with. We're going to fix inefficiencies of government It seems to me that you're you're the argument is is that government has been failing opposed to you know in its execution of plans as opposed to we simply have not been the wrong people have been or the wrong agenda. Has government's been used for the wrong agenda right. I mean like i don. I mean like i say we can talk about the inefficiencies in the unemployment benefits were. Put out certainly. It was inefficient because we had no apparatus to get money to people. Who were you know. Uber drivers or You know we had no but it also have poverty it..

clinton carter reagan carter administration nader Linda Carter germany china obama Hillary us clintons gore
"paul sabin" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

10:12 min | Last week

"paul sabin" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The book because he Makes the journey from being a public intellectual unsafe at any speed his expose of the auto auto safety in automobile sort of close alliance between the auto companies and the and the government To them becoming an organizational entrepreneur and he creates dozens of organizations Starting in the late sixties and leads encourages young people particularly to investigate lots of government agencies and do lots of exposes and he kind of runs through this. He's a thread through this. So yeah Really a fascinating character grew up in north western connecticut as a sun java restaurant family and That had immigrated lebanese immigrants and We're very committed to town meeting life and small business and the and the is that idea. And i think that really carries through neighbors philosophy through his whole life including his antagonism to big business. His sense of a belief in the american ideals of competitiveness and small town democracy participation And so he tries to bring that to the larger larger arena. Certainly well i mean. Let's let's let's let's talk about how you know like where the line was drawn or was it or you know that Between the idea of our government has been corrupted by business on some level or our government is imperfect or that government is problematic or having that much power is problematic because he was also. I mean he would not be accurate. Call him of the socialist left. No he's he's clearly you know he's a he was against of 'isms and i think and that's important part of this sort of public interest movement than writing is that it was not Not it kind of came after. What will it's really antagonistic. Both to state sponsors socialism and two unfettered capitalism and it criticized the socialist model because it had a critique of bureaucracy essentially it was a critique of institutions large institutions and that included bureaucracies that would become unaccountable and oppressive to their citizens. And so someone like nader was a you know the the embrace of citizens as an ex outside watching over the government was a rejection. Both of the corporates corporations and their power but also of the unfettered power of the of the state itself but was it was it you know. So if fdr said that you know essentially something. I'm paraphrasing but we but we are the government that we are the government did nader's tack change that formulation in that like you know. We'll we'll or. I think that's a great question i mean. I think they'd say the. I think what what nader and others would say is that is that the government should be us but it's not us Because of the way it's been captured and and the way that has these internal dynamics That don't lead to it representing the people And so therefore you need. We need to create this. I mean it's just a wonderful name of public. Interest movement is saying essentially that outside of the government is where the public interest. The flame of the public interest has to be curated has to be safeguarded To make sure that the government is representing it. So i think there's a strong faith in government. The belief in the government and the congress is representing the people but also a sense of disappointment and failure And a need for that. The system is needs to be held accountable with sort of a permanent outside. Watch guards and and and to what extent would i mean. I think people can understand how that that framing can. Both i mean can can cut both ways. Yeah i mean because my My assessment of what the public interest is holding. The government to account for that is very different from other people's notion of the public interest is and that seems to me. Open your opening up once you once you're identifying or you're saying that. The problem is structural with the government. as opposed to its relationship with. Let's say big money. And the implication being that you need permanent outside institution because you can never fix that relationship with big money It starts to become a little bit problematic in up to anyone. Sort of idea of what the public interest is. I think if we were thinking about some of the weaknesses or limitations of the movement one of them would be This issue which is that. They believe that they they held the idea that may hell the public interests But then they're antagonists conservative conservative law law firms groups also organized in. Also they were. They were claiming that they represented the public just and they were suing to protect property rights against regulations. And and all that and then as the judiciary has shifted over the last Four forty years or so It's become increasingly unsympathetic to the liberal public. Interest groups more sympathetic to the conservative ones and has just shown that as a as a mode of social change that relying on sort of external litigation and advocacy has serious limitations as opposed to trying to control the institutions of power. Get involved with politics has as messy compromised as they are to try to build a larger social movement. I think there's been a realization that that that is necessary. Let's talk about like sort of the the other types of groups You know because it never occurred to me that we you know you hear so many of the defense funds That those were all sort of almost in some way Incubated or modeled after a did and and to be in we outline and it's sort of like a material way. What did through these citizens i mean. I think people here listened to some of the past times where i've gone to these tort conferences. We get a little bit of that. You outlined what they're sort of what their methodology was adopted by other. That's great So so i'd say. I is two things. One is the idea of the defence fund It was inspired in some ways but by the end of lacy peasley Legal defense and education fund and seeing the civil rights litigation and civil rights movement and those attacks and critiques of the government And seeing that. Oh well we could create these types of organizations so you get the environmental defense fund the natural resources defense council the sierra club legal defense on their all modeled on on on that and also maybe the aclu and so it in at the end of nineteen sixty seven to nineteen sixty eight and some of these other folks Decide to start creating organizations That would that could live gate. And that could you know. Sue the government and try to rein in and watch over the agencies and the other thing that was mobilized motivating. Some of this is the is the vietnam war and the sense that The growing distrust of government was stimulated by By the war itself and the antiwar movement since government might be lying and misrepresenting and misleading leading. You know so. These are all the environment of it So as nixon comes into office the liberals out of power Groups like the ford foundation fun to hold network of these organizations and what they do is start lit litigating so they're tremendous numbers of lawsuits against the agencies are investigating nader particularly Did a whole series of investigations of clean air a water pollution of air pollution of a pet toxic pesticides all these different things and they were investigations of agencies and you can tie them directly to the major legislation of the early nineteen seventies like the clean air act and the clean water act and they had a big impact on how those laws restructured in terms of the role of citizens in account holding government and business accountable and also the way that congress Set the rules of very stringently so that agencies would not have as much latitude for action that they wanted to create. They didn't trust the. This is a fundamental distrust in the legislation of early seventies that is stimulated by these types these investigations in this litigation. Wait i'm sorry. Will you explain that last part That the that the legislation did not give agencies that came out of the nineteen seventies wide parameters. Well will empower the agencies but it gave them very specific goals and mandates and the idea was that you couldn't just You can just try necessarily just trust the agency But you had to really be very directive of the agency so that they're much more in Much much tougher emphasis on enforcement because under under johnson. There had been a kind of these. They embrace like conferences. Like there'd be we're gonna have a conference of the interested parties and we're going to discuss how we can improve improve the air and we'll work on it and we'll try to try to solve it and there was a sense that this is broken That the government they need to pass laws. There was one guy working clean water. David zwick says we have to. We have to pass laws that our government proof with the idea that the government you know you couldn't let the government deal undermine the law itself and so And so that was that at that time it was more get together with business and labor and figure out what the solution is and now it's like the solution is to to make it less. I mean the irony of course is that we are. I don't know if it's months or maybe a couple of years away from the supreme court essentially staying.

nader north western fdr connecticut congress natural resources defense coun government sierra club aclu ford foundation nixon vietnam David zwick johnson supreme court
"paul sabin" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

08:37 min | Last week

"paul sabin" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Professor of history at yale university director of the yale environmental humanities program and author of his most recent public citizens the attack on big government and the remaking of american liberalism. Paul sabin welcome to the program much. Thanks for having me on the book. fascinating in part because one of the things that i regularly do And i used to do a radio show with a With a trial lawyer is to go to these mass tort conferences and very often. I get an opportunity to sit down with with a public interest. Lawyers okay awesome and and so. I'm very familiar with the type. A skepticism of government. And really right now right. We're seeing an enormous amount of skepticism towards government. And we're finding we're we're we're seeing. What the potential real problems are with that in functioning of a of an emergency. But let's start with where we were post war in terms of this perspective. Which was i think you know fundamentally different than where we were probably pre new deal and tertia. Yeah yeah yeah. I mean so public citizens. The book israel is really about the journey from In some ways. The journey from lyndon johnson toronto reagan and trying to make sense of the changing attitudes towards government over that time period. And so it's really important to start with the the period that you're talking about beginning in the fifties and an early sixties When you have a kind of the federal government playing kind of managerial role in the economy and Brokering between business and labor and managing different sectors of the economy including trucking and energy and Airlines communications and and so it's a a period of time when the the Those one economists writes about it as The system of countervailing powers. And there's this idea of balance between these different parts of the political economy And so what my book is talking about is is really the the the rise of liberals Speaking out against that system and seeing it as problematic and so it's going Against against and interpretation that describes the Through the end of what some people call the new deal order this period and the post war period When the government was doing big things it was building dams highways and urban renewal. Lots lots of big big interventions and how that sort of fell apart during this period. And so you know. So i'm i'm writing about How this wasn't just conservatives that were attacking us but also the liberals That were Increasingly upset with the sort of unaccountable power of the federal government. And we say you know when we when we look at around that period The say the late fifties early sixties Polls that looked at faith in government. Was something like three quarters of the population had trust in government. And now it's down to like one quarter. Yeah yeah so. So i mean you you have the government coming out of the war and out of the new deal. The sense of the the government does the protector of democracy the representative of the public and so part of what i'm writing about is the idea during that time period that the That the government could Represented the public interest And that it There was an idea in the new deal that you create these executive agencies securities exchange commission others And those agencies would be able to represent the public and as i was saying broker in the interest of the public and and so So also agencies like the tennessee valley authority and the historian henry. Calmer talks about that as being so this great Example of how government could be superior to business and the government could manage in the public interest and we had to it was the was the epitome of american democracy and Yes so so. Part of what i'm talking about is is how that falls apart and we should say it was galbraith right that That referred to the yeah break. Yeah yeah the countervailing powers directly and so okay. So this is the story of how we got from that. Seventy five percent to twenty five percent in many respects and It is I mean i think like you know other people have have told the conservative story And ensure that has a. That's a big part of that. Yeah but there's also this other part and it's I it's interesting to me in terms of like how it has an interplay between anti monopolist and and socialists or people who are more social. His socialist lead the inclined. I guess in in some respects. But let's talk about how The where you start to see and part of what you right is both a history ended intellectual history in some respects and you see some of this skepticism. I guess of government starting with with change cups. Who just talk about that just as a as a and we can talk about. I opened the book with With three strong characters Names are familiar to many jacobson. Rachel carson and ralph nader and and talk about them as intellectual public intellectuals of the early nineteen sixties liberals who turn on the government. And so jane jacobs famously wrote this book the definite life american cities and the first sentences that is that this book is an attack on on on on planning and planners essentially and And so she is reacting to people like robert moses great city builders Who were remaking the new york new york area with highways and Parks and bridges and other types of things and she is reacting reacting to that And so it's really the Part of what's happening is in the in the postwar period. The federal government is grown. It's in scale and it's it's it's sort of using technology and science to increasingly manipulate. The american landscape rebuild it around the automobile carson speaks up about pesticides the spraying of mass spraying pesticides across the Across the nation a. nature is first injured. You major intervention is around the automobile as well in terms of automobile safety but it's Yeah so there. There's speaking up. And then so part of what i talk about in the book is how it goes from these ideas these intellectual ideas which extra even embedded even represented in the kennedy administration There's a report when kennedy comes into office about the agency's talking about how Agencies aren't doing what the people wanted him or thought they should do But yes. I started these public and big public. Intellectuals has become an organizational movement By the end of the sixties into the seventies And then he you really do focus on on nature. i should also say at this point to what i found. Really interesting was There there is a there is a theme that we see the comes out of this era in it is sort of adjacent to the the hippie movement i guess But it is a libertarian streak. If you will on the left on some level and Or in an individualistic Anti institutional concern about the bureaucracy famous. What was the mario saudia you don't want a cog in the machine Kind of thing. Exactly stephen thinking about like adam curtis's You know documentaries on like the the what happened in that era was the notion of individuality yourself that took place on the left. I as an expression of of nonconformity. I guess on some level and getting away from that but So not ralph nader agai with basically three different i guess profiles right the the the consumer advocate and then sort of the broader citizen advocate maybe and then and then In one thousand nine hundred eighty as sort of a third party guy but Let's talk about his development and what the implications of that were sure. Yeah so nate. Nater as in many ways. I use him as a central character..

yale environmental humanities Paul sabin federal government yale university lyndon johnson government reagan tennessee valley authority toronto israel galbraith ralph nader Rachel carson jane jacobs robert moses kennedy administration
"paul sabin" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

08:56 min | Last month

"paul sabin" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Not something that's like killing a lot of people are making people really super sick but the path from here to there is is just not clear and it seems right now like there's just as a lot of obstacles. I think probably the best way to make sure people get the vaccine is to tell them they. Can't you know just like make. It seem like something. Only only the government gets to have and then hope that reverse psychology on people. Because i feel actually a lot less positive. I live in georgia. So i am certainly in the midst of lake vaccine denial world but in a way i really do worry about what has been thought of or if like a fringe anti-science movement that like wasn't even across the political spectrum people were okay getting their kids vaccinated as a general rule. I am worried about like what happens after this because so much misinformation is spreading. I just seeing the other day on instagram offender. A friend who is a nurse and she's protesting outside the hospital because they're saying jessica vaccinated and she doesn't think that's fair and you just wonder. Yeah it's very it's dark right. It's very. It's very depressing concerning to see so much rejection. Even from medical professionals rate of the need to get vaccinated against something that has literally killed. Almost you know over half a million americans alone And yet there's still so much pushback. So i i'm worried about what is coming down the hatch on this i mean it's so our inability to act for the collective good so high. These days are failure or incapacity. To see i mean to. I'm sure the nurses saying oh well i. I'm willing to endure that risk for myself and it's like it has nothing to do with you. It has nothing to do with you. Nurse it has to do with all the people you're going to interact with who are vulnerable. I mean what she what she said was like she was. They were treated so badly during kobe. They had no. Pb protection they are asked to do so much they which is totally true. I don't understand why the response to that is. We should be able to put you know sick. People at risk versus we deserve better protection. We deserve You know better. Hey we deserve better hours in It just feels so misguided to me in in some ways. I think it is an attempt to exercise control in a world that that people feel like is unpredictable. And they don't have a lot of control over rate but honestly seeing nurses protests outside hospitals. Beat me a lot more pessimistic. Can i ask you all a question about the sort of global moral quandary. Were in so you know. I totally understand why parents of younger kids are begging for a faster approval vaccine in the united states. it doesn't seem like we can get to herd immunity without those kids especially with the more contagious variant. At the same time we have these horribly low rates of vaccine access in much of the world and you know we were supposed to have a plan that ensured that vulnerable people globally older people people with Other risk factors got access before the lower risk. People who were the younger people. I mean have. We abandoned that out of pure selfishness in the united states is the contagious of the delta variant. A legitimate reason. What like how are we supposed to think about this. I mean i was actually thinking about emily that i've been talking about the us so much as we've been talking about this and not like what this actually is is so much more dire for people in other countries and they don't have access to what we have access to up by the way makes the vaccine those who are refusing to the backseat a little bit more frustrating. Because you see. In other countries people waiting ten twelve hours in line for the hopes of getting a vaccine in here were just rejecting it but it is true that what we're seeing in places with less vaccine access is in no makes what's happening here look like cakewalk. It's it's devastating. Let us go more. Surely to cocktail chatter when you are sitting in the swelter of new haven. Emily baz lan extremely cold. Drink next you cold alcoholic drink. What will you be chattering about to paul sabin. I am imagining that margarita. Over the weekend. I can never resist an opportunity to talk about the census and this week. The census bureau is dropping the all the data for redistricting across the country. So this is the data that will enable states to reallocate legislative seats within states. We already did apportionment now. We're onto the inside states. How does power shift. And we're gonna just have this mad dash of map-drawing Because a lot of states have these really fast approaching deadlines for redistricting to take place like in the fall. And it's just gonna be really interesting to see you know how. The state affects the power balance within states. What happens to opportunity districts for black and latino voters that are acquired by the voting rights act There's just like lots of political power to be reallocated with huge consequences and some of the states that are going to expect it to move really quickly. According to politico are colorado michigan. Ohio kentucky iowa. Other states with early deadlines oregon north carolina california virginia. Those are some really important states for both the balance of power in the house and st some of them with their own state houses in play. So anyway i will be watching all of this very closely because i am obsessed. The census j. dr jesse w race. What's your gender. So clint smith who co hosted justice in america with me for our first two seasons. And it's just one of the kindest people on earth guys not. I'm recommending his book. Because this book is legitimately great Is called how the word is passed and it is kind of a survey of american history through visits to different Historical sites so he goes to different sites including angola prison in louisiana. He goes to monticello. And he printed analyzes and assesses the role of slavery in american history. The way that we grapple with it or don't grapple with it and it's really just beautifully britain as well. i mean it's it almost feels like fiction. It's so so beautiful So i highly recommend clinton and then one other book that i just to anybody who has middle school kids will really enjoy. This book called my in the robot which is just amazing book by eve. Doing who is just incredible scholar in all sorts of ways. But this amazing. Why book for kids. I guess it's not why maybe it's for second to fourth grade or something around that age but it's really really good and so I highly recommend that one as well. I just want a second recommendation. Especially for clinton's book and also to a few weeks ago you're on the show and you talked about d. transition baby is a novel that i was in the middle love when i was listening to you talk about it. Oh my gosh. We talked about online. And i got a lot out of that but yes it's so good. my chatter about. Maybe the best story. I read in a longtime. It's jen senior story in the atlantic. What bobby mckelvin left behind grief conspiracy theories in one family search for meaning the two decades since nine eleven and it's about a family and this family lost a son in nine eleven. Bobby miguel vein and his father and mother survived. His brother survived. His girlfriend survived and jen senior. Who is very close bobby. Miguel veins family goes back and spend time with twenty years later and tries to understand what his loss meant. And how how. That's shaped how they've moved through the world since then and it's i don't want to spoil it by getting into any of the details it's just a beautiful heart wrenching story about loss and and about surviving loss so check it out listeners. Listeners listeners listeners you send us your cocktail cheddars and it's great. Please keep them coming to us. Please send them to us at slate gabfest on twitter because.

us Emily baz lan paul sabin jessica georgia dr jesse w emily clint smith clinton kentucky monticello iowa angola north carolina oregon colorado michigan Ohio virginia bobby mckelvin
"paul sabin" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

13:53 min | 2 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And so the fact that I still have a few more gulps left is a positive. I don't know how long until the caffeine wears off. But I do know that we're an hour down and I'm still upright, boom. It's after hours with Amy on CBS sports radio. Thanks so much for tuning in to the show. If you want to ask Amy anything, now's your chance, and you don't even have to wait 'til win the after hours bracket challenge. So, but that doesn't mean you get to join us live when you do it. So you can send your questions this time to our show Twitter after our CBS. And also post them on our Facebook page, I did re tweet, but make sure you send the questions to produce producer, Chris and not to me. And then on our Facebook page, he will be patrolling. And while you're there on either Twitter or Facebook, you can join the after hours bracket challenge, we don't require you to know anything about college basketball. In fact, you want to know what I found? This is really cool. I knew there had to be some science behind it. But I actually saw a tweet that spelled it out for me on Tuesday. Listen to this. This comes from Paul Sabin. Who is a master sports analytics he actually has a PHD in statistics. And he now works for ESPN. So he put the tweet out the refers to a psychologist and her team in two thousand one who did a study somehow and found that there wasn't inverted. You curb do you know, what euchre basins essentially a learning curve? That's at upside down you. Okay. So think about. It's like a finger the finger tip. But upside down you they call it inverted U-curve the relationship between your basketball knowledge and the performance on picking winners in the NCAA tournament. Meaning that if you're a basketball knowledge is high your accuracy and making picks is low. They are directly correlated. If your basketball knowledge is low. Or somewhere in the middle very often year accuracy and making picks in higher. What are we talking about last night show, the method? This was our Twitter Tuesday question the methods for making picks and some of you you sent me tweets all day long. And also on our Facebook page, some of you talked about mascot, some of you talked about uniform colors. Some of you talked about having your seven and nine year old kids. Do it. Some of you talked about having the dog step on a particular a particular school. And that's how you pick it. And some of you said, you flip a coin somebody you use the well all kinds of gifts. But one of you said. It's the famous, Sandra. Bullock, and don't tell me bird box last night. They called it Byrd bath. And it was cakes giggles for days. Yes. I mean, I laughed too. So it's okay. If you left. The numbers. Don't the numbers will tell you. That the more, you know, about college basketball, and the more you try to apply your knowledge to the NC double A tournament bracket. The more red. You will have what it oh. Last night. A listener said it's like a game of thrones wedding. The more red you will have on your bracket. So don't use your brain don't use your noggin. No instead. Yes. Use chalk use the schools. You know pig. Couple of critical upsets. And then hope that you somehow preserve most of your Sweet Sixteen most of your lead eight because the the deeper you go in the tournament the more points, you get per winner per round. All of that becomes. Perfectly clear when you joined the after hours bracket challenge. So do it do it either on Twitter or Facebook. We're inside the rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans studio rocket mortgage is with you every step of the way to provide a seamless mortgage. Experience. Our number's eight five five two one two four two two seven that's eight five five two one two four CBS. We have a couple of NBA notes that we will get to. But of course, there's news from the NFL. Of course, there is. How about von taste Bertha? Ct the linebacker who spent seven years in Cincinnati seven controversial years. Infants and Atty. And he has now joined the Oakland Raiders on a one year deal. Up to five million dollars that comes from the NFL network. But there are couple of things here that at and this kind of goes with the theme of free agency for any sport really a lot of times. It's about who, you know, not what you know. And they're generally pretty small fraternities. And so will now go play with defensive coordinator Paul ginther who had that same with the Bengals for for. What is it for three or four years while he was in Cincinnati? And he will now be on the same team though. Obviously opposite side of the ball but same team as an Tonio Brown. Do you guys? Remember, the two thousand fifteen postseason. I do we talked about this game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cincinnati Bengals four days. I remember it was wild card weekend. And there were four games total. But this one dominated and it wasn't even the entire game dominated though, fire member correctly. It was AJ McCarron who was playing for Andy Dalton and McCarron had the Bengals in position. They had a double figure Lee, maybe it was fifteen to nothing something like that. They double digit lead. And. And the Steelers come back, but. It still looks like the Bengals were in position to win member. Jeremy hill had that crazy fumble the Steelers were covered. But then Dante's perfect forced to turnover by the Steelers. If I'm not mistaken a lot of this is fuzzy, but I just remember we did two full days on the end of this game. When perfect then blows up Cincinnati's win for a helmet to helmet hit. He goes in. Hot and heavy on Antonio Brown and helmet-to-helmet hit. Antonio actually miss the rest of the postseason for the Steelers. Which included did not include the trip to Denver. The very next week. They were in Denver and he missed the game against Peyton Manning. And the Broncos. Anyway. So Brown got a concussion Berbick was spending three games. But it happened in that final member. Joey porter was out on the field and Bengals fans were incensed. The Bengals were poised to win it. And then they just fell apart in those final couple of minutes. But there was also a hit this past season that felt like he had a little personal element to it. ABC catches a pass over the middle. Berkovic flies in with an elbow and seemingly hits Brown and the head again. And so a B's down on the turf, he doesn't get out for a couple of seconds. He had some words after for birth defect. And so there's a crazy history between these two, but of course, Antonio Brown. Took to social media to say, it's he said he'd just talked to. The Twitter handle for vont, his birthday's king fifty-five says I just talked to him black and silver baby. Hashtag bully season. I think that hashtag could come back to bite him in the rear depending on how the raiders do this year hashtag bully season could be used to mean a whole lot of things. So in Tonio Brown involved as Bertha CT with the raiders, oh, and then you know, Jon Gruden Chucky. So that's ways of news from the NFL. It's after hours with Amy Lawrence on CBS sports radio. This is going to take some getting used to for me. Probably for a lot of Green Bay Packers fans as well. Clay Matthews and other linebacker has agreed to terms with the Rams on a two year deal. Now, it makes sense for him because he grew up in southern California. And he walked on at USC. But he's the Packers career sack leader. He's there all time leader in franchise history with eighty three and a half sacks. Now, I know this past year, he only had a handful even though he he played all sixteen games. And he's getting older. He's thirty two. But what a cool opportunity for him. The fact that he can play in southern California for a team that just went to the Super Bowl like Sean McVay, and the Rams are gobbling up all these pieces. Now, it's hard to know exactly how they all fit together. But they do not shy away from picking up veteran guys will out of experience. And then think about who the defensive coordinator is Wade Phillips. A Super Bowl winner. But also a guy who is he's a master at putting all the pieces together and communicating and not just teaching but learning from all these younger guys. And so claim Matthews in a Rams uniform. That's. It's going to be a little jarring a living in Tony O'Brien at a raiders uniform or seeing Odell Beckham junior Browns uniform. It's good thing. We have a few months to get acclimated to these changes. It's after hours on CBS sports radio. There is other NFL news that will get you. But before we take our break. Did you happen to see that? There has been a plea deal offered. That would essentially drop the charges against patriots owner, Bob Kraft and not just craft but the twenty four other men. Who were caught up in the sting, the sex trafficking ring that was split up in Jupiter, Florida. Well, south Florida, but but the one in particular that we've talked about was in Jupiter and remember there are videotapes. And and these were the authorities who were. Who had planted these these video recorders and caught a bunch of guys on camera. And then as part of the bigger picture charge them with soliciting prostitution. However, here's the catch. So you decide if you're Bob Kraft, would you do this? Now, remember he has pled not guilty not in person, but he's pled not guilty through his attorneys, even though according to authorities. They have in one camera twice in the span of twenty four hours visiting this or kids have Asia, whatever it is. It's actually closed down. Now. Oh, and remember the authorities outside this strip mall stopped his vehicle twice. And he was asked to present ID. Did he not know at that point that something was going on? So they know he was there. And they have them on camera allegedly soliciting a prostitute. And you can read the details. But here's the catch. If they dropped the charges it requires the craft and these other men have to look at the tapes, they have to review the evidence. Oh, could you imagine? I mean, it's bad enough that other people have seen the tapes. But could you imagine being forced to sit there and watch it with your attorney and the district attorney editorials? Oh. Are mortified for him. I mean, the whole thing is mortifying the the idea that he was paying for that. He was allegedly. I have to keep saying that allegedly paying for the things he was paying for the whole thing is gross and disturbing and the sex trafficking part. Just rips your heart out, though, authorities have indicated there's no connection. There's no proof that these guys knew this was sex trafficking. I think you kind of have to be blind to it. But either way they're not wrapped up in the sex trafficking charges. But these guys would have to sit there and review the evidence. And here's the caveat admit, they would have been proved guilty at trial. So there's no. There's no way for them to get around. The guilty part. So even if the charges are dropped they would be on record as saying, yes, we would have been proved guilty at trial. We want to avoid trial business the plea deal. So the charges would be dropped. If they watch the tape at admit to prosecutors that they are guilty..

Twitter Antonio Brown Facebook CBS basketball NFL Pittsburgh Steelers Cincinnati Bengals Amy Lawrence raiders Rams defensive coordinator Clay Matthews California attorney caffeine ESPN Green Bay Packers
"paul sabin" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"I consider it to be a step forward a step in the right direction. Maybe a positive on this edition of home show that I haven't actually sucked down all of my coffee, usually by this middle show of the workweek when I enter studio. The is already gone. And so the fact that I still have a few more gulps left is a positive. I don't know how long until the caffeine wears off. But I do know that we're an hour down and I'm still upright, boom. It's after hours with Amy Lawrence on CBS sports radio. Thanks so much for tuning in to the show. If you want to ask Amy anything, now's your chance, and you don't even have to wait to win the after hours bracket challenge. So, but that doesn't mean you to join us live when you do it. So you can send your questions this time to our show Twitter after our CBS. And also post them on our Facebook page. I did read tweet, but make sure you send the questions to produce producer, Chris and not to me. And then on our Facebook page, he will be patrolling. And while you're there on either Twitter or Facebook you can join the after hours bracket challenge. We don't require you to know anything about college basketball. In fact, you wanna know what I found? This is really cool. I knew there had to be some science behind it. But I actually saw a tweet that spelled it out for me on Tuesday. Listen to this. This comes from Paul Sabin. Who is a master of sports analytics he actually has a PHD in statistics. And he now works for ESPN. So he put the tweet out the refers to a psychologist and her team in two thousand one who did a study somehow and found that there wasn't inverted. You curb do you know, what you curve as essentially a learning curve? That's an upside down you. Okay. So think about it's like a finger to figure, but upside down you they call it inverted euchre the relationship between your basketball knowledge and their performance on picking winners in the NC double A tournament. Meaning that if your basketball knowledge is high your accuracy and making picks is low. They are directly correlated. If your basketball knowledge is low. Or somewhere in the middle very often year. Accuracy and making picks is higher. What were we talking about last night show the methods? This was our twizzlers Tuesday question the methods for making picks and some of you you sent me tweets all day long. And also on our Facebook page, some of you talked about mascot, some of you talked about uniform colors. Some of you talked about having your seven and nine year old kids. Do it. Some of you talked about having the dog step on a particular a particular school. And that's how you pick it. And some of you said, you flip a coin some of us, the well all kinds of gifts. But one of you said. It's the famous, Sandra. Bullock, and don't tell me bird box last night. They called Byrd bath. And it was kicks in giggles for days. Yes. I mean, I laughed too. So it's okay. If you left. The numbers. Don't the numbers will tell you. That the more, you know, about college basketball and the more you try to apply your knowledge to the NCAA tournament bracket. The more red. You will have what it last night. A listener said it's like a game of thrones wedding. The more red you will have on your bracket. So don't use your brain don't use your noggin. No instead. Yes. Use chalk use this schools. You know, pick a couple of critical upsets? And then hope that you somehow preserve most of your Sweet Sixteen most of your lead eight because the the deeper you go in the tournament the more points, you get per winner per round. All of that becomes..

Facebook basketball Twitter Amy Lawrence Chris CBS caffeine Bullock Paul Sabin ESPN producer NCAA Byrd Sandra nine year
"paul sabin" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Do you take? A team like Texas. With a sixteen and sixteen record. But some really good winds. Beat North Carolina. Beat the best teams in the big twelve this year. Or do you take the mid major team like UNC, Greensboro? Won twenty games this year. And so in these situations who gets the nod. The selection committee the last few years has sided with the power program. Saint Mary's one thirty games last year and got left out. And the committee's take was you want a lot of games, but you didn't beat many if any good teams, you got swept by Gonzaga. Then challenge yourself out of conference. Sorry, you're out. And so when that happens, I get it. If you didn't schedule. If you and I know it's hard for those teams. And sometimes you get lucky sometimes you play amid major and it doesn't look like it's a big game. But that team. That team comes out of nowhere and wins. It's league or makes a big jump and might go from like a seventeen win deemed or twenty five win team. Sometimes you don't know like last year one of the big reasons, and I'll reference this team again because they're always on the bubble last year. One of the reasons why Syracuse cotton is because they had buffalo on their schedule in a non conference game. They beat them. And most times most years when you schedule buffalo in the carrier dome. It's like let's have a team drive three hours to lose. Last year. Buffalo was really good. And they even better this year. Buffalo beat. Arizona last year in the tournament in this year. They've been ranked in the top twenty five all year. So sometimes scheduling you think you've got a good schedule when you don't and vice versa. UNC, greensboro. I think is the case study. For me in what I would want. Out of a mid major team if we're really struggling to come up with. A field of sixty eight. Give me the team that doesn't have a bad loss. And I know that that doesn't sound like I'm setting a very high bar. Because really they didn't beat many. They didn't beat anybody. But there twenty eight and six and they really did not stub their toe. One time this year. These are the six losses for Greensboro at LSU at Kentucky. They got swept by Wofford. They lost three times against Wofford. A team. That's ranked twentieth right now. And they lost that Furman. Now, who's Furman Firmin's a team that beat Villanova in is also on the bubble. And I thought what are the analytics guys at ESPN Paul Sabin made a good point. That this year. Gonzaga won four games against quad one team. So the upper echelon of the NC double A four the entire year in went twenty six zero against everybody else. Greensboro, won two games against quad one teams in what twenty four no against everybody else. Gonzaga might be number one seed. Greensboro was a bubble team. Sagas resume is better. But it's not leaps and bounds better. So when you're loading up on cupcakes you in twenty eight games. That's really not always that impressive. You gotta dig into the numbers. We only lose six games you want to see you those six losses came against in Greensboro case, they either came against a great team or a pretty good team. And so that's the kind of mid major team that I would want in the tournament over say, Texas or Indiana, Ohio State give me that team. Give me the team that might not have slayed Goliath. Didn't slay Goliath. But they also didn't lose to David. And I don't always give the Thai or I'm not just charitable and say well, come on let the little guy in. I think you've got to earn in this case you play this. Listen to this you play thirty four games. And you don't lose to a bad team or an average team. You don't have a one night where you go on the road in your own conference into somebody else's, Jim. And they're not as good as you. They're not there. There a cellar dweller team or their middle of the pack in your league. And they just get up for your game. And they beat you that Emerson college basketball all the time. But it never happened to Greensboro this year. So that's the team if I'm rooting for. And I am full disclosure if I'm rooting for a team in the bubbles always watered down maybe not as water down now because we've had some teams like the a ten tournament that's going on right now. That league got an extra bid because VCU lost. And the Pac twelve got an extra bid because Washington in Arizona state lost. So the the bubbles been strengthened the last few days, it's still not strong. I root for a team that played thirty four times this year in didn't lose to a bad team. That is an NC double A tournament resume when you're kind of splitting hairs at the end. And you've got a lot of crap. Give me a team that didn't have a bad night all year. Eight five five two one two four CBS. Take some your AA tournament. Questions asked me, if you think a team is interesting, I'll tell you. Sir team. You think is asleep or you want to run it by me give it to me. Team. You think is upset alert high seed that you think will go down early. Team you've been watching that you think is under the radar. These are the kind of discussions and debates I like to have on a day. Like this thrilled of some of you want to join me eight five five two one two four CBS. That's eight five five two one two four two two seven or on Twitter at the pony. Express pony. Spelled P O N. I follow us on Twitter at CBS sports radio. I'm also going to tell you teams who probably think therein. But I think are going to end up being on the outside looking in. But first it's time for the latest sports update with Darwin's..

Greensboro CBS Furman Firmin UNC Texas Arizona Buffalo North Carolina Twitter Gonzaga Wofford Saint Mary Goliath Syracuse basketball David
"paul sabin" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Selection Sunday is who do you take? Do you take? A team like Texas. With a sixteen and sixteen record. But some really good wins. Beat North Carolina. Beat the best teams in the big twelve this year. Where do you take the mid major team like UNC, Greensboro? Won twenty eight games this year. And so in these situations who gets the nod. The selection committee the last few years has sided with the power program. Saint Mary's one thirty games last year and got left out. And the committee's take was you want a lot of games, but you didn't beat many if any good teams got swept by Gonzaga. Then challenge yourself out of conference. Sorry, you're out. And so when that happens, I get it. If you didn't schedule. If you and I know it's hard for those teams. And sometimes you get lucky sometimes you play amid major and it doesn't look like it's a big game. But that team. That team comes out of nowhere and wins. It's league or makes a big jump and might go from like a seventeen win deemed or twenty five win team. Sometimes you don't know last year one of the big reasons, and I'll reference this team again because they're always on the bubble last year. One of the reasons why Syracuse Scott in is because they had buffalo on their schedule in a non conference game. They beat them most times most years when you schedule buffalo in the carrier dome. It's like let's have a team drive three hours to lose. Last year. Buffalo was really good. And they were even better this year. Buffalo beat. Arizona last year the tournament and this year they've been ranked in the top twenty five all year. So sometimes scheduling you think you've got a good schedule when you don't invite versa. UNC, greensboro. I think is the case study. For me, and what I would want. Out of a mid major team if we're really struggling to come up with. A field of sixty eight give me the team that doesn't have a bad loss. And I know that that doesn't sound like I'm setting a very high bar. Because really they didn't beat many. They didn't beat anybody. But there are twenty eight and six and they really did not stub their toe. One time this year. These are the six losses for Greensboro at LSU at Kentucky. They got swept by Wofford. They lost three times against Wofford. A team. That's ranked twentieth right now. And they lost at Furman. Now, who's Furman Firmin's a team that beat Villanova and is also on the bubble. And I thought what are the analytics guys at ESPN Paul Sabin made a good point. That this year. Gonzaga won four games against quad one team. So the upper echelon of the NC double A for the entire year in wet twenty six zero against everybody else. Greensboro, won two games against quad one teams in what twenty four no against everybody else. Gonzaga might be number one seed. Greensboro was a bubble team. Gonzaga's resume is better. But it's not leaps and bounds better. And so we're loading up on cupcakes. You win twenty eight games. That's really not always that. Impressive. You gotta dig into the numbers. Or we only lose six games you want to see you those six losses came against in Greensboro case, they either came against a great team or a pretty good team. So that's the kind of mid major team that I would want in the tournament over say, Texas or Indiana, Ohio State give me that team. Give me the team that might not have slayed Goliath. Didn't slay Goliath. But they also didn't lose to David. And I don't always give the tie or I'm not just charitable and say well, come on let the little guy in. I think you've got to earn in this case you play this. Listen to this you play thirty four games in you don't lose to a bad team or an average team. You don't have one night where you go on the road in your own conference into somebody else's, Jim. And they're not as good as you. They're not there. There a cellar dweller team. They're middle of the pack in your league. And they just get up for your game. And they beat you that Emerson college basketball all the time. But it never happened to Greensboro this year. So that's the team if I'm rooting for. I am full disclosure if I'm rooting for a team in the bubbles always watered down maybe not as watered down now because we've had some teams like the tournament that's going on right now. You know that Lee got an extra bid because VCU lost. And the Pac twelve got an extra bid because Washington in Arizona state lost the above the bubbles been strengthened the last few days. It's still not strong. I root for a team that played thirty four times this year in didn't lose to a bad team. That is an NC double A tournament resume when you're kind of splitting hairs at the end. And you've got a lot of crap. Give me a team that didn't have a bad might all year. Eight five five two one two four CBS. Take some your NC double A tournament. Questions asked me if you think a team is interesting. I'll tell you. So our team you think is asleep or you want to run it by me give it to me. Team. You think is an upset alert high seed that you think will go down early. Team you've been watching that you think is under the radar. These are the kinds of discussions and debates. I like to have on a day like this. And I'd be thrilled of some of you want to join me eight five five two one two four CBS. That's eight five five two one two four two two seven or Twitter at the pony. Express pony. Spelled P O. Follow us on Twitter at CBS sports radio. I'm also going to tell you teams who probably think therein. But I think we're going to end up being on the outside looking. But first it's time for the latest sports update, Darwin suck..

Greensboro CBS UNC Texas Arizona Gonzaga Buffalo North Carolina Twitter Wofford Goliath Furman Firmin basketball Furman Saint Mary Syracuse Scott David
"paul sabin" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"You come up with something that you'd be like, wow, they really came up with the something that was just really gross even worse than the, you know, we talk about targeted tax cuts this this tax cut is exquisitely well-targeted. I think music. Emily pointed out, the inheritance. Tax changes are equally disgusting, tiny, good. Yeah, that's a good one too. But you know that I think that the answer choose the Democrats malpractice on my agree with you is it is very hard when the president has the argument about an economy that is warring at four point, one percent growth, albeit for a quarter and I'll be ju stop by advanced spending to by people who are trying to deal with his coming tariffs and things like that. He people don't take in details about economic arguments. They kind of take in the sort of broad sense of how they're feeling and broad numbers and the economy's doing pretty well right now. And that is wind Republicans backs. All right. Let's go to cocktail chatter. You're sitting on your yacht Emily here yacht, your low tax yachts, tax habit. The New York Times magazine where I work is in the midst of publishing an amazing issue about climate, it's called losing earth. It has incredible photographs than this historical kind of majestic narrative. And the thesis is that between nineteen seventy nine and eighty nine, the world had a real real chance to deal with carbon emissions to prevent climate change and came close and failed. And so it is the story of that decade and that attempt and failure. And it's, you know, one of those like historical counter narratives are being asked to imagine that something could've could've come to fruition that didn't, but it's just really worth reading and thinking about in these waning summer days, as you know, we seem at least in this country to be further away from really addressing climate change by Nathaniel. WJR you follow the the counter arguments made by a lot of climate science people who I thought very effectively pointed out some deep problems with with the narrative. Reading that well, or at least just starting to. And my husband, Paul Sabin is a environmental historian. It yell was also expressing some preliminary skepticism to me this morning, and you know, I think that's all part of it. Right. Like you put a provocative thesis like this out there, you marshal your evidence, and then you know, other people, knock it down and sometimes they win that argument, but it's kind of all intellectually interesting. So gotta might chatter is in age of Trump. There are probably two ways to do escapism. One is what one of my kids is doing is binge watching old episodes of the west wing, or you know, for me, it would be watching like old, Hugh Grant movies and just, but but I seem to be trending much more towards kind of binge-watching dystopia ish TV series. So my husband and I have been settled in night after night with Babylon. Berlin were as usual. A little bit late to the game came out last year, but it's this very tangled convoluted story about corruption and intrigue in why marcher Manet. And there's something about the sort of decadence of it that is a little bit uplifting in the sense of your thinking about other people's troubles for a change instead of what. Is going on right in front of your face. So I'm that's my cocktail chatter. I'm quite enjoying it. All right. I have a cocktail jar, but I, I'm gonna, do listener chatter again listeners you? Are you good? A game to cocktail chattering just a reminder were, were soliciting your suggestions for what you're you would be chattering about at your at your yacht bound cocktail parties, and we're asking to tweeted us at slake FSN with.

Emily Paul Sabin FSN Hugh Grant president The New York Times Nathaniel Babylon Berlin one percent
"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

Championship Drive

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

"Time on this is like everyone keeps saying it's coming out april twenty fifth and march this and it's like okay so i was going to do their thing the has got to do their own thing and they can't just take the fbi's investigation and make it their own they're going to do their own we saw how long the carolina thing took like they take a long time this is not going to end for two three years maybe if we don't know i mean there'll be some other things that probably come out but it's like reports there might be forty coaching changes by next year because of this problem again nobody knows nobody knows at this point i mean you don't know how many times i heard before the tournament from tip off of the tournaments right they're going to no or or come out then somebody's working on a big story and it's your came out it's going to drop who's writing it i don't know it's not me i don't know who it is and i don't think anybody knows what's going to happen right now but hint they investigated this this thing for two years and nobody knew what thing about i mean i've never developed an fbi source in my life so i'm a little i'm trying i'm undermanned i'm trying not as an issue as it is not easy we'll be back in a moment with more of my conversation with jeff born zillow and rob dawson but first one more visit from the talk nerdy guys seth walder in paul sabin talk nerdy to me hello everyone set welder here from espn analytics these season is in the books so today is the final college basketball version of talk nerdy to me presented by google cloud i'm joined as always by paul sabin our college basketball analytics specialists paul obviously story today's villanova they won the championship in pretty resounding fashion last night the question i think that we're pretty well positioned to answer is how good is this team in the context of other recent champions and other recent teams they're the best team.

fbi rob dawson paul sabin carolina jeff zillow seth walder espn basketball google two three years twenty fifth two years
"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

Championship Drive

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

"Right of course i'm hearing something that's going on who who gets drafted like the kid or the parents that's a great question to ask oh the kids making it meanwhile you see the parents live i'm not saying that happens all the time but i see it happen the lot we'll be back in a moment with more of my conversation with jay will and the talk nerdy guys but i i want to tell you about spotify did you know you can stream this podcast on spotify right now it's easy open the app on your mobile device or desktop clicking the browse channel then click in the podcast section you can also stream on your smart speaker now it's that much easier for you to stay up to date on all the latest and greatest and all things sports thanks to spotify march means one thing basketball basketball basketball did you know the college players born in north dakota or historically the most accurate three point shooters the ncaa is using google cloud to turn data into insights and so can your business see how it g dot co slash march madness google cloud the official cloud of the ncaa talk nerdy to me hello and welcome to another edition of talk nerdy to me presented by google cloud i'm seth walder alongside paul sabin college basketball analytics specialist here at espn paul we're heading into the final four and there's just no way that you can have a conversation about this year's tournament without kicking off with a little bit of loyola chicago the ramblers are the darling of this year's tournament there in the final four we've seen eleven seats get to the final four before so how improbable really was this to see the ramblers where they are today wolf you're looking at just loyal the interesting thing is actually going into this tournament a few weeks ago i would've told you that a sixteen seed would beat a one seed but that wouldn't have even been the most unlikely to happen in its own region that'd be the truth because oil of making the final four going into the tournament only had a point three percent chance of happening whereas you in bc beating virginia was one and a half percent you can so it's five times more.

jay north dakota ncaa seth walder loyola ramblers virginia spotify basketball google official espn bc three percent
"paul sabin" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Here & Now

"But just who shot first and why is still in dispute although most media accounts at the time said it was pretty clear cut it was almost like another pearl harbor as a group of crazed melons let loose with gunfire on police when it was over ten persons were dead including three officers now fred amata evans the leader of the militants goes on trial in a few weeks for murder but the television news narrative of shootout on city streets followed by looting and property damage misses the story as experienced by community members yeah yeah abdu sabur and covered some odd were teenagers that summer walking along the same streets it's easy to remember the chaos of fifty years ago this whole area was involved in the shoot these role right up on us in pointed guns at us you know i mean i thought we would did such personal perspectives are being captured by paul sapien an england based filmmaker who spent his teenage years in shaker heights it was his father's connection to the glenville shootout that satan back to cleveland he was in advertising and a number of people felt that the trial had been unjust mafia was approached cv helped him running ads in the local press highlighting some of these injustices george sapien created a full page ad that ran in the cleveland press while fred ahmed evans awaited sentencing for his murder conviction it pictured the silhouette of a black man in handcuffs his arms outstretched over his head paul sabin came across the image in a google search last year than that prompted for me.

murder england shaker heights cleveland cv cleveland press paul sabin fred amata glenville george sapien fred ahmed evans google fifty years
"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

Championship Drive

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

"Three point shooters the is using google cloud at turn data into insights and so can your business see how it g dot co slash march madness google cloud the official cloud of the ncaa talk merita to me hello everyone welcome to another edition of talk nerdy to me presented to you by google cloud i'm seth walder alongside college basketball analytics specialist paul sabin paul i mostly want to look ahead but i don't think that we can have a conversation about college basketball and probability without bringing up the unbc upset over virginia so using put that crazy number sixteen over number one of set in context for us i mean it was definitely i think we all agree the most improbable win of any team at two story and be agrees grant it'd be piling goes back about ten years but we had the one and a half percent chance of the retrievers we were gonna pull that one off and they did and some other notable upsets for reference if you might recall the florida gulf coast over georgetown to get in the sweet sixteen city yep don't yeah that was three and a half percent so you know this one is even more unlikely than that virginia obviously overall see doesn't get crazier than that so let me ask you about this south region now which obviously has really opened up with the upsets all four of the top seeds in that region are out it seems pretty clear to everyone that sort of the seas parted for kentucky and they are the fever to come out of that region should kentucky fans be thinking more about a championship at this point then even just the vital four i mean yes i mean they can think about championship if they want it still not.

seth walder basketball virginia georgetown google official ncaa paul sabin florida gulf kentucky ten years
"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

Championship Drive

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Championship Drive

"Hello folks welcome to the first college basketball edition of talk nerdy to me i'm seth walder from espn sports analytics team in today i'm joined by statistician our team paul sabin paul is it's is first time on the podcast are you fill in the pressure paul just a little bit all right so they won't talk about being move made by the ncaa recently where they added a series of new metrics to their selection committee teamsheets they added to espn metrics bpi and straight the record they added ken palm zagren ratings in k p i as well paul jit let's start big picture here what did you think about this move by the ncaa i think it's a move that's been in the works hopefully for many years and i think most people would generally agree that rpi is somewhat doesn't make sense um but you know these metrics bpi saccharin ken palm they're they're good metrics there designed to predict how good teams are going forward other metrics such a strength of record or more resume metrics what has the team accomplish this year i like that they included both of them on these teamsheets they did something a little bit strange i think people around here at least raise their eyebrows they averaged the rank of the three resume metrics they average the rank of the threeteam strength metrics and the average the rank of all six together what did you think about that move averaging the rank needs group individually although there are better ways to combine the metrics is not what really caused me too much of a concern what caused me the most concern is at the average the rank of all of the predict a metrics with the resume metrics but shimmy is a sign that the ncaa kamei doesn't really know which one they're looking for are they looking for the best teams or are they looking for the most deserving teams aberdeen together i don't even know what the result of that is so what are they done in the past they generally do they lean towards the best teams are the most deserving in the pass the at large decisions the committee has made generally reflect that they care about rewarding the teams that deserve to be an nca tournament not necessarily the best.

seth walder paul sabin paul ncaa paul jit basketball espn
"paul sabin" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Planet Money

"That's the kind of narrative in america the met started 1980 and remember it's about the price of medals over a decade so the bet just sits the ten years creep by during which the world population does continue to climb we add eight hundred million people to the planet men it's mateen who won the bed support for planet money and the following message come from t the ameritrade like the economy investing can seem complicated until it's explained in simpler terms that's how td ameritrade approaches investing by learning more about you and your goals before crafting a plan it's that simple to schedule a complimentary goal planning session today visit td ameritrade dot com slash podcast so simon nod decisively won the bet the prices went down by a on average around 50 percent in all the channels across you know if you if you bundle them together and they all go down a they all went down for our like barlig right it was a it was a it was a pretty substantial loss uh in in terms of the outcome of that bet what are the reasons prices dropped so much was just what simon said people invented substitutes instead of aluminum people used plastic for packaging and we're erlich worry that new wars in conflict would just continue to escalate and make things scarcer the opposite sort happened do you know for example a war in zaire and zambia where there was a lot of copper actually ended so there was more copper in the world and the price dropped economists have gone back and looked at whether simon just got lucky you know metal prices do go up and down a lot and if you pick other 10year spans airlec would have won but paul sabin says broadly you gotta give this one the simon the catastrophe erlich was predicting just did not happen so far we have not been just like butterflies were more complicated in the sense that what simon represented was the idea that uh the other that markets and technology and done prices would lead to.

world population simon zaire zambia metal prices erlich america paul sabin 50 percent ten years 10year
"paul sabin" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Planet Money

"Early about what you believe in what you don't and there are these famous good natured beds in the world of science for example stephen hawking bet another scientists that sickness x one with cigna six one the thing up in the sky that sickness x one was not a black hole hawking lost it was a black hole richard feinman physicist once bet that no one could make a motor smaller than basically a grain of sand smaller than 160 fourth of an inch he also lost but an economics but don't seem to happen very often in fact if you ask around people really just mentioned one story one bet those big one was a bet over the future of humanity and unlike those vets in science it was not a friendly vet at all pillow lot on the planet money i'm alex bloomberg and i'm david casted them today we talk with historian paul sabin gale who just wrote a book about this famous wager the book is called the bet and historian tells me explain why bets like this don't happen more support for this podcast and the following message come from fund rise and award winning first of its kind to real estate investment platform in 2012 fund rise created the first simple lowcost way to invest in real estate private equity now you can unlock a world of investing that used to be reserved for only the most sophisticated investors learn more and get your first six months of advisory fees waved by visiting fund rise dot com slash npr this is not a bet from mike the 1800s or something it happened alex when you and i were in middle school it was a bed between a biologist and an economist the biologists name was paul erlich his of fessard stanford an expert on butterflies hebron a book called how to know the butterflies which was not a big hit but then 1968 he wrote another book took him just a few weeks to put together and this book at a much snappier title scott the population bomb and.

physicist alex bloomberg paul sabin gale real estate paul erlich stephen hawking black hole david real estate investment six months
"paul sabin" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"paul sabin" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Convince these neanderthal conservatives of how to think correctly that this really should be an open process because the fact is the left has been wrong about significant things i mean the left for a long time was not and arguably today is still not sufficiently respectful of how much better an economic system capitalism as than all of the alternatives yes capitalism as problems but boy nothing has come close to the left spent decades worried that our society was going to collapse amidst an overpopulation crisis um the population bomb there's a great book about this called the bat by the yell historian paul sabin and so i i think the left is wrong about a lot of stuff regarding education today in left turn the glass wrong about it but i i think that it's just really important not to see this as onesided as all the facts and the other dozen anyone read my column knows that my opinions are not squarely in the centre they are to the left of centre and so i think the democrats are much closer to the truth on climate change on inequality policy on all kinds of of major policies but that doesn't mean the right about everything and then they should be humble and open about what they might be wrong about so would one go about sorting out the issues in which may be you need a revisitation of every visit to the facts and the and the issues where no it will be a total waste of time you know you're right that's not going to change and is there a problem with that second how that second list is put together.

paul sabin climate change