12 Burst results for "Paul Loosen"

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Twenty one. I'm sarah crespi each week feature the most interesting news and research published in science and the sister journals first up this week. The new biden administration announced on day. One has plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon. It's basically a way of estimating the economic toll of greenhouse gases produced today on future generations staff writer. Paul discusses why this value is so important and how it will be determined next up researcher in barker talks about the sounds of naked mole. Rats you may already know that these amazing mammals are pain and cancer resistant. But did you know that they make these little chirps to identify themselves. As members of their colony as a new administration comes into power in the united states. We're seeing some swift changes in certain scientific areas rejoining the who the paris climate agreement. A new director of the office of science technology and among these early moves the biden administration has also asked for a recalibration of the social cost of carbon staff writer. Paul loosen is here to talk about this change. Hypo hello high. So this was announced on the first day biden was in office that the cost of carbon to future generations needs to be looked at. What exactly are they counting here. This gets pretty pretty quickly. But the social cost of carbon essentially is used in all the big regulatory decisions that the government makes it essentially takes the economic damage which really reflects the damage to our everyday. Lives will come with a policy that allows more greenhouse gas emissions or less greenhouse gas emissions. Now runs it out through the future then comes back to put a number on what those emissions are going to cost us so it's like a price on carbon except it's not it's not a carbon tax or anything what was happening under trump. So obama had put this all together under his administration when trump came in they may to small changes that drastically decrease the number so i instead reflecting the damage done to the entire world. It looked only at the damage. Done the united states in the future and it increase some as called the discount rate which is essentially how we value future generations. And what we can do with when we get wealthier to kind of a combination of those two you increase that enough. You essentially go far enough in a future. You don't care what happens. There was basically a devaluing down to a dollar per tonne of carbon. Co two in some circumstances before. Gets you what it's going to be potentially in the next Four years how will this carbon cost be calculated. Now what are they gonna take an how. What are these numbers that we just mentioned about discount and how far into the future. We look how those going to be calculated before said they'll go back to the global damage feel bama administration news and they have to timespans here. I a rapid thirty day revision and then a year long final update that rapid thirty day revision. They could either go back to the obama era policies or they could even set the discount rate lower. Which many economists think is appropriate and new york state actually in their own calculation late last year. What might devalue be then for this short palpitation. The thirty day one or the yearlong. How would it compare to that one dollar amount that you talked about. Possibly within thirty days it could go up to one hundred. Twenty five dollars per tonne. That discount rate is a powerful thing on its own so that's moving from three percent to a two percent rate everything staying the same including global damages. There are a lot more changes that could happen for that year. Long update that could reflect a lot of new signs and new methods are now going into the bottles that form this number. What are people looking at with respect to climate. Let's take that first. How might that be different than what was considered under the obama administration so these economic models scott integrated assessment models that you're used to produce all this you know they have lots of knobs the climate models like this very simple climate models are built into them didn't really reflect the best science particularly. They warmed to slow compared to more complex models. Now there have been a few new simple models felt by climate scientists that more accurately reflect that consensus so those can probably be used and one big change is. There's been a group of economists and climate scientists who've been putting together these econometric estimates of the future damage of climate change damage from climate pile uncertainty onto uncertainty. They take these massive data sets from as many countries as they could find globally and look at short term variations over a couple of decades or shifting weather use that to try and extrapolate out into the future to some extent so there's more data informing is policies even if they are ultimately uncertain this value if it was that one hundred times or possibly more what kinds of regulations this is gonna impact when is taken into consideration. Can you give us some examples. So any of your teen air. Regulations determining the future of power electricity in the country. That's all regulated by epa that will all factor in this cost of carbon the efficiency standards for a refrigerator cars all these things that the government overseas it often makes ways oria compelling case even more compelling the rarely flips it from negative to positive and that cost benefit analysis so it's a tricky standard cousin. See with a number. How much moves. How much do you rely on that to support your decision making the it's a complex dance but knowing that this value is out there will make this assertion stronger and it's has a lot of validity and i think the courts would respect to. Why do you think that this is something that the administration decided to do day. One is it because there's probably a lot of new regulation on the horizon and this needs to be there to buttress. I mean there's a lot of for to be done and think the thirty day kyle people by surprise but this will probably as needed to start getting to work allow these regulations that they'll be looking at the trump administration did wreak did the obama administration ones and so they can't just repeal them. They have to rework through the rulemaking process and to get that started. You need this higher. Cost of carbon probably. Okay thanks so much paul. Thank you paul. Visit is a staff writer for science. You can find a link to this article. At science mag dot org slash. Podcast could naked mole. Rats be the new model for language. Learning stick around for the sound of naked mole rats chirping at each other and my interview with researcher and barker about what the sounds mean naked mole. Rats are famous for a few reasons first. They have some striking biological features like being resistant to cancer and insensitive to certain types of pain. they're also use social mammals. They live in colonies with a queen now in a science paper this week. Alison barker and colleagues. Show that naked mole. Rats learn songs from each other. Allison is here to talk about how they figured this out and why it's so special. Hi alison hi sarah. Thanks for having me here today. Sure i love talking about these guys at find the so amazing researchers have been studying these rodents for a long time and what. They've not noticed. These interesting sounds that they make..

alison Paul loosen sarah crespi trump Alison Allison three percent sarah obama Twenty five dollars two percent thirty day Paul paul new york two this week biden first each week
Calculating the social cost of carbon

Science Magazine Podcast

05:03 min | 3 months ago

Calculating the social cost of carbon

"The new biden administration announced on day. One has plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon. It's basically a way of estimating the economic toll of greenhouse gases produced today on future generations staff writer. Paul discusses why this value is so important and how it will be determined next up researcher in barker talks about the sounds of naked mole. Rats you may already know that these amazing mammals are pain and cancer resistant. But did you know that they make these little chirps to identify themselves. As members of their colony as a new administration comes into power in the united states. We're seeing some swift changes in certain scientific areas rejoining the who the paris climate agreement. A new director of the office of science technology and among these early moves the biden administration has also asked for a recalibration of the social cost of carbon staff writer. Paul loosen is here to talk about this change. Hypo hello high. So this was announced on the first day biden was in office that the cost of carbon to future generations needs to be looked at. What exactly are they counting here. This gets pretty pretty quickly. But the social cost of carbon essentially is used in all the big regulatory decisions that the government makes it essentially takes the economic damage which really reflects the damage to our everyday. Lives will come with a policy that allows more greenhouse gas emissions or less greenhouse gas emissions. Now runs it out through the future then comes back to put a number on what those emissions are going to cost us so it's like a price on carbon except it's not it's not a carbon tax or anything what was happening under trump. So obama had put this all together under his administration when trump came in they may to small changes that drastically decrease the number so i instead reflecting the damage done to the entire world. It looked only at the damage. Done the united states in the future and it increase some as called the discount rate which is essentially how we value future generations. And what we can do with when we get wealthier to kind of a combination of those two you increase that enough. You essentially go far enough in a future. You don't care what happens. There was basically a devaluing down to a dollar per tonne of carbon. Co two in some circumstances before. Gets you what it's going to be potentially in the next Four years how will this carbon cost be calculated. Now what are they gonna take an how. What are these numbers that we just mentioned about discount and how far into the future. We look how those going to be calculated before said they'll go back to the global damage feel bama administration news and they have to timespans here. I a rapid thirty day revision and then a year long final update that rapid thirty day revision. They could either go back to the obama era policies or they could even set the discount rate lower. Which many economists think is appropriate and new york state actually in their own calculation late last year. What might devalue be then for this short palpitation. The thirty day one or the yearlong. How would it compare to that one dollar amount that you talked about. Possibly within thirty days it could go up to one hundred. Twenty five dollars per tonne. That discount rate is a powerful thing on its own so that's moving from three percent to a two percent rate everything staying the same including global damages. There are a lot more changes that could happen for that year. Long update that could reflect a lot of new signs and new methods are now going into the bottles that form this number. What are people looking at with respect to climate. Let's take that first. How might that be different than what was considered under the obama administration so these economic models scott integrated assessment models that you're used to produce all this you know they have lots of knobs the climate models like this very simple climate models are built into them didn't really reflect the best science particularly. They warmed to slow compared to more complex models. Now there have been a few new simple models felt by climate scientists that more accurately reflect that consensus so those can probably be used and one big change is. There's been a group of economists and climate scientists who've been putting together these econometric estimates of the future damage of climate change damage from climate pile uncertainty onto uncertainty. They take these massive data sets from as many countries as they could find globally and look at short term variations over a couple of decades or shifting weather use that to try and extrapolate out into the future to some extent so there's more data informing is policies even if they are ultimately uncertain

Biden Administration Office Of Science Technology Paul Loosen Hypo Bama Administration Barker United States Biden Barack Obama Paris Paul Cancer Obama Administration Government New York
"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:14 min | 7 months ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcasts for October two thousand twenty. I'm Sarah Crosby. Weekly feature the most interesting news and research published in science and the sister journals. First Up, we have staff writer, Paul Ryan, he talks about the. Rex Mission to. The asteroid venue. was has been there since two thousand eighteen and will finally a sample on October twentieth few weeks away. What have we learned so far? We also hear from researcher Hubert Lamb about a new treatment for Tinnitus. What used to be called ringing in the ears the team uses by modal stimulation, laying sounds in the ear and buzzes on the ton to change the brain and turn down the Tinnitus. Now, we have staff writer Paul Loosen. He wrote a story this week on a stack of papers published in science and science advances on the OH. Cyrus Rex Mission to the asteroid Banu Hi Paul Hello Okay on the podcast we last checked in omnia Cyrus Rex Mission in December twenty nineteen, the craft had been orbiting and surveying this asteroid for quite a while and some surprising things that popped out. For example, there are small ejection events, tiny rocks, jumping off the asteroid and surprisingly big boulders littering its surface, and that's meant a change to plans for a sampling from asteroid. What's changed about that? Paul before the spacecraft reached do they had thought it would look like this kind of. Plane like a beach was kind of the infamous term that Dante Lauretta. used. Had all these boulders kind of shocking. These polders are safety hazard and there's no spot that reached the criteria for a safe approach from the original plans. So they've had to reduce the area that they will sample by ten times. So much smaller sample area they had to pick a site they had to figure out if the crash could actually land there, but it hasn't happened yet. We're not there sampling is coming up in a few weeks October twentieth. In the meantime, we have this package of six papers. They tell them more detailed story of the asteroid surface. It's gravity or about these boulders what did you find particularly interesting in this in this new information about the asteroid one big question with sampling asteroid and bring it back to Earth is why are you spending one hundred million dollars to get a sample when we have all the stuff on earth we have tons of meteorites on earth kind of the volunteer sample return. These papers really show examples of several things that could be caught these samples that you just wouldn't be able to learn from a meteorite thing that really stands out to me the mess of carbonate veins in these boulders. At the parent body, the kind of planet testimony that venue Brokaw from once this major water system, Moeen through it as an ancient water world. When you save veins, you mean, there's just like you know what does that mean? Exactly this bright slash linear slash of mineral that deferring from the rest of the rock it's different than Iraq and you think it's made of something that indicates water y. so these carbonates are known to perform from water from hot water in precipitate out that water, you just don't get them. So the same things are evidence of water on Mars as well, and it's not just a little rock in of water it's like a little river of water. Yeah, so the ideas from meteorites they'd always, yeah, there's on these asteroids, but there's only little tiny pockets that don't around you know a couple of millimeters or something like that. But this is kind of showing that these. Mike had at least the parent body of Ben New had water flow in throughout the whole asteroid and probably a lot more water than once thought this definitely connects to the main this mission. What can we learn from asteroids that we can't learn for meteorites, but it also tells us something about the formation of the solar system. Then like what was going on way back when when we had has mills running around the have there's there's also the story of the Solar System? Merged even as Cyrus rex was launching, they realize that asteroids like Ben New Form Beyond Jupiter and migrate all the way in this is something only emerged meteoroid stays in the past decade realizing they have these two separate pools of asteroids and the samples from Ben you might be able to actually say if that's true does finding this carbonate, these veins of carbonate support the idea that asteroids delivered water to Earth definitely in this is a fairly well accepted ideal already with this further bolsters that claim provides institute remote-sensing evidence of Hey these probably had a lot of water. So maybe this was one source of the water it's not. Definitively rule something out because who knows. Yeah, it's definitely a major support for that one. Sad. But here is the boulders aren't the exact target for sampling was ours rex is not going to land on a boulder if it's just not possible, but we'll still be able to tell us more about these veins more about water content more about carbonates from the sampling that a new. Yes. So the this instrument that they used to detect this carbonate I that came from a close fly over the sampling site earlier surveys have shown that it's covered in carbonates. Or carbon burying molecule. So that could be like organic compounds like amino acids, other stuff stuff that they expected to see but there are signatures of that throughout the asteroid. So even the pebbles will have some stuff we mentioned earlier that the parameters for where the sampling can happen changed. Once the crafts had reached asteroid what are the risks here as we get closer to the date? Is there still big questions about whether this would be successful or or how much you can get the definitely they've created this hazard map. Of, the sampling sites, this kind of pure circle of green there's a chance they come in to this red area that is hazardous, and then the spacecraft students. Autonomous Louis will waive itself off and kind of retreat back testing that five meters away, or there's the chance says, hit a boulder a little bit and skews needs to press flat against the surface to be able to suck stuff up. So there's a chance that doesn't happen. They've the ability to says, and then try again at a backup site in January. If it doesn't work out. There is a chance that these boulders are very soft, but we don't want to find that out by landing something on them. You know they're really curious why they got what Ben will look like. So wrong what the surface would look like one of these papers try and figure that out and it finds that a lot of these boulders are so porous that they're kind of fluffy. So they always look like what a beach might look like in the radar or infrared signal that they got. Of Ben who explains why they had this kind of signal suggesting a beach the spacecraft could probably crush these borders if rammed into them, but they don't WanNa do that. That makes sense. So l know how much they got, but we're GONNA have to wait for the analysis for quite a bit. It's due to arrive in twenty, twenty three in Utah. We should mention why it's autonomously sampling to near Earth asteroid but right now it's not near Earth and it's much farther than Mars from Earth right now, there's a about an eighteen minute lag between what happens there and wheel here. So all has to be done a ton misleading because of that is there anything else you think we could learn from the sampling? There's the question of these one of the sources of life, this kind of chemistry and that was going on in the. Early Solar System for these organic molecules that men were delivered to Earth. Maybe there's some way of teasing out what this looks like for the altered on impact with Earth could be something that holy surprising when you get those samples back. All right thank you so much Paul. Thank you haul in as a staff writer for science you can find a link to his story and the related papers and science and science advances at science mag dot org slash podcast. Stay tuned for an.

Ben New Banu Hi Paul staff writer Rex Mission Tinnitus Cyrus rex Sarah Crosby Paul Ryan Paul Loosen Hubert Lamb Dante Lauretta. researcher Iraq Brokaw Moeen Mike Utah Louis
"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Also hear from researcher Hubert Lamb about a new treatment for Tinnitus. What used to be called ringing in the ears the team uses by modal stimulation, laying sounds in the ear and buzzes on the ton to change the brain and turn down the Tinnitus. Now, we have staff writer Paul Loosen. He wrote a story this week on a stack of papers published in science and science advances on the OH. Cyrus Rex Mission to the asteroid Banu Hi Paul Hello Okay on the podcast we last checked in omnia Cyrus Rex Mission in December twenty nineteen, the craft had been orbiting and surveying this asteroid for quite a while and some surprising things that popped out. For example, there are small ejection events, tiny rocks, jumping off the asteroid and surprisingly big boulders littering its surface, and that's meant a change to plans for a sampling from asteroid. What's changed about that? Paul before the spacecraft reached do they had thought it would look like this kind of. Plane like a beach was kind of the infamous term that Dante Lauretta. used. Had all these boulders kind of shocking. These polders are safety hazard and there's no spot that reached the criteria for a safe approach from the original plans. So they've had to reduce the area that they will sample by ten times. So much smaller sample area they had to pick a site they had to figure out if the crash could actually land there, but it hasn't happened yet. We're not there sampling is coming up in a few weeks October twentieth. In the meantime, we have this package of six papers. They tell them more detailed story of the asteroid surface. It's gravity or about these boulders what did you find particularly interesting in this in this new information about the asteroid one big question with sampling asteroid and bring it back to Earth is why are you spending one hundred million dollars to get a sample when we have all the stuff on earth we have tons of meteorites on earth kind of the volunteer sample return. These papers really show examples of several things that could be caught these samples that you just wouldn't be able to learn from a meteorite thing that really stands out to me the mess of carbonate veins in these boulders. At the parent body, the kind of planet testimony that venue Brokaw from once this major water system, Moeen through it as an ancient water world. When you save veins, you mean, there's just like you know what does that mean? Exactly this bright slash linear slash of mineral that deferring from the rest of the rock it's different than Iraq and you think it's made of something that indicates water y. so these carbonates are known to perform from water from hot water in precipitate out that water, you just don't get them. So the same things are evidence of water on Mars as well, and it's not just a little rock in of water it's like a little river of water. Yeah, so the ideas from meteorites they'd always, yeah, there's on these asteroids, but there's only little tiny pockets that don't around you know a couple of millimeters or something like that. But this is kind of showing that these. Mike had at least the parent body of Ben New had water flow in throughout the whole asteroid and probably a lot more water than once thought this definitely connects to the main this mission. What can we learn from asteroids that we can't learn for meteorites, but it also tells us something about the formation of the solar system. Then like what was going on way back when when we had has mills running around the have there's there's also the story of the Solar System? Merged even as Cyrus rex was launching, they realize that asteroids like Ben New Form Beyond Jupiter and migrate all the way in this is something only emerged meteoroid stays in the past decade realizing they have these two separate pools of asteroids and the samples from Ben you might be able to actually say if that's true does finding this carbonate, these veins of carbonate support the idea that asteroids delivered water to Earth definitely in this is a fairly well accepted ideal already with this further bolsters that claim provides institute remote-sensing evidence of Hey these probably had a lot of water. So maybe this was one source of the water it's not. Definitively rule something out because who knows. Yeah, it's definitely a major support for that one. Sad. But here is the boulders aren't the exact target for sampling was ours rex is not going to land on a boulder if it's just not possible, but we'll still be able to tell us more about these veins more about water content more about carbonates from the sampling that a new. Yes. So the this instrument that they used to detect this carbonate I that came from a close fly over the sampling site earlier surveys have shown that it's covered in carbonates. Or carbon burying molecule. So that could be like organic compounds like amino acids, other stuff stuff that they expected to see but there are signatures of that throughout the asteroid. So even the pebbles will have some stuff we mentioned earlier that the parameters for where the sampling can happen changed. Once the crafts had reached asteroid what are the risks here as we get closer to the date? Is there still big questions about whether this would be successful or or how much you can get the definitely they've created this hazard map. Of, the sampling sites, this kind of pure circle of green there's a chance they come in to this red area that is hazardous, and then the spacecraft students. Autonomous Louis will waive itself off and kind of retreat back testing that five meters away, or there's the chance says, hit a boulder a little bit and skews needs to press flat against the surface to be able to suck stuff up. So there's a chance that doesn't happen. They've the ability to says, and then try again at a backup site in January. If it doesn't work out. There is a chance that these boulders are very soft, but we don't want to find that out by landing something on them. You know they're really curious why they got what Ben will look like. So wrong what the surface would look like one of these papers try and figure that out and it finds that a lot of these boulders are so porous that they're kind of fluffy. So they always look like what a beach might look like in the radar or infrared signal that they got. Of Ben who explains why they had this kind of signal suggesting a beach the spacecraft could probably crush these borders if rammed into them, but they don't WanNa do that. That makes sense. So l know how much they got, but we're GONNA have to wait for the analysis for quite a bit. It's due to arrive in twenty, twenty three in Utah. We should mention why it's autonomously sampling to near Earth asteroid but right now it's not near Earth and it's much farther than Mars from Earth right now, there's a about an eighteen minute lag between what happens there and wheel here. So all has to be done a ton misleading because of that is there anything else you think we could learn from the sampling? There's the question of these one of the sources of life, this kind of chemistry and that was going on in the. Early Solar System for these organic molecules that men were delivered to Earth. Maybe there's some way of teasing out what this looks like for the altered on impact with Earth could be something that holy surprising when you get those samples back. All right thank you so much Paul. Thank you haul in as a staff writer for science you can find a link to his story and the related papers and science and science advances at science mag dot org slash podcast. Stay tuned for an.

Ben New Paul Loosen Tinnitus staff writer Banu Hi Paul Hubert Lamb Cyrus rex researcher Dante Lauretta. Iraq Brokaw Moeen Mike Utah Louis
"paul loosen" Discussed on The Big Show

The Big Show

03:26 min | 9 months ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on The Big Show

"Ought to the minutes, commodity prices and market analysis that sense this is the big Joe. Twelve, fifty five on the big show clock big. Thank you to the coalition to support Iowa's farmers are host today. For the big show we'll be on the road tomorrow we are kicking off our clean water Wednesdays here on the big show the subject will be clean water and how you can participate and how some other people are participating, and we're going to zero in on farm projects and also some large scale city projects and some projects that you can maybe change habit and. Undertake in your own home. How `Bout that? That's all coming up over the next couple of months as we focus in on clean water in Iowa start here it starts with you Andy. We have on the telephone line right now to wrap this up Paul Muss Mag. West Commodities Paul We have a USDA report. I WanNa ask you do you think the wind is gonNA come out of some of that report importance with what happened across a lot of the corn and bean bell yesterday. I don't think so I, I i. wish it would have a bigger impact than it did we went up four or five here this morning, and now we're about ready to close and we're going to close like unchanged maybe only a half higher so. Unfortunately it's not having a big impact right now, USDA will take take the cake tomorrow with their numbers. Now. This is all survey based, right? Paul. So it's a little different than in the past it survey farmer based survey, and then also satellite analysis from those folks. So it is quite a bit different in the past and really it's a it's a guessing game. Now through harvest on what that final yield will be. Interesting thing is gentleman. You know three months ago we were guessing was a at one hundred and fifty bushel crop. Potential or one ninety well now that range is much much tighter average guests right now is seventy eight, topside eighty, three, one, eighty, three. So we've only got five Bushel guests in both of those guests is from the low and the high side are very top into the range just add a tremendous amount of corn potentially a fifteen point one, fifteen, point two, billion, Bushel grab coming out of share this fall so that. That's a lot of pressure. Yeah wouldn't be the largest ever, but it'd be certainly up there. Yeah Let's talk a little livestock here Paul. We're seeing some strength in the cattle trade today and a little weakness pork lies the yeah you're right on one hand you're talking about six or ten year lows on corn depending on what you're looking at. But now you're looking at six month is in Seattle. So we've got a demand structure on on the meat side. That's pretty phenomenal. What we've seen in cash meet both in the beef and in the in the hog market really really good strength that's that's being driven by a weaker dollar and. Strong exports we need those to continue, but also a good demand here at home you know folks were running out of meat here three months ago on the shelves and they remember that. So there's still some places that are that are looking and Kinda running some just in time inventory. So we've got very very strong meet specials and good demands. So there's a there's a huge positive impact on the livestock side on what's happening now. How do we reach out to you directly full pay if you'd like to get a hold of US eight, six, six, we head we'd love to talk to you. Paul loosening West commodities are expert market analysts here today. How busy big show and all the final word your next shot at a thousand bucks alone. Rush Limbaugh..

Paul Muss Mag USDA Iowa Rush Limbaugh Joe US Seattle Andy
"paul loosen" Discussed on The Big Show

The Big Show

04:00 min | 11 months ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on The Big Show

"Forward to try and that it Kinda cheats. Appreciate your time today as always. Thanks Andy appreciate it absolutely, Tom Winner, one of the folks that we try to keep up with in terms of getting our products out to market directly. They've done such a wonderful job of finding. Value added opportunities and providing those. Wholesome fresh high-quality dairy products. In many different forms and many different tasty forms. Very easily accessible here today. On the big show, it is twelve forty three by the way this segment of the show brought to you by our friends at hurts real estate services, farm, farmland, auctions, brokerages and evaluations hurts real estate services time now for the three big things you need to know. Looking for bright spots in overall bearish hogs and pigs report Jason Franken and economists Western Illinois University says you can find a few of them if you look hard enough fee, says pork, exports, and very good. Seven hundred and two million pounds of pork were in March, primarily headed for China and Hong Kong. However, Cova nineteen is also expected to negatively impact you as pork exports through constraints on processing and lower world, economic growth and income for the rest, the two thousand twenty, and into two thousand twenty one. So that's one of those bearish signs but he also does say that. In terms of constraining slaughter rates in demand. Calvin nineteen and the lower prices may continue to do that, but he points out the adjustment to the breeding inventory less than anticipated and a softening of domestic export demand could continue these low prices in the near future. Asking for inclusion into the next round of assistance from Congress is the Turkey producing producers. We talked quite a bit of course about some segments of the industry liquid eggs for example that were left out of Sif up well, how sad committee chair. Collin Peterson is now said. The Turkey growers weren't treated fairly in the first of the program Hacks Hagstrom report rather has a piece out. Peterson wants Turkey producers to get it on the next round of corona aid to come out of Congress adding that in quote, my opinion, there are many producers who weren't treated correctly by the program including in Turkey industry. That's why they've been working to provide data to quote USDA so they know how much financial assistance will be necessary. Momentous occasion formation of US MCA placing after. Renegotiation Process, obviously, it's been a long and arduous but I. was Senator Charles Grassley the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee who shepherded the deal to its final passage is hailing today benefits for Iwa Agriculture and American actress new agreement will provide certainty to our farmers and ranchers and update Nafta and other important areas, and I've already mentioned digital economy, but also custom sanitary and phytosanitary Masur's and technical standards, and even helps on intellectual property. Now. He says that it does a lot of things to help gain access fairly to our neighboring countries, markets, including ending thirty years of Canada blocking imports of us, dairy, wheat, and poultry. It is twelve forty six on the big show clock. Can those are the three big things you need to know? We're GONNA. Finish the big show stronger as well look at market numbers that are near their highs for the day and the week, and my longer than that probably Paul loosening our expert marketing analyst with West Commodity. Is Coming your way now..

Collin Peterson Jason Franken Congress Turkey Senator Charles Grassley Calvin Andy Cova Hong Kong China USDA Illinois University Senate Finance Committee marketing analyst West Commodity Paul Iwa Agriculture Canada Masur
"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Now he has staff writer Paul Loosen. He wrote a story this week on a quantum diamond microscope. That can look at fine traces of magnetism. Hi Paul Blow what. I say find traces of magnetism mean how fine. How small are these little pieces of banditism? These are magnetic signals trapped in ancient ancient rocks typically that get down to grains of the rock that are thinner than the width of a human hair. How does it work? I used the word diamond and the word quantum and iker scope which. I'm not exactly sure how they all relate to each other is actually kind of complicated. But we're here boils down pretty easily so diamonds in their carbon lattice view injected nitrogen atom into it knocks out one of the carbons and the next to it. This vacancy to call the nitrogen vacancy center that little vacancy has low cloud of electrons around act like free atoms. That are very hyper sensitive to magnetic fields among other things. And so if you stick the diamond right next to that sample you're trying to get at then. Stimulate it with laser light a sign of the magnetism of that sample POPs right up and sign is glowing Yeah it's Changes in the color red. This was something that was observed when people were looking at diamonds as components of quantum computing. Yeah I mean. People have known about these imperfections for decades and physicist used it for a long time to experiment on quantum stuff you know it's existent room temperature solid piece of matter and then some physicists at Harvard and elsewhere realized. Hey you know this could actually be a super sensitive sensor for applications and not just are playing around. Yeah we about this as something that can kind of do spatial resolution of magnetism in rocks Is it more sensitive then instruments and if so how sensitive is it? It is not the most sensitive. It's very sensitive but there are these cryogenically cooled. Superconducting Squid. Magnetometers are called are much more sensitive. Still they're trying to get it up to that sensitivity. But they've wasted on that so really you know it's something that can do a lot of samples but it's this resolution where it can get finer details and show you the overall map for lines up with the microscopic picture you have of what you're looking at what. I caught my attention about. This topic was actually a science advances paper. That's also coming out this week on very early plate tectonics and actually lead the quantum diamond microscope fit into this. Finding and then it turns out you know has had a lot of other interesting results using this technique. So can you talk to us first about the early plate? Tectonics so this is dame back three point two billion years ago okay. That seems really early. It's within the range of what many geologists expect. There's a huge error bar anytime from three billion years ago to four plus billion years ago soon after Earth formed there are credible guesses that could be made their different lines of evidence but this type of Paleo magnetism evidence which is very good evidence hadn't previously been found past two point eight billion years ago. So how can Paleo magnetism tell us about tectonic movement the Earth's magnetic field Runs to these rocks as their crystallizing spins the electrons around and causes orientation in the magnetic rocks. And that is than fossilized into the rock as it turns from lava into assault both spent decades figuring out how to extract these signals. Back out of these lavas not just with this curium but also with these super sensitive other times. Superconducting sensors see. You can see how the rocks were oriented when they solidified and then if the plates move you can say oh well. This one's not where we expected to be right. So you have this one data point and then if you have another one for three point five billion years ago for nearby rocks you can be like. Hey this is the minimum distance. They must have traveled. How is this different? From other techniques that have examined Paleo magnetism that have been applied to this problem? There some break techniques out there. You know the new study you mentioned uses those as well to get the actual estimate of the pill magnetism because that's still a more sensitive technique with acuity M does is it allows you to believe your estimate because the the old estimates would give you this bulk signal and accused him. Gives you kind of a map of this tiny thing where you can say oh? Is this magnetic field coming? From something that formed right the rock formed or is it something that happened later on some sort of magnetism that can be imported law new magnetic. Graham's come in ob it's all some distortion trying to figure out what's primary versus. Secondary fuels allow debate in the field. What would it mean if we could pin down a date for when plate tectonic started? Why's that important I? It's kind of just goes back to our basic understanding of how the world works. We know it started right. But what are the world. Look like before if you go far back enough. It can come into the debates about the rise of life. Was Plato conches. Involved in the rise of life did it fuel the carbon cycle the kind of hardcore massive skill rock carbon cycle. It all depends on how far back you push it. But these kind of connections to the evolution of life on earth changes in kind of chemistry of Earth. All can get skewed. Depending on one plate to Connex started this has been used on rocks from Outer Space. Or are they trying to learn by looking at the magnetic map of this meteorite? Will they know it? Likely formed around present-day Jupiter further out than previously measured meteorite for magnetism. And with the kind of fine spatial scale. They could see this one little sulfide ram of this little melt inclusion that could have you know a magnetic signature from the very early solar system and they saw a very weak magnetic field from it weaker than they might have expected to see compared to the previous data points they have of a meteorite that form closer to the center of the solar system. What's generating a magnetic field? In that scenario it comes from the first collapse of the molecular cloud to form the the dust disk and then sheer rotation in the dust convince amplify. What kind of questions are people asking about magnetic fields? At that time the traveling question here is to what extent exist but did it play a role in the formation of the planets so you can explain the formation of the without magnetism but it's quite possible that some also played a role in bringing together these dust particles to form into comes into your comps bigger clumps that eventually became plaza moles and then planets. And if you can especially if you can find that the magnetic field is patchy and variable not just this uniform thing then maybe these patches were stronger helped 'cause planet formation. You mentioned to me but it's not in a story another application for this for extra terrestrial rocks or non earth rocks. Yes so Roger Food. Who's the geologist? Who's been pushing? This forward has a a famous meteorite sane in his lab perhaps one of the most infamous meteorites in the world a meteorite from Mars that back in the nineties was blamed as evidence of life on Mars Life on Mars next not looking for life on ours. But it's also called one of the most studied rocks maybe the most state rock on the planet. He's searching for signs of the ancient Martian magnetic field from that and when it started how it might have changed very cool all right. Thank you so much Paul. My pleasure follow loose and is a staff writer for science. You can find a link to his story and a related paper in science advances on plate tectonics at science mag dot org slash podcast and that concludes this edition of the Science. Podcast if you have any.

Paul Loosen staff writer physicist iker assault geologist Roger Food Harvard Connex Jupiter Graham Outer Space
"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"You can find a link to the story. And all our corona virus coverage at science mag dot org slash podcasts. Stay tuned for an interview with staff writer. Paul Loosen on one. He quantum diamond. Microscope is revealing about Earth's early tectonic shifts. This week's episode is brought to you in part by Kiwi Cow. He Co create super cool hands on projects designed to expose kids to concepts in stem art and design all from the comfort of home. He because mission to help kids build confidence creativity and critical thinking skills and have a blast while doing it. Each crate is designed by experts and tested by kids and teaches a new steam concept. You can sign up for an ongoing subscription or purchase a single crate that strikes her interest or both head to the Cuban coast store to shop by agent interest search bestsellers store exclusives and find the perfect fit for the kid in your world. Each box comes with all the supplies needed for that month. Project Plus easy to follow instructions and enriching content. Choose from a bunch of different topics designed for all ages with Cuba Coz hands on art and science projects. Kids can engineer a walking robot last off a bottle rocket explorer colorful kid-friendly chemistry and a whole lot more all from the comfort of home. Have you need to make steam seriously fun? Delivered to your doorstep. Hit your first month free on select crates at Kiko Dot com slash magazine. That's K- I W I C O dot com slash.

"paul loosen" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Skimm This

"Most complex stories of the day and giving you the context on why they matter today today the House Intelligence Committee and the country's top intelligence official are digging it out over mysterious whistleblower can elaine then protesters protesters against the Russian government had been gaining Steve and the arrest of a film after their has mobilized even more backlash on stage and finally we had to the mall the National National Mall. We're here to make your evening smarter. Let's skim this. The most complicated story today is about a whistle blower in Washington right now. The head of the House Intelligence Committee and the Acting Director of national intelligence are in a standoff over a mysterious mysterious whistleblower complaint made last month. We don't have many details on what this complaint was about but the Washington Post is reporting that it has to do with a promise president trump trump allegedly made to a foreign leader but other news outlets are saying the complaint was about more than just one convoy trump hat. There is still a lot of unanswered questions and surrounding this whole case so today we're going to get into the legal protections for whistleblowers why this complaint is getting so much attention and where things go from here. Let's get into do it starting with a definition. A whistle blower is any person who alerts a higher up to wrongdoing at a company or in the government ah a few decades ago. Congress decided that whistleblower should have some cover if they flag any shady actions so in one thousand nine hundred nine. Congress passed the whistleblower Lower Protection Act to make sure that federal government employees won't face retaliation for whistleblowing but that law excluded employees who work in the intelligence community think DOC FBI CIA National Security Agency Congress said we don't want to protect you if you leak classified national security information so in one thousand nine hundred eight. Congress passed sort of affects the intelligence community whistleblower protection act so people in the Intel community could at least blow the whistle to to Congress without blowing the lid off classified information in two thousand ten Congress created an intelligence community inspector general or I G to look into whistleblower complaints coming from within the Intel community which brings us back to the complaint. We're hearing a lot about today. Reportedly a member of the intelligence community any heard about something that made them easy. We don't know what it is but again the Washington Post says the whistle blower claim to say trump made some kind of promised this to a foreign leader during a phone call they decided something sketchy was going on and filed a complaint that was last month the New York Times and CNN cites eight sources saying the complaints about more than just one phone call. It's about multiple actions but what those actions were is still not clear so why complain getting so much attention today because now the head of the House Intelligence Committee Congressman Adam Schiff knows about it and wants details. He says that the whistle blower wanted the info to get to Congress. See by law the whistle blowers complaint sets it's off a chain of events whistle blowers in the intelligence community have to send their complaint to the I g then the idea has say yeah. This is a big deal or or not if it's big he sends it to the Director of National Intelligence Schiff says the I g use the words credible and urgent so he passed it onto the deny the deny is then supposed to forward whistleblower complaints to the House and Senate intelligence committees within a week of getting one but the acting DNA Joseph Maguire didn't do that when the I g realize the complaint wasn't getting run up the flagpole he apparently went around the DNA and send a letter directly directly to those committees like heads up. You should know about this thing shifts sent a letter to the DNA essentially saying W. T.F. Why didn't you tells tells about this shift said he wondered if the complaint was being purposefully concealed last Friday he issued a subpoena telling McGuire either hand over the complaint or come talk to my committee in a public hearing. So where do we go from here. I it looks like acting director. McGuire decided to go with door number two. He is expected to testify in a public hearing next Thursday but the House Intel Committee didn't want to wait for deeds today behind closed doors they heard from the I g the guy who went around the DNA. He reportedly didn't share the full contents of the complaint but according to some reports he says it wasn't just about one instance and he wouldn't save this complaint was even about the President Committee chair ships spoke after the briefing and said they're still determined to get to the bottom of it. This shows how someone is trying to manipulate the system to keep information about an urgent matter from the contemplating like we said there's a lot about this complaint that we don't know like who made it in the first place which foreign leader trump allegedly spoke to and what he may or may not have promised us to that person but reporters are playing their own version of guests who the Washington Post reports that according to White House records trump had interacted with at least by foreign leaders leaders in the weeks before the complaint including Russian President Vladimir Putin and North Korean leader Kim Jong UN also in the mix the prime ministers of Pakistan and the Netherlands ends and the Emir of Qatar to be clear. It's normal presidents to chat with foreign leaders. That's kind of what what it means to be president. What's weird is the alleged promise and that the whistleblower complaint didn't go through the usual channels this afternoon. CNN is reporting according to the White House and the DOJ were apparently involved in the decision to not tell Congress about the complaint but so far they're the only ones reporting that so what the skin while Congress tries to get to the bottom of what the complaint is about and why it's taken so long to get to them. Trump is trying to throw water are on the whole thing this morning. He tweeted that the story is fake news and asked quote. Is Anybody dumb enough to believe that I would say something inappropriate with a foreign leader meanwhile the question of what's in the complaint and why didn't go through the usual channels to make it to Congress and whether it's even a legit thing those are still not be but expect there to be a lot of back and forth on that between the trump administration and Congress uh coming up actors in Russia are getting creative after this summer's pro democracy protests more on that after the break so you like to listen to skim this on your way home from work which is great because we love being your commute buddy but if you're looking for more from the skin we've got you covered enter the skim APP. It has everything the skin has to offer kind of like our one. Stop shop wake up with the news. You need to start your day. Get a five minute. Read for your lunch break. Check out our weekly deep dives on everything from marijuana legalization to the student loan crisis and at five PM Eastern listened to that day's episode of Skim this it right on the APP to download search the skin. That's with two M's in your apple APP store or Google play happy skimming the next. Let's head now to Russia where anti-government protesters could be gaining momentum after a pretty cruel summer. Russian Russian opposition parties basically people who aren't thrilled about President Vladimir Putin's power trip wanted to compete in Moscow city council elections this month but in July election officials in Moscow locked some top opposition candidates from running claiming they didn't collect enough signatures to get on the ballot doc thousands of people took to the streets in protest and that really angered the Russian government big-name position leader. Alexei navalny was among those those arrested after that protest for planning to lead what a spokesperson said. We're unauthorized demonstrations the following weekend his arrest in the continued crackdown only made things things worse and protests and arrests went on one of the people thrown in jail was a young actor named Paul Loosen up and on Monday. He was sentenced to more than three years in prison for allegedly dislocating a police officer shoulder during those protests video. Saddam's arrest appears to show him being tackled by police after just walking through public square looking at his phone. The judge wouldn't let the video be used as evidence in court even though it showed that he didn't do anything which fueled allegations that case against Ustinov wasn't fair. We should mention some people say that as protesters. There's are being sent to jail instances police using excessive force. This summer aren't even being investigated so tensions over that are already brewing but Ustinov sentencing sentencing this week sparked a surprisingly large and creative backlash according to the New York Times one of Ustinov's actor pals conveniently named Alexander Pal while posted a video calling on others to join a virtual flash mob in support of the actor that I need to finish up pretty soon more and more actors posted their own and videos towards Alexi Navales team is keeping track of all these videos they say the videos show actors making their case onstage during curtain calls after some recent performances today those clever protests could be paying off government prosecutors reportedly now want Ustinov released on bail because of the public outcry and a Moscow court says we'll consider it tomorrow. WPRO protesters calling fair elections in Russia's still face major hurdles because it's difficult to get the Russian government to change course on much of anything but but these actors have found a new way to speak out literally on stage.

Congress trump trump House Intelligence Committee Washington Post Russian government Russia President Vladimir Putin president Moscow CNN Washington New York Times Director of National Intellige McGuire House Intel Committee Acting Director of national President Committee chair Ustinov National National Mall Intel
"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcast for February. Fifteenth two thousand nineteen I'm Sarah Crespi in this week's show. I'm talking to staff writer, Paul loosen about whether there's a hard limit on. Whether prediction is fifteen days as far as we can get and Meghan, Cantwell and Trig Faucheux discuss his paper on an Thomas bought. That's mapping final plankton off the coast of Norway. How far out can we predict the weather we've gotten pretty good at it? But is there a limit staff writer, Paul vision is here to discuss a study that says, yeah. About two weeks, that's the maximum for the mid latitudes. Anyway. Hi, paul. So the app on my phone gives me ten days of weather, and it's pretty good. I expect a little variation in those like ladder days. But is that the best that we can do right now is the best we can do right now the top and models from Europe, and the US really they max out at skillful predictions about ten days we've been getting better at this over the last few decades, what has been that rate of increase each decade. They've added one additional day of predictability, this is a really great success. But is that gonna stop we can't just keep adding one day of prediction a decade forever? Probably not it would be nice. It'd be great for job security for forecasters. Yeah. But this is something meteorologists have wondered about for fifty years, and they have often said maybe it's about two weeks. And this new study seems to say, yeah, it does seem to be about two weeks. How can a study prove a negative that we can't get better than you know, a certain limit. It can't to a certain extent. You know there. There's always gonna be ways you could improve this method. But yes, so they took the last version of the European model which contributed the best in the world and ran at about a hundred and twenty times, which is not really operationally expensive, these are supercomputer type models. So they ran out hundred twenty times a day change something about the initial conditions or what they were measuring or what they were excluding in these different sessions. Yeah. So a lot of the air that we see in miles could also drive from our uncertainty about what were observing today. So we don't have these perfect understanding of the weather and so trying to tease out. What is a problem do? Our imperfect knowledge versus the inherent chaos of the atmosphere has always been issue. But if you do this kind of big ensemble suite of models, Ryan them all together, you can artifice -cially make it seem like you have no error in the observations. You can narrow the range reduced to ten percent from the current uncertainty and that creates kind of artificial certainty. This is kind of presuming that or even better in the future. Measuring that we know more about how weather works and that we're better at inputting that data into these models. And when all those assumptions, we still get this two week limit. Yep. Implausibly better. We'll probably never get a good and still you comes to this two week limit that Edward Lorenzo who is a famous meteorologist mathematician. Father of chaos theory is fly Mr. butterfly effect. He hostile laid in a nineteen sixty-nine study that probably seem to be about two weeks law. People quibble about the model said may be didn't, you know, really? Like the atmosphere. But now these new models that do look a lot like that Mr. to the point of even having convection, the kind of cloud thunderstorm systems for me in them, which is hasn't been the case in the past still run into chaos after two weeks and no better than your me. Guess in base off climate records. Let's go back to the butterfly effect. Great moot. Natta great for people who don't know what this was about. I was kinda surprised that there was a paper kind of just thought it was like a thing that people say from scifi there was that too freshest butterfly as the crush history. This is the flap of butterflies eggs affecting weather. Yes. Yes..

staff writer Paul Sarah Crespi Norway Europe Meghan Trig Faucheux US Thomas Edward Lorenzo Cantwell Ryan two weeks ten days two week fifteen days fifty years ten percent one day
"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

09:05 min | 3 years ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Hello. Welcome to the science podcast for August tenth, two thousand eighteen. I'm Sarah Crespi in this week show staff writer. Paul loosen joins us with a debate about the newly main mega lion age. That's the latest division of the Holocene epoch. Yes, there is a new name for what time that we live in and staff writer. Kelly surface here to talk about using one buck the samurai wasp to control another marmalade stink. And what happens when this type of bio control pose out of control and don't forget to tweet to us or write to us about this month's books will be reading the book of why the new science also affect. You can tweet to us at science magazine or Email us at science podcast at AS dot ORG. I hope we have staff writer, Paul vision. Hi, Paul, and we're gonna talk about the Meghalaya and that's not a super big lion, but a newly named division of Holocene epoch. That's the epic we live in and the mega lion is now the age that we live in. It's new age. Paul it is. Okay, welcome. So what are the borders of the Meghalaya n- we make a line starts about four thousand two hundred years ago and it ends well knows and right now and what is it named after? It's not actually even EMMY g. a. l. i. o. and how do you know tonight it's named after a northeast northeastern state in India and a cave that the golden spike for it was taken from. Can you tell me what golden again? He was reading. The paper does like this is a railroad term the golden spike. So for each time you have a new geological time period. You need a example of the rock record to specify. When this time period happened in this golden spike is the exemplar of this change. Okay. So let's talk about this decision to start a new age within an epic. So who gets to make that decision? So there's a bureaucracy is one of my favorite scientific institutions called the international commission on stratego v. and this association of geologists that governs geologic time and they have these long tenure debates about whether a age or stage or epoch should be named and the evidence for it. About ten years ago, there was an effort. They're looking at the Holocene and which is the last eleven thousand seven hundred years since the ice age and most recent time period and people seem to be using the terms early middle and late Holocene a lot. And really this came from an effort just to standardize what those dates meant. They already had a few markers in the Holocene at this point. No, they done. Have any just do the start of the Halsey. Okay. So they put all these divisions down, but this is the one the mega lion starting forty two hundred years ago or supposedly starting forty two hundred years ago. This is the most contentious. It is. Yeah. Why are people not happy with the Meghalaya n- particular when they divided the Holocene into three ages, it has to do with linking this beginning of this time this age to a drought that may or may not be global, right? There's evidence that drought existed in the Middle East and other areas, and that starting up nineteen nineties. This evidence I started to appear in the records and people start hunting for that all over the world. And one climatologist told me for every one sample where you do see a bump know these these little wiggles of record. Yeah, you might have to samples where you don't see it. The central arguments that's premature to take this as a really kind of defining global. Event and they didn't wanna just divide it into three equal parts. They wanted something to peg this time. Change too, right? Yes. So simply that's what they're trying to do was divide it into three quarts of the need to have some sort of signal in the rock record to those clearly visible. They can't just go divine willy nilly. There are still some people for this, right? They think that this was an important time. This is an important change. Is there a division between people who studied climate versus people who study rocks versus people who say, look at the archangel record, typically, when you think about geology, you're thing about really deep time and the past millions millions and billions of years ago? Yeah, the Holocene only eleven thousand years. I mean, they also named all the other times Vida tie. Right? And for those longer time periods, a lot of Pilat climate scientists, you know, they often look at things like ice core records still. I might that are not relevant for these long, deep geological time records, and these two communities don't really have a lot of crossover. And some people see that as the math station of the Meghalaya n- as an example of that are symptom of that where they didn't wait to see that there is broad consensus that existed. There is support for this from many people. There are signs of a bump at forty, two hundred or four thousand records really all seven continents, but signal as global strong event. Allow people question that and what about the archaeology went about what people were during that time. This is a very early period, have the rise, the Acadian empire, which is really what originated that this first evidence in Syria and some other civilizations. There's some evidence of claps or decline of these early civilizations. There could potentially head to the strout. Some archaeologists also disagree with some of these interpretations archaeology as a as a discipline. There's always a live interpretation that goes into it. And I know it's hard to have berry clear cases of climatically. Caused claps is my favorite part of the story is, as you mentioned, this is a ten year event. This is not something they're going to be able to take back anytime soon to think that in ten years, this is going to be revisited pretty seriously, I think so. You know, some of the evidence we site in the story hasn't been published yet, so wasn't even there for them to consider and fair enough that they would not consider until it's actually passed pure view and been published. The question is how much people really invest in taking the time to dispute. Thou people I've talked with have also said, oh, well, okay, the name this, and it's useful date to have as we do make these references to early middle late and no one's actually going to call it the Meghalaya lion, and you know where it's going, nor this and move on with our lives. This might cause enough dust for people to look at this or it might cause the pill climate community to come aware of this event because it had you kind of this cottage industry of people who did see it in their records and nad workshops about it, and others who really haven't been paying attention to it. So could increase focus on this on studying whether it is truly a global event or not. What would be the harm in leaving it that way? Think there'd be a ton of hard, but you know, it comes down to just proper science and you know if this is the standard they have for a signal, you want to be global, and there is a tential that given we have this event now and it's kind of standardizing given this premature that people them look at new halio climate records and CEO of this bump at three thousand nine hundred years ago, maybe time shift that a little bit. And that's indicative of this rotter event when actually it would not be there's a confirmation bias possibility, not necessarily, but it's possible outcome of this human endeavors can easily shape how signs conducted course. Yeah, speaking of which and another dust up about naming things. What about the anthropic seen? How does that the enterprising? How does that fit into this story? Yeah, it doesn't. Allow the initial coverage really thought it did. And so the enthroned a seen as a potential epic being debated still still being considered. There hasn't been a proposal the same body by the same body. This would take over from the Holocene not looking at these smaller divisions of the Holocene, but really just saying, oh humid, humanity started becoming this global shaping force at x. time here when when that be as of earlier this year, the target had been the late nineteen forties, early nineteen fifties. It's an time called the great acceleration when industrial revolution really kicked full steam globally emissions really spiked, and you have the global plutonium signal of atom bomb system. So that might be the next to bait in ten years. So it will certainly be Bill will be the next two years. All right. Thank you so much Paul. Yeah, you're welcome. Hall is in is a staff writer for science. You can find a link to his story at science bag dot org, slash. Podcasts, stay tuned for an interview with staff writer, Kelly servic about using samurai wasps to control marmalade stink, bugs that have invaded the United States, whether we want to or not.

Holocene Meghalaya Paul vision staff writer Kelly Sarah Crespi Middle East Pilat India EMMY g. Bill United States Syria Hall CEO ten years forty two hundred years eleven thousand seven hundred three thousand nine hundred ye
"paul loosen" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"paul loosen" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Of orbiters not a lot but recently we've had some orbiters at venus the european space agency had our one called venus express and the japanese have one that's there now called i could sukchae and you can do certain interesting things from orbit at venus but there are certain important goals the you really need to plunge into the atmosphere to accomplish measuring the compositions of of the gaps molecules what's really there as opposed to what we think is there and measuring how the temperature and the pressure vary with height measuring the properties of the clouds and then even as we just send towards the surface we would be able to take images take photographs of the surface as we descend and indeed land on the surface and more in something of what those minerals than those rocks are really bike so there are uh there's a series of goals that are would be very important for for figuring out this puzzle of venus and and how it's evolution diverged from that of the earth that we think we can only answer by plunging into that forbidding atmosphere and heading down towards that that searing surface and taking data along the way and then radioing that information back to earth in in uh you know that that that's with the bonanza would begin we'd we'd we'd start to really interpret that in and see what we were burning about our our sister world there's an article in science magazine must recently will reminding the to call grandson entitled tougher than hell tougher than haiti's by paul loosen and key explores wide he is that nasa has not had good tools to land on the surface of the as you mentioned the temperature and also the unknown solve settling into a cloud system you can't see through they're looking at building what looked to be world war one tanks and then armored in situ explores with new silicon carbide on reactive semiconductors that won't melt at the temperatures or be disrupted so those aren't built yet you haven't got them but how long do you think you can survive after reading this i'm amazed that anything could survive on that surface how long can you last him yes so we it's great that people were are developing the this advanced technology and some day we would like eight lander on venus.

science magazine haiti nasa world war paul