15 Burst results for "Paul Mao"

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Commercializing in everything from music and I'm an operatic tenor Peter Director producer who came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the South West Michigan's are sitting entertainment scene and invites you into the conversations welcome to breaking territory breaking characters brought you by Lake Michigan College Go Slight Theatre Center Heiress Gallery Arts and Culture Center the twin city players and the Mason Jar cafe look into this week's upset of breaking reported from the coast late in the Benton Harbor district I'm Jeremy Bonfigli and I'm Paul Mao liven well here in October tuber I know feel nightfall Dude I love this one I know it's great best putting some to bed got married on Halloween I made my New York City Opera debut on Halloween I think actually about Halloween but the sector over great I had my My Bachelor Party in Vegas on Halloween yes and Baseba- baseball cardinals cards oh cards awfully hopefully that'll be relevant when this comes out Atlanta so well hey I'm you know an addition to the cardinals I'm also pretty excited about that. One of my favorite Michigan girlfriend singer songwriters what a many him is performing in town weekend of course I'm talking about traverse city's own may Irwin he plays delivery on Saturday night what makes this particular concert even more special is that it is a release concert for her brand new album titled Second Site it's an album filled with songs reflection about the Times that we we're living in and very pertinent to what's been going on in our country right now Earlier this week I had a chance to speak with may about the ooh out for a new record is taking a long time to finish took a schedule for a chance to it's been a long time coming and I'm really really take to finish it and it's the fans are all written host selection of the current president and so a lot of it is how it means to be living in this country right now and talking about the origins of our flagon and this country in general and and the hope is to try to help reconnect people look what it means to them to be be living here and it means to continue to create positive change in our communities and making adapting are sort of American dreaming and creating a new one that is more inclusive of everyone who calls this place home and while also asking you know those the powers that be to be more responsible and respectful of all the people that live here as well so that's what the album is about and the shows are sort of a piece kind of taking people on a journey through reflecting on those ideas we'll tell me a little bit mad about the title second site tell me a little bit about the idea behind in and like maybe a shift yeah that the title game instead of the you know the talk coming from the title but it's really when it boils down to feel like right now reconnecting to intuitive fellas really important part of healing and so the second site is sort of the part of us that knows what to do beyond any sort of like external knowing so sort of being quiet enough to reflect inside ourselves and and have our intuition guiding US instead of being led by happening around us especially right now there's so much to be distracted by and also there's a lot of things on the political world that are really taking out of energy and distracting us from what we know and what we want to see so check and say is sort of your what the intuitive higher self and and reconnecting to that and with these shoes I know that you can these this this little of released tour tell me year what are the songs that have just kind of uh they resonated for you and starting to resonate with audiences as well when you're you're playing these live in pretty amazing it was a little bit scary to Matt Really Know How people would receive the material having it being kind of your content matters unusual my my voice in a way is an activist and so I wasn't sure but people have really been receiving the message really well and connecting in the songs that we've done like there's a few that are extremely just relevant to a happening right now one is whole again one and Sach my home and then on his called how can I return and those three are pretty heavy pieces and they're kind of the flag suite of the album and so they're reflecting on different parts of the flag and and what it means to live here now and they've just been received so well and and it's been really powerful to be supported by the band who's willing to go very deep and Ashley with me into this message to deliver right with a lot of thought and heart and then to have received has just then a really really beautiful sharing and given given me a lot of faith in our work at the community people really we are ready for a different way forward you know the to carry ons of tooth we had and fitted to the five it took pain that Novacaine office live burn into history legacy.

Michigan Lake Michigan College Slight Theatre Center Heiress Atlanta New York City Benton Harbor Paul Mao South West Michigan baseball Peter Director producer Vegas Mason Jar Jeremy Bonfigli
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

09:40 min | 1 year ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Week's episode of Breaking character go slight in Benton Harbor district I'm Jeremy Bonfigli I'm Paul Mao Episode One Hundred Fifteen Yeah we've done this for that long shit announced where Holy Shit that's right we can't our hair cast brand please that's right here in silently a nod my head at earmuffs all right well let's let's talk about let's get serious let's talk about a subject that we we all know a little something about I think in this room and that's resiliency Hick and F. Data rate allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back at least as strong as before well resiliency is also the title of a new exhibition devoted to the process but in the face of adversity trauma tragedy threats and stressed opening in this Friday at the art center here to tell us all about it is deputy director and curator Tammy Miller and Tasha Turner whose victim for us for the first time here drama that's right the program director for trauma informed initiatives at spectrum Lakeland Healthy you both for being here today thank you hear touch think heard I'm GonNa do it now list just talking about the idea for this exhibition because it came out came about as a conversation between Brazil and Lakeland told me a little bit about how you that conversation developed in how between mental health initiatives and the power of art and how those conversations led to this collaboration in the exhibition cure thing Tasha meet nealer and do it I'll take a stab at so you know at Spectrum Health Lakeland we've really been talking a lot about mental health because our community is consistently telling us it's one of their priority health needs no that's the term that we use we found that in two thousand sixteen we find it again in two thousand nineteen and so we thought it was really important to do some very intentionally around that work but with that you know as important as it is to talk about like adversity and the challenges that people face it's also equally and even more important to talk about the things that help us get through and the strength that we have right and not just focusing on the bad and the ugly and so we have those conversations internally and in kind of thinking you know who are our partners in the community that we could work with and going beyond like just all the mental health professionals right like making this something that's truly community effort and that ripples even beyond just the work that I do and so then we started talking about the crisis role in how just healing therapeutic we know are to be just generally right like the arts are incredibly healing and what kind of national a partnership could we start to form and you know people talked and they talked about talking and now here yeah timmy like free because I know that's the the mission statement craigslist you know strengthening the community through art so tell me how this kind of in with the crowds was missing statement of version yeah so in the last couple of years we changed our mission statement to in to read that we would that we want to inspire meaningful change and strengthen community the visual arts and as part of that process you know we've always had community based input in our exhibition programming but we decided that we really wanted to start building a couple exhibitions each year that started with the community first and then sat out the artwork so so this is our first tip of this kind and and it's great so we through these natural conversations that were happening between the castle and Spectrum Lakeland health we had defied this need and the community and this need for awareness and and we do you know we also know the great benefits and the wellness benefits of art art can be very therapeutic and has lots of great tangential benefits to it so it was just a perfect fit and a great way to start in this project together and how did you end on on the subject of resilience see as being kind of a topic to explore and seek out artists for an in tell me just a little bit about that process of of finding artists kind of fit into that category sure so which are very good at we've known Oh thank you so the theme of resiliency was developed through dialogue with Lakeland Spectrum House so we had gotten together and had a couple of group conversations with staff and the team from spectrum and talked about these different needs an and the links between our wellness and we landed on the term resiliency because it's because we believe it's positive it's proactive and it's it's a need right so she can speak better to that but I will for the artist process once we don't determine this was our theme we actually put out a nationwide call for artists and ask them to respond to it and we gave them just a very brief definition of resiliency and let them respond to it with their artworks and we received several proposals that we're addressing that theme really different and wide ranging ways whether the process builds resiliency for the artists themselves whether the artwork was addressing the issue of resiliency some of them very directly some of them very abstractly and so it was a fascinating process so we so we captured all these proposals and then again we sat down with the team from spectrum and we reviewed them together we had a shared rubric that everybody was filling out scoring the artworks and I had to tell you this is actually the part that I loved was that I'm thinking okay how's how's this GonNa win oh you know everybody has different responses to artworks and even the spectrum Lakeland health individuals their team was not scoring cohesively I mean they were you're vastly different from one another like the castle staff were vastly different from one another in their responses to these artworks and so we gather those responses and from there we call down a list of artworks artists to include in the show that school and before we dive and fully to the art I wanted to to go back to Tasha and spoke to you guys over there yeah you know it depending on where you look there's lots of different definitions for resilience and what it means to be resilient you know kind of like the most basic is that ability to bounce back right you the imagery of like a rubber band comes to mind and there's all different kinds of rubber bands you have some that are super-duper flexible you have those that if they haven't been used that great they can become brittle so they might have a little bit of a stretch but they could break really easy right the ones that are like huge already well it it takes some effort to even stretch them and so just like we were very varied in our responses to art I think that also speaks to the fact that has people we are vastly different and so the things that strengthen us can be very different the things that we see as our strengths and supports can be very different and different doesn't mean wrong right and it in this work really just honors that individuality in that people know what's best for them you are your your best expert I tell people all the time as a counselor I'm not an expert in you I'm an expert in helping you find the you that you want right I don't give you the answer there's I just hope you to see the answers you already have and so with this resilience piece it's helping people kind of turn inward look for what are my internal supports I already have how can I use those external things around me what might be missing that we really want some more of we want to do some more of and that all of those things are very valid yeah and now tell me I know you've been covering the Artan boxing and getting things set for the opening this Friday also the artwork in the artist just to give us a cross section of how this theme does speak in different ways to artists in you went through a rough patch in her own life and she took out a period of time and did a whole series of artworks that she calls herself care series so she illustrated what self-care means to her whether that's taking a nap with her dog whether it's taking a bath whether it's reading a book or or planting it lovely illustrations and so so she's one of the artists in the show and really just delightful and I would almost even a little trendy looking you know you know and then you know Allie Farkas is Michigan artist who does he's Really Beautiful.

Jeremy Bonfigli Benton Harbor Paul Mao
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"At these Jeremy Lamb Paul we both have a passion for the visual and Performing Arts and share that is slightly different ways. I'm a recovering print journalist commercializing everything from music and I'm an operatic tenor eater director and producer who came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the South West. Michigan's are sitting entertainment scene invites you into the conversations welcome to breaking error territory breaking characters brought you by Lake Michigan College Go Slight Theater Press Center Heiress Gallery Arts and Culture Centre the the twin city players and the Mason Jar cafe splashing into this week's upset over breaking care fair recorded from the dust lay in the Benton harbor district. I'm Jeremy Buffalo and I'm Paul Mao what's up. Gb Man how you doing. I'm awesome the first week of fall yeah the music finally meet ears by things following. Take temperatures beautiful leaves me asleep. Yeah exactly that's right. Sorry all things things before. We have interesting and you know what else happens. In the fall is the mental main stage season kicks off the walls on and there's a great falls fire nine balls of fire yeah that doesn't quite where we have another great great mental show coming up insulin suckle history in December fourth nineteen fifty six at the Son Record Studios in Memphis Tennessee Carl Perkins came in to record some songs with his band and the labels latest acquisition position. Some new kid named Jerry Lewis. You're sitting in on piano. It just so happened since it. Was You know sun records. Johnny cash happened to come into the studio that morning. You're listening and then sometime in the early afternoon twenty one year old Elvis Presley standby for a casual visit an impromptu museum session followed who wish for with off or members Jerry Lee Carl Perkins Johnny cash and Elvis Presley. This jam session was record quartered and is the basis for the hit musical million dollar. Quartet kicks off its tenth anniversary national tour on Tuesday. Take a tuber I at the mental center at Lake Michigan College. This will be the first show of the tour so we're excited about that. I recently had a chance is to catch up with trevor. Dorner portrays Jerry Lee Lewis in the show to talk about that seminal moment in rock history and his portrayal of the great balls of fire singer. Yeah so the show itself all revolves around this one night in Memphis Tennessee son record where I they had Jerry Lee Lewis Johnny Cash Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley all happened to be there together and they had kind of an impromptu jam session so musicals was kind of a dramatization of that night which like we play some of the songs that they played that night because there is like an actual recording straight through like everything that happened I think and yeah so that's like kind of the whole show is that I've been doing Jerry Lee for a while now I actually I was on and the national tour before this. I'm about two years ago. and I was the under study for that tour and then since then I've done a couple of other productions regionally and now the tour has put me back to daily this time around for the Serie Super Cool. I'm super excited. This'll be you know I'm in and like I'm close to two hundred shows doing million dollar quartet so far one hundred that'd be under study now getting close to a hundred actually playing Jerry Lee the cool kind of growth over the last two years of doing this show and Kinda. Let me here to opening the tenth bursary tour.

Jerry Lee Lewis Jerry Lee Elvis Presley Lake Michigan College Johnny cash Jerry Lee Carl Perkins Carl Perkins Michigan Memphis Slight Theater Press Center He Jeremy Lamb Tennessee Son Record Studios Benton harbor Jeremy Buffalo South West director Paul Mao trevor
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

12:30 min | 1 year ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Flow welcome to this week's episode breaking character recorded from the ghost light in the Benton Harbor district. I'm Jeremy Bonfiglio. I'm Paul Mao. We are here with episode one. Oh eight we know eight. That's a lot of episode two and more than two years worth of episodes in sitting here looking at my face. I'm hiding sitting here with you. It seems at least like four years not even breaking character totally in care. We have a couple of characters in studio today yes but before before we do that. I just wanted yeah because everybody who's who I've run into that. We do this podcast and know that we're friends has come up to me and said how wonderful <hes>. West side story was and and <hes> I know that you you were really really really pleased with it so I wanted to say it is to you and Kudos to the entire production team. I mean all the way down I mean in the people in this room is well to support me and all the people that work hard on all these things all year long it takes a huge village to pull off something like west side story a symphony any company to theater companies like we all are working twenty four seven three sixty five to make these things happen so to be able to be out there and let the heavens opened up and be kind to us for two nights in a row and have an evening like that. I mean is there beautiful time to be alive on Civil English terrific this Saturday. I mean just amazing to have whether how did you write. I don't know we got right now last year in high so he got oldest one is what I'd like to take some of the credit for with that but I can speak him. No rest for the wicked theater continues inaugural Hummer run this week with birth burst nurses Pulitzer Prize winning play Clyborn Park razor-sharp Satire Takes Jab at race in real estate in the fictional Chicago neighborhood of clyborn park. The play begins in Nineteen fifty-nine as a black family moves into a white enclave then act two lifts the script up to quite literally taking us back to the same house in two thousand nine as gentrification sets in and the roles are reversed joining us in the talk about the show you you just heard a sneak peek of our actors. Bill Klein and Carol Siser. Thank you both for being here. Thank you hear well. Bill Bill I wanted I wanted to start off by asking the two of you this and and commenting on it because I think most theater goes especially in this community. We know you both from all the work that you've done across the river at twin city players and I think it's important fact mentioned that because you know what this really shows I think at the theater community here is in fact just that a community so before we dive into the play. Tell me what made you both went to be a part of the inaugural season here here at the coastline into to show that just that fact that this isn't a competition. This is just more more more good theater that people can have opportunity to come see well ladies first well. I I was noticing when I was writing my bio bill for this show and I was listening the last few things that I'd been in that I'd been at the symphony. I'd been like Michigan College. I'd been at twin city players and now I'm here I do you really think is a universal community. We love each other we share. I hope people don't think that if you if you're one you can't be the other because I don't see it that way at all and I am thrilled to be part of something this new and this fresh and this wonderful. That's going to be here long after I'm gone and have just a little tiny part to play in it. It's just exciting and quite frankly a little inspiring yeah. This must have been belfry you the same thing I've been involved with twin city players for over thirty years but I've also worked with a lake shore. Beckwith <hes> Michigan Dunes of lists the our town players Weiji. I you know I've done a lot of different theatre groups in one one of the consistent things is always to me a family yeah you get involved in the inner production with a production company and and you become family because you spend so much time mm together and in this case and I've advocated the family -ness of when city players for years and this one's even a double dose because it's not only my family but it's my actual that's right Marion daughter for through my wife this director funny other little thing we were pulling costumes and in my perfect character wears an apron <music>. An out of the pile is an apron. That was my mother's wearing in the play. It's been twenty five thirty years ago. I don't eat it a couple of smocks two twin city players and now here. I am where one of her smock may play. That's you know I'm not so mad genius but sometimes things fall into place so I think you know two things. I thought why you asked that question. I didn't know you were GONNA. Ask which is great though thank you. Jeremy always after is that people come come up to me or even some people on my board and say Paul. We want to want you to realize your dream well. It's not something that I caught into. I it's it's been a natural progression. It's been my work at S._M._C. at C.. Three years on the border twin CD players to understand how all those things work well and don't work well so right and so that coupled with the idea that just coincidentally a piece of this magnitude of this kind of importance to be able to have you to and some other veterans at Wednesday players be a part of this production of of this important level of understanding conversation and actually just hit me like a ton of bricks to talk about the word twin and what twin city players is and has not been and we're talking about gentrification and what we're trying to do in both places so it was designed but here we are l. and the actors are twincities players veterans and here we are talking about what is and is not twin about Ben Harboring Saint Joe Right Hander clyborn park and nine hundred fifty s versus and I I think there's a lot of comparisons between that play in this and just go back to Jeremy said a while ago you know th th the competition level competitions not always bad. I mean it's always good because that brings both of you to a higher level and I don't. I don't look at go slater the DOJ EAC or anybody else as competition I look at it is is basically expanding banning the audience absolutely our people that we can bring into live theater and show them. What a great entertainment value that is it benefits. It's everyone because then people will come to see every all the shows everywhere no matter where you're at because no matter what the ater you're in if you I wanna see that show you can see the show twin city players you can see and still see the show at the ghost light and still see the show a dodger. If that's that's live theater here is what you enjoy it and to me. I mean I would pick live theater over any movie television show that I've ever seen except for. Maybe deadwood sporting event. I mean you strip away from that. You know now. There's a second theater or whatever it's office. Michigan are in in Ben Entertainers a were right around the lake from a very successful city named Chicago. Oh my goodness the theater city for two hundred storefront theaters. They all figured. got a way to get along to rise up and I go up to be credible theater to really dedicated theater fans coming to see Li- borne part okay and we better be fortunate. Wait no it's Sunday. It's our first Sunday Sunday the fourth uh-huh riddick well. Let's let's time into this show a little bit and Paul. You alluded to it a little bit. <hes> you know this show has themes about an explorers <hes> the idea <hes> gentrification and you know it's interesting and I'm sure there's thought that went into this. When you're you're building this this building and thinking about this season of you know there has been some criticism about the arts district <hes> you know and building joining us that you know that it is gentrification and in that you know white people from Saint Joe or coming in and so so you know wrap my head around that and just asking the question you know what what kind of thoughts went in for you. When you know you were building this theater season and thinking about doing a show like this we talk about even on our mission statement. We're interested in theater that <hes> that <hes> purports or continues news conversation and I think nothing continues a conversation about gentrification more than a play designed to do just that <hes> as some people might shy away from controversy. I think think a piece of eater puts the onus on us. When we lift the curtain or or or turn on the house lights to say what did you think about that and so we're going to have a chance to do that eight times with this piece but also you know people like to say the gentrification of dirty word while it's what's happening and so for us to say. It's a dirty dirty word. Doesn't you know that someone classify it doesn't have to be we can talk about how it's happened before us. I it's happening now. Why it's going to happen in the future is that what is happening or are we trying mind to work within the confines of the Arts district or been harbored to do something better for the community as a whole. Is it <hes> is. Is it community improvement for all be competing community improvement for instead of you know somebody pushing somebody else aside as you know way. oftentimes uh-huh these conversations are center right and you know those the twenty dollar price tag keep people away. They can't afford this piece of theater. It's something we're talking about something the newness at this theater. Could we have one night at least that is a pay what you can pay what you want type of eating because I do think some families is to make that bryce ticket yeah so <hes> I did want to mention that this Sunday we have officially landed a guest panel of folks to have a talkback session <hes> how we are going to have at least four guests. Shar Mae Sanders Char may works with students at Lake Michigan College. There's on the race relations. Council is the CO chair of AL packed the community community police relations effort and Ben Harper and has interesting perspective on as an African American woman herself who grew up in Saint Joe was mainly Yarborough who we all know in Love County Commissioner President of Ben Harper Library Board Lord wife of the former mayor lover of the arts and she's been in the thick of things for decades and as well as two of the the white men in this own some of the land down here Mr Kennedy who's on our board board and Mr Peter Clovis. They're both going to join us so it's going to be lively discussion. We invite people to come this Sunday with or without having tickets. We'd like people to see the show. I it's a two o'clock. Matinee A. and the post show talk Michael Taste or four thirty see that's awesome and then well. Let's let's talk a little bit about the show because I is an interesting concept you know <hes> <hes> two different time periods different characters bill and Carol Tulsa a little bit about the Carol character she you play and you know how they they fit into this story. Well it's nineteen fifty nine and in the first act today in the first nineteen fifty nine and bill and I play husband and wife and we have just sold our home as it turns out to the first black couple to becoming into the neighborhood which sets up a whole domino effect right between the neighbors and what's happening in our lives and I don't want to give the whole story away but there's tension mentioned. There's my character I one of the things that really drew me her is she is trying to deal with so many different things in this play and she she she travels. She isn't just a constant. The second character is not so much so but this I beck one..

Jeremy Bonfiglio Paul Mao Chicago Arts district Bill Bill clyborn park Benton Harbor Michigan College Pulitzer Prize Bill Klein Ben Harper Carol Tulsa Michigan Dunes Mr Kennedy Lake Michigan College Michael Taste director Ben Entertainers Ben Harper Library Love County
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Of breaking character reporting from the slight right here in the Berbar district. I'm Jeremy Bonfiglio. I'm Paul Mao Episode Number One. Oh Sick six-man. We've been doing this whole lives. It feels like it so what do I got real yeah. How are you how's your week? I'm good buddy. <hes> you know west side story all the time these days Wayne Yeah more days then we'll be at the beach. That's right so we'll get the this a little sneak peek because that's coming next week on breaking care I laugh. Is this week started off. We have the bucks factory for the arts. It's next next art. Exhibitions series five featuring the work of Susan Teague Eric Roberts. I'm not even going to build on Lee. You are so clearly the that's why I need him. The Re this mercy Mitchell and our friend Jennifer Zona with a reception this Friday at the box factory in Saint Joe joining us in the studio to tell us all about it is Hoopoe Nikki Gauthier this as well as artists and Erica Roberts. Thanks for joining us today for having us so Susan Erica. Let's start with the to tell us a little bit about the work you'll have on display in this exhibition and the inspiration behind it Erica hi this is Erica so my work is in sort of a fantastical style and I was just telling sue earlier today. My older sister has always been in an enormous inspiration to me. <hes> she's a fantasy writer and my whole life I grew up sharing a room with her and she helped me fall asleep by making stories up on the spot and so much of the fantasy genre has become really close to my heart because of that <hes> but not only that it's like putting together a story and you know analyzing using it structure is also. It's also become really important to me so my overall theme is about the heroine's journey which that's an old book by Maureen Murdoch and <hes> what she talks about is she differentiates the heroine's journey as something different than the hero's journey it necessarily must be because women are inherently different from men <hes> so so each of my pieces is about a different heroin and her story and then together <hes> each piece fits different part of the Hero's journey so for instance one is all about the call to action and another piece is about the eye of the storm thick of the action. The character thinks that they've overcome their their hardest trials already the and they've just found that it's actually just beginning you know that sort of thing so each piece sectional heroines our heroes from the or they from his book that you must sell some of them are sort of have just a very personal to me and my personal stories and then some of them are actually historical so one piece is called bridget. Bishop is a witch because bridget bishop was the first woman the first person who is executed in the Salem witch trials and so I retold that story and my painting as if Bridget Bishop really was a witch and she was all powerful and look out I just I tend to like rewriting the stories in a way that I prefer warm. Medium is painting right. Tell me are you on canvas or board or what are you tell me what you're using so I use oil paints numb. <HES> and I make my own panels on M._d._f.. And then on quite a few paintings I like to embellish with I discovered this stuff called Dyke Creek blasts <hes> which is <hes> Dyke. I Croak meaning to color so it has the effect that you look at it from one side and it's one color and then you turn the other way and the particles are reflecting refracting differently you get a completely different color will use that <hes> <hes> mixed in with the oil painting media minutes a really cool glaze the fact cool Eric has also done some of my set design airliner change and then the panels that you saw for sister act or projections of her beautiful our works so if you've seen that you've already gotten a kind of a sneak Peek Horton incredible and then and then to be an incredible. Tell US toast a little bit about your work and what we can expect in this exhibition. Hey there's a twenty five pieces. This is my work in this show and it is twenty-five yeah. There's twenty thank you those twenty five pieces in this show and it is two parts in fact with the same theme running through the first part is work that I had done on retrospectively when I had cancer about fifteen twenty years fifteen years ago and it was titled Woman Passion Power Divinity and so my these oil paintings and graphite drawings are in expression of <hes> my quest to discover through cancer what what is it at who am I as a one and who I s an artist and who am I as a human being in this world today so they all have a message so one of my favorites in that is. Is No painting called Gypsy fire and it speaks about a woman's drive in her power to expand explore and discover and then <hes> the remaining pieces of this show their sixteen more pieces and now these fees are totally different than the rest of the pieces so I've I've morphed through the years so the first body of work is very classical realism very tight painting in oil. This is all tissue paper and so in two thousand ten <hes> I I was twenty two thousand six me. I was given a box of colored tissue paper then what to do with it because I paint and I draw for living in bureaus and things like that so I let it sit for years and one day I got him out and I was tinker around with that banned these things layer really well you know they they they could look like a stained glass window. They like paintings and I thought Hadda nine what to do with so I ordered ten eight foot high forefoot panels and had them shipped home and I created he's fictitional goddesses and so for and there are play on words so for example carmine woman's name. CARMINE is the goddess of taxicab. Mom's that's awesome. Fanny is the goddess of hot flashes the fans all around her and then there is Germane Germay thank you Germain Germain is where my favorites and it's G.. E. R. M. Dash May I n.. A. And she's the goddess have disinfectants and so there's six they're sixteen of these playful pieces and as I'm created them I submitted them for our price in two thousand ten and and hung among hung them up there with <hes> <hes> people going by taking photographs thinking that they were paintings and so I put this huge sign up I mean huge and it said this is tissue paper. Only no pain dot got that exclamation point really ex- ah happened that Ripley's believe it or not vice president of entertainment and museums came by and saw them called me up and asked me if I would sell them to their museum in Florida so that's where they reside so when I got this invitation station to <hes> show at the box actor I thought this is an important place for me to expand on the idea of these <hes> goddesses and as I'm doing that I oftentimes think that ideas inspirations come through the back door. Rarely rarely they'd come knocking on the front door and so I'm doing these tissue paper pieces and I'm thinking you know I'm beginning to realize there's something more about just than humor some things brewing on the inside of me. That's it's very powerful and say listen to it. I thought now I know why am doing these. This is about women where they have walked in the past fifty years is I'm almost seventy so I can speak from that a place and also where they are now so for example penny he n._y.. Is the goddess of finances and then. I realized you know where we were as women when I was a child women didn't own property operative. We're not allowed to own property. We didn't go to college unless we were going to be teachers are nurses into the change and who are who takes care of the money. Women are now have bank accounts which we couldn't have back then unless a man's signature was on it tried even as a young married woman couldn't do that right so there's all these stories is so I began to write stories about each of these goddesses from my own personal experience and also from research aware what it was like and what I mean not that I had research because 'cause I lived at but what it was like then and who is involved then and what it's like today for women that transitions we've come a long way that quote baby rather than baby. It's got us so this is now a book and it's being published comes out tomorrow and it's called got us as Galore you and me sister and it will be available at the box factory. Thank you very cool. We'll nicky. Tell us who else you've you've wrangled or this exhibition in in what else we can just kind of expect overall. There seems to be a strong your title artists Wrangler. I like it one. That's one of those rain or something like that so actually I want to point out that Susan is giving a presentation during the exhibit <hes> <hes> in August on Thursday the fifteenth she's presenting women in art remarkable rebels and trailblazers so I think there's been sort of a female centric team <hes> with several of our artists Susan Erica obviously being two of them and they share a gallery which I think has turned out quite a Kismat kind of thing I'm enjoying seeing their pieces getting laid out together and seeing how they're going to <hes> play off of each other but <hes> Jennifer Zona who you mentioned earlier she's in our River Walk Gallery and her <hes> collection of work is also somewhat <hes> themed around some activists type points <hes> she's <hes> hitting on some some measures that we've all seen coming through the legislator recently regarding <hes> restricting abortion access. She's also hitting on a gun legislation. It's really powerful important work. <hes> a her <hes> body work is called birth of chaos and in the river walk gallery. We also have Marcy Mitchell who's a local artists from Saint Joe's both and <hes> she does a mainly abstracted <hes> landscape <hes> paintings and and <hes> there's brilliant colors in all of her pieces <hes> so that's been a lot of fun to see and then in our whitlow gallery. We have an artist from Chicago and Paul. You did such a nice job with his name earlier. Turtle Turtle only is his name so he is actually presenting sort of what I might call a retrospective retrospective. He's African American okay cool name. <hes> he's kind of a cool guy so you shouldn't yeah yeah artist appraise incredibly cool. Excuse me I said Kinda and he's <hes> presenting rid mystic. SMORGASBORD is what he's called this sort of collection it represents years and years of of work of his and he's also doing being a presentation <hes> during the exhibit those dates are all available on our website and facebook. Paul has them to yeah so the opening reception for the series. Five exhibition is five thirty seven thirty P._M.. This Friday.

Susan Erica Paul Mao bridget bishop Eric Roberts Marcy Mitchell Jennifer Zona Berbar Jeremy Bonfiglio cancer Erica Roberts Dyke Creek facebook Susan Teague Wayne Maureen Murdoch Lee writer heroin Salem
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"This week's episode of breaking character reported from our new home at this. Late in the Benton harbor, our sister. I'm Jeremy von Victoria. I'm Paul Mao. Yes. A little rain here. Little bit little echo. We should just whisper, so anyway. Or maybe should be furniture in your office NTR sweaty balls guys twenty twenty with anyway. Yeah. Well, speaking of theaters are I guess, if have been known to portray, some maybe creepy on stage and in real life, where they're certainly cookie. I don't think we can argue that. But we don't think we're all that species. That's why we invited Martin and windy, go back to the podcast. Talk about them new musical adaptation of the Addams family, which ovens of four weekend run this Friday at the twin city players play house. Thank you guys for coming back. Do so. So people, let's say a certain vintage, like myself are certainly familiar with the classic TV show. And, and the comic firm wish this is based but there's also been if you movies made in the nineties as well as I understand, in new enemy films, coming out the Stober of that family, but, but tell us a little bit about what makes this new musical version so much fun. This one is. This one is taking place, as Wednesday in Pugsley, getting older and Wednesday is secretly engaged big really secretly and taking her to Alaska. Anyway. The pre podcast joke. Bottom line is it pays a wonderful tribute to the television show. It takes some of the aspects of the movies, and it puts it all together in a way that we can make it fresh so that we can have some fun with the characters and kind of suspend some realities without really changing anything that you're going to be looking for. Okay. You're going to see a lot of millier festers. Neither short Moore bold. Okay. Or fissures toll in her suit. And so as long as fester festive needs to do, and he is absolutely every fester. Nice when you see him because David before, but, but, but we, we deviate from the stereotypes often when we direct think enough of your audience is years away from Addis family. They'll come to it with a fresh look. Anyway, absolute. In this presentation really looks at four love stories, okay. Story between Gomez tissue. Of course, you've got the love story, which weaned Wednesday and her new bowl, Lucas, you've got we'll develop into a love story, Lucas parents, the Bina keys Mellon. Alice, find love again through the course of the mayhem that ensues in the Adams house, and then fester, of course, is in love with the moon of all goes. It's faster. That's awesome. Well, it's so it's like Anna Karenina there's lots of different plots. Remember.

Moore Benton harbor Jeremy von Victoria Paul Mao Lucas Anna Karenina Bina keys Mellon Alaska Addams Adams house Martin Addis family Alice Gomez David
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"I'm Paul Mao dot dot dot opening banter, yes. Yeah. Hi, paul. Hi, mary. Yes, he is. And that's different from any other Tuesday by nothing about not Arjun. Not at all right. Well luckily joining us this stadium. Yeah. What our old friend Tammy Miller, deputy director of the art center them back to, you know, are you? I'm a little scared. But if. You've been on this enough. Not to be scared. Go on now over the. Now you have a very cool exhibition opening this Friday, featuring the work of former White House for Pete Souza. Let's start there. What can you tell us about it? It is a super cool exhibition. So Pete Souza was the White House for tire for, for both Ronald Reagan, and Obama. And so these are photographs from both of those presidencies, and we're showing fifty six photographs total and they're really great. So, so what he's done for half of the show. He's done these dip IX where he'll show images of Reagan golfing, and Obama golfing Reagan in the motorcade Obama in the motorcade. So he shows he's two presidents who had very different views and policies and histories to their presidencies, but he'll show them side by side doing very similar activities shows them in the Oval Office. You know both contemplating what they're doing. So he shows sort of shared. Humanity shared actions shared just similarities between these two men, different parties, two very different time periods in very similar very difficult job. Absolutely. And so, you know, pizza is he's really trying to get at the integrity of both of the individuals and the humanity of both of the individuals. So, you know, I think what's so important about this exhibition is that we live in such polarized polarizing times. And he's taking two opposing parties to put presidents who is, you know, be like, in disliked, heavily by different individuals. And he's showing their shares their shared commonalities, which I think is really beautiful. Yeah. I think the thing is really fascinating to me. I was leave from, you know, my former career in print journalism is, you know, he has a photo journalism, background and. These spent thousands and thousands of hours with bus these presents. In public in personal situations. So he was able to really capture these candid moments. I mean it has a definite but of journalism quality to it. He tells just about some of the some of the images that struck you when. Either when the exhibition came in or when you were just working looking at this as something to bring to the Grassle. Yeah, I mean, one of the things that I like is he start to think about the private moments of the presidency when you're looking at these photographs? So there's a picture of Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan, and there at this ranch in Maryland. It's a presidential ranch and ensues talks about how every Saturday that they could the Reagan would go to this ranch, and they would go horseback riding together. But what people didn't know is that they would sneak off of the property and go to the public parks, on horseback, without telling the secret service, you know, and they just wanted their time together their freedom away from the spotlight. And so, so some of those images and the image that everybody's seeing of Obama and Michelle Nago night, there in like a freight elevator and you got the service lined up along the sides of the wall, and they're just having a special moment together where he's looking at her in the eyes and, and you think about you think about privacy and you think about how much. These people are scrutinized, how much they're in the limelight, all the time, and for Sousa to be sensitive to that. But also to capture these really enduring moments early impressive about like how that works for him. Does he spend every waking moment with these people does he just get called out? He does every make. But he's I don't know. I mean exactly but he does talk about, you know, trying, he makes sure that he is capturing these personal moments. And so you talk about it with Obama that, you know, he definitely needed in wanted to get photographs of Obama with his children, but also want to respect this time with this children. It'd be difficult. You know, and the president's you know, each laid out their own little boundaries with him. You know, this is okay. This is not. Okay. And so, so he has to be really respectful of, of the president's obviously, and sort of no one to turn aside and walk out of the room or went to be present. Yeah. Yeah. Into. Tell us how this came to you this exhibition in what was it about it? That made you decide. It was. Yeah. Fun to show it here in at the causal is fairly well known photographer. Photojournalist Bataga for and he's done a lot of interviews. And he's published a book recently. And so, so couple, I think it was actually probably two years ago. Now, our executive director Julia Orly came in and she's attainment has just listening to NPR, and there's this really great interview with Pete Souza on there. Wouldn't it be great if we had a Pete Souza exhibition as like that'd be fantastic? And so, I just, you know, file them in the back of my head and a few months later, I thought, you know what I know a company that puts together exhibitions, specifically photography. I'm just gonna call them. The hey do you have a Pete of exit, you know? And I did our art circulating exhibitions and they said, we're putting it together right now. We don't even have a checklist yet. But we actually are, and this is what it's going to be. It's gonna be his photographs of Reagan Obama. And I was like this is so perfect. Them. Yeah. I mean I was like sinus up on the list so that we can bring this year. So, and I loved that it wasn't because I was thinking, well, we can't just do an exhibition of Obama photographs, you know, like we need something a little more universal little more broad unless pointed. And so the fact that they did the Reagan Obama pictures together was just perfect. Yeah, you know, and then you said they're fifty six. Yes. Yeah. And would've you decided to pair with it in, in the art, we have an pairing with this one, actually. So Norwood Viviana is a glass artist who lives in Michigan and teaches at grand valley state university, but he shows throughout the world. I've seen his work at the Renwick in this Sonian in DC, and he did a project called manufacturing cities. So, so Norwood looks at post-industrial American cities and he's interested in. In the rise and fall of these cities. He started looking at their population charts and data, and he literally blows in glass, these glass objects that reflect the rise and fall of populations in these cities. So you get these really beautiful vase like, you know, objects that started very small at the bottom, you see them, get wider as they grow up. And then you see post industrial America they start to taper and again in decline. Right. So he's done twenty four cities and the way that he displays it is. He'll put the name of the city on the wall behind it with time line. And then the object hanging in front of it. So you see how that how objects relates to history and the different years, and the data, so he's like he's literally creating visual illustrations of data, you know, through blown glass and it includes a Flint. It includes Detroit, and it includes Grand Rapids in, in this project. So, so I love that. It's a way of looking at American history. That will pair alongside the Sousa exhibit, as well of the president Merican. Yeah. I live in, as you know, I love Pataki exhibits to there's something about capturing moment like that, that, as always impressed me, and, and I'm starting to remember, it's you. At least try to do what at least one dark fee exhibited you season day that we've had. Oh, gosh. Migrant mother. Her name. I got another photographers named my head. But we've done. Yeah. We've done some really wonderful attacker fake. That's awesome..

Reagan Obama Ronald Reagan Pete Souza president Tammy Miller Paul Mao Nancy Reagan White House deputy director Norwood Viviana Sousa Oval Office pizza Grassle Pataki Photojournalist Bataga Maryland grand valley state university Detroit Merican
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Yeah. Has been. Get. Jeremy lamb, Paul. We both have a passion for the vigilant forming art and share that. It's slightly different ways. I'm recovering print journalist, specializing in everything music fists, and I'm an operatic tenor. Eater director producer came home to help nurture, the next generation of local talent right here in southwest, Michigan, this show, that not only gives you behind the scenes. Look in the south west, Michigan's are sitting team had seen invites you into the conversations welcome to breaking hair. Breaking care brought to you by Lake Michigan college, go slight theater as large center, heiress gallery arts and culture centre, the twin city players and the Mason jar cafe. Ninety eight breaking character reported from the federal building rate year in the Beden harbor arch district. I'm Jeremy Bonfiglio. I'm Paul Mao. Ninety eight point breaking character. More. Is it my star beginning because their four feeling this as we get closer to one hundred eight you know, it, it, of course, ninety degrees. And I couldn't think of the song there. Yeah, I sure so as promise, we welcome back our machine college colleagues, Mike nadeau ski executive director in the mental center in grace Kellner director of the main stage and nounce twenty nineteen twenty twenty mental center Macy's in lineup. Welcome back, thanks. We were just here doing this year already what, what? Right. We actually record for shows at once. That's right. If only we could plan that far in. Right. Make life so much easier. One day, remember? Good. Now, your fishery now thing this to members about the same time as this podcast drops Wednesday evening. So we appreciate getting a sneak peak. Let's dive right in who's opening the season for you this year. Tell me tell me about kicking this stuff off in September. Yeah, we open with Beatles versus stones fall. If you fall on the Beatles side or the stones. Yeah. A little bit about actually. Yeah. Good fight. Hey guys. You guys here. So it's to world renown tribute artists who are going to do the Beatles do the stones. And then they come all together at the end and perform together and said, all out bash. Yeah. And that's all that September September twenty first couple of songs might recognize. I heard on the radio. Every song ever played. That's well that's a great way to kick things off. So, so let's just run through the lineup. We didn't have nets next up. Then we have our big Broadway show, million dollar core tat and this is based on a true story, Jerry Lee Lewis Carl Perkins Elvis Presley, Johnny cash all got together in a Nashville studio, and one magical weekend or evening or something and jammed. And this is basically based on that experience. So it's toured all over the country. It's Tony award winning. It's going to be, again, a lot of highly recognizable music. That's Tuesday, October, first million dollar or tat off the tenth anniversary tour of that show at the mental center. Awesome. Awesome. The first one I I. Opening night for the tour. Yeah. Yeah. Really excited to be in that position up next. We have our first discovery series show, and it is Mike, super magic, and allusion. He definitely lives up to his name. He was a finalist on America's got talent. And he won NBC's phenomenon. He was on Penn and teller sfu us, so lots of credentials, there lots of, of awards. He's won. And he's, he's a really spectacular magician discovery series for second with that means. Yeah. The discovery series is usually four or show, four so shows that are approved for all audiences, not necessarily for kids, but it's just shows that would be great for kids, but okay are often. Formation times. Yeah. Yeah. Booking. Maybe like your if all of the above my wife, and I, we have a young son is twelve so he can't see everything. But there he definitely loves at school. I'm into the Mendel and sell those different subscription package. Like discovery, if you want all the discovery doesn't, you, you can do that are subscription packages are just if you buy at least three shows your subscribers so you can make up your three shows of three discovery serious shows, you can mix and match two for the kids, one for the adult parents out,

Mike nadeau Beatles Michigan Paul Mao director Jeremy lamb Penn Lake Michigan college Jeremy Bonfiglio Beden harbor arch district Tony award Macy Jerry Lee Lewis Carl Perkins E executive director NBC producer Nashville America Johnny Mike
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Has been Shelby. X rays. Jeremy lamb, Paul. We both have a passion for the vigilant forming art share that it's slightly different ways, I'm recovering print journalists. Specializing in everything music fists, and I'm an operatic. Tenor. Eater director producer came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest. Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the south west. Michigan's are sitting team it seen invites you into the conversations. Welcome to breaking care. Breaking character. Brought you by Lake Michigan college to go slight theater pres- center, heiress gallery, arts and culture centre, the twin city players and the Mason jar cafe this. This. Hello. And welcome to episode ninety seven breaking character recorded from the federal building and the Benton harbor district. Jerem rebound, fig Leo, and I'm Paul Mao episode seven nine two seven you better watch out better hold my beer 'cause I'm gonna take you to the old town road and be the rest iris and got her Susan's. Plaque. I don't think we have the rights for that song play along. That's the mood. I'm in. Let's take in the bag while we're talking about it. We got some blues barbecue bluegrass. Right right into it. It's right. Of course. So ninety seven wouldn't be complete without some Amy's APL plug gray. Exactly as of course last week. You heard our friend ABC APL exactly as the executive director of St. Joe today. Talk about the seventh annual barbecue blues and bluegrass all day music borough and feed event. Well, it takes place this weekend, the Saturday noon to eight pm at whirlpools intending park. So this week we turn to seven the musical acts themselves this year's lineup. Features the special consensus, Nora Jane Struthers in the party line shea, Apache patch Appalachia at bow cheese them. Yeah. Like Appalachian, go back and episode and see way Appalachian. Yeah. To make it and headliner JD McPherson. Erased are sorry for that dupe. I'm not trying to. Yeah. I just caught up with my friend or Jane Struthers, Nashville based musician. Who has long made southwest? Michigan a regular tour. Stop to talk about playing her very first barbecue blues and bluegrass events and newest in decidedly youngest member of the party line crew. Her new daughter, really great Paul that we had her. She this week little girl. Her name is Annabel. Jane? She's be shied Naito next weekend. She's I think we should. Are your mental? But but yeah, we're not as. Ever have before. And just feel really really good now. She's good baby. Are you breaking her in these? It's definitely a learning process for everybody involved. But but yeah, she actually pretty well. It's really like flying. That's favorite hang on in time. But working out the car thing. Three till you're you are coming up for barbecue believes bluegrass, obviously the plant this area lot for. But this is the first time at this festival. Tell me tell me. Taking part in this ending up doing mcchrystal's. So. How does that kind of change the set list, and and and then being able to do with here in in the area? That's really responded to you guys as well. Yeah. In tortured, I'm psyched, we definitely want the best parts of the job. And if you know kill job all so badly, and yeah, I'm up there in summer. I feel to me like but harbor summer yet, it's still spring, but he asked me up here a lot in the fall and winter for some reading grows here getting signed experience the region, and the I mean how do these for half there yet down here along the spring? But you know, we were just up in Arbor with toxic. And it was not a string. It depends on the day here in Michigan some days, it feels like spring some days, you know, like impossible to bring a little bit of everything pilot. So. You hasn't been working on new album? Tell me Comey would've been about about that. And when we might expect it to be released. Have done recorded it in November when I was eight months pregnant, and I was like only a little worried of reduced lung capacity. Went into the studio turned out turn out fine. They're really well. The band kind of farewell album to our Qatar player. Josh who has been with us for five years, and he is taking stock to focus on full-time anti pipeline activist community in Virginia. So you know, I wanted to read playing my knee songs together for several months, and I was looking I don't want. I don't want not capture this. You know, everything that we have always. Out to special. So we went in. I don't know in a lot of ways that we've ever done. And I think other you know. You know, my manager has heard it, and she's she's on that on that page we've ever done. So you know, it's got to have. Have full perspective of. But I will say I think the ban sounds are gonna ever on it, and that's awesome. So hopefully the next next year. I don't know let's see of the new commit to offer that much. Some.

Nora Jane Struthers Michigan Paul Mao Lake Michigan college Shelby Jeremy lamb Jane Struthers JD McPherson Benton harbor district mcchrystal director ABC Amy Leo executive director producer Qatar Annabel Comey Susan
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

12:55 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Has been Shelby. X rays. Jeremy lamb, Paul. We both have a passion for the vigilant forming art and share that it's slightly different ways, I'm recovering print journalists. Specializing in everything and music, and I'm an operatic. Tenor. Eater director producer came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest. Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the south west. Michigan's are sitting team it seen, but invites you into the conversations. Welcome to breaking hair. Breaking character is brought to you by the present art center heiress gallery. Our culture centre the twin city players and the Mason jar cafe. Hello. And welcome to episode ninety one of breaking character reported from the federal building right here in the Benton harbor arts district. I'm Jeremy Bonfiglio, and I'm Paul Mao like Lazarus back the dead you sick. You sick. And then some more sick strep throat, the new to me, you know. I believe you. I guess that's good. A bullet. But I made a little bit of a golf ball today. But I'll do my best. All right amongst living. Let's good good. We're glad to. So let's let's talk a little bit about what's happening over at Lake Michigan college at the Mendel Senator Reid only three of the most successful rock acts in the nineteen sixties will appear in concert this Saturday at the mental center. Elem see the concert dubbed stars of the sixties will feature Dennis to final the Rijn lead singer of the Buckingham 's Bob Miranda, their original lead singer of the happenings and will be headlined by the Lovin spoonful whose hits include do you believe in magic? Did you ever have to make up your mind Nashville cats, you didn't have to be so nice daydream and towns ever in the city? I was gonna say you see you can't sing too, right? I'll bet you saw somebody's albums from. Yeah. I do. Yes. Ever the city that's side gig. Yeah. Yeah. Then harbor hustles harder. So Irish recently caught up with eleven spoonfuls Steve Boone to talk about the show and the band's rich history. From the show we work with the laws of Jovan are- only of problem for he is a good audience. One of the things we like about work in his shows that the audience is become really enthusiastic about the and all performers you're really psyched the end of the night. It's almost like a giant party was having such a good time. And I think that one of the key indicators of it is while Phosa grew up with the sixties and seventies music steam kind of camp find their entertainment zone, any more. And most of them were all be called empty nesters or you know, they or pretty much either retired or sooner retire, and and they want to relive some memories from their early days and their teams in Houston. And I think that the show. Shows give folk and opportunity to not just here one group, but you know, two or three or four even sometimes that kind of cover the spectrum of busy we had written. And like I said earlier those enthusiasm the audiences. It's it's like an infection. They really gets everybody energized. And so that's my main thing that you know, will get the chance to play the songs of just pretty much are the fabric of the nineteen sixties music scene. And I one of the things I liked the best about our shows stores. We do a meet and greet. And they comment just terrific. There folks were some of them were in Vietnam. And then, you know, shoe the armed forces radio, they hear some of the music back home and daydream, and do you believe in magic and summer in the city were some of the songs that really, you know, early Vietnam vets later on in the seventies music scene in changed a little bit. But in in sixties era was real optimistic the sunshiny kind of songs, and I think that was a good morale-booster. And then. A lot of folks that were one of the things the spoon for dinner was unique where you're one of the first if not the first rock band tour college circuit where in the past they would've hired jazz or now. Or, you know, slightly bigger productions they didn't usually have four and five piece for man. And I think it was a real treat for the college kids who were get a chance to hear something that was, you know, right out of there alley the music they had gone to high school with and now during college, and they get the year the band way. And so I think that helped us a lot their audience is that the memories from the mid sixties are kinda like intact. They just need a little bit of of recovery to kind of go. All yeah. I remember that. So it's just a combination of factors that all funny show and the audience is usually go a really happy. So that's that's our MO. Awesome. And then I want to ask you. A little bit about the early years for you guys. Now, just you came came up. At a time that there was really happening in the Greenwich folks, seeing so Tony Tony a little bit about what it was about just that time and that little the little. Stretch of land there in New York that that seemed to have some magic happening at that time. You're you're really right about that. And the the most positive thing for my memory was that right about the late. Fifties fifty nine to nineteen sixties one vote music was really starting to catch home, especially young, folks. And of course, they Kingston trio Joan by as and Bob Dylan Pierre Paul and Mary printing, his those kinda acts really attention, but they weren't Roth act. They weren't. I thought stuff we're anything like that. He could dance to it may be. But most deal it was you know, who content may just think a little bit. And then he fish screw off music in those days. The bans didn't play on their record. The wreckage would hire they would hire studio musicians to make. The record. And then the bam would come in and do the singing of the track. But with folk was folk artist getting out and only having one or two instruments char base baby or a guitar banjo. They would play on their own records. And then when when so in rock story to get together when when Joe Butler nine met, John bash all, you know, they were they were to folk musicians who had never played in a band professionally. So they were really all speed on how you play was the kit kit, drums, electric bass and with Joe, and I we had played together for three years fry or to the advent of the love and spoonful. So we were already tight as rhythm section. So the two blending of the two styles of music because Gelin plays and mug. We would nowadays. Because the cover band where we visit hits today forty years, and and then we matched up with Joe Johns. Ali we were all ready ban. The go into the studio and play on our own music. And we did we were actually one of the very first rock bands from the sixties that didn't play on their records. And so I think that made it a little bit more of a. Namic experience of the listener, they founded this serving bands had a real tightness to nearly sink. Then I guess is the word you would use today for how the ban was tight. And I think that really helped us in a way that when we on the stage to perform records, we didn't have to learn them. We already knew. So that that made a difference? I think for sure and then I have to ask you. Now, if I'm if I'm correct here. Do you believe in magic was the Israeli really the first I that that was a hit for you guys. That's yet. Tell me tell me a little bit about what it was like free. You guys, you know, especially what was that sixty five. I mean, there was pretty credit music field. If I remember coming at sixty four sixty five so what was Alexi you guys? Find yourself climb up the charts where you know on the note. Even that was one of the first solace recorded, and as she before we had a record deal of our producer went in the studio, and we recorded that and other songs, and they shopped it around all the major labels who turned down because they said we'll be this song. It's a great record. But the boys in the band don't have a British accent. So we sign the band. So that was that was a handicap source, then, you know, mall record company Kama Sutra Gus started. And they were their specialty was getting records on the radio. And we knew that we could get our songs on the radio. We thought we would do well because that's always hard to get your music on radio. So we took a chance to win with the small label and works out real good for us. Because like I said, the the managers are the owners of the wreck. He didn't know how to get records on the air. And that was the key to getting us to a big separation from the anguish fans because record you don't have to have an accident on the rep when you talk afterwards, they expected the big raid was expected to ban members of the the sound like they're from England. And then of course, that kicked off, you know, the the run of consecutive hot one hundred hit said they're in it in. Be remiss if it didn't ask about summer in the city because I think that's the song. Probably most people. Recognize the band buys. Oh, tell me about that song. And and what do you think about that that particular tune that that just seem to resonate with people to reach number one on one hundred chart say actually daydream went to number one on one of the? In one in those days there was there was the hot one hundred was billboard was the top hundred and in record world also had a target counted? So there was three charts. But you had to be number one on all three charts to be official certified number one. So daydream went to number one on I think cash, but then when Severna city was recorded. It was the only song every band every member of the ban knew was going to be hit all the other ones longer would make you on to the charge or how well would do. But when we came out of the studio after the final mix, we we everybody badger road manager torment, your engineer producer. They everybody till this is gonna be a number one record. And it was it was that strong recording that we knew we had some really good. Sim-

producer Michigan Paul Mao Shelby Vietnam Jeremy lamb Benton harbor arts district Lake Michigan college golf Steve Boone Nashville Jeremy Bonfiglio director Severna city New York Jovan Phosa Kama Sutra Gus Dennis
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

08:38 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Has been Shelby. X rays. Jeremy paul. We both have a passion for the vigilant forming art and share that it's slightly different ways, I'm recovering print journalists. Specializing in everything music, and I'm an operatic. Tenor. Eater director producer came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest. Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the south west. Michigan's are sitting team it seen invites you into the conversations. Welcome to breaking. Breaking character is brought to you by the present art center heiress gallery, arts and culture centre the twin city players in the Mason jar cafe. This. Episode nine breaking character reported from the federal building right here in the harbor arts district. I'm Jeremy Bonfigli Paul Mao eighty nine that's the lame class. I was plus ninety see well next week. You can like they always Lord it over the eighties. Ain't well, that's what they say. Ninety one ninety two stuck well since I was classified eighty s savage last week. So I would agree with that old. Yeah. Exactly. All right. Exactly. Speaking of. Oh. When you're in the theater every night sixteen. Sixteen. Five years. Right. A week. Of course, you're you're talking about sister act. So kicking off the show today. Of course, we welcome. Rickie to war in Laurie passed to the stars lake. Michigan colleges performing arts departments production sister act, which opens this weekend on the mental center main stage forces pause, directing the show. He probably didn't give you a choice. Being here. We did now for those. You may not be familiar with the show. Of course, this is Alan makings musical adaptation of the nineteen. Ninety-two Whoopi Goldberg film. Rakija you played Delors of mon- Carter nineteen seventies disco diva. This is a murder it has put into protective custody custody in a convent. And Laura you play I think this is fair to say the rather uptight and. Uperior? Why don't we start telling us both a little bit about your characters? And how these two very different women deal with the situation there, suddenly thrust into. Yeah. Very good. I think. I think the show starts is the situation she's thrust into which then gets thrust upon right? You're the first one what she gets. In. So Dolores is a diva big diva that is trying to make it big in the show biz. And she is dating a really big mob kind of guy. And she. Yeah. Yeah. See yourself in a situation where she. These murder someone that's never. Yeah. That tends to. Eggs and bacon. I'm murdo. I've got a convent for you to hide it. So she she has to go and hide away. So she is in the next on the murder list. She runs the police like any good girl would. Gotta hide her. We're not gonna notice this big diva, right, and all this hair, and all these hips and all these moves on public. Where can we? Invent jinx. She shows of the convent and is thrust upon the lifestyle of mother superior. Yes. This appears reaction superior tries to take it like a champ. But basically is has a very difficult time with the the mindset and the former lifestyle of the Laura's Dolores challenges challenges a lot even all of mother superiors leadership tactics. Right. So they they literally butt heads from our very first scene together which. Yeah. Feisty ladies with strong opinions that are do not line up. Shortly thereafter, that the rest of the conventional convent nuns pun intended conventional. I'm not really. Been ready to say some things as well. But they haven't had the catalyst, but Laura's becomes catalysts for them. To also sign off. Sucks acquire. Can we get some help nights? Right. Ricky data and Loris help them. Learn how to get there. This thing on their bow. Joe? The new possibility. A whole. Comment, and we won't tell you anymore could possibly happen bumped bomb bomb, the Paul this, obviously isn't a sma- music. No, very large cast and crew. Can you talk just a little bit about some of the challenges and efforts in putting on something like this? Well, we have been crazy fortunate over the past year and a month to have the support of our administration to say we believe in you cast crew all mount production quality, we've seen the first four or five shows you've done in the Hanson theater. And we believe enough to try to bring something like hairspray enough sister act over to the mental center main stage, and that's one of the proudest things that I'm going with these days is that I'm the first person to push that envelope and make that happen on our own stage in our own barn in our own house ever since the middle center apparently opened some people's children's music workshop. Other groups have rented the space minded all skis done, a great job of making it is affordable possible. But. It's a big ole bar. It takes a lot of money to just turn on the regular lights. Let alone the Strobe lights and every other LED light and get five different tech people to operate the rails and everything else costs a lot of money. So we're begging begging pleading that our audiences continue to show up more trying to put on shows that are family friendly and big enough. It can get you know, even half the house for we're talking fifteen hundred and sixty seats the math on that seven hundred eighty or something. Yeah, that's half full. Right. And so I have yet to average that. But I think hairspray we had something like I dunno sixteen hundred paid eighteen hundred total for three shows. So that's about six hundred. But we're getting there as long as we keep putting on named shows like sister act, and Santa music and lay MS and things like that not that we're doing those anytime soon, but we we have a hope that we'll fill more than the first three rows. Right. Yeah. And so two the first challenge that I wanted to mention is that we still are not a stuck. But confined. To because so much else happens on the mental center main sage range in the Hanson theater on stage. It's about half the size or even like a fourth of the size. Or fraction looking for. They're not a fourth. But like, I don't know. But just under. But not enough ru there's not enough room, and we're trying to put the dances on there. And there's not enough room left and right has different entrances exits. So that's the biggest challenge is taking a show from the Hanson theater. Where we've rehearsed for four six weeks to only a week we can half in the center, and then say okay now, but I used to. The carpet and sit down, no. Run all the way around grab a profit. Yeah. So so it's a very different situation. Now, there's also, of course, lots and lots of music too. So I have to ask you all what are some of your favorite pieces to perform during the show. Why what are some of your favorites? Well, my favorite pieces say, oh, wait, my favorite pieces.

Hanson theater murder Michigan Jeremy paul Laura Jeremy Bonfigli Paul Mao Shelby Whoopi Goldberg Alan makings director Dolores mon- Carter Laurie stars lake producer Joe Ricky Loris four six weeks
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Has been Shelby. X rays. Jeremy lamb, Paul. We both have a passion for the vigilant forming art share that it's slightly different ways, I'm recovering print journalists specializing in everything from using fists, and I'm an operatic. Tenor. Eater director producer came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest. Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the south west. Michigan's are sitting team at seen invites you into the conversations. Welcome to breaking character. Breaking character is brought to you by the present art center heiress gallery, arts and culture centre the twin city players in the Mason jar cafe. Neb sued east of breaking character recorded from the federal building right here in the Benton harbor are strict on Jeremy Bonfigli, I'm Paul Mao eighty eight eight that was the year. I graduated from high school really you're older than me. I am some good gladman eight eight eighty eight that's global attack. Anyway. Yeah. Anyway, global what are we doing the dishes us, you know, kicking off the show up up back breaking characters. Unofficial third-heaviest, Nathan Margoni. Jeremy? Missile. I keep I keep showing up. So he's like Cam. Nathan's here, obviously talk about new territory arts association, spring are up takes place from six to nine PM Friday right here in the Benton harbor district. Welcome back. Nathan it's an honor to be here. I know it is the to back in missed this. You know? And I get to be part of it. Just answer to you know, pretty things up here. Offensive to beautiful in his own way. Is I shower just I'd say, no. Oh, yeah. Is our hero in more ways than one in a receiver air, scour arson cultures. Sponsor. We're proud to here. Our newest so our hop. Let's let's go right to it in spring. It's starting of rain. Wrong today. Forty six degrees, man, if this is being broadcast in the future is going to be even warmer, right? Because it's Wednesday sixty today. Yeah. Right. Yeah. That's awesome. Hop into surround getting there. So, you know, putting together this this event for people note. What do you how many or seasonal helps year? Right. That's right. We like say quarterly events. All right. Sometimes we don't. To. All right. We'll tell us tosa a little bit about just this event. This time in some of the things going on. Yeah. And then we'll highlight some of that and Paul have gone on to. Okay. Well, art, hops are always great. And ta puts them on four times a year also known as quarterly and all of the truth. You know, places get involved, and they put on a lot of live music this time. There's a lot of new artists showing in the galleries in in the coffee shop and library. We even have some fairly new locations. And I don't know there's things happening. Into all that you can actually walk around if nice winter hop. Yes. Chatter chatter teeth hard. We got through it that hopefully going to be nice to be nice. And then over speaking of nice heiress gallery. Let's let's talk about the nice all you need is love a faculty X exhibition. Tell us a little bit about. That's right. You're your own faculty. Yeah. The title there mazing teaching artists, you know, they come. They give they teach there really on board, and you want to show, you know, some respect and show their their artwork. So we have this this great cast of teaching artists and their work as we have married at Schmidt and Kim would and many Hello use me turn. All right. Not at all. We have Susan Henshaw. Josh mason. We all know, John. Abstract experimental. You know artist we are into for the last year, we've been spending a record the appropriate term retirement. All that. And that's what we do. We do live music a lot too. Been in the record we spend records. Yeah. And we have our own coffee. So we are going to serve out maybe some Irish coffee coffee. We are on constant. Street. So. Technically, it's coffee by uncommon grounds. So guy that owns uncommon grounds. He created the special for us. It is really nice. Bag during the tenure. Are so many reasons, but anyway, if you ask for an Irish coffee, we might hook you up with a little, you know.

Paul Mao Nathan Margoni Jeremy Michigan Jeremy lamb Shelby Benton harbor Jeremy Bonfigli arson director Josh mason Susan Henshaw producer John Schmidt Kim Forty six degrees
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Yeah. Has shelby. Get X. Jeremy lamb ball. We both have a passion for the vigilant forming art and share that is slightly different ways. I'm recovering print journalist, specializing in everything and music, and I'm an operatic. Tenor eater director producer came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest. Michigan this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the south west Michigan's are sitting team at scene, but invites you into the conversations welcome to breaking care. Breaking care here is brought to you by the livery, the crabs lart center players and Mason jar cafe. Welcome to episode eighty seven breaking character from the federal building. And the Ben harbor arts district. I'm Jeremy Bonfigli, I'm Paul Mao. It's freezing cold again. Jeremy you said when it was March. It will be warm. I lied. I lied rings marching in like a. Lion. No is is been way. Too called remarks. Not the ides of art. Over here. Parts I can't deal with. Children's film festival this. We have kind of thing. This is kind of a kid Centric podcast, you know, this week. So it's hard to believe really that it's been nine years already. But this Friday, March eighth Hicks, the ninth annual coastline children's film festival. The ten the ten day event that showcases some of the most intriguing and engaging films for movie lovers of all ages at eleven different venues throughout south west Michigan in northern Indiana. Joining us in the studio today to talk about this use best is coastline, founder and curator, Leslie solvent and Tom Allen. He's the coordinator of the festival's young filmmakers competition. He also provides technical support throughout the festival. Chris this cool popcorn box booklets. You may have seen around town and married other things we can do that, Tom. Thank you for being here today. Thank you. Thank you. So listen, let's start with you. As I mentioned the festival kicks off on Friday with a pretty cool avent's at the crabs art center, toast, a little bit about about that that the kickoff. Yeah, I'm excited about that. Because we're having Brandon Matson come back to do his wonderful music at six o'clock coupled with a screening of the kid flicks. One prevent. Coming from the New York children's film festival and those are like the most stunning beautiful films. And we get them knew each year. And we have a lot of them this year Kim swan Catholics to of Aviva Catholics, which is Spanish. But at the opening night. We're showing though the ones that are meant for the smallest kids in this also like a costume party area. Yes. Oh, so it's. That tower was your idea. We have had pajama parties. We thought we'd kind of kick it up a little and do something a little different. So we thought about a costume contest. And so it's a contest and kids come is their favorite animated character. And we're going to crash us going to supply from frozen. Right. Exactly. I won't mind if that happens, but but people can come in any animated characters they want, and we're gonna give out prices for the most creative and we've never done that before. So I think will be a lot of fun and Craigslist gonna not supply the costumes hits should come dressed with something. But they're going to have material. So you can add to your costume more creative. Yeah. Then obviously another festival highlight is the young filmmakers competition. Tom for those who may become to this for the first time host a little bit more about the competition in where people can see the spoons. It's a competition. We started several years ago, and it's open to anyone eighteen years of age under living in Michigan, Indiana and greater Chicago area. Yeah. This year, we have twenty submissions. And this year was the first year we actually used film freeway, which is a website where were anyone can upload their short film for consideration. So we have a variety of stop motion live action a couple of documentaries beautiful sort of documentary film, where these these kids from high school in Troy visited all five Great Lakes and one day in went swimming in each one of them one day. It's amazing. That's really cool. And then then we're where people seeing these what what what are the this time for the the the program premieres at Michigan city public library on March ninth and new buffalo township library the same day at one pm Michigan cities eleven thirty AM central and new buffalo is at one o'clock, then you can see again on March thirteenth at six pm. The box factory for the arts and Saint Joseph and F those three venues it can also vote for your audience favourite, oh, which will be awarded on March fifteenth at citadel Okram or will show the program for one final time and award first second third album mentioned prizes along with audience favorite March fifteenth fifteenth five thirty right? Nice. It we swing into a program with Larry doing Chaplin shorts after the young filming. What time do you? On what I wanted to ask you a little bit about your inspiration for the beginning. For the Genesis of the festival. I understand the idea made a come from Tila swin. Tell me about that. Okay. I've adored her and met a yeah. And I actually got to meet her when I was at poets house in New York City like a dinosaur era ago. We had our Landau as a film for benefit. And so she came in. She had just she was of that was her. Giant film that she did that made her famous. I think earliest the first time, and so she came to the benefit got to meet her and became aware of for eight and a half foundation, which she started which I think is one of the most important thing she's done which is introducing young children to films before they turn eight and a half. You know, it's the Philly knee reference. But it's also it's about like being to you need to have an innocent mind sometimes to be exposed to these wonderful films. And she, you know, she started her foundation, and we really just adopted her mandate her philosophy here on the side of the pond. That you did that.

Michigan Tom Allen Jeremy Bonfigli Indiana Ben harbor arts district shelby Craigslist New York City Michigan city Kim swan crabs art center New York director Brandon Matson a. Lion Hicks coordinator Landau Troy Chris
"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

Breaking Character

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Breaking Character

"Has been. Get x. Hi, I'm Jeremy then Paul. We both have a passion for the visual forming arts and share that in slightly different ways. I'm longtime print journalist specializing in everything from using the film, and I'm an operatic. Tenor. Eater director and producer who came home to help nurture the next generation of local talent right here in southwest Michigan. This this show that not only gives you behind the scenes look in the south west Michigan's team seen but invites you into the conversation. Welcome to breaking care. Breaking character is brought to you by the herald palladium the livery Brazil arts Quincy players and the Mason jar cafe. Plot. Hello. And welcome to episode eighty five of breaking character from the federal building in the Benton harbor our system, I'm Jeremy Buffy land. I'm Paul Mao after a week of hiatus high. It is. Hi store way out to slip down here high. He'd been versus. We're having to be here for the first thing the ghost light. Yeah. I know table read. Yeah. This is kind of a cool thing that you guys are doing now tell me a little bit about it Paul star off with you. This is what a series of winner workshops that you guys are gathering on the fires with Phoenix coffee shop and doing what some live table reads and some presentations had tell me just a little bit of over here artistic director, Mr. Larry Underwood here in a second. This is kind of his baby we thought it would be a great chance for people to come out and read through some of the scripts and talk up some of the different ventures were excited to be apart of echo sleigh. Even prior to us officially opening our doors in June. Just the other night Monday. Right. We hosted. No, no sad. Wow. I every night. Yeah. His reading of clyborn park, which was fun because there, and I got the L D show that a little bit. And fortunately, we have a friend in Jaffe Barlett over at Phoenix coffee shop who's letting us jump in the room right after he closes the doors on Saturday nights. So Clyburn parks a part of our inaugural season that goes up August, I three eleven. Yeah. And this coming Saturday, Debbie, Jeff, Portsmouth who we've become fast friends with over at Eden springs are hosting and presenting Eden springs Benton harbor forgotten garden, I'll turn it over to you. Larry talk a little bit about your friendship with the boy Smith, and and well brings to the table his party go slate, we're we're trying to also educate people. The history of what's what's already happened in Benton harbor and somehow last summer I stumbled onto an amphitheater in. Rate next to the camp ground. We stumbled, but. I sort of stumbled into it. She was riding around on a lawnmower and stop me and ask me what was going on. But it there is such a rich history in Benton harbor from one hundred years ago that this was a mecca this was a place for people all over the midwest to come and see world class entertainment at music, and vaudeville and exotic animals and horticultural guard vegetarian restaurant and sugar comb. Waffle waffle cones? Right. Yeah. So also, you know along with Larry joining us. This is Debbie Debbie tells now this you don't know much about eating springs toast, a little bit about you know, what is going to be talking about on Saturday a little bit about this this history that Larry was leading to. We're gonna talk about all the entertainment that happened in the park. They started the park back in nineteen. Oh, eight. Eight they ran regular entertainment up until the mid nineteen seventies had all kinds of acts. Come. They started out just having their own people play small bands and orchestras and things like that. And then as they became more and more popular they would travel with their bands and traveling acts between Chicago and Detroit would stop in and play and also acts from around the world, right? Yeah. Definitely. Yeah. There were there's actually film if I can find it of hula dancers down there. Yep. Yeah. Everything. And so we're gonna have a slide show. We're going to have pictures and stories of all the different things. I mean, they brought an animal acts. They had performing seals and dogs and just about anything. You could imagine down there on the stage as well as the will remembered Wednesday night amateur night, which America's got talent sixties. Yeah. I started in nineteen thirty five and they did that up until the mid nineteen sixties and every Wednesday a pretty good size the stage age the stage. Yeah. Of people in there. Yeah. Yeah. The biggest recorded group that they had or crowd that they had I guess to watch was about ten thousand people in. There are not I don't know where they put them. Really ever held your fire on this. But was it just slowly decayed away? Or did it was their fire or visit pretty big structure, right? Yeah. Yeah. Well, the the stages. Yeah. That was that was actually the fourth stage that they had down there, and I'll get into that with pictures and stuff on Saturday. Yeah. It was built in nineteen thirty three over the years. You know, there was a big thing that happened in the seventies with all these small, amusement parks and stuff. Right. People's interests changed, you know, they point Great America. Let's yeah. The big ones these little ones just couldn't compete, right? And then over the years. Yeah. Once they closed nature took over, and it just started decays because it was down in dishes. The empathy of there's a bowling alley. Bowling alley. Any arcade. Aide covered Dan, beer garden and waffle cones powder. Yeah. I can't say enough about the waffles because we're going. On saturday. Debbie has been nice enough to uncover and lend me the original house, David Eden springs, waffle irons, and we're going to remake old-fashioned waffle cone waffles from these Iran's as as she does the talk. So there's going to be the smell of cinnamon and sugar coming out of the kitchen and mixing with these tales. These still for me living tales of of what happened in this small space. Ben harbor people. Write direct lines of ferries and trains came from Chicago to come here to Benton harbor. This designation. They

Benton harbor Debbie Debbie Mr. Larry Underwood Paul Mao Phoenix coffee Michigan director Eden springs Benton Brazil clyborn park Eden springs Jaffe Barlett Jeremy Buffy Clyburn Chicago America David Eden Great America Dan Ben
"paul mao" Discussed on Big Brown Breakdown

Big Brown Breakdown

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"paul mao" Discussed on Big Brown Breakdown

"And then make your own decision. Altay Brown Artega via submission in the fourth round. I think he's going to struggle early on with the strike IMAX highway Holloway the distance from Exxon. He's not gonna be able to get him down by the third or fourth round. He's result. A pulling guard. I think he pulls off Alexa mission over max Holloway. I never pick against max. He's my favorite featherweight not named Brian Ortega. Then you got Shevchenko you want to inject check. I don't think a lot to be realized they fought before in kick box multi when they're little youngsters and Shevchenko beater twice. I think if not three times, Peter, and this is for the inaugural belt, right flyway. Yep. Great fight, man. Phenomenal fight. Shift Janko is a girl who went to split decision gets newness. And then off the Janas had our struggles her last fight. She beat teasha Torres before that she wants to rose twice. Like, I said, I my my only issue with. Gen check was she never took credit and she never owned her losses in her mistakes. She always blamed on everybody else which instantly makes me not a big fan. You know? So I'm gonna take Shevchenko in this one. I think Shevchenko veal decision closest Asian but Shevchenko gets done. Of Alex cowboy Libya verse get Nelson, you see her Nelson. You see picture posted. No, go to go to Twitter Instagram shred city, the golden snitch be all on your nut sack. Elson prepare yourself. I'm not saying you're doing anything. I'm just saying you look look at them. Okay. Looks pretty damn shredded. And bigger to shreds city. Swelled the fuck up, I'm taking gutter Nelson, just because. Because. Skillset over he definitely complete machine. Their damn gonna Nelson be a decision yet. Jimmy manohla. Theo Santos, definitely your knockout of the night. They got the dined piece of all dioceses cloudy days. Skept real hip is her Brian take on the same card. No question air. Anders the Adora. That's great. Get card overall been to I'm interested. How this does pay per view is. But the OSCE the the big dogs are max hallway and Browner tail. What's the odds? Here is a bear. Yeah. That's fair. Plus when five mice twenty-five damn near even money shift. Janko dam is dam pig favorite. Wow. No one kick boxing matches to how she's a really big favourite. Get an to be fair. Right. I'm not freaking reinventing the wheel here to remain a over. Theo. Santa's got I'm taking Jimmy mandala. See only underdog bet I can give you guys Jimmy Mandawa. Ozzy days is going gonna do her thing. Air ganders almost even money. Theodore. All right. All right. All right. So I'm taking brighter a via submission late gutter Nelson submission shift chanko decision. Jimmy wa KO first round. Bo Bobo, boom, boom, boom, boom that that's it. Anything else going on this weekend? There's a boxing thing. But I don't know, you know, this. Yeah. Nightmare says super welterweight and Sheffield UK is great, man. All right. Fan questions and questions. All righty, Jim some faint question quest. Jones. You me go I go for it. At damn good three sixty five. Interesting name Brennan, shutout to your boy, paulie Mellon Ozzy for being the only one that come Terry to call out those horrible ass. Judges after the fight one fifteen one eleven my ass. This that fight was everything. Great about boxing. The decision was everything. Wrong with boxing, peace, brother. What's up, dude? Damn on good three thirty five. Okay. Here's the thing. I agree with you about about Polycom those judges obsolete. You know, if you listen to this podcast previous to this. I said, I don't think it was a complete fix. And I I don't have a problem with it being a drawl. That also I don't think it was crooked shadiness there. The guy who gave it one fifty one eleven obscene do better do if you're gonna be fucking shady do better. But the other two got it, right? One was an English judge who actually called it as a drawl. I think there should be more drls that being said I love how Paul Mao Nause calls. It like it is whether I agree with them or not I like when guys are real what their opinions and not cookie cutter and not just trying to please, the producer or the guys write the checks. I'm all about when Polly goes, this is bullshit, man. 'cause really feels like that. I want to hear that. What I don't want is bullshit cookie cutter going with the flow answers. So that's why love Polly Mellon Ozzy for that. And he's a great commentator. At Royal.

Shevchenko Nelson teasha Torres Altay Brown Artega paulie Mellon Ozzy boxing Brian Ortega Theo Santos max Holloway Polly Mellon Paul Mao Nause Janko dam Alexa Jimmy manohla Jimmy Mandawa OSCE Twitter Jimmy Jimmy mandala Elson