5 Burst results for "Paul Popham"

"paul popham" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

08:16 min | 5 months ago

"paul popham" Discussed on Making Gay History

"Spotlit in a board. And and Mabel Mercer's playing on the phonograph right so I describe this little Dr Fry in Dr Fries. Reaction was I. Don't I wouldn't see those guys anymore factory and that's what Gail was like that's going to so there wasn't there wasn't a local gay student group you to call it was. I mean I love going back to Yale now and this is my real yardstick of of how far we've come even though. I'm always yelling about how we've not come far enough. I go back to Yale and Yale is like the college now and there's the dance every year for well over a thousand gay men and women in in you know across the campus from where I tried to kill myself because I thought I was the only one so that is your yardstick for change. It certainly is. Yeah that thirty years time you were completely alone thirty years. It is. God doesn't long time. So where does that leave us? A lot of change no change well. I guess it's in. It's in my nature to be impatient and I only got politically involved because of AIDS and there is no question that we have lost the war to AIDS and that we've lost and we'll continue to lose a great many people when we did not have to lose and that the speed of research treatment education you name. It has been tragically in an inhumanely. Slow it's an epidemic that need not have happened and that we should have listened There's no question that that enough people knew what was happening. Should've list we'll specifically. You should listen well the community. I mean the gay press the gay leaders. You were there before. It was an epidemic or just as it was becoming. Well I think now we know that even when we found out eighty one it was much bigger than we thought but we thought it was just the beginning right. Eighty one in this very room in August. Eighty one eighty men sat with Dr Freeman keen from Nyu who told us in no uncertain terms exactly what was happening and and he was right at eighty one in. August of eighty one. The New York Times article that alerted. Everybody really was July third eighty one. The New York Times headline was freer. Cancer Semen forty-one homosexuals and said that all the guys had the same history which was a history of of having had all of these sexual diseases. Amoeba was hepatitis A. and B. and mononucleosis syphilis gonorrhea n-name it. When I saw that in the New York Times I was scared. Because I'd had all of that and I guess the penny dropped the English say or the bell rang or something I call Larry. Massu was was it is my friend. Who's a doctor? And who had written some articles? He wrote a health column for the native and had written about it before the Times had and And I guess I've spoken to Him peripherally about it but not it had. The Bell Hasn't Rung Until The Times. That's the way of making you really stood up and say wow of times covers. It has to be real so he said go talked. Alvin to Dr Freeman keen which I did and Alvin who turned out to be gay and we turned out to have mutual friends. Said this is what's happening. You GotTa Stop Fucking. You're someone well known in the Gay Community. You have to do something about it. Somebody's got to go out there and tell them and it was because of that that I invited Larry Math and I and two other guys. Now dead Donald Been Paul. Rapoport invited everyone. We knew to come to this. First Meeting in August include people from from political groups capable? He got on the phone and we call everybody we called. Anyone could think of political people rich people media people doctors none them showed up and It was a good cross section and It was a lot of people didn't believe him. Did you know this was a hot political football when you picked it up or did you expect people to respond to you or to what you have to say that very meeting that night with without the early evening with Alvin so that I mean there are a lot of very nasty questions put him? There are a lot of people saying you know you're a born again How can you make all of these assumptions on the basis of so few cases? And how can you expect to hope community to stop talking and you know there was no virus? Then people say there's no virus now but it certainly wasn't a virus then that didn't come for another couple of years people could say you have no evidence to base this on and anyone say even if there's the slightest possibility well that's what he was saying and that's what I was saying and It wasn't so much the people that Paul Popham and Nathan Fain who came to be my big adversaries and Gamons health crisis. It wasn't so much that they didn't believe or not believe what was happening. Paul had of course lost a couple friends by them and the lover it was that he didn't think it was Jimmy sees or anybody's position to tell anybody else how to live their lives and that people had to make up their own lines so a lot of valuable time was lost. Not BEING THE CONDUIT. I thought I was setting up or funny to help. Set up with others an organization that was going to do one thing and that organization became and still is another. What was what was set up to spread information and to fight to fight to make the system accountable and to spread the word of what was happening and that you know we got a cool it. It was not that at all it was. It became very quickly. It was taken over by the social workers and and then it is now what it is then. It's a social service in a very good social service organization but it again. That's our tragedy. It's an organization that that helps people to die and is not an organization that helps the living go on living and we still don't have an organization to do that is that maybe act up. Bush came along much too late Beverly for never but much too late. I BLAME MYSELF. I I am very cognizant of of a great failure on my part that I did not have the ability to be leader that I did not have the ability to deal with my adversaries and still be friends. God didn't there is a God. Did Not give the gay community leader when the gay community needed a leader and you feel awesome and you failed in that role and I failed in that role. I feel very strongly failed role. What does the future hold? Then I think age is.

Gay Community the Times The New York Times Alvin Dr Freeman Paul Popham Larry Math Mabel Mercer Yale AIDS Gail community leader Dr Fry Dr Fries Nyu Rapoport Massu Bush Donald Beverly
"paul popham" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"paul popham" Discussed on Making Gay History

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Gay Community the Times The New York Times Alvin Dr Freeman Paul Popham Larry Math Mabel Mercer Yale AIDS Gail community leader Dr Fry Dr Fries Nyu Rapoport Massu Bush Donald Beverly
"paul popham" Discussed on The Influencer Podcast

The Influencer Podcast

04:03 min | 11 months ago

"paul popham" Discussed on The Influencer Podcast

"The world. Are we have an incredible instagram program. And Moss mind program bomb so lots of different ways but the main thing for us is just able to provide those specific bits of information as well as the confidence attempts the tracks because also kind of building on from that one of the things that we have found is holding a lot of women. Is this confidence. Its lack of confidence or doubting themselves or seeing what everyone else is doing getting put off not that far head on so big. Paul Popham is to provide women with that confidence. It's kick daily. We call it like daily shot of Virtual Expresso So you'll see on our instagram. All of these amazing Costa so inspirational also make you feel like a bit far us so the daily Espresso is definitely one of my favorite ways of just being connect with the audience daily. Oh I love that and I I wanNA talk a little bit about the monthly membership. I mean you just shared kind of what it is an why you decided to do it but I would love to talk about it more from behind the scenes perspective because A lot of people that listen to this podcast. They want to create their own products and services and You know a service that any entrepreneur can create especially if they have an education into share as a monthly membership and I think monthly memberships can be phenomenal. But I would because I know that you have built a seven figure monthly membership and have done very have seen a lot of success and done very With your monthly membership but I know that there can be some challenges that come with that retention Creating new content finding experts to come in and lead content. So how how have you been able to not only navigate the monthly membership space. But I would love to hear what challenges have you faced throughout the growth of that. What are things that you kind of had to learn along the way to keep the retention going to keep it consistently growing and successful Such a good question. I feel like I could talk ships all day. Yeah so I I like the blood veins. It's the business that is just growing month on month without was having to read too much with it in terms of gross. I very much much grows itself through referrals now which is amazing. But as you said there's a lot of things you need to consider when setting them up so for us it was reading about. We could got a product out there at scale onto a lot of people. Because if you've got a low priced membership and you don't have the scale to be able to get it out there then. Chances are it's I'm not going to generate enough revenue to want to keep doing what he really way if you can do that so I think it all starts with being able to have this really solid. Boxing Plan Dot can help view reach a lot of people on then beyond that. You need to kind of consider how you're GONNA GONNA is it GonNa be Evergreen so that it's constantly open and no one really. I had a real reason to join in the beginning because we opened up these spots for founding members which was they would never price ever again on. It would be closing and we didn't know when we're going to reopen and for us. That was a big risk because say we only got ten people in an calling it a membership on when opening doors for another few months. Because we've said we wouldn't that could it'd be really scary but we really full handed the projections though you know what. We've got a really good chance of getting a couple of solid people in here a founding member so let's go ahead and do outweigh outweigh fast. So we did that and we decided to close the doors on. That was an amazing thing. I really told us the power. All's keeping kind of a closed space based on allowed us to redefine feasts in the membership and understand what we were doing before we then put more attention on growing we had to focus on the retention piece. So there's lots of kind of bits within it that we focus on the biggest thing for us is retention and Kuzma success and happiness. Because without that. You're memberships eventually GONNA stop unless you're constantly generating new leads it's GonNa stop and like people always say the best rate. Make money in your business to focus on the people that are already paying you the clients that you already have so. We saw very much hands on getting feedback from people. We'd be posing in the group almost every day. Like how did you find this. What about.

founding member Paul Popham Moss
"paul popham" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"paul popham" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Are so important over shareholders. We care about the environment. We're doing everything we can but what they do. In fact is they do just enough to keep activists at bay and they do just enough to keep themselves else from getting a bad reputation but they're careful not to go so far read about the bill norris kind of situation or the john mackey you or paul popham of going so far as to alarm the shareholders you know that they are actually spending shareholders money on doing good which was not the purpose of surprised that winter in tech companies for instance don't don't be evil with google when you heard that when they did that and all the companies have some version of that on the board of of a tech company and dan when we went public our motto was we'd be good. We'd be good and i wanna tell you we ended up doing absolute flu terrible things to our employees in china and we ended up having fifteen sixteen year old girls working being sixty seventy hour weeks p times you know we'd be good cheesy to say right the one of the things i push for and the only reason i'm saying this just is to create the discussion because they're never gonna do this. Having ethics are like right now so many of the things that tech impacts are very similar to what say chemical companies are cigarette companies did the society is getting hurt by their inventions and therefore they should have ethical considerations about how they make make things and so things have a chief ethics officer even though i think that person would have no power our some of these companies are thinking of having ombudsman lately. I've been hearing that and i'm sort of like if they don't have power what's the difference. It's just it's just a fig-leaf again. On on the concept i l. hoped for more from tech but these most of these of at least the larger tech companies have with the ethics and compliance officers right and unfortunately those ethics and compliance officers almost all lawyers and what happens is that compliance gogol compliance becomes the most important thing in the ethics get for because they know what the lawyers ethics is a gray gray area. We're not trained ethicists so what we do is we just make sure that we were being the law they would happen at facebook okay in this company where where i was working the excuse of the members of the board and top management from how we were treating the women girls i mean they're fifteen years old. When do your put your daughter in a place like that was because technically it wasn't a violation of chinese law so it's okay because it's not a violation of chinese law not because of the ethical consideration nations which is would you allow your daughter to work these long hours in this in this place at the at age fifteen and so what happens is compliance drives drives out ethics to what do you do..

facebook paul popham china john mackey gogol officer google fifteen sixteen year sixty seventy hour fifteen years
"paul popham" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"paul popham" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Relief he alleged the clear that out me up yep some however refuse to be silent in january of 1982 larry kramer who was the author of the play the normal heart which was just a few years ago turned into an hbo movie without really beautiful mastic you need to see at its oh my god i cried thought uh so larry kramer along with paul popham formed the game ends health crisis in new york city gmh c to raise money for aids awareness and research the gmh c stepped in where no other public health organisation had even attempted this group of men mostly gay set up a crisis counseling hotline raised awareness recruited social workers and provided legal aid and other forms of assistance to gay men and their friends and family remind me what year this is 1982 okay was we're an earlier julia ears yeah no one knows what's causing aids not at all yeah later their mission would extend to anyone affected by aids the gmh see would continue to play a big role on hiv and aids advocacy throughout present day and there early organized approach to raising awareness and providing support set an example that many other organisations would later follow in its first year several internal debates raged at gmh c one of them over whether or not to tell gay men to change their sexual behavior which mirrored a debate among public health officials over the closing of gay bath houses.

larry kramer paul popham hbo new york public health julia