14 Burst results for "Paul Outlet"

"paul outlet" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:55 min | 6 months ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Here comes Chris Paul stutter Step in a drive through the lane. Stop. Some of dying throws it off. The eight egos Riverside lay up in that one's up in a man Without Devin Booker T hydrate. It's gonna be a guy that becomes a real focal point of the son's offense, and he's off to a good start. 12. The 75 point lead here for Phoenix. High right side is to ball. Murray Murray garnered out there by McHale. Bridges crouches down, drives down the line leans in floater. No good rebound down to Phoenix Camp Johnson. The other way. Bank shot is up in the in wait for the whistle. And no time out coming for head coach Michael Malone. Will Barton has it across the timeline? Dancer down now by seven gets a high pick from the coal. Yokich gets down. The lane leans in bank shot, no good late whistle and a foul called on. Will Barton on the chin Art will see on a replay of Jae Crowder Zj Crowder's the player who took this charge if he was feet where his feet were on this Seeing that replay quite yet. And back to the way comes Phoenix Bridges. Three. That was no good rebound. Yokich length of the floor outlet over the Millsap layup. No good. It was blocked at the rim rebound down the Chris Paul outlet pass to Kam Johnson behind him to McHale bridges. Bucket here. You have to call time out. Cam Johnson hasn't against Millsap. They throw it down on the elbow over to DeAndre eight and one on one with the Culleoka. She goes baseline, got fouled by joker, and then we'll be free throws coming up here for DeAndre eight. Just a very aggressive start for the Sun's big man, DeAndre eight. He's already got seven points in this game three free shooting. You know they are looking for him, and you know if he's going to be able to score in situations where it's just a half court offense in general He's also really good at crashing the offensive glass. And so you know, the Nuggets have to beware early as he misses the first free throw just exactly not letting him get out of getting away from him early, first free throw form. Up again, and they'll have one more beaten last night at 27 points against Denver. Second free throw form is good and Denver basketball coming back to the way they get so down by 8 15 to 7 Martin has a top of the key open. Jamal Murray throws it on the elbow over the yo Pidge. Yokich gets through the lane in the corner to Millsap for three. That one's no good. Rebound down to DeAndre eight health to pass off over to Chris Paul less than seven minutes ago in the first quarter. Paul has it on the high right side. Pick there from eight throws it off to the Andrea de Elbow, one on one with the coal. Yokich shoots over that one's no good rebound tipped by Millsap and out of bounds, but they're going to say a last touched by Jae Crowder. So that'll be Denver basketball. Coming back the other way way. Have a time out on the floor, 6 46 left to go in the first quarter, none that serve down an early eight points to Phoenix on the.

Millsap Jae Crowder Zj Crowder Chris Paul DeAndre Phoenix Denver Yokich Nuggets Phoenix Camp Johnson Barton Murray Murray Phoenix Bridges Andrea de Elbow Devin Booker T Kam Johnson Bridges Michael Malone Jamal Murray basketball Culleoka
"paul outlet" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right <hes>. So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays <hes>. And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain <hes>. He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here <hes>. So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay <noise> so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway <hes>. He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in <hes>. that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

mike explorer steve lauren julia wilson library Julia microsoft syracuse liverpool gene white house Steve vint cerf
The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
"paul outlet" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:05 min | 9 months ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Century. . alphabetical order appeared to be immortal no longer could anyone at home in an alphabetic writing system remember a time when the automatic response to ordering had not been alphabetical. . In fact, , it often seems that the chaos and cacophony of the world could be tamed by the of position alone. . Paul Outlet Eighteen, Sixty, , , eight to nineteen, , forty four was a Belgian visionary who wanted to and believed he could categorize all the information in the world anything ever written a book everything ever known could be compressed. . He believed into a card system one. . Nugget of knowledge per index card, , all filed in alphabetical order whence any information about anything anyone anywhere any time could be retrieved outlet began modestly in the eighteen ninety s creating a bibliography of sociological literature. . He then spread his wings to found the International Institute of Bibliography in Brussels which drew on his many library catalogs and Bibliographies, , as could be consulted to compile a summary and some he hoped of all libraries and all books, , an inventory of all that has been written at all times in all languages and on all subjects outlet then established a subscription service that supplied his customers monthly with standardized cards filled with newly precise information. . One hundred, , he had three hundred full members and by the outbreak of the First World War another fifteen hundred people annually approaching the Institute for Information the Second World War saw Utopian Dreams Wayne to be replaced by pragmatism in Germany in nineteen forty the government ordered the seizure of any books from across occupied Europe that might contribute to the stock of the projected library of the Nazi who Shula or University of the third. . Reich. . But outlets universal bibliography comprising nearly fifteen million cards. . After almost half a century of indexing and summarizing was spurned it is an impossible mess. . It was reported back to headquarters and it is high time for this all to be cleared away. . Nevertheless, , there were elements that the Nazi's thought worth preserving the card catalogue might prove rather useful. . This sounds harsh and must have been unbearable for the elderly outlet but in retrospect it is worth noting that it was the card catalogue, , the engine of his system that was deemed worthy of preservation. . For in the preceding half-century, , alphabetical systems had spread everywhere even when the great medieval encyclopedias were aware of alphabetical order, , they had frequently disdained it by contrast at the start of the twentieth century Nelson's Encyclopedia Nineteen O nine. . Soon to be retitled, , Nelson's perpetual loose-leaf Encyclopedia had leapt on Alphabet Ization as it savior in an attempt to find a solution to the bane of Encyclopedias of all eras that of becoming out of date Nelson's volumes consisted of pages of alphabetically ordered entries like any other modern encyclopedia. . The difference was that those pages were not permanently bound into their covers as regular books were. . But manufactured as a loose leaf system and held in place with pins in the binding that opened with a special key Nelson's was a modern book trumpeted the publisher's preface with a new and special emphasis on subjects which are of wide and active interest today namely, , the sciences and technology as well as biographical essays on living people all of which needed regular updating each volume included our guarantee. . No less than five hundred removable pages would be sent without further cost to each subscriber for at least three years after purchase as has now become unsurprising however, , and despite their very product hinging on alphabet. . and. It . being its main selling point. . This system itself was apparently invisible even to Nelson's the encyclopedia contained entry for alphabet covering the history of writing. . But none for alphabet ization it might well be that alphabetical order even in a perpetually updated reference work had by nineteen o nine become invisible because it was so routine and so ordinary just as it had and that other beacon of alphabetical order the telephone directory or Phonebook Street guides and later post office directories precursors to foam books head appeared. . In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in many cities these publications listed the names, , occupations and addresses of residents and businesses arranged in alphabetical order or occasionally in St Order that was itself organized alphabetically within districts even. . So most of these early directories had included prominent and alphabet components. . For instance, , they were prefaced by registers of government officials magistrates, , Alderman or other civic leaders or institutions almost all of whom were listed hierarchically or chronologically the first telephones were sold in pairs the owner of one of a pair. . Able to communicate only with the owner of the other customers therefore had no need for directories in eighteen seventy, , eight George Coy who had earlier worked for a Telegraph Company in Connecticut designed and built a switchboard where calls could be switched from one exchange to another vastly increasing the reach of anyone subscriber who was now no longer tied solely to a single exchange. . These switchboards housed a series of Jack's one per subscriber one subscriber rang through to the exchange. . The operator answered the caller asked for A. . Fellow subscriber in the operator plugged the callers Jack into that linked to the requested subscriber. . Koi signed up twenty one subscribers to his switchboard service. . In his first year there was, , of course, , no need for numbers to be associated with each name. . A subscriber would call the exchange nasty speak to another subscriber by name or occupation. .

Post Office British Museum UK Ben
The battle for Wisconsin

TIME's Top Stories

05:05 min | 9 months ago

The battle for Wisconsin

"Century. alphabetical order appeared to be immortal no longer could anyone at home in an alphabetic writing system remember a time when the automatic response to ordering had not been alphabetical. In fact, it often seems that the chaos and cacophony of the world could be tamed by the of position alone. Paul Outlet Eighteen, Sixty, eight to nineteen, forty four was a Belgian visionary who wanted to and believed he could categorize all the information in the world anything ever written a book everything ever known could be compressed. He believed into a card system one. Nugget of knowledge per index card, all filed in alphabetical order whence any information about anything anyone anywhere any time could be retrieved outlet began modestly in the eighteen ninety s creating a bibliography of sociological literature. He then spread his wings to found the International Institute of Bibliography in Brussels which drew on his many library catalogs and Bibliographies, as could be consulted to compile a summary and some he hoped of all libraries and all books, an inventory of all that has been written at all times in all languages and on all subjects outlet then established a subscription service that supplied his customers monthly with standardized cards filled with newly precise information. One hundred, he had three hundred full members and by the outbreak of the First World War another fifteen hundred people annually approaching the Institute for Information the Second World War saw Utopian Dreams Wayne to be replaced by pragmatism in Germany in nineteen forty the government ordered the seizure of any books from across occupied Europe that might contribute to the stock of the projected library of the Nazi who Shula or University of the third. Reich. But outlets universal bibliography comprising nearly fifteen million cards. After almost half a century of indexing and summarizing was spurned it is an impossible mess. It was reported back to headquarters and it is high time for this all to be cleared away. Nevertheless, there were elements that the Nazi's thought worth preserving the card catalogue might prove rather useful. This sounds harsh and must have been unbearable for the elderly outlet but in retrospect it is worth noting that it was the card catalogue, the engine of his system that was deemed worthy of preservation. For in the preceding half-century, alphabetical systems had spread everywhere even when the great medieval encyclopedias were aware of alphabetical order, they had frequently disdained it by contrast at the start of the twentieth century Nelson's Encyclopedia Nineteen O nine. Soon to be retitled, Nelson's perpetual loose-leaf Encyclopedia had leapt on Alphabet Ization as it savior in an attempt to find a solution to the bane of Encyclopedias of all eras that of becoming out of date Nelson's volumes consisted of pages of alphabetically ordered entries like any other modern encyclopedia. The difference was that those pages were not permanently bound into their covers as regular books were. But manufactured as a loose leaf system and held in place with pins in the binding that opened with a special key Nelson's was a modern book trumpeted the publisher's preface with a new and special emphasis on subjects which are of wide and active interest today namely, the sciences and technology as well as biographical essays on living people all of which needed regular updating each volume included our guarantee. No less than five hundred removable pages would be sent without further cost to each subscriber for at least three years after purchase as has now become unsurprising however, and despite their very product hinging on alphabet. and. It being its main selling point. This system itself was apparently invisible even to Nelson's the encyclopedia contained entry for alphabet covering the history of writing. But none for alphabet ization it might well be that alphabetical order even in a perpetually updated reference work had by nineteen o nine become invisible because it was so routine and so ordinary just as it had and that other beacon of alphabetical order the telephone directory or Phonebook Street guides and later post office directories precursors to foam books head appeared. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in many cities these publications listed the names, occupations and addresses of residents and businesses arranged in alphabetical order or occasionally in St Order that was itself organized alphabetically within districts even. So most of these early directories had included prominent and alphabet components. For instance, they were prefaced by registers of government officials magistrates, Alderman or other civic leaders or institutions almost all of whom were listed hierarchically or chronologically the first telephones were sold in pairs the owner of one of a pair. Able to communicate only with the owner of the other customers therefore had no need for directories in eighteen seventy, eight George Coy who had earlier worked for a Telegraph Company in Connecticut designed and built a switchboard where calls could be switched from one exchange to another vastly increasing the reach of anyone subscriber who was now no longer tied solely to a single exchange. These switchboards housed a series of Jack's one per subscriber one subscriber rang through to the exchange. The operator answered the caller asked for A. Fellow subscriber in the operator plugged the callers Jack into that linked to the requested subscriber. Koi signed up twenty one subscribers to his switchboard service. In his first year there was, of course, no need for numbers to be associated with each name. A subscriber would call the exchange nasty speak to another subscriber by name or occupation.

Nelson Alphabet Ization Paul Outlet International Institute Of Bib Jack Germany Europe Reich Brussels Institute For Information KOI A. Fellow University Of Shula Connecticut Alderman Publisher George Coy Wayne
"paul outlet" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And I don't know how it's going to it's just a race to the bottom I need digital advertising is eight topped up business yeah it's a razor thin margins you're competing against Google and Facebook you're never going to be able to compete with them in terms of reach and targeting capability it's so I mean if you are just kind of you know monetizing your ads by putting them up through an ad network and you know having people by the probe problematically I mean it's just not that high quality advertising I'm not saying you can't make money up and certainly can't people do it yeah but the one to do it are you there Sir foundation only same as the one to sell subscriptions and for whom subscriptions are the primary revenue source they're just they have a very close relationship with our audience and then monetize that audience more effectively B. as per subscriptions or advertising or both so we talk about this about the new York times only use them as an example here and then I want to set this up for after we have a break I got to do some of the stuff on the show but I want to let people from the listenership chime in on some other thoughts here but on the New York times is an example of someone who's one had programmatic advertising still has programmatic advertising but also created a bunch of other lines of business subscription what pay wall podcast in podcast live read yeah mother creative stuff as well as investing in the technology so that they can similar Bloomberg they actually use the data to find people who are you know in other words if I run after New York times unlike a lot of other places if I am only a lifestyle New York times yeah I'm not like New York times deep into like politics I won't see the same ads and those ads will follow me all over the Lazier ones right just blanket like you clicked the page boom you're in our box and I think that this whole thing has created the sophistication level where a lot of these these agencies and and Paul outlets in this case how the ability if they so choose to invest in not only creating a better opportunity for the listener higher quality content more money coming in they can pay reporters real fair money to actually do work but that simultaneously or creating a product that is almost equally as good for the advertisers and brand partners that work with and that's the part that I think is is is a very big positive for everyone because I'm not gonna be fed garbage out to do do not pertain to me and I also have the ability to pay to make them go away yeah in media and so I mean it's unique in that sense I think you have to simultaneously to serve two different side your potential to grow your audience business but then you also have to satisfy your advertisers and not many people know many other businesses and you don't have to do that simultaneously that they have these two different sides that they're standing in the middle of and they have to service boat so it's unique in that respect but sometimes the perfect example because to your point they have this a nice mix of revenue streams subscriptions different advertising units and so now when things are challenging day he you know because they have this diverse Everton's James they're able to ride out this you know economic downturn more all while experiencing I mean I take the time to put out the tendency couple do a story on their own financials and they said yeah advertising revenue down which is across the board but they were like however we've seen a huge boost in subscriptions tearing coke yeah during colder during the pandemic because of what you talk about people are really start for well reported reliable information right now so they're going to step in to know even advertising comes back they're going to have the new subscription base and all the boost in advertisements out there said either way they're perfect example so I want to talk about before rollout of this that the two take aways that I I'd love to hear from you and and the audience can again please text or call in after this after this interview we went to ninety one seventy two hundred what do you think let's assume if things play out like the times that are more of the outlets are a little bit more sophisticated a little more responsible with how they generate revenue which enables them to pay you John to do more what is a positive outcome of them having a more reliable revenue stream for you as the writer you is the actual reporter what what does that provide you with the opportunity to do and then the second half of this because you know you play both sides of this is the audience went what does this overall thing that we're talking about due to make media consumption are better or easier or whatever the case may be what a great question because he didn't want another you know by by the kinds having more revenue other than somebody else like someone like me out on a more ambitious report project and because they can find it but I mean you know reporting is a tough business and requires money so by then having more revenue than more money to operate with they can tackle bigger projects in Jack a bigger project it's a better product for the re sound one just feeds directly into the other hi I was on the ground that part I mean you're looking at the elicits it's easier to just write out new headline at a couple of of citations to a store they broke somewhere else that's what we got into the habit of the gun where you normally go with your clicks now it's like no no John I want you to write a story that no one else has and that's were meant put those on the ground don't just collect a bunch of tweets in yeah how do you think that plays out for the the the audience like it did they do you think that gives them more options you think it gives them the ability to and I'm I'm thinking this is all related I'm thinking a Spotify I love the ability to have one where I get ads and I in it I'm fine with that I don't care like but then I apologize I don't want is I want to just get to it there is I think it's giving me choices as a as a customer to pick and choose where it's clean and where it's like kind of community if that makes sense I you know I think those premium models are always going to exist kind of side by side indeed you know one clippings speak in the time that they don they made all the Kobe related news should be free to everyone it's kind of in you know that serves their business because people see that they're turning out good reliable news about this pandemic and once the pandemic's over or you know once those people have more disposable income they're more likely to papers instruction because I know the times trustworthy insider etcetera what does it mean for the reader I don't have hard to say I do think what were I I do think you're going to come to things happening against us higher and publications taking command you know that have these armies of reporters and our subscription based I think they're gonna keep those but I also think you're gonna see individual owner operators who have like a very direct relationship with their consumers I think they're going to see it but so I think it's going to be at like either ends of the spectrum is where people are going to gravitate to because yeah I mean those are the people that have cultivated the most loyal audiences no I agree with you I think I like that I I think it it it I do what I'm hoping is we'll start to see more of a Hey we socialize and banter back and forth here and it's kind of free never knows that we're the product and then here's some of the P. Y. support financially because I I just did what they're doing and then here's the plans I get my news for and I'm you know my my primary source I pay for the rest of my just kind of like you know some thirty yeah totally I mean a lot of people have tried this and no one's been able to mail it back it would be great if there was a sound subscription they give you access to fax number of articles across a number of different sites in kind of aggregated together she could have that mix of news sources but also but not have to pay for each individual publication but knowing that really been able to nail that thus far apple trying didn't go so well founders out there listening that that's your challenge go solve this problem John thanks so much where people go to call you I'll tell you just bombing at McDermott on Twitter probably the best place I love that you have your last name only on like myself onto the top of your name is your name is common line is less yeah I was a data I mean on you that you're simply following concerns some strange that for sure sorry John thanks so much thank you thank yep all right folks you can follow me speaking of Twitter you can follow me I could tune we're gonna take quick break we'll come back right after this restaurants are shut down bars are shut down hair salons are shut.

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"paul outlet" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"The Titans are a different team am I going to have to re visit all of America's opinions on Ryan Tannehill because of the last six or seven games where the Titans didn't even know that they had the better quarterback on the bench they'd seen plenty of Mariota and then all of a sudden they lose a couple times the way the Titans often do and boom can help comes in and I think their offense since he's come in has been averaging more points per possession than even the ravens wow yeah they're eight wins now we know how this story ends the so is America am I going to have to revisit America's opinion on Ryan Tannehill you know what maybe go ahead and open up the club open it open it in the second is the computer buffering band opened it now now now you go while he's doing that hold on a second because I have the updated very important Paul the Twitter Paul outlet of George I was brought you by H. B. L. A. never seen before log that football's most powerful friendship from HBO sports Bella check it said in the art of coaching chronicles the friendship between two of the most successful coaches in football history now streaming on H. B. out now I swear I'm get into that but I open of HBO go yesterday and I watch Dan Soter stand up special instead and is really good check that out it was good I like this little watch your coaching I will get to it today I know we'll talk about it more is mac and cheese all the rage right now sixty eight percent of the audience said yes you're doing a poll from Wednesday that's where we were open it now now is a buffering now.

Titans America Ryan Tannehill ravens football HBO Dan Soter Paul Twitter George I H. B. L.
"paul outlet" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Trouble that it has because it means that and all these big companies have power over it whereas we all interact actively it could've been such a different thing than the worldwide Google doc cool and it's so weird that we're calling worldwide Google doc given that Google is obviously one of the things that's benefited from this huge monopoly. The companies have anyway. I was looking Cantu the earliest transaction digital transaction so digital money for for product and there's quite a few competing theories about what it was no one's quite track to town but one one of the leading ones is that in nineteen seventy one and nineteen seventy two the first transit so between that time a first transaction was made it was between students at Stanford University the MIT and they were selling weed to each other cool so the first potentially was a drug deal. Yeah sorry I said cool like wanting to be cool route. Really I know yeah like an eight yeah lady earlier who'd ordered something by telephone signed but that didn't count because she paid in cash when it's delivered her door. She predates that but this is the first digital money transaction go. I don't think it is as a cop. I can put my cups hats on to your wearing hats right now. Data James a wearing the had different kinds of different eras quite judging by the half say not even going to say about the hat so just GonNa let you if you send a drawing in of the hats you think Dannon James Aware of the moment gets closest to win a small prize two hundred hundred Mauri. It's you don't really q-quick out before you go to the soft play area doc I found so a precursor to the worldwide web or in fact wikipedia which was the mundane him which I can't believe I've read this was a thing thing that was created in one thousand nine hundred ten and it was after this initiative from eighteen ninety-five off two Belgian lawyers could Paul Outlet and Henry Laffoon phone ten and they wanted to create what they called a world palace basically all the world's knowledge and information they wanted to catalog it and so they started doing this and it was in the Palais Monte we also the police of the world I think in Brussels and they got up to twelve million index cards so as a side effect of this also invented the index ah until information and it was sitting in Brussels four decades and then it's just in a big room yeah and there's loads of filing all incumbents with index cards which has oli mentioned the welded. It's impressive. Isn't it just throw them probably had a few secretaries but it's incredible. Is it still around. When does it still accessible? Irritatingly I know they always ruin everything but in one thousand nine four see the Nazis rocks up on the Third Reich replaced it with a bunch of Third Reich art and and some of it was left over most of it. We don't know where it saw yeah. I know that was always a response to the Nazis doing something. He's we're GONNA start going to that. Child's play area in Berlin the the.

Google oli Dannon James Brussels Cantu Palais Monte Stanford University Berlin Paul Outlet Henry Laffoon MIT four decades
"paul outlet" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

09:04 min | 2 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"All don lemon have only today. I'm not able to overhaul the ruling indictment of paul outlet. Let that morning compete looking going on now in the business. Never the head hog. Oh yeah back in working fine when we left it at more doing stopping for how long long everybody behind moya word. I'm hanging thing all morning i now i come down here to give up and when i wouldn't have to packet away well. I think the only al look man damn right now. This is about the most today you're all right. I'll tell them a lotta nerve for you have any thoughts on thanks a lot of time talk after hope they do offer haryana. Hey hello why no. They're not right now. <hes> they ought to be back on it. Why did her why he thinks that anybody else thia balalaika. Hopefully oh thought the moon it reminds me. I thought it happening my kinda getting then yeah. Well you know like the monday coming down. I i don't know how many of those times fellow thing off the big game winning compact and mike why not around talking about driving that i go yeah well. How do i how did you do oh don't uncommon diane. He's out of your day. All i the better than doing enough business to put me on a don't know about doc all day off our eh well. It's not a whole lot of down now. I hadn't thought about count out talking today about being a pair of yeah yeah they didn't early. You're fine back on hold on my feet all and eh one million dollars of mind album thing in the morning on the road and then and convey that up. Hey no author our meeting canadian. Now i would have all kind of fire i i think i think that that that the third the foam almost hey walk on hold on. Don't that gentleman online again. I had a big day all my here my mind now with a dollars and thirty today good talk about l. on nothing nothing but often often do that had it down local. I was cutting back back on the porch rocking driving on him along the little time that the worthy widely off talk about that after god we running down a little it all nothing i'd be willing to break a leg kind of ah all david anything no no a- let that two seven dollars and seventy seven and a half off one why thanks did we we don't have no active role in the rain all all about not at all we thought it out they ankle but etiquette dollars behind the dam uh-huh and you got to take off your pants this week though the other on thank you bye good morning i'm like i don't know all i welcome. Is that cut it on. I thought of things but the twenty three band pocket that nobody ever the money under the.

l. haryana moya paul david one million dollars two seven dollars
"paul outlet" Discussed on Silver & Black Pride

Silver & Black Pride

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on Silver & Black Pride

"But then he talked about himself, and he said bottom line. I am the best if it's back in this draft, and I could be that guy. And you know, I've talked to some people about him, and and others are they're kinda home on them in this summer like really high on like you said, and he could be the best in the in the draft. I think that with his determination his confidence in his, you know, the little swagger about himself. Even though I hate that word. I think you know, he might he might be something, you know. I don't know if you'll be that guy immediately. But he might be that guy long-term he might turn out to be that best guy. He might end up being Aeneas Williams when you know where he went third in the third round. I mean, and then turns out to be a hall of Famer, you don't say like, you just never know. But he could he could have something I have seen him all of a sudden picking up a lot of lot of traction. So it's it's funny that you mentioned that it's funny. The way you started to set that up. I was like, oh, he's going there. He's absolutely going there. So yeah, I I guess you've been here. What I've been hearing as well here in it. And I mean some too. Yeah. Exactly. I mean, six to two ten random four four something like four five eight four five six if the do can plate again, take don't lie and in the SEC he held his own, you know, and it's and it was it's not like in Turkey's hop for football is getting their give stoops credit, but he's a guy again long lead you want you want somebody next to calmly on the other side of Conley key makes cents a ton of fans because again, Paul outlet corners. Now, that's not something that Gunther had his natty look at you look at hall in the few the other guys, they're you know, they're a little bit shorter. But then you have Jonathan Joseph who's over six foot. Never way of Jackson out of Houston. Yep. He was he was a guy that was really high on since natty got right at the end of of Gunther. I think how had maybe two years in the first year Jackson was hurt. He had a got a peck injury. So he missed the whole season. But William Jackson figures William Jackson, the third of fat. He can he could play. And that's who I kind of think of when I see Lonnie Johnson. I think he's third as well or junior. He's a junior Lonnie Johnson junior. Yeah. When I see him I kinda get that William Jackson field as well. I even again, if you look at the second round, and when you're looking at it, and you're sitting there and you're projecting. Like, you said you really don't have third round pick. You may have to reach for guy in round two that you may not normally take if you had a third round pick. And at the corner position there's a ton of corners in this draft. I mean, KENDALL Sheffield's and other guy have you wanna Gattaca flat out run? And and had great tape across the board at Ohio State KENDALL shelf. The guy and he's five eleven he's not super tall guy. But he's five eleven about one hundred ninety something pounds got the flat. You probably ran into four the low four threes. Maybe hi four to he's a guy. So you may want to say, okay, look. We don't have. We don't have this third round pick. And we know we need to get a corner. That's go ahead and reach a little bit and getting there or is that is that safety position. So I think it all comes down to what the raiders value on their board. When you go into the fourth round, you still, you know, unless you take a receiver in the first year, I four pigs. You may have to go get another receiver to get a young guy. Groom. This is a good draft to do that. We've mentioned a few names earlier guy. Bring up every podcast Keyshawn Johnson from Fresno state. He's the guy to go round into round two beginning around, you know, somewhere around four he's the guy to keep an eye on that teams really liked because the way he runs rows catches the ball things of.

William Jackson Lonnie Johnson Aeneas Williams Keyshawn Johnson Gunther Jonathan Joseph KENDALL Sheffield Turkey raiders Ohio Houston SEC Fresno Conley football Paul two years six foot
"paul outlet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fight for one position in the game. And. But I can say as always we tried to play good football. And try to be the best deal on the future. So Iran and Iraq both in action in group d what are they game to tell you about today later in the day group in Lebanon facing Saudi Arabia takes to the road to Super Bowl fifty three. This is in the NFL continuing this weekend. The divisional playoffs is the stage where it is. Indeed. And in the AFC the top seeds Kansas City Chiefs host Indianapolis Colts in the NFC. The Dallas Cowboys are at the LA Rams say the divisional playoff winners, then play each other in the divisional championship finals next weekend. And the one is a thirsty matches go through to the Super Bowl two weeks after that. Well, the Cowboys edged out Seattle in the wild card game last week. The Rams had a by is the number two seats and the Rams head coach Sean McVeigh says his side of lost momentum. But having a week off. You know, you could look at it where if you wanna maintain your rhythm in your routine and being able to play you know, it's been a couple of weeks off. But I think the players would say that. The rest is definitely the best way to go get as healthy as possible for us where we've got, you know, we're we're about as healthy as you could ask to be, you know, going into the division around. So I know we've certainly looked at it as a positive. It's been a good chance for guys to kind of get re refreshed rejuvenated. And there's a good buzz in the building this week building into two Saturday night. Cricket. Finally, India chasing, two eight nine to win the first one day international against Australia in Sydney, so how they doing very badly. Twenty for three that target is some way off of that moment in the tenth ever had a terrible start India twenty three in the ten th over chasing two eight nine thousand first of three one day as in this series. Just to tell you that on day to the third test in Johannesburg as well Pakistan would resume on seventeen for two in reply to that Africans first-innings total two hundred sixty to play gets underway. Just over half an hour from now, thank you very much column. Harrison with the sport. Now, there's a long tradition at the start of the year of people try to predict what the headlines will be in the coming twelve months. It's never easy here, though is a pretty safe bet. They'll be endless stories in two thousand nineteen about the internet and social media their power to spread news both real and fake and the appetite for harvesting our personal data. Now, a new museum in the Belgian city of Mons says created the opportunity to remember. One of the optimistic visionaries who imagine the world of the internet before it went a little bit sour. He's name is Paul outlet. He came up with the idea of the internet and the search engine years before the invention of the computer and called his vision the Monday neom Kevin Connolly now tells the story of one of history's near geniuses..

LA Rams Harrison Dallas Cowboys India Mons NFL football Kevin Connolly Sean McVeigh AFC Saudi Arabia Iran Cricket Johannesburg Indianapolis Colts Seattle Kansas City Chiefs Paul outlet
"paul outlet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Charles were listening as no to a piece of music by franz joseph haydn and there's actually a story about trust that you've talked about beat behind this piece essentially haydn's spent most of his career in the permanent employment of the prince esterhazy now this prince particularly like spending time in the country palace and where he is caught when his retinue and of course the orchestra and haydn as its chief however one day in the seventeen seventies this prince decided for whatever reason that he didn't want the orchestral musicians families living in the court anymore you can imagine the musicians who are desolate but the prints on this occasion was implacable non pending so hard to saudi way to prick his conscience in to melt his heart was to write a piece of music for symphony called the farewell symphony and in the last section is written into the score that bit by bit musicians finish that paul outlet candle i wo cow so the music literally slowly withers and dies and it's a beautiful for really isn't it that there is no trust the music with his away but whether is trust there is music and it continue forever and happily this piece of music did indeed effective prince immediately reversed the decision i wonder as a conductor new you know exactly how you want something to sound right i mean it must be tempting to want to be a dictator sometimes like predecessor housi gosh of course you could as a conductor micromanage you could drill each remember the orchestra into every tiny neons just controlling directing making the decisions for them but if you did that you might get something that was very precise very accurate but it wouldn't have any life because it wouldn't actually be truthful for any of those musicians you know i mean the most brilliant manager is the manager who somehow manages to unlock ideas and others rather than impose his or her own and if i can get a question right as a conductor it's the most extraordinary magical spiritual life affirming experience you could possibly have that's charles hazlewood he also conduct something called the para orchestra it's the world's first professional ensemble for disabled musicians you can learn more about it at para orchestra dot com.

franz joseph haydn charles hazlewood prince esterhazy one day
"paul outlet" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Within seventy or trail by as many as eighteen james harden now comes in after used to calls a timeout cappella has it inside the art and i'm a high left side over to james harden heartened back older chris paul checks his feet at the 3point line guarded by murray gets a cappella pick goes baseline those at the opposite corner to tucker sapa kia reza shot clock winding down areza runner down the lane is up in the air bharti 738 ninepoint lead here for the houston rockets to ball murray as a for denver top akita plausibly hand back where he threeman we've the barton barton gets down the paint lanes either on or off the window and down grill barn has been active as well in denver gets down to seven forty seven a forty chris ball dribbles behind his back exit out the harden guarded thereby beasley and jabs at of wants gets a cappella pick uses that gets inside the ark on the lady goes lofting layup is up in in with a left hand the ninepoint lead again for used in forty nine to forty two mall murray has it up the last away murray guarded out there by trevor a reason with ethos left side over the barton barton puts it on the floor gets a pick from lyles lobs it over to beasley dangerous pass but he handled it beazley said the baseline falls down throws it away right to chris paul outlet pass up the right wing to pj tucker tucker drives on barton lanes in runners up no good rebound comes down to parkway good defense by will barton's across the timelines and he's foul by pj tucker frustration foul after he didn't get a whistle on the other it gary hair is going to come back in four denver ryan anderson in four member or the houston rockets split cuts fellow will get the breed another nineteen seconds amish shot clock year for denver were a little over half way home in the second quarter duluth rashard it a new take it a comeback in here for houston as well and that'll do it for pj tucker luke.

murray barton barton denver beasley trevor beazley gary hair ryan anderson rashard houston james harden chris paul chris ball lyles pj tucker duluth nineteen seconds
"paul outlet" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"paul outlet" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"One thirty four it is garza that's who steered in the regional good by gray herds nine fifty to forty one two three zero by me prayer is good he hit them both the home in and we haven't talked about it enough to freeze really struggle in this game is shaping up and down the floor and defensively ski struggling to stick with his ban he's playing through some pain right now and got to respect the guy for that sacrifice and chris tunics fears bohannon gives it left side tomas he curled shot no good cannot say hype it a rebound for minnesota goal first down eight with the paul outlet washy could he's on the floor not a mason makes it all the good huambo hannity into the paint key the out four quick gerald his open three cheryl triple heating savages like that it's a fivepoint dave fifty two 45 pitiless rival gives the pair no good house cook humorous that cannot day brings in the rebounds had ahead said he goes post because got knocked off balance miss the cia none of the foul he's looking at the pitch will not getting back here's comes bears the other way poor iowa working left seeding downloaded kush against can i take kickback bohannon open three good down bohannon were mesa every time complains about the rest he gets burned he complained that he didn't get a call and the offense advani in hustle back on defense and bohannon will make you pay over and over again mason working right kicking the hurt hurt slashing toward the paint back to the basket finds it cutting washington under the basque you gotta vladamir layup yet 3point play chance at patino going to talk to me right now a body fairly 50s fit complaining about the refs complaining about the rafts to make that point washington a pocket you'll have agreed throw coming into its iowa 53 minnesota forty seven we'll take the time out this is goal doper basketball from lear field we abbott fund the foundation of the global healthcare company abbott is dedicated to helping people build better lives and stronger communities era minnesota and around.

garza tomas hannity cia iowa washington abbott minnesota bohannon cheryl mason