26 Burst results for "Paul Hutton"

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

04:28 min | 9 months ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

"And that breaking news. Is that a south lake. Tahoe where firefighters continue to focus their efforts to contain the kaldor fire. That's casey are news. In sacramento where the kelder fire threatened south lake tahoe this week hurricane ida wreck the power grid around new orleans than flooded new york and the northeast and here in minnesota twenty twenty one just broke the record for the hottest meteorological summer. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. Here today on climate cast. What do we know about. Climate change links to these three separate extreme weather events. John abraham is a professor of thermal sciences at the university of saint thomas in saint paul. Hi john welcome to climate cast. It's a pleasure to be on pau. Let's start with hurricane ida. We know there's a link between stronger. Rapidly intensifying hurricanes and warmer oceans. Is that what we saw with. Ida and what can be said about ida and climate change will pull. The short answer is yes. My colleagues pulled up the ocean. Temperatures along the path of ida in it turns out. They were warmer than they should be. The ocean waters that ida passover over about two or three degrees celsius warmer than they should have been which is about four or five degrees fahrenheit and that translates into a significant increase in the strength of ida now what increased while the wind speed increase which then caused increased storm surge but also the precipitation increased. So when you hear about these heavy rains and flooding that increased by approximately fifteen or twenty percent so clearly the warming planet and the warming oceans are affecting these storms and we just saw a case. Study of that. This week with ida. Do we know how much stronger hurricanes are because of climate change for every degree celsius increase in the ocean waters that the hurricane fastest over three things changed with the storm the size of the storm so think about that as the diameter that will impact. How much of the coastline is hit. In addition the wind speed increases. And that of course that causes destructive forces to infrastructure and buildings but it also creates storm surge and then lastly the rainfall increases Warmer oceans fuel the evaporation of water from the ocean that than powers storm so those are the three principal areas. That warming ocean strengthens storms. This is a dangerous time of the year. it's not just peak hurricane season wildfires. Get a lot of attention in a peeks out west this time of year even minnesota. of course it's been in the news this summer. How is climate change. Fueling these events in wildfires especially out in the west to make them more dangerous so what climate change is doing is. It's drying out the western part of the united states. And it's even creating more dry times in the centre part of the us and it's that kind of weather patterns in in concert with the heat. Right which is making a wildfires more damaging and no frequent. So we're in the middle in minnesota. I mean we're trending wetter overall but then we see these. Extreme swing sort of flash drought into these drought years. Is that seemed to be part of our climate change pattern here in the upper midwest going forward states like minnesota and center part of the us we're experiencing a slight increase in the wetness which means we're getting a little bit more rain each year. But what's happening is it's coming in really heavy down bursts and those down bursts are interspersed with dry warm periods so the result of that is a state like minnesota can go from floods one month to droughts the next month back to floods the month after that. So we're seeing these dramatic swings from one extreme weather system to another. Sometimes we say we describe it as weather on steroids and we're seeing that in minnesota in our neighboring states in the us but also other countries. John abraham with the university of saint thomas in saint. Paul thanks for your insight on climate cast today pleasure. Paul have a great day. That's climate cast. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist all headman..

hurricane ida university of saint thomas paul hutton minnesota John abraham south lake south lake tahoe Tahoe saint paul npr casey sacramento new orleans ida new york john us
"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

04:11 min | 9 months ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

"To meet the moment to be responding to the needs of the people we have to be bold. And we can't tink worth the edges. I'm mpr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton here. And that was massachusetts democrat on presley. Talking about the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill that passed the senate this week. It now heads to the house where presley and her progressive colleagues say. It isn't bold enough on climate change especially on the heels of this week's dire warning in the un climate report but while some say it doesn't do enough to reduce emissions. It does offer billions to help the country prepare for the effects of climate change. Forbes tompkins manages efforts for flood prepared communities with the pew charitable trust and joins us now. Hi forbes welcome to climate cast i paul. Thanks for having me. So what do you see in this bill. That can help address. Climate change altogether. This bill really marks potentially a once in a generation investment in climate adaptation and resilience in particular. There's a focus on transportation and it's going to open up An abundance of resources for communities to develop new plans to implement new projects that can better prepare themselves for flooding and other types of disasters. So let's focus on the flooding aspect a little bit. I know you work a lot in that area. What are you seeing in there. That you think can have short term impact One of them is called the building resilient infrastructure and communities program and this bill would infuse a billion dollars into the program immediately and it would allow communities to support. You know any type of hazard mitigation projects That can help them reduce their risk that they face from disasters the second piece specific the flooding is also a second infusion for fema flood mitigation assistance program that provides financial and technical assistance to states localities for projects to reduce the risk of repetitive flood damage to properties and buildings insured by the national flood insurance program. The bill includes a hundred and thirty million dollars for tribal governments to relocate members who live in vulnerable areas. There's been this concept of managed retreat especially on the coast. Climate migration in the united states always felt far off. But is it really well. They're going to be some difficult decisions. That are going to need to be made. Probably at all levels of government historically the country's had a tendency to continue develop and some of these most at risk areas. I think that this bill is a clear indication that you know these impacts are no longer going to be ignored and it has bipartisan support. To ensure that we're providing the resources to these localities to these states to make these informed decisions. Let's talk about that. Bipartisan support republicans have been resistant to other kinds of climate change policy. Making why is this bill more palatable. Well i think it really gets at the heart. Heart of the issue That this is something that is impacting everyone across the country. It's these real impacts Happening in the backyards of americans no matter what political affiliation you might have. How significant do you think it is that bipartisanship on climate is growing these days. Well i think it's a game changer. It's critical that we move away from some of these more piecemeal approaches. Let's inner we've resilience into long-term state transportation plans into land use policies. It really needs to be echoed From the federal government down to local government to ensure that. We're all moving in the right direction and we're all building and developing in ways that are sustainable for its time comes with the pew charitable trusts. Thanks so much for being on climate cast today. Thanks so much for having me. That's climate cast. I'm npr chief meteorologist paul..

Paul hutton presley Forbes tompkins pew charitable trust massachusetts un senate national flood insurance progr Bill fema paul united states federal government npr paul..
"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

"To meet the moment to be responding to the needs of the people we have to be bold. And we can't tink worth the edges. I'm mpr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton here. And that was massachusetts democrat on presley. Talking about the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill that passed the senate this week. It now heads to the house where presley and her progressive colleagues say. It isn't bold enough on climate change especially on the heels of this week's dire warning in the un climate report but while some say it doesn't do enough to reduce emissions. It does offer billions to help the country prepare for the effects of climate change. Forbes tompkins manages efforts for flood prepared communities with the pew charitable trust and joins us now. Hi forbes welcome to climate cast i paul. Thanks for having me. So what do you see in this bill. That can help address. Climate change altogether. This bill really marks potentially a once in a generation investment in climate adaptation and resilience in particular. There's a focus on transportation and it's going to open up An abundance of resources for communities to develop new plans to implement new projects that can better prepare themselves for flooding and other types of disasters. So let's focus on the flooding aspect a little bit. I know you work a lot in that area. What are you seeing in there. That you think can have short term impact One of them is called the building resilient infrastructure and communities program and this bill would infuse a billion dollars into the program immediately and it would allow communities to support. You know any type of hazard mitigation projects That can help them reduce their risk that they face from disasters the second piece specific the flooding is also a second infusion for fema flood mitigation assistance program that provides financial and technical assistance to states localities for projects to reduce the risk of repetitive flood damage to properties and buildings insured by the national flood insurance

Paul hutton presley Forbes tompkins pew charitable trust massachusetts un senate national flood insurance progr Bill fema paul united states federal government npr paul..
Infrastructure Bill Offers Once in a Generation Investment in Climate Resilience

Climate Cast

02:07 min | 9 months ago

Infrastructure Bill Offers Once in a Generation Investment in Climate Resilience

"To meet the moment to be responding to the needs of the people we have to be bold. And we can't tink worth the edges. I'm mpr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton here. And that was massachusetts democrat on presley. Talking about the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill that passed the senate this week. It now heads to the house where presley and her progressive colleagues say. It isn't bold enough on climate change especially on the heels of this week's dire warning in the un climate report but while some say it doesn't do enough to reduce emissions. It does offer billions to help the country prepare for the effects of climate change. Forbes tompkins manages efforts for flood prepared communities with the pew charitable trust and joins us now. Hi forbes welcome to climate cast i paul. Thanks for having me. So what do you see in this bill. That can help address. Climate change altogether. This bill really marks potentially a once in a generation investment in climate adaptation and resilience in particular. There's a focus on transportation and it's going to open up An abundance of resources for communities to develop new plans to implement new projects that can better prepare themselves for flooding and other types of disasters. So let's focus on the flooding aspect a little bit. I know you work a lot in that area. What are you seeing in there. That you think can have short term impact One of them is called the building resilient infrastructure and communities program and this bill would infuse a billion dollars into the program immediately and it would allow communities to support. You know any type of hazard mitigation projects That can help them reduce their risk that they face from disasters the second piece specific the flooding is also a second infusion for fema flood mitigation assistance program that provides financial and technical assistance to states localities for projects to reduce the risk of repetitive flood damage to properties and buildings insured by the national flood insurance

Paul Hutton Presley Forbes Tompkins Pew Charitable Trust Massachusetts Senate UN Bill Paul Fema
Refurbished Wind Turbine Powers Homes and Learning

Climate Cast

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Refurbished Wind Turbine Powers Homes and Learning

"I'm standing underneath a wind. Turbine in chaska minnesota on a windy spring day. I'm npr chief meteorologist. paul hutton. Her this is climate. Cast this wind turbines middle. School educates students about renewable energy and generates electricity for nearby homes. It's operated by the minnesota municipal power agency or m. pa matt quota. Har- sqi is the group's chaska chair or standing under a hundred and sixty kilowatt Wind turbine that was refurbish. Here from palm springs california and one of these resides in each of the twelve member communities. And what does mpa do. So mvp is twelve member counties that basically represent municipal electric Users that we basically get together both to generate our own electricity for all communities or to purchase it off the grid depending on the pricing of one. Electric has a give time. What are you trying to accomplish. So basically our goal is -ccomplish having a very reasonable electric creates our goal is to have power that's cheaper than xl energy As investor owned utility. How is it going deeper. Yep it's going very well. We're on a residential level. We ten in chaska to be about eight to nine percent lower than xl energy. These swishing blades above us help adults and their pocketbooks and offer a learning opportunity for students. Amy feet teaches. Fourth graders at saint. John's lutheran school in chaska. She leads her students on field trips to see renewables action. It's a great opportunity for students to think about how they use energy on a daily basis. We think about what are some ways that maybe we could cut some of our energy use and maybe not us quite as much energy. Our we may be wasting energy. We talk about how our use of energy affects the planet and all the people around us as well and then we also when we get to favorable energy park We they put us through. Maybe we'll ride a bike and we'll try to power entire home and how hard that is when we have lots of different things on in our home versus when we have maybe one thing on or two things on We'll go to a different station where we look at the solar panel. We'll go to a different station where we look at the wind turbine We'll talk about how we use non-renewable energy and also renewable energy the differences in those and how they actually affect us and how they actually affect the world around

Chaska Paul Hutton Minnesota Municipal Power Agen Matt Quota Amy Feet NPR John's Lutheran School Palm Springs Minnesota California
The Search for a Better EV Battery as Customer Demand Rises

Climate Cast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Search for a Better EV Battery as Customer Demand Rises

"More expensive models are going to have even longer ranges were go. What would be about the same as a small car. Get on a full tank of gas. That stand guerrino from inside climate news and he's been following new kind of space race in electric vehicle batteries. And i'm npr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton hutler today on climate cast. How quickly is ev battery tech evolving. Hi dan welcome back to climate cast and to be here. So you wrote about the quest for a solid state. Ev battery what are they. And how are they different from current ev. battery tech. so right now the battery. That is in just about ali's if not all either that i know of have a joe material a kind of a thick liquid material that is what the electrons pass through as they charge and discharge a solid state battery is designed in which those electrons are passing through a solid material. The reason that that's potentially a breakthrough is that it takes less space to have the same amount of energy passing through a solid than it does through a gel on so you can pack more batteries into the same space more power into the same space which leads to longer ranges. it also can lead to faster charging times as far as automakers. We know tesla has led the way in. Ev technology which other automakers are now going all in on ev technology. Just about every major automaker is at the very least talking a lot about their vm. Bishen volkswagen is the company that could probably make the strongest case right now that it is investing the most heavily and making kind of a a top to bottom transformation into an e company.

Guerrino Paul Hutton NPR DAN ALI Bishen Volkswagen Tesla
The Natural Gas Boom Appears To Be Going Bust

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

The Natural Gas Boom Appears To Be Going Bust

"Son natural gas as the bridge fuel to a net zero energy future but the rapidly emerging climate solutions mean. That bridge is getting shorter fast. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. Her and today on climate cast is the natural gas boom going bust. Justin mccullough is an independent journalists covering the finances of the energy transition. Hi justin welcome to climate cast. I paul thank you very much. So big companies like shell bet big on natural gas what are emerging solutions to the economics of natural gas. There are two main challenges to show all the people who had bet big on the future of natural gas and specifically liquefied natural gas. Renewable energy now can produce electricity for lower costs than natural gas. Fired power straight up competition. The other issue is there's oversupply right now. What level of investment are we talking about to get into these projects you know when shell bet big on the future of natural gas they in two thousand sixteen. They bought a company for over fifty billion dollars in two thousand and nine exxon company for over forty billion dollars. Exxon has since written off the majority of that forty billion dollars as a loss and it now appears that shell is facing similar problems with its fifty billion dollar investment in natural

Paul Hutton Justin Mccullough NPR Justin Paul Exxon
Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

"Little to no ice floating along marquette bay noah reported january's total ice coverage in the great lakes to be the lowest in the last forty eight years lake superior. Ice cover briefly grew to fifty percent during our february arctic outbreak but that fleeting is vanished just as quickly with our mild march. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. And today on climate cast. What are longer term lake superior ice trends telling us about climate change in the upper midwest professor j austin researchers all things lake superior with the large lakes observatory at the university of minnesota duluth high. Welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on paul. Let's start with this past winter. What was notable with ice cover on lake superior It was a really unusual year very low ice covered starch and we had that remarkable cold air in february and we ended up with fleetingly above average ice levels superior and just as remarkably. They went away really quickly. And how does this fit with the longer term ice trends that you're seeing on lake superior and the great lakes. I expect that we're going to see Significantly lower than average ice cover this year and basically since about nineteen ninety eight. We've had a long string of relatively low ice cover on lake superior with some exceptions like like the polar vortex in twenty fourteen where we had nearly complete coverage for two months.

Marquette Bay Paul Hutton J Austin Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Great Lakes Arctic NPR Midwest Paul
MN leads Midwest, but falls short on electric vehicles

Climate Cast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

MN leads Midwest, but falls short on electric vehicles

"The purchasing power of the federal government to buy clean zero emission vehicles that are made in source right here in america. That's president joe biden. He wants to electrify the federal fleet to help reduce transportation greenhouse gas emissions but our consumers and states ready to follow. I'm npr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton are here with climate. Cast the american council for an energy efficient economy tracks eib progress their state policy director. Brian howard is here. Hi brian hey all great to be with you today. So this is some pretty big news on the ev front. I president biden's plan and then gm announces its goal to sell only electric vehicles by twenty thirty five. Are we approaching a tipping point here for these. I think so. We've continued to see a steady growth in the av market Even this year despite all the challenge of the covid so you with those activities that are coming from federal government and from a major auto manufacturers. I think we are reaching invasion point about what transportation electric vacations gonna look like in the united states and correct me if i'm wrong but these are only about two percent of the market right now. Why is this such a huge scale of opportunity for vs to reduce these transportation emissions to start with the transportation sector is responsible for about eight percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the united states which is the largest emitter based on kind of the sectors. That are out there So when we're to convert interro combustion engines and move that over to electric vehicles. There's a significant emissions reduction benefit which obviously helps with climate. But then also there's a number of other residual really important benefits as it relates to public health that you get from electrifying transportation. Well in one of those. I assume is jobs right because it's not just the vehicles you need the right infrastructure charging infrastructure. You need the right policies to move these things along which states are leading on this front of the hundred points that we looked at california scored. Ninety one next in line was new york at sixty three point. Sixty three point five which is obviously a pretty deep differentiation between the numbers. And how does minnesota rank minnesota is twelfth based on our evaluation which is a leader in the midwest but certainly is behind the national leaders in the top ten. What is minnesota doing. Well and where is there a need for faster. Progress with vs. So minnesota's done a number of things well Minnesota has done a really good job of articulating. How utilities could invested infrastructure. The state has also taken some initial steps to ratify california's zero emission vehicles regulations which would set that manufacturers need to sell a certain number of electric vehicles from passenger like vehicles in the state of which is being considered. Now you know there are some things that clearly need improvement They have identified that the absence of statewide incentives for electric vehicles is a challenge in something that they need to address. One thing. We should touch on right when we're charging an electric vehicle. It matters where that power came from right absolutely. And so what. Are you seeing with trends of different states. That have More renewable energy than other places when it comes to being able to charge navy with that we are seeing a an overall positive trend in terms of having states move towards outer percent clean energy for their for their grids. There's also a lot of states that are taking that activity very seriously and providing interim goals about how they're going to get to that low carbon future minnesota as an example is considering how to deal with that now in the legislature But other states have already shown us the way. Brian howard state policy director with the american council for an energy efficient economy. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective. Climate cast today. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for the time.

Brian Howard Paul Hutton America Minnesota Joe Biden American Council NPR Biden Federal Government GM Brian California Midwest New York Navy American Council For An Energy Legislature
"paul hutton" Discussed on Serienweise - Der Serien Podcast

Serienweise - Der Serien Podcast

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Serienweise - Der Serien Podcast

"Dominates on cooling. maxed out by Hutton Shuna crucify till to heard the. Fatty Tut it club or violent about OBA for. Our. Acceptance of. In, do the rain fondest. Realized cuts does, the MY. Vice not dosage by the rain forces devolve on nutty advice not as Donald Sinden, release Meghan that's syndrome Sumitomo As line also bunk always a coffee should as voted done finish in schism in the Aston Shuffle Envy as kindle about Yvonne Leash Jewish, Gainesville does dosage to begin vase muscle on a front. Soon, this dossier India without its fighters is guilty pleasure trusting. Took on fund our Mendes Patent to the Santa speak the DOT. Com indium concept. foresaw ambition Gamal at five nights. If I hundred US dominance been earned unfunded oceans, Kovac Agung that's body Bester and tried on demand but super-busy among. The certainly with Paul Hutton via. Off before in where he could can call on. On On us but allure of rigged the ibew. Flame acquaintance by. Skate. In Denmark keep designed apocalyptic. Than Imaging Stein Viewers Dinner Quasi obviously. Or and these Mon, the Abboud Asmara's admit Ian Turn in I'm underground bunker on Aina Mr..

Paul Hutton Hutton Shuna US Yvonne Leash Jewish Donald Sinden Abboud Asmara Kovac Agung OBA India Aina Mr ibew Gamal Ian Turn Bester Denmark Meghan Santa
How cities are preparing their water infrastructure for bigger storms

Climate Cast

04:03 min | 2 years ago

How cities are preparing their water infrastructure for bigger storms

"The cost of heavier rainfall. I'M NPR CHIEF. Meteorologist Paul Hutton. Or this is climate. Cats governor. Tim Wall says Minnesota Needs Two hundred ninety three million dollars to retrofit. Its water infrastructure to keep up with climate change last year more than twenty Minnesota location set annual precipitation records that includes the twin cities and Rochester. Were more than fifty. Five inches fell last year. Minnesota is now about five inches wetter on average than in nineteen eighty and these heavier twenty-first-century rains are overwhelming. Our Twentieth Century Stormwater Infrastructure Randy Nip rash is a storm water regulatory specialist with Stanford Consulting and the Minnesota cities stormwater coalition. Hi Randy Paul. So we see the data right. Minnesota's getting wetter. What are the impacts of this climate shift on Cities? Not only are we getting wetter in general but more of our rainfall is coming in more intense. Storms everybody has seen what a really intense storm does to an urban storm water system. But you can Get those sort of impacts at scales where you have real problems where you can jeopardize property where people can get injured or even killed and those impacts are real inconsequential for our cities. We have rain bursts last summer in South. Minneapolis in a neighborhood that overwhelmed the storm systems and there was water up to the top of the tires and cars parked on the street. How does that four cities to to those heavier bursts of rain? One of the things that we try to do is figure out where the problems are going to be an advance so instead of just responding to problems after they happen we can use computer models to look at our urban stormwater systems we can we refer to it as dropping designed storm onto our urban landscape using these computer models. Watch how all the water moves through the storm water system and see where the problems are going to be. So for instance the hundred year storm nowadays For the twin cities area is thought to be about seven and a half inches which is up from six inches from earlier precipitation frequencies that change in rainfall can cause impacts that we can Analyzing advance anticipate and perhaps address before they happen instead of after it happened. Okay so let's say we do that. And we address them. I assume we're building bigger storm water projects and how much can a big storm? Water project cost a city a million multiple millions of dollars. Sometimes sometimes it's a fixes though can be quite simple. You can provide a path for water to pass under an emergency situation. Could be a road. Could be a parking lot of places where you can move water or store. Water even temporarily. Sometimes you can do it pretty cheaply randy and you're dealing with cities. What's your assessment of where they are with this process? Are they on the right track? With upgrading. Stormwater infrastructure cities are as usual trying their best They also have multiple water issues to deal with so for instance they have state permitting. Requirements for water quality whereas flooding questions are related to water quantity. There isn't the same regulatory pressure on the water quantity side but the cities are always and and for a very long time have been deeply concerned about flooding potential randy crash with stand tech consulting and the Minnesota City stormwater coalition thanks for being on climate cast today always a pleasure. Paul keep up the good

Minnesota Randy Paul Paul Hutton Minnesota City NPR Tim Wall Stanford Consulting Minneapolis Rochester
"paul hutton" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

12:04 min | 2 years ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Blew them a neighborhood right. We give them casinos fine now and blankets with smallpox. Let's not forget that feeling but there's this it seems to me by killing everybody and then adopting their names for our sports teams. I mean generally I just celebrated our our anniversary and we were at Powell. Hatton resort down in down in Virginia Paul Hutton. Was a father on us. Read the story about happened to that Guy I'm like Holy Shit and others other just resorts after him like terrible him. Also old plantation. Like how Plantation Thomas up his story Pocahontas it comes in. I come from her Oh Paul Monkey really awesome. Virginia so okay there is actually there was a video oh years ago where this This guy walked around in a Redskin logo shirts and all the only change that was made made is rather than it'd be a native American. It was just a white male had an earthquake occasions. It was a cock and fusions and so they just he just filmed it. You know and what's funny is that everybody is like it's just a sports team get over it And people were so mad. People were so mad they reacted so so badly to the fact that he was walking around with the shirt they were very angry And I think that just shows the level level two level of just how wrong it is we just don't we don't need all that but again. Are there done enough words and our vocabulary that we can't do better that we have to use while I call an email that and also I just WanNa say from the perspective of an indigenous person here for for us to say. Well it's got one hundred years of history while if we had a sports team that was called some other racial. It's the Celtics. No this is something I won't. I won't say we wouldn't have any problem saying that's unacceptable. It's wrong to Stop Abbott. So the question is why is it okay to continue to Put put the indigenous people out there in this way the funny anything to me about the whole thing is that like Washington itself. Their basketball team for years since they came into the League was the bullets. They decided that bullets it was a negative connotation around the city of Washington vs how violent the city was and so they changed the name of the team. It's not like it hasn't been done before over something that wasn't offending budget. Absolutely but who was it. The took the initiative on that. It was the owner of the team. The owner of the redskins will die right before changing. The name of the Senate used to not be racist. It was always racist. The problem is that people were a lot more comfortable in their beds at night and the people with it being racist and the people who was against didn't have a voice that's right and and yeah and I was. I was going to try to answer that to you. It's like yes. They were always racist as idea of them becoming. Raise the sound like the kind of conversation conversation you here at Thanksgiving from the uncle. Who's like this stuff didn't used to be racist? It's racist to all these people are all you know their own social media talking about it right. How come it's always in life so I know it's a it's a it's a it's a it's it's a cliche but it's true but like the other thing when you think about what of their sports teams are named we go back to this hierarchy kind of thing of hierarchy like emails humanity and then you know thinking about where systemic racism comes from his putting people into categories? That aren't even human and you think about other sports teams the Tigers. eggers the lion. The redskin there's this level of like bringing things up as mascots right and that's really really offensive. Well we also have the Patriots. The Celtics cowboys. I mean it's not just that there's a lot of different names careers. I mean it's just just to just call just ended there on dehumanizing using based on the name of the team can be true but not always if you look across all the major sports. Franchises is Irish Celtics Ticks Celtic first of all so damn and get it right all right That's part of it. No I don't think so. I don't think so calling team the Patriots either the problem. Here's here's who call. WHO named the team? The context So if their mascot looks like logo depends right so hey chief Wahoo isn't get news right. I mean th so you know the Michigan State spartans were named after a you know a very famous. You know city state In Greece Because they were fierce fierce People into wells right but the point being The probably weren't The people who named the Michigan State Spartans Michigan says spartans. Probably were not Persian. Okay you have an age old and I can't tell you right now. The person businesses let screaming the SPARTANS. But I can tell you right now. It probably wasn't someone who had an age old rivalry with the people living in Sparta Talk. Sports teams came out of like the time that we had prohibition happening though because they needed another pastime to do so I I also that's coming in an era that wasn't exactly Politically correct in in all of its doings. Either so that makes sense aggie. Didn't that sound all that formidable. No on this on this question though for me. It's interesting like sports. We can get out because you know the the Redskins is a issue But I I think some things weren't always racist honestly an case in point there is a point where black people were called Negro right. We're called negroes right and my mom talks about the she's in her sixties like we were called Negroes and then we'll go black and now we're African American and I have a hard time keeping up and there was no negative connotation to being called Negro now. Have you ever called the other end word. Obviously there was negative connotation to that but Negro was just black people in America and then it was black and then you were black people in America. Now you're African American but if you were to call me Negro now that would be considered raises. And it's funny. There's an episode Black Ish Anthony Anderson Show where They are talking about the word Negro and his boss. His coworkers are like the oblivious Livia White people and I love he's always educating them and He's A and they're pushing back on the whole Negro. Were being racist like what do you mean. What do you mean China? I always donate every single year to the United Negro College Fund. Because you just donate to them so you can say the word Negro the only reason you say hey so and every year I give money servers all right caller people right and so I do think that there are Dr Things that do become racist over time but I would differentiate them from the things that have been racist the whole time and now we're becoming uncomfortable with the with the examples you gave them. I would say those have always been racist. The ones on not the ones you just said I mean the ones page. Okay all right. That's right so it's so easy just not to say those really is. I grew up in the same so badly. Why do you want to say that so badly I I grew up in the fifties and sixties and and the the woman that cleaned the house which was the colored lady? Well I haven't used that terminal on time just because someone said it's not a great word you don't use it anymore so just out of breath out of common decency. I just stopped so going back. This is sort of going back to the last question of content or context or intense is that Intense doesn't change. What happened but enchant tend to changes correction? There's intent where education is enough like you may not realize. Is that calling the the woman who Cleans Cleans Your House colored the minute you find out. Oh I'm GonNa not do that anymore. Right because your intent was never negative to start with It was just an education however if the context or intent is meaningful like you just don't care. Will that changes it from an Education Haitian to perhaps confrontation perhaps cutting them off. Perhaps whatever it might be. I think that could be where a major issue or disconnect is on this a People aren't going to take the time to Parse it out unfortunately but Is this is this a moment where someone lacks information like Dave Union. Bob Said Hey. We don't know y'all come in and talk to us. We lack information now. If you were doing something racist you know. Hey I need information you got the information and then you're like fuck that and you just keep going out still being racist well fuck you. You're a terrible person but if it's hey this person did something racist. It was racist. There's no way to. There's AH there's no two ways about it and then that person gets that information and they go. Oh my God I didn't know and they stopped doing it. Okay case in point point there was a guy here he was on a missionary trip. I was embedded journalists. I was taking pictures for them whether they were going different. Places in Detroit. These are Christians Christian missionaries and Dan. We were back at their area that they were staying the places where we were staying at. And they're all excited and talking about their stories campuses. They were going to talk to people. And and somehow somebody was buying something and it wasn't the right price and they were haggling over price and this is the leader. This is like the pastor their church church the school chaplain his. Yes this guys over there. He's trying to Jimmy down. What and and they're from the south from Texas right and I just tournament like what did you just say? Yeah Yeah so it's talk guy trying to Jimmy. You can't say that say you can't say Jimmy down. Why is a racist? How's that raises as like? That's just a term. I grew up to saying like little. You were worshipping Jewish person person and then seeing a guy trying to do your down like the Jewish people are cheap. Their money misers right. And there's a whole long history to that and he was like like I'm never going to say that again. I had no idea but he got the information and then changed. But if you get the information you know that's an issue when the Atlanta bringing up again appoint when we're talking about tent at the state of Michigan for every discriminatory harassment policy. It pretty much says your the intent doesn't matter at all so it doesn't matter what you think it's how it is received by the person that's the context that's memorialized that is part of the disciplinary process You can't come back from that. Let's let's move forward. I Wanna I wanNA jumped onto question eight. There's a few that I'm going to just kind of cut out time sake. Have you ever accused of being racist. I think I just jumped into that. Right did Have you ever accused him of being racist outside of the Internet described the situation Matt. We'll have you go okay. Yeah when I was a lift driver here. Dan Detroit About three years ago this news navy at least twice a week attorney But I had to be awful about it because it's so wanted to be tipped for so The.

redskins Celtics Virginia Michigan United Negro College Fund Dan Detroit Plantation Thomas Jimmy Pocahontas Powell Patriots Washington spartans Michigan State Senate Paul Hutton America Anthony Anderson
How Accurate Are Those Winter Forecasts?

Climate Cast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

How Accurate Are Those Winter Forecasts?

"Good are those winter forecasts. I'm NPR chief meteorologist. Just Paul Hutton here. This is climate cast one thing we know for sure in Minnesota. Winter is coming so how much and long-range climate forecasters really tell us about this upcoming winter. Let's ask Pete Boulay from the Minnesota. DNR climate working group Hi Pete Great to talk with you again. Ed Great to be Your Ball. We know the first of Minnesota's two seasons road construction is winding down right so that must mean winter is coming. I checked with no other climate prediction center and they don't suggest any trends for a warmer or colder winter right absolutely the there's not much direction this year for temperature sure at all so they went with the three sided coin equal chances above normal or below temperatures and so that's how they break down these forecasts tell us a little a little bit about that whether waited for one direction or the other so there could be a little bit of a tilt for above normal or below normal and then their confidence level increases from there air every ten percent so rarely. DC A real extreme on either case for Minnesota least let's talk about what some call the Blob that unusually warm bubble of water in the eastern Pacific off the west coast is back it happened in twenty fourteen and my sense of it atmospherically as it supports warm weather in California that puts us downstream often the northwest flow potentially could mean plenty of cold outbreaks sure and that's the real key. There's a big difference where that gentle setup so to the north and east of that jet will be cold south and west of the jet will be warm and you know one thing to look for to that's happening. This fall is warm water temperatures all around Alaska Aska Alaska's got a very good chance of having a very warm fall so the longer that persist the less chance will have forgetting some real extreme cold air because of cold air has gotta gotta come from somewhere and it felt in the Arctic in Alaska stays warm. Our Pool of cold air will be somewhat limited as you look at the atmospheric factors this winter. What indicators do you see. That might give us a clue about how this winter could unwind. One factor is you know overall trends have been for increased precipitation in the winter in general so last last nine out of ten winters have had above normal precipitation. That's meteorological winner December through February. I call the almanacs the worst of the weather they're terrorists because they always seem to predict the worst winter ever every year and I see their long-term. Accuracy is about fifty fifty at best. What about the no outlooks outlooks. What's the state of the Science of seasonal climate prediction. The farmer's ALMANAC have my mom and her friends terrorize just petrified with fear with this winter the thing it's going to be the worst ever and it really doesn't look like it will be I look back in the last couple of years from the climate prediction center's. I'll look for the winter see how well they did. Last last winter they were banking on a war were the normal and a dry winter and it turned out to be normal to cool very wet so they didn't do so good for eighteen thousand nine the year before that they said cool and wet and it turned out to be normal in cool and normal the wet so I'll give him a pass and that when they did okay so sometimes I do pretty good and sometimes they you might as well go with just the opposite so anything could happen and it is a very difficult process isn't it. I mean the Tele connections that we talk about out in the atmosphere. How warm water in the Pacific or jetstream patterns will affect winter or a season is pretty hard to pin down. An atmosphere is very fickle fickle. Where were those storm set up. You can build on a winter by getting a early snow. Cover a long duration snow cover and that adds to the coolness It's it's like a puzzle with some of the pieces missing seems like climatologist people lay with the Minnesota. DNR climate working group. Thanks for your perspective on climate cast today

Minnesota DNR Alaska Aska Alaska Chief Meteorologist Pete Boulay Paul Hutton NPR Ed Great Pete Great Alaska DC California Pacific Arctic Ten Percent
Carbon offsets 101: How they work and how to get the biggest bang for your buck

Climate Cast

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Carbon offsets 101: How they work and how to get the biggest bang for your buck

"Carbon offsets one. Oh one i'm n._p._r. Chief meteorologist paul hutton her her. This is climate cats. They're called carbon offsets and you can buy them to offset your greenhouse gas emissions. But how do they work work. And how do you know they're really offsetting. Your carbon. Emissions maggie lund is a manager for greenie certification programs at the center for resource solutions nations megi. Thanks for talking today. Thanks all carbon offsets. One o-on what are they yes so a carbon offset is really just just a tradable purchaseable greenhouse gas emissions reduction so as a consumer you can go out and buy a carbon offset and apply that carbon offset to your own carbon footprint and negate or diminish your own carbon footprint so an easy example is let's say i drive cross cross country from san francisco to new york. If i calculate the greenhouse gas emissions from that trip i can go out and buy a corresponding number of offsets <unk> an zero out the emissions from that trip. Let's take an airline flight for example. What would a typical offset for an airline flight across the u._s._a. Cost me there is a pretty wide range of prices for different kinds of offsets depending on different kinds of benefits associated with that offset offset so with some offsets just the straight up emissions reduction in which case it would be a little bit cheaper probably around. I'd say five to seven dollars depending on who you're buying from a that's a rough estimate <hes> but if you wanna buy offset that has some attached co benefits which is other kinds of environmental or social benefits associated with the carbon offset project. That's gonna cost you a little bit more so let's say i do that. What what actually happens to the money. Where does it go when you think about a carbon offset generated all across the world it could be you know implementing energy the efficient technologies. It could be a renewable energy project. It could be a project with improved forestry practices. One of the core principles of carbon in offsetting is that without the revenue from the carbon offset or the carbon credit. The emissions reduction would have never happened so your investment as a consumer consumer into that carbon offset is what is driving the emissions reduction to happen in the first place. How is that verified. How do i know are the buyer no that that offset offset is working one of the most important if not the most important things to look out for as a consumer is what we call project level certification you know the carbon carbon offset market could potentially be a wild west if there wasn't some oversight of the projects themselves to make sure that the emissions reductions are quantified in a consistent and credible way so as a consumer when you're going out to buy these offsets. It's really important to make sure that the project project the offset is from has been certified at the project level because that certification body is the one that's going boots on the ground to the project to make sure that emissions actually are being reduced and they're the ones coming out with different processes and methodologies to quantify those emissions reductions so so let's say i i'm taking my flight right and i feel a little guilty about my greenhouse gas contribution for that flight i buy i buy my offset and and i've certified that it's legit. It's going somewhere. That's legit what would be a specific example of kind of offset project that that money would go towards. It's so a carbon offset project could look like a situation where normally a forest would be cut down but because of the investment into into this carbon offset project day avoid the deforestation in which case the trees remain standing and carbon dioxide is absorbed for years into the future church so as a consumer. What you're specifically doing is funding that avoided deforestation. It's probably worth noting that forestry projects six generally cost a little bit more to buy from than some traditionally less appealing project types so in the u._s. We see a lot out of what we call. Methane capture projects. That's where methane is captured in flared off into carbon dioxide which is less potent greenhouse gas than methane but they're you're still emissions coming from the project so you can argue that some projects are not only more attractive but you might have more holistic benefits as well well well and that's a great question because you know big picture. How effective are these offsets. Is there a more direct way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions rather than off set them after they're already in the atmosphere. Absolutely you know the the logic in the industry is generally reduce what you can offset what you can't it so carbon offsets are just one tool in a really big toolbox of activities consumers can engage in to <hes> reduce their carbon urban footprint so one is purchasing carbon offsets but another is just reducing your own emissions by installing energy efficient technologies or buying renewable energy or doing in a whole host of other things so what offsetting isn't is a permit to pollute. What about the airlines are are they already making carbon offsets part of the ticket price or they think that there's demand there for that in the future. I think there's absolutely demand for that in the future. I know that for some airlines they offer carbon offsets. Let's is kind of a back of the seat. You know you have your touch screen and you can navigate to the page where they allow you to buy. Carbon offsets to offset that flight but i don't know that it's necessarily built built into the price of the airline ticket yet although it is worth mentioning that there is this international initiative that's coming up. It's called corsica and it's something i think all countries eventually have to sign onto where international flights must be offset and that's coming up in the next decade or so. It's a program of the u._n. Baton and the criteria for those offsets is still being determined. It's kind of in flux but it is really looking to shake up. Not only the carbon offset market the the aviation industry is well. I can just see it now. When you log onto book your flight <hes> book your seat to check your bag and check the box for carbon offset right love love it yeah maggie lund for greenie certification programs that the center for resource solutions. Thanks for your perspective on climate cast today. Thanks thanks so much paul. That's climate cast n._p._r. Chief meteorologist paul

Chief Meteorologist Maggie Lund Paul Hutton San Francisco New York Seven Dollars
"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

"Support for climate cast comes from bank of america financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets. It gets in jobs bank of america n._a. Member f._d._i._c. new inclusive climate change solution. I'm n._p._r. Chief meteorologist paul paul hutton here. This is climate. The minneapolis foundation has awarded its first round of grants designed to involve involve low income diverse communities in climate change initiatives. One of those is an effort from the city of saint paul x._l. Energy and our car to bring <unk> shared electric cars and charging stations to lower income communities but what will it take to get buy in from residents. Shomar givens is senior program officer at the kresge foundation and she just wrapped up a nationwide effort to bring climate solutions to fifteen low income communities. She joins me via skype shomar. Thanks for taking the time to talk with us on climate cast today but thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. Correct me if i'm wrong but i think i've seen some polls that show people of color and low income communities is are really strong advocates of climate solutions so i'm wondering what are the best methods that we can use to engage that support absolutely as poll well after poll after poll instead you have to study that shows that communities of color in particular are some of our strongest environmental advocates. I think the challenge is that these communities for a very long time have not been engaged in a way that connects the dots to their lived experiences communities of color low income communities are are disproportionately impacted by environmental hazards cumulative hazard and are often you know the first and worst hit by climate change however there's been a framing of climate that has not necessarily resonated with these communities but when you engage these communities and really connect that to the economic social public the health issues that they're facing every day. It's like a high of course and they become your strongest advocates. There's a project here in the twin cities. He's called our car that would bring shared electric vehicles into low income neighborhoods and i'm curious how your view that kind of green infrastructure structure project in a neighborhood versus more of a policy initiative at a broader level. I think that having electric infrastructure along communities is a good good thing. I do think that <hes> there is a tension right across the country about how we do i. I think it's not what we do. Right is how we do it. I think it's important martin to really get their voice around the best way right that we're deploying this type of electric vehicle infrastructure and we know that in this real estate had an income scenario that we live in these days you know it's hard for a lot of people to find affordable places to live so if we bring it infrastructure into low income home neighborhoods does the issue of gentrification become something we need to consider. There are communities that worry and are actually afraid to bring green.

paul paul hutton bank of america saint paul x._l kresge foundation Shomar givens Chief meteorologist minneapolis foundation skype martin program officer
The promise -- and perceived peril -- of bringing green amenities to low-income communities

Climate Cast

04:44 min | 3 years ago

The promise -- and perceived peril -- of bringing green amenities to low-income communities

"Support for climate cast comes from bank of america financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets. It gets in jobs bank of america n._a. Member f._d._i._c. new inclusive climate change solution. I'm n._p._r. Chief meteorologist paul paul hutton here. This is climate. The minneapolis foundation has awarded its first round of grants designed to involve involve low income diverse communities in climate change initiatives. One of those is an effort from the city of saint paul x._l. Energy and our car to bring <unk> shared electric cars and charging stations to lower income communities but what will it take to get buy in from residents. Shomar givens is senior program officer at the kresge foundation and she just wrapped up a nationwide effort to bring climate solutions to fifteen low income communities. She joins me via skype shomar. Thanks for taking the time to talk with us on climate cast today but thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. Correct me if i'm wrong but i think i've seen some polls that show people of color and low income communities is are really strong advocates of climate solutions so i'm wondering what are the best methods that we can use to engage that support absolutely as poll well after poll after poll instead you have to study that shows that communities of color in particular are some of our strongest environmental advocates. I think the challenge is that these communities for a very long time have not been engaged in a way that connects the dots to their lived experiences communities of color low income communities are are disproportionately impacted by environmental hazards cumulative hazard and are often you know the first and worst hit by climate change however there's been a framing of climate that has not necessarily resonated with these communities but when you engage these communities and really connect that to the economic social public the health issues that they're facing every day. It's like a high of course and they become your strongest advocates. There's a project here in the twin cities. He's called our car that would bring shared electric vehicles into low income neighborhoods and i'm curious how your view that kind of green infrastructure structure project in a neighborhood versus more of a policy initiative at a broader level. I think that having electric infrastructure along communities is a good good thing. I do think that <hes> there is a tension right across the country about how we do i. I think it's not what we do. Right is how we do it. I think it's important martin to really get their voice around the best way right that we're deploying this type of electric vehicle infrastructure and we know that in this real estate had an income scenario that we live in these days you know it's hard for a lot of people to find affordable places to live so if we bring it infrastructure into low income home neighborhoods does the issue of gentrification become something we need to consider. There are communities that worry and are actually afraid to bring green.

Paul Paul Hutton Bank Of America Saint Paul X._L Kresge Foundation Shomar Givens Chief Meteorologist Minneapolis Foundation Skype Martin Program Officer
Former Vice President Al Gore talks climate change solutions in the Twin Cities

Climate Cast

10:37 min | 3 years ago

Former Vice President Al Gore talks climate change solutions in the Twin Cities

"Former Vice President Al Gore comes to Minnesota. I'm N._P._R.. Chief meteorologist Paul Hutton here. This is climate gas. He's arguably the most important historical figure in expanding climate change awareness in America <hes> and the world his two thousand six film an inconvenient truth introduce climate change science and solutions to millions. His work earned the Nobel Peace Prize this weekend former Vice President Al Gore is here in Minnesota training twelve hundred climate activists through his climate reality project. He sat down with me at the event in Minneapolis Mr Gore thanks for taking the time to talk with us on climate cast today and hey welcome to Minnesota. It's great to be back. You know you're here in the the twin cities this weekend for this climate reality project training event. Why did you start climate reality and what does this accomplish well because I came to the conclusion Susan that the only way we can change policies in time to solve the climate crisis is with grassroots pressure from every state in our country from every county and so I decided when my first movie came out I used one hundred percent of the profits from that movie and the book to <hes> to set up the climate reality project and to mobilize Aisa thousands of people tens of thousands of people to put pressure on their elected representatives and business leaders and civic leaders and community leaders nice to to make the changes that we need to make let's go back thirty one years ago this Summer Nastase Dr James Hansen testifies before your your committee in Congress and he says there's a ninety nine percent degree of confidence for a cause and effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming? How important was that testimony in your path to climate change awareness well? I think that was an important moment. <hes> in making lots of people realize is that this is for real and we need to do something about it unfortunately in the wake of that hearing and the others that I and other members of Congress Health <hes> the fossil fuel <hes> industries took the playbook prepared by the tobacco companies companies back when the doctors and scientists say hey folks <hes> smoking cigarettes causing lung cancer or disease and they hired actors dressed up as doctors and put him on T._V.. To falsely tell people that there was no health problem at all well that same blueprints what's been used by the fossil fuel companies with the point of bring that up is in a healthy democracy where the truth was turned into power testimony like that of Jim Hansen you asked about would have led to dramatic policy changes reason it hasn't is because of the political influence of the coal companies the oil companies in the gas companies but we're gaining on them and these grassroots activists including an impressive number of them here in Minnesota are really making progress ars you talk about policy. You came within a whisker of the presidency in President Gore I like to think it would have been completely and totally different of course in our country. A president has to persuade the Congress Congress and asked to be a skillful politician and getting support for his or her initiatives but I like to think I would have been able to to put in completely different policies that would help to avoid some of this <hes> heartache and hardship and I still think we can do that. We've lost some ground for sure. Some damage has been made inevitable now unfortunately but we still have time to avoid the most catastrophic consequences so rather than looking back and crying over spilt milk as they say. I look forward and try to figure out what I can do to serve in different way. Just watch you give what we might. Call the talk talk at this climate reality event not that dissimilar from the one you used in an inconvenient truth but how has your presentation changed in the thirteen years since the the movie is changed dramatically in a lot of ways because I can bring up examples of floods or droughts or storms or whatever whatever not from ten years ago but from yesterday or last week and literally every night on television news is like a nature ager. I threw the book of revelation and the examples that illustrate all of what the scientists have been warning us about are all around us now every single day. I think that does make an impression on people I know it. Does it makes an impression on me. Yeah I WANNA get your assessment of where we are with the big big picture on climate change today. We're seeing the positive side rapid progress on solutions like renewables Minnesota here. We generate twenty five percent of our electric power. You're from renewables as you know last year. That's way faster than people thought it would happen fifteen years ago. Public opinion is shifting. We know that a little bit and yet greenhouse gas emissions are still rising globally and this administration is basically a wall or going backwards on solution so what's the right urgency level here and what's your assessment of how this plays out for the next ten to twenty years the dramatic truth is that those of us who are alive today we have in our hands decisions to make that will have enormous consequences for thousand generations to come. Tom and that sounds overly dramatic but it's the case. We're putting one hundred ten million tonnes every day of this heat. Trapping pollution into the sky stays there for a thousand years on average and it's trapping so much extra heat <hes> the amount of extra heat energy every day is equal to five hundred thousand or Rocha uh-huh class atomic bombs exploding every day. That's crazy but that's what we're doing. Now what I think you're getting at in the first part of your question is how do we see this. They're contracting interesting trend some good some bad <hes>. We're gaining momentum for the solutions but we're not yet gaining on the crisis crisis because the crisis is still getting worse faster than we are mobilizing solutions yet because we're gaining momentum we may soon have within our capacity the ability to gain on the problem there was a famous economists in the last century name. Rudy Dornbush who once said things take longer to happen than you think they will but then they happen much faster than you thought they could. I think think that it's likely to be true. Where are solutions to this crisis. It's taken longer than many of us thought. It would hoped it would anyway but. But I think that we're now getting to the point where it could happen faster than anybody can imagine to take one example <hes> when the cost of electricity <hes> pity from solar and win gets not only cheaper than electricity from Cohen Gas but way cheaper then no matter how much political political power the fossil fuel companies have it would just take a complete idiot to continue spending way more money than necessary to create dirtier and expensive electricity when you can have it for much cheaper when cleaner air and more jobs and I think we're right in that region now where we're going to see see this flip over and more rapid change. I hope that I'm not pollyannish or overly optimistic but that's the pattern I see unfolding right now. Let's talk about about how that seems to be happening a little bit. I mean if you look at investors. The big insurance firms Swiss re Munich REC- this changing catastrophic loss model we saw P._G.. Any go bankrupt <hes> because of the fire liability in California right. I mean some saying that's the I fortune five hundred climate bankruptcy. How important is this growing investor risk awareness in driving that positive change you talk about Oh. I think it's extremely important there was a story this this morning about the largest private investor black rock losing many billions on fossil fuel investments and they're still the largest fossil fuel in bed. I'm not picking on my in respect them a lot but there so many investors who are taking a close look at the fact that these carbon assets <unk> are really not that different from the subprime mortgages of a few years ago you know there were seven and a half million subprime mortgages meaning mortgages that it looked as if they were triple. A. Rated assets with a value that was based on <hes> false assumptions when actually they were worthless because they'd been given out to people that couldn't make monthly payments and good make down payments and there was a mass delusion and people finally pull pull back the layers of the onion enough to see the truth of it and they suddenly collapsed and that's what caused the credit crisis and then the great recession well. We've now got twenty two trillion dollars worth of carbon assets the reserves of coal and oil and gas and the stocks and these as multinational companies that are based on the assumption that all that fossil fuels going to be burnt well it can't be burn won't be burned not just because of some mm treaty or some law but because solar and wind is going to be much cheaper and efficiency is reducing the demand for what they're selling an electric cars or a progressively destroying the market for liquid petroleum assets and it's only a matter of time before they wake up to this the largest sovereign wealth fund in the world the Norwegian Fund which got all his money from oil and gas. They're really smart. They just announced they're going to divest one hundred percent for from oil and gas assets a so those who are taking the time to read the handwriting on the wall are coming to the conclusion that they need to get with this change and move onto into renewables and the sustainability revolution.

Minnesota Vice President Al Gore President Trump Chief Meteorologist Fuel Industries Minneapolis Congress Paul Hutton Congress Congress Dr James Hansen America Mr Gore Congress Health Gore Cohen Gas
"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

12:45 min | 3 years ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

"Were weakening the jet streams because the Arctic is warming faster than anywhere else on the planet so it's it's not just a you know. This isn't all rosy picture for Minnesota's. I'm looking to see do we finally break that pattern and we get back into what we have been seeing for years and years one month after another warmer than normal temperatures and Dryer or or closer to normal precipitation because you know well June was a little dry here. Only it seemed July for the twin cities what we're seeing. I think double the normal rainfall for the month already Kenny it's interesting to look at those global maps of temperature departure karcher average temperature and you see red over much of the planet and there has been this persistent blue blob over the upper midwest southern Canada for it seems like the last couple of years yet you almost feel like the walls are kinda closing in there though it's because the majority of the landmass and even a lot of the ocean areas are <hes> read or you know warm running warm anomalies yeah I. I'm also looking for not just this pattern ending but you know we're talking about. The heavy rains in Rochester in Redwood Edward Falls in Redwood Falls. Had I WANNA say they're cooperative. Observer Redwood Falls has registered a five inch rainfall or greater. It's either four or five of the last six years which is that's unheard of. We don't have anything like that. On record. That's a real anomaly anomaly and but this has happened this year without a kind of classical extreme rainfall setup so I'm watching for. Do we get the sort of you know. The the mega rain the the really widespread heavy rainfall do the precipitation anomalies get distributed around the state a little better rather than just focusing on southern Minnesota and I'm also watching for signs of what what winter looks like because southwestern Minnesota's had back to back record breaking winters the Marshall Area had had nearly eighty inches of snow to winters in a row and so we're kind of watching for that too thus the water in the fields and redwood falls here comes another storm. It's right on your doorstep <hes> to the north and west right now Kenny Blumenfeld senior climatologist just with the Minnesota D._N._R.. Climate Working Group and Care Eleven sunrise meteorologists spin sunguard so good talking to both of you. Thanks so much. Thank you good to be on thank you. We pivot now to climate cast in. You know. There's an interesting trend that I've I've been really SORTA caught. My eye grabbed my attention recently British newspaper The Guardian recently decided to use the terms climate crisis or climate emergency instead of climate change. They say it's more accurate of course environmentalists applaud that critics are groaning and there is now clear attribution science that measures how Earth warmer wetter atmosphere supercharging these extreme weather events that we're seeing so here's the question today what language most accurately describes these more extreme weather events and the increasingly costly impacts that they're creating on our changing planet and when does language that's too extreme hurt more than it helps genevieve gunther direct end climate silence dot Org. That's an organization that helps the media link stories about climate change impacts to climate change and she teaches at the new school in New York. Welcome back genevieve Heke so much for having any Paul and Bobby McGill is the president of the Society of environmental journalists and the energy and public land's reporter for Bloomberg Environment. Hey Bobby Hi. How are you good great to have both of you today? I think this is an important discussion genevieve. Let's start with you. What do you think about a major news organization like the Guardian changing their language to describe climate change as a climate crisis or climate emergency well? I'm all for it because I actually think it's a more accurate way to describe what's happening to our planetary system. From the perspective of human beings <hes> climate changes the scientific term it describes any change in climate parameters for example rainfall or wind and it doesn't talk to be global nor does it have to be human caused but we know that this episode of climate change is caused by human activities namely the burning fossil fuels are mostly the burning of fossil fuels and we know that we have to stabilize allies the concentration of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere and halt warming so that we don't experience an utter breakdown of the climactic system that enabled civilization to establish itself and thrive so from my perspective to call what we're in right now. <hes> greenhouse gas concentrations of over four hundred parts per million a climate emergency is an accurate description of the situation that we're in <hes> it works better than climate change which from my perspective has all sorts of positive connotations which complicate it as a term to be used in <hes> human discussions bobby your climate journalist. I'm a climate journalist. We know the language we use is important is there. There's such thing as going too far to be effective when we're communicating climate changes all this is something that's this this change on the part of the Guardian. <hes> has been a bit of a debate among those of us in in in and in the environmental journalism community but I don't think you're gonNA see <hes> other news organizations make this change anytime soon. <hes> I think part because that language I think is perceived as a bit partisan. I think it's perceived as value judgments events and we would report that the climate is changing that climate change is occurring that it's human caused and there are numerous <hes> repercussions of that <hes> but to call it an emergency or crisis. Is something that we. It would have to attribute to <hes> I also think there's some question and some nervousness on the part of or some doubt really on the part of <hes> other editors who might consider this change as the Guardian Ardian sort of leads the way in this. There's a possible credibility issue. This smacks of activism I think <hes> and <hes> you know the Guardian has teamed up with fifty dot org to <hes> as part of their leave it in the ground campaign and and journalists are simply not in the business of keep of putting an entire industry out of business we are here to report the facts <hes> to value judgments to others and <hes> attribute attribute those judgments to <hes> sources sources genevieve. I'm interested in your reaction to that. What about that line between being an activist and being a neutral journalist when it comes to climate change well I feel for journalists who are under tremendous pressure from all quarters <hes> who are being attacked by the president of the United States as being entirely partisan <hes> the right wing and our country has politicized climate change it's turned and understanding of the <hes> consequences of climate change into some sort of political opinion as if it weren't just an acceptance of reality but it was somehow you know <hes> a position you take in order to sort of sneak socialism in through the back door <hes> so I understand why environmental journalists might be reluctant to adopt language that they see value late and <hes> from my perspective if an asteroid were shooting towards towards earth and were slated to kill hundreds of millions of people in the next decades and we knew this as a scientific fact for sure the media would call it an emergency so from my perspective to call call it an emergency to call it? A crisis is again. An accurate representation of what climate change is for human beings so <hes> I I don't agree that it it smacks of activism to me not to represent it in these terms smacks of <hes> having been affected by playing the rest that you've been accused of bias so much that you actually misrepresent something in order to try to prove your objectivity. You're you're listening to climate cast here on N._p._R.. News I'm Paul Hutton her the question today. How should we as news organizations talk about and describe climate change? What's the most accurate way to do that and join the conversation? If you like six five one two two two seven six thousand or eight hundred two four two two eight two eight bobby we've seen some big advances in weather attribution science. We can link these individual extreme weather events to climate changes like warmer oceans more water vapor in the atmosphere. How is that sort of attribution science working into your writing well? I'd say it's complicated. I mean you know most of the journalists who were members of as you Jay and mm died in my own reporting will <hes> we will report the we will report the <hes> the the influence of climate change on any given whether event just this week for example here in Washington D._C.. <hes> we had <hes> you know the most intense rainfall ever recorded over a period of out of an hour in its history and <hes> just down the street from my office as a matter of fact and you know this the Washington Post reported on this and at the end of the story they said it's more likely see that <hes> you know in a warming world these events will happen because of a warmer warmer atmosphere will will <hes> will contain more moisture in these are more likely these events are more likely to occur we have it's all about context and I think that that reporters if they report the facts with with <hes> with sufficient context they can convince urgency of the issue of of of climate change and they can illustrate in this case there was a demonstrable emergency locally and I think what the Guardian is trying to get at is that climate change is in emergency globally and and a- as as <hes> you know <hes> as an existential crisis and again I think that's something that needs to be attributed and let's let's assess a minute here. You know just what is a climate emergency or a climate crisis. I WanNA talk talk about a couple of extreme weather events with clear climate change attribution links California wildfires last fall P._G.. Was Liable for something like twenty five billion in losses there because their power lines sparked the fires and that actually caused them to declare bankruptcy in many observers financial insurance observers are saying this is the first climate change driven bankruptcy of a fortune five hundred company now P._G.. And he is number one eighty three on the latest fortune five hundred entered list with sixteen billion in annual revenue so I guess let me start with you bobby. If a fortune five hundred company goes bankrupt because of climate change isn't that a climate crisis for that company and for ratepayers in California. It may be <hes> it's but again it's something that I don't think as a journalist I can just say that it's climate crisis. I think that we have to tribute that to the company itself to scientists do I to others in the field who are more expert than I am. In determining whether that's a climate crisis genevieve I also just as a tag to that the San Francisco Chronicle reporting that the California Assembly just voted sixty three to eight in favor of a bill bill designed to create a fund of at least twenty one billion to pay claims from future wildfires started by electric equipment and here on climate cast. I often say follow the money. <hes> climate change is already costing US billions. We're just getting started here. What's your perspective on this entire situation? I mean from my perspective. I feel like extreme weather. Events are sort of only one piece of the overall challenge that we're facing <hes> we're also also facing the fact that the vast majority of the crops in the Mid West haven't been planted yet because the ground is still flooded from the intense rainfall of a few months ago in that region of our nation. We are faced raced with an immigration crisis as the tropics become more arid and hotter and the agriculture which is sustained most people.

Climate Working Group The Guardian Minnesota Redwood Falls Kenny Blumenfeld Redwood Edward Falls bobby Rochester genevieve gunther Arctic Paul Hutton Mid West Bobby Hi president genevieve Heke reporter Canada New York
"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

14:41 min | 3 years ago

"paul hutton" Discussed on Climate Cast

"News Kenny Blumenfeld is a senior climatologist with the Minnesota D._N._R.. Climate working group welcome back Kenny good to be here. You're getting frequent flyer miles this year. I think you guys tired and yet and you see him on care. Eleven sunrise meteorologists spend sunguard joins us today by phone highs van Good Morning. How are you today? How was the morning show pretty good always good on a Friday yeah best day of the week? Listen guys the biggest breaking weather news today obviously hurricane bury the latest stats a hundred miles or so just south west of the mouth of the Mississippi sixty five mile an hour winds but the big story looks like rain here. Maybe four to eight to twelve inches for New Orleans. Maybe ten to twenty west of New Orleans <hes> span. Does it still look to you like flooding from heavy. Rainfall is the biggest risk there. Oh yeah absolutely absolutely <hes> I think everybody's become familiar with the topography of Louisiana after unfortunately large storms starting with Katrina so and they also had a lot of people don't realize they also had some very heavy rain earlier this week to in that area so the the ground is already saturated and you know you remember it was harvey a couple years ago in the models or spitting out those ridiculously high amounts. You didn't really believe it but now when the models are doing that with <hes> Berry. It's a lot more believable since you've been concede the extreme rainfall events with with these tropical systems especially Kenny the flood situation. They're kind of a one two punch we had heavy runoff from the Mississippi from Spring Snow Melt and all the rain we've had in the Midwest and now we throw a tropical system on top of that that really is going to test those levees down. There yeah indeed it's you know it's Kinda hard to believe that we're actually up here. Contributing to the problem they're experiencing dancing in Louisiana just by virtue of our very heavy snows in the spring and then the rain that we had after that and that all of course runs down the Mississippi I see the latest forecast nineteen feet on the Mississippi River in New Orleans levees are twenty feet Suzanne were were were testing them. We're getting close. <hes> hopefully everything holds out for New Orleans. Yeah I mean obviously it all depends on the specific track it does appear like as you mentioned that the heaviest rainfall may be just west of them and certainly the the wind which is in this storms just more insult to injury <hes> because the rain is going to be the biggest concern but if you can keep those near hurricane-force winds further west to that would be obviously let's see helpful but yeah this'll be kind of a test for New Orleans with with <hes> just see how how well they've prepared Consi- after pass storms and it seems like we're always talking about New Orleans when it comes to flooding. Let's talk a little what about the unique flood she holography that is New Orleans. I've got a clip here from N._p._R.'s Debbie Elliott. Let's listen to it and talk about it on the other side earlier this week a heavy rain inundated the city and kind of crippled parts of it <hes> and so the city is already saturated. It's like a big bowl. That's basically surrounded by water. Mayor Latoya Cantrell says the city's pumps are running at optimal levels. There are no problems there but she says that might not be enough and Kenny. That's that's a great description. New Orleans is a bowl. I saw this great graphic with a cross section and there's this bowl with berms and then lobbies on either side. That's a dicey situation for them. long-term yeah being below sea level and just having the water kind of find you <hes> not an optimal situation indeed Suzanne <hes> when you look at this and I know you do a lot of reporting on climate change <hes> when we think about places like the Louisiana coast places like New Orleans <hes> what are the connections there when we start to get these tropical systems moving in well for us. I say you know I call it weather atmospheric constipation in terms of how people wonder how this affects us but it can kinda block the pattern and that's got to be at least a contributor to the fact that we're going to stay kind of locked into the hot and humid pattern excellent but also this can feed into systems that we see and you know make our rainfall more extreme too you know I think most minnesotans know by now that a lot of our some rainfall is directly a result of golf air and Gulf moisture that feeds straight up the planes into us so you know anything that develops here that can tap into that can be not an issue as well Kenny there have been some Minnesota connections with tropical cyclones in the past right yeah indeed and you know when people get asked you've probably been asked this to o do hurricanes or tropical storms arms ever really affect Minnesota. I think what people are assuming as the remnants of the I is GonNa pass right overhead or we're going to see some kind of strong winds. That's obviously not what we really experience what we do experiences something more like what vengeance described although although there's a bit of a meteorological mechanism in there and we get these they're called predecessor rain events where the leftovers of the hurricane or tropical storm kind of drift across the midwest somewhere in the southern half of the United States but but just as the air flows are such that as a weather system passes through the region and especially when they get stuck it taps into some of that excess moisture and you get these blossoming thunderstorms and sometimes it's just bands of heavy rain without much lightning or thunder at it all and there's a pretty clear signature in the St record rainfall from August of two thousand seven down in Hokum Minnesota that actually had this kind of predecessor rainfall event tropical connection that we're talking about so it was a way that we juice the atmosphere here locally by adding all that moisture from remnant tropical systems indeed and if you think of the way our heavy rainfall operates when there's not a tropical weather system at play were already dealing with anomalous Lee rich rich moisture in the atmosphere and so if we then just add on top of that you can really these storms can really go crazy and that's I think why in August of two thousand seven people were scratching their heads because we'd never really seen anything like that and I think although we have no real real evidence it's we could speculate that what we often considered to be one of the heaviest probably the heaviest rainfall ever recorded Minnesota in the last two hundred years ago doesn't have a lot of official measurements is out near the Chippewa River in western Minnesota Soda <hes> this was also early August and there are estimates that twenty five to thirty inches of rain fell and we'd have to speculate that if that is indeed the case that there was a tropical connection with that also you know and I remember I worked in Tucson. On Arizona's for nine years so we'd watch these tropical systems spin off the eastern Pacific and then re curve and I remember watching some of that moisture get sucked up into the upper midwest as well so we can also get some tropical Pacific moisture into some of these systems yeah indeed and with some of the new tools on the goes sixteen satellite you can actually see this happening you can look at the water vapor channels and actually see the moisture getting transported over the mountains in the mid and upper atmosphere right into our region pretty neat Paul Hutton are here with fellow. Oh I'm sorry go ahead son Pineapple Express yes there you go paul near here with fellow meteorologists and weather geeks Kenny Blumenfeld and spend sunguard. It's ask the meteorologist today on N._p._R.. News and if you WANNA talk about our crazy Minnesota weather if you have a question or comment six five one two two seven six thousand or one eight hundred two four two two eight two eight all right guys let's <hes> refine that focus on Minnesota a little bit. We've talked about the moisture. It's been a crazy few weather years. Here and wetness seems to be the constant theme. I mean it. Just doesn't stop then my weather chance on m._p._R.. And updraft this week I talked about the fourth wettest <music> you're on record for MINNESOTA. In the past twelve months. I think Rochester's having the wettest year on record so far they've already had thirty inches of precipitation <hes> which weather numbers are jumping out at you this year. You know I think for me the the <hes> it's GonNa be extreme rainfall that we've been seeing you know we're we're. We're just sort of talking about but here in Minnesota to remember when a four five six inch rainfall was much more rare and now they're happening with more regularity in different spots and it's the volatility of it to you. Don't know necessarily where it's going to be June was actually a little below normal for us but you know I was out of the country for half the most so I was surprised to come back and see that we actually were a little drier drier than normal but Rochester and southwestern is that it was a very different story continued the very wet trend that we had and I was actually out in western Minnesota yesterday doing stories on the prairie out there and the Minnesota Zoo working with <hes> reintroducing introducing an endangered butterfly and I was shocked at how many flooded farm fields are were between the South Dakota border in here almost every cornfield yeah have huge puddles and ponds you could tell these are not areas that were bodies of water because you can see the we've always had corn disappeared all of a sudden into the water and obviously some of the worst of it was around Redwood falls that saw that very heavy rainfall was early last week or the week before that five to seven inches but that whole the area still between here and there flooded farm fields Kenny you look at the longer term numbers yeah. This has been a tough spring and summer for many farmers with the wetness but that's a trend isn't it yet we so we we have multiple sort of overlapping entrenched here one is we have the long term trend that really goes back about forty or fifty years towards wetter conditions over most of Minnesota but then we have this kind of hyper concentrated trend in the last decade or so. We're we're looking at being the wettest decade gate on record throughout much of Minnesota especially the southeastern half and then it appears that the last couple years are sort of an exclamation point within that hyper concentrated trend where we're just you know after two thousand sixteen when he broke the rainfall record annual rainfall record for Minnesota. We thought okay that we're going to start going down now and then of course both Caledonia and harmony broke that record again last year. Let's talk about that for a second should sixty inches of rain last year in Southeast Minnesota. That's like almost New Orleans or Tallahassee Florida average annual rainfall. That's just off the charts for Minnesota. We hadn't officially observed anything even close to that until this past year span you talked about southwest plus Minnesota. I'm watching the doppler here with a pretty strong thunderstorm. That looks like it has hail writer on Cottonwood right now. <hes> you know we've we've seen these kind of heavy rainfall events. They extend into late summer sometimes lately lately fall <hes> Julia in stillwater calls in today and asks us. I'm a farmer and I wonder what the outlook for fall is looking like here. We know the El Nino La Nina cycles tend to affect winter more. What's what's your take on the upcoming fall any signs their boy? I you know I think trying to predict what will the precipitation will continue to do. Is it's pretty difficult because I think you know well. The trends are wetter and wetter of course the whole state and all of us. It's is also very volatile where it can completely shut off to <hes> so it's hard to say I think our falls have been trending much warmer and I don't know about the precipitation. Maybe we can talk about that but it seems like this wet pattern that started really in February it just is continuing until we see some mechanism that shuts that down. I it's hard to believe we won't just continue to see more of the same overall anyone about trends in the fall. What are you seeing there? You got it right. The we've definitely been getting a lot warmer in the fall and of course you know the volatility that's been talked about is really important because we're not talking. It's not guaranteed that you're gonNA have a warm fall every year. It's just that the majority already of our recent falls have been warm and so that's led to fall being the second-fastest warming season Minnesota's warming you know six to eight times faster than summer <hes> winter warming more like ten times faster than summer in terms of precipitation. It's been pretty hit or miss. We've seen some really big rainfall events in sort of mid late September and early October over the last one to two decades but we've also seen some some real drying during fall also so we we see volatility and it's hard to I agree with span. It's hard to make a forecast that far out and makes me happy. I'm just a climatologist yeah. Go ahead span five. Just you know and <music> gotta remember too that forecasting that long term. It's very difficult you know <hes> this was supposed to be a a week El Nino winter which would tend to favor a mild winter and it ended up not being one so you know so predicting the precipitation patterns and even more difficult and boy I feel I'm always thinking about Minnesota farmers. When I look at these numbers and I driving through some of the fields I live in eastern carver county so I I see my share of fields every week and boy talk about a tough job? How about being are in Minnesota listen? Let's pivot you guys because the heat is finally coming right summer. It seems like took forever to get here. Although interestingly I noticed even with only one ninety degree day so far in the twin cities June was one degree warmer than average. July's running several degrees warmer than average so far and here comes the heat finally and Kenny. It's not always the heat. It's the humidity but really it's the dew point and some of the models for the weekend and the next week suggesting do points joints in the mid to upper seventies. Maybe even eighty degrees and I had a question come in from twitter here. Are we seeing a higher frequency of high dew point episodes in summer in Minnesota Yeah. It's a question we get a lot and the answer. There's actually not yet now. We have the caveat. Is that our records are. We have really good records in the twin cities that we can push back pretty far but they become a lot spotty or when you go to other places but if you look at.

Minnesota New Orleans Kenny Blumenfeld Mississippi Louisiana Midwest Southeast Minnesota Suzanne Minnesota Zoo Debbie Elliott twitter tropical Pacific Rochester Mississippi River Latoya Cantrell El Nino La Nina Arizona United States carver county
Media changing their tone on climate change

Climate Cast

04:50 min | 3 years ago

Media changing their tone on climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society transition to a low-carbon economy, Bank of America, NA, member FDIC, a major news organization is changing the way at talks about climate change. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hutton her, this is climate cast. But study by media matters found broadcast TV news coverage of climate change plunged, forty five percent between twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen and had happened at the same time climate change enhanced extreme weather disasters spiked in the US now a major international news organization is changing their description from climate change to climate emergency as climate events, become more extreme. What's the most accurate way for news organizations to describe climate change? Susan, joy, hassle is a climate change communicator, analyst, and author. I spoke with her via Skype the cabinet. I really pressure is climate disruption. I think that term gets the point that this is human caused where disrupting global climate system and yet it avoids a term like crisis, or emergency that some journalists type think might feel a little uncomfortable with Susan. There is a push among many scientists and journalists as you touch on to really kinda sharpen the. Language around climate change to more reflect the urgency of the situation, and you touch on this, but I'm curious how far is too far? And is there a tune out threshold? I think it's really important to know that climate change is real. It's us. It's bad. But also that there's hope that there's a lot that's currently being done, and we need to do more. And we need to do a faster, but the future is largely in our hands. Sometimes I worry that if we talk too much about the crisis, and especially if we do it in a way that just scares the bejesus out of people or makes them think that it's inevitable, and that there's nothing we can do about it. That that's really a mistake because for one, it's not true. And for another, I think that fear alone is not enough to make people want to act. They need to know that there's something we can do about it climate change communicator, and author Susan joy hassle. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Sure happy to be with you. My name is Aletta Brady, and I am the executive director of our climate voices. I am originally from south Minneapolis. My name is Kia Johnson. I am the outreach director at our climate voices and I am originally from the east side of Saint, Paul are come invoices, is a use led storytelling platform that is humanizing the climate crisis. So what we do is we work with people to share their personal stories with climate change. How climate changes impacted them the facts are scary? Sometimes it gets to the point where sometimes you just kinda don't think there's anything you can do. And storytelling. Really humanizes. It, it connects us to climate change, and how it's impacting people climate change is not an issue if the future is something that's impacting us now. And so a big part of what we're trying to do is tell current stories about the ways that ourselves and our communities in our friends and people are being impacted it like right now. And so it's difficult to create change if we feel distant from climate change, you know, you talk about the glacier, smell. Team while they're on any glaciers right here. So we feel like that's really impacting you. So when you can see how it's actually impacting communities, an individual people, this is when you're inspired to take action. We really believe that everyone has a climate story. So whether you are dealing with homelessness and impacted by increasing heat waves, or, you know, in Minnesota year recreational things change skiing running because of weather patterns, like understand how it impacts, you personally, when human beings, we all have a right to nature. We all have it right to clean air, clean water to being outside and that, right? Isn't necessarily being honored for everybody for all communities, including my own community communities of color are more impacted by climate change as well as impoverished communities. And so I'm here to be that voice or, or help those voices be heard on so that those communities in what's happening in those communities that people see that. You look it up volcano, and it's really scary, and it basically wipes everything out. But then there's like this new opportunity for growth in a new environment. I really think that as communities as we fight against climate change and climate injustice, that we're almost seating for a new environment that can really grow and flourish. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul hunter.

Susan Joy Chief Meteorologist NPR Bank Of America United States Paul Hutton Fdic Analyst Minneapolis Director Paul Hunter Kia Johnson Minnesota Paul Aletta Brady Executive Director Forty Five Percent
Minn. leaders meet to address threats to lakes, rivers

Climate Cast

03:55 min | 3 years ago

Minn. leaders meet to address threats to lakes, rivers

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing, clean energy initiatives, and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs, Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. I'm in Walker Minnesota at an annual meeting of rivers and lakes advocates and lakeshore. Homeowners associations and one thing they're seeing is the data is clear. Minnesota is getting wetter overall and as our climate shifts. That's presenting challenges for these folks. Jeff Forrester is the executive director of Minnesota lakes and rivers advocates. Well, I hear from people across the state and, you know, obviously water levels are changing, you know, some areas dryer. So there's drought other areas are over the shoreline and then we're also getting plants native plants there, didn't used to be plants people are saying, well, you know, we've got this northern mille-feuille which is native. And now it's growing right to the surface, and it's in places that never was before we can't get boats through my guess is that warmers having an impact, and then the cloudbursts events are flushing more nutrients cynical ex. And I'm just thinking, you know. No, it's really time to focus, some science, some energy on. What are the impacts going to be? How do we mitigate? How do we build resilience into our systems? The changes that we're seeing in the lakes. How much science is there in terms of linking that to climate? Well, my sense is, there's some, but there's not a great deal with agriculture. They've, you know, the farmers and farm groups have done a pretty good job of looking at the impacts on farms, and did oh with the timber industry and did o with people who deal with the infrastructure of our cities. But there hasn't been a real focused effort on what's going to happen to our lakes and rivers because there isn't the same kind of constituency. And that's really what this event is about is bringing in people who are focused on water and one part of the state one week or one, watershed and bring them together to kind of start talking about these larger issues. We we've seen a couple of recent records that have really jumped out at climate watchers with regard to precipitation, Minnesota, one was the, the twin cities record for all time annual precipitation of forty inches in two thousand sixteen. And then just last year, we had harmony that came in. With sixty inches of precipitation, that's the all time state record. That's closer to a New Orleans level average annual rainfall this spring. We're seeing many lakes, over Bank full are people noticing those changes on their local legs, people are definitely noticing, and I'm getting emails about it from across the state, and I think some are starting to connect the dots. Some maybe not so much. They're wondering what they can do about it. Because it's a climate impact and the climate is changing, and it's going to continue to change. That's why I'm thinking about resilience. What can we do to build resilience into the systems? What, what, what can we do to begin to manage our likes a in adaptive management holistic way, rather than just focusing on the walleye while we're gonna stock while focus on we? It's all well we're going to treat the weights here. We're going to do this, or that, discreet activity isn't going to get us. What we need. We need kind of a bigger vision. That's climate cast from Walker. Minnesota at a water conference. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hutton there.

Walker Minnesota Bank Of America Minnesota Fdic Jeff Forrester Walker Executive Director Chief Meteorologist NPR Paul Hutton New Orleans Forty Inches Sixty Inches One Week
Hurricane season 2019 is here, and could be intense

Climate Cast

04:30 min | 3 years ago

Hurricane season 2019 is here, and could be intense

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society transition to a low-carbon economy, Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. What's the latest science on hurricanes and climate change? I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner. This is climate cast. It's hurricane season again, in the past few years, several hurricanes have intensified so rapidly. They surprised forecasters. So what do we know about climate science and hurricanes in twenty nineteen hurricane expert? Gabe Vecchi is a professor of geosciences at Princeton University. So with hurricanes and climate. It is generally difficult to find very strongly detectable and very strongly. Attributable signals. This place is very differently than say temperature or rainfall for which, there are strongly detectable in the trivial signals. But what are starting to emerge in, tropical cyclones, as more modestly detectable in the tribute, -able signals are things related to, in particular the amount of rainfall, one example, is Harvey, where there has been some studies attributing. Aspects of the enhanced rainfall from Harvey on the warming that has happened to date for other things like the number of hurricanes in Atlantic. It's a little more problematic to make either detection or attribution statements in part because the way that we observe hurricanes now is very different from the way we observe them, fifty years ago and exceedingly different from the way we were observed them a hundred years ago. And so when we see a change, it's hard to know whether that is due to us looking at the storms differently or due to an actual change in the storms. So at this point where we sit today. What's the best message? You can give people about the current and future state of the science on climate change in hurricane. Well, I think that message that I could give people is the good news is we understand hurricanes and tropical cyclones and how they interact with climate much better. And in addition, this information has in a parallel way. Sometimes feeding back coincided with the development of better weather forecast models. So we're in a position where it can provide a lot better information on the bad news. It seems that many of the changes that we think are likely to occur from warming climate to hurricanes are the types of things that would, if we don't adapt, if we don't change our vulnerability lead to generally undesirable outcomes. And so what we have now is the opportunity to digest this physical science and try to understand how best to react to it gave Becky professor of geosciences at Princeton University. It's a great conversation. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Oh, you're welcome. Hi. My name is Joshua Hodak. I live in Minneapolis Minnesota, and I ride my bike, I ride my bike, because I enjoy it. It helps keep me healthy and minimize my impact on the environment and climate change. Bicycling's important for me because not only is it fun. But it also helps me stay healthy, I build in exercise otherwise would not get by riding my bicycle to and from work, and where I need to go, and it's a way for me to make a significant contribution to the environment and climate change. Transportation is the number one source of climate change pollution in Minnesota and the United States and our trips in our vehicles, particularly short trips that are under two miles, even are actually are most polluting trips and so by bicycling, even those short little trips. Those are the easiest chips to convert to bicycling to walking to Hoppy non of the bus or a train to sharing a ride in. So if we can convert more of these short trips we could really. They make a significant difference. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hutton here.

Chief Meteorologist Joshua Hodak Bank Of America Bicycling NPR Princeton University Harvey Professor Fdic Paul Hefner Gabe Vecchi Minnesota Minneapolis Hoppy Paul Hutton Becky United States Hundred Years Fifty Years
How climate change is affecting Minnesota's apples and wine grapes

Climate Cast

04:24 min | 3 years ago

How climate change is affecting Minnesota's apples and wine grapes

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing, clean energy initiatives, and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs, Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. How do you think climate change is affecting Minnesota's apples and wine grapes? That's a question that NPR chief meteorologist Paul hunter asks in a trip to the university of Minnesota's horticulture research center on today's cleven cast. Thanks, kathy. Minnesota apples are world famous for quality and northern wine, grapes, and wineries are popping up all over. But what climate Trenton impacts are growers seeing as climate shifts? My name is John tool and the vineyard manager out here for the U them's grape breeding project. I'm Jenny tool. I am a research professional at the horticulture research center out here in Victoria, Minnesota, standing here talking to you too. I think about it's a monumental task what you're trying to do. I mean I four. Cast weather in Minnesota for over thirty years, and I know how extreme and it is and grapes, have a nice little climate range, that like to be an an you're trying to develop a grape variety that handles, Minnesota's wild climate. What is that like for you? It's very interesting for mildly at makes it, it makes challenging, which is fun. You know, you're looking for a vine that has that laid bud break ability that early ripening ability to fit in our like four or five months of seasonal weather that we have frost free days, so to speak. What are the success stories since you've been doing this, obviously, of some varieties of grapes, that are doing well, there must be some vineyards that are doing while they're, they're popping up like brewpubs almost one in every town now. So what are the success stories out there? Well, people are doing really well with the hardy varieties, such as the Franek family, for instance, it's really hardy grape. It's very nice large cluster. And it's it started with the red grape called Franek and then that. That grape gave natural mutations that turned it into gray color, or gree as we call it and then agree also mutated further into a blank or white color. So that's pretty cool, which is a single generation from wild has been in people's vineyards now for twenty plus years and is getting more interesting as it ages as well. So they pick it and they're making it in. It's there's a little bit more complexity. That's not coming with that fruit because it's been in those vineyards, how's the winemaking industry moving forward in Minnesota. Our vineyards increasing our varieties, increasing just what's the general landscape. Like at the moment is around seventy wineries that are in the state of Minnesota far mourners, functioning wineries. I think there's more licensed, wineries at this point where they're getting ready to open. I feel like vineyards have decreased and maybe because of the extreme events there used to be a lot. You'd hear a lot more people growing. But I feel like these last couple extreme cold temperatures have really been maker break for people. So how about the apples? Minnesotans love their apples were famous for some great varieties of apples. How how they come through the past few winters, the apples. They seem to fare pretty well, in our coal climate the breeding program here for that has been in place for a long, long time. And it seems like they've nailed down the hardiness fairly early on, on the apples in general. Are they apples more suited to our Minnesota climate than the grapes? You're with in some ways. Yes. In other ways, I guess maybe they've had more time to find that hardiness in the apples and work on the quality and the apples whereas we do have the hardiness and the grapes, with wild grapes. But getting that quality from what people are used to with the traditional grapes, into that hardiness and getting that to match up together is a little bit more challenging so. Maybe we're just a little bit behind the apples as far as that goes. But you know, we'll have our hunting. Chris moments some day. John and Jennie tool. Research specialists with the university of Minnesota's horticultural research center at the landscape, arboretum, thanks so much for your time today. Thank you all that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hutton. Her.

Minnesota University Of Minnesota Horticulture Research Center Chief Meteorologist John Bank Of America Fdic Kathy NPR Paul Hunter Victoria Chris Paul Hutton Thirty Years Five Months
How climate change risk is showing up in real estate

Climate Cast

04:42 min | 3 years ago

How climate change risk is showing up in real estate

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing, clean energy initiatives, and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs, Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. Climate change risk showing up in real estate. I'm MPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner. This is climate cast. The concept is pretty simple. Rising seas higher storm surges and unprecedented, flooding adds up to more risk for trillions of dollars in real estate. So now big real estate investment firms are calculating climate risk on property portfolios. Ed, Walter is global CEO with urban land institute. I think they're looking at the full gamut of what you see in the news on a regular basis. So one, they're looking at the impact of rising seas to they're looking at the impact of extreme heat and other markets. And lastly, you're looking at the impact of rising, it's a major storm events. So how does or will climate change risk be priced into current and future real estate, the challenge with this issue is that you can see in the long run that changes are coming to a variety of markets and something will ultimately need to be done to protect the real estate in those markets. And so as they're trying to assess. Yes that you have to both examine, what is the anticipated risk within an anticipated timeframe. And then what are the measures that are going to be required to protect against that as a real estate investor? Those dollars alternately whether they show up and investments in the building or higher tax rates within the city, the impact of those expenses, will ultimately affect the value of the building. What's the biggest message you think people should know about climate risk going forward? I think it's hard to dispute that we aren't seeing an increase in sea levels, and an increase in storm events and an increase in extreme heat. And so without getting caught up in the politics of debating climate change. I think the reality is, is cities need to be thoughtful and building owners need to be thoughtful about how to protect themselves against those three threats and so being smart and proactive about developing solutions where you can enhancing protections where you can. And developing where you should is really the best protection for any city against any real estate owner against those types of issues, and Walter global CEO with the urban land institute. Thanks so much for your perspective today graduates. Great to have a chance to talk with you. Paul hello. My name is Julie Marquel. I'm from Saint Paul Minnesota, Mike, climate story is about summer spent with my family up at Leech lake Minnesota. The storm. We had been watching build in the skies across the lake had reached our shore, wildfire foot waves crashed onto the beach reaching up to the treeline smoothing, the sand with each departure, the air, smelled of rain, fish and lake water, dark, clouds and shades of gray and blue hanging low in the sky, I watched as my young sons and nephew raced up and down the beach screeching and delight as they jumped to avoid the NextWave. This is a place of family history. A rustic camp compound, my parents had created for our family. When I was very young, where he would spend a month every summer living off the grid tents were shelters meals, all cooked outdoors on a raised. Her rooms were carved out of the Greenwood's with trees and sky as our ceiling, so many amazing experiences campfires. Storytelling in songs star field skies Northern Lights from horizon to zenith long lazy days swimming reading exploring the woods building forts and sand castles, we were visited by FOX bears. Skunks raccoons and owls in a life list of birds. I assume that this was a world that as it was would also belong to my children and their children. That will not be the vegetation, will change the cold clear lake will warm climate change is a reality. I pass on to the next generation. I stay hopeful engaged and committed to imagining a better world. That's climate cast with thanks to climate generations talk climate institute. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hutton. Her.

Chief Meteorologist Urban Land Institute Bank Of America MPR Paul Hefner Fdic Saint Paul Minnesota Leech Lake Minnesota Walter Global Ceo Greenwood Global Ceo Paul Paul Hutton Julie Marquel
Fish on the move under climate change

Climate Cast

04:44 min | 3 years ago

Fish on the move under climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC. Fish on the move because of climate change. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul Kutner. This is climate cast. A new study in the journal nature finds fish are on the move because of climate change. But which species can adapt and which will run out of favorable ocean real estate as they reached their thermal limits. Malin Pinski is a marine scientist with the department of ecology evolution and natural resources at Rutgers University. So there are many ways that animals and the ocean can adapt one simple as just they may be physiologically able to tolerate changes in temperature high temperature or low temperature, and what we looked at with how close those animals both on land and in the ocean moved to the highest temperatures. They could tolerate and what we found is that ocean animals move closer to their high temperature limits, they can tolerate less warming. In other words, may when we hear stories news reports of things like lobsters moving to different ranges. I'm curious how is climate change? In does your. Study shed any light on how this is impacting the fishing industry. Always found is that about half of the ocean, ails you looked at and disappeared from places they had been historically and many of these animals and the ocean are really important for recreational fisheries for commercial fisheries. It's species like, clams and halibut and flounder. So these are species that chalk hunter dinner plates. That's afford coastal economies and that provide food for many people all over the world. I know your work is in marine ecosystems. But as you look at your science, what do you see with regard to the wider impacts of warmer ocean waters in our weather and climate system. What's your message there? Yeah. So more than ninety percent of the heat global warming actually gone into the oceans, and in many ways, the oceans are actually shaving us, at least from ineffable sense from much faster warming that would be happening. Otherwise on the other hand that warming really takes toll on. On life in the ocean. And species moving out of places is then found moving into new places as well that really scrambled or ecosystems in many cases, and really disrupts or fisheries in any cases as well. These are changes. We're seeing happen right now, it's not some abstract future problem. Malin Pinski marine scientist with the department of ecology evolution and natural resources at Rutgers University. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Thanks, so much wealth straight through with you. My name's Joel lights, and I'm a professor of. Wow. Aji university of north western Saint Paul which is small Christian school as I have experienced my faith community just on having a lot of resistance to environmental matters. A lot of distrust of climate change being human caused or an important issue. You know, when I think about my own faith in my own values and beliefs those go hand in hand this idea of taking care of the earth. I teach a lot of environmental classes and actually teach a class on climate change for the students. So I spent a lot more time on on the values pieces. You know, why are we interested in this topic? So social Justice issues taking care of vulnerable and marginalized people trying to go against poverty, you know, those kinds of things and showing how climate change makes these things worse makes job harder to do this. And so showing that it's really causing human suffering, and we're about alleviating human suffering in our community. And so why wouldn't we go after something that's causing a lot of problems? And then I bring in the science kind of underneath that to kinda show. Okay. Yeah. There is agreement from scientists and that there is factual understanding of how the climate works and how it's changing and how it's impacting us. And so that kind of marriage between social Justice and science can helps students students are. Becoming more open to this idea that this is a big problem. And that they want to do something about it because of their values and faith. That's climate cast with thanks to climate generations talk climate institute. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton her.

Bank Of America Malin Pinski Chief Meteorologist Rutgers University NPR Department Of Ecology Scientist Paul Kutner Fdic Aji University Of North Paul Hutton Saint Paul Professor Ninety Percent
Minn. snowfall records might be aided by climate change

Climate Cast

04:50 min | 3 years ago

Minn. snowfall records might be aided by climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. Snow in the forecast again, that's an argument against climate change. Right. I'm MPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton her. This is five cats. You've heard the one about Minnesota's two seasons winter and road construction. This February features just to weather forecasts snowing and snow on the way today, we close the books on the snowiest February on record across much of Minnesota. So what if anything does all this snow tell us about climate change? Let's talk about yet another climate record with Minnesota DNR senior climatologist, Kenny Blumenfeld, I would say that the geographic breadth is really what's fascinating. So of the first order the really big long standing climate stations in Minnesota. There's five of them four of them in broken February snowfall records. So that's been really impressive. So Kenny Blumenfeld you're at a party that guy comes up, and we all know who that guy is. And he says the inevitable. Hey, what's up with all this? No, we sure could use some of that global warming now. Okay. So have you been to? Lasca recently. It's really warm and Alaska, it's it's hard for us to remember. Sometimes that right now is not always. And that where we are is not everywhere. It's easy to forget that up until mid-january we had been really warm and the cold that we're ending with just barely pushes us over to a cold meteorological winter in Minnesota, we're just on the other side of it and the the balance of years since two thousand really since nineteen eighty have been warm during the wintertime in Minnesota and in North America. And of course, globally for still above average. The data shows Minnesota has warned six degrees in winter overall since nineteen seventy on average again, but hey, that's still plenty cold enough for heavy snow right in winter. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. And moreover, we're finding there's a little more water vapor around probably we can't say exactly why. But it might have to do with the rising global temperatures event. Rating more of the surface water off the ocean. Putting it into the atmosphere. So in Minnesota for the most part, even though we have gotten warmer. We also have gotten either snow ear or we have held steady with snowfall throughout the state getting with all these records. You're getting frequent flyer miles here on climate cast the past few months, but it leads me to wonder with so many records. What's the inside baseball talk like at the state climatology office about the kinds of records? We've been breaking in the last couple of years. Some of the things we talk about are. You know? Oh, I wonder what would happen if we looked at it this way. Or if we looked at it that way, and my colleague people makes Minnesota snow depth and percentile maps, and we can't help but note that about half the state is sitting at the ninety ninth percentile for snow depth for this time of year. So it's not the deepest. No we've ever seen. But it's about as deep as we've ever seen. So contiguous Lee across Minnesota this late in the season. And that's something that we're all kind of keeping an eye on. I on rivers and thinking, what ones snow gonna come off. And what's going to happen? When the snow comes off the land. Minnesota senior climatologist Kenny Blumenfeld, thanks for sharing. Your insight again today on climate. Thanks for having me on. We'll see probably next. My name is Caitlin Buckland. And I work as a program manager at the Great Plains institute, specializing in transportation and fuels which is heavily focused on electric vehicles. Biofuels we had a fleet vehicle on loan from Nissan, and I would say that experience really sold me on electric vehicles. I think mainly it was just how smooth ride was and in the winters who as I was driving it. It was a huge perk to have heated seats heated steering wheel. My husband, and I were at a point where we were looking for a different vehicle. So we decided to go for it. And we least twenty eighteen Nissan leaf. I'm aware that the transportation sector has the highest greenhouse gas emissions right now, a cell from sustainability standpoint, my husband, and I were really keen on improving the environment, reducing our emissions and then just. In general, lower maintenance. I mean, the only thing we've had to do in our V so far as changed to winter tires that's climate cast. I'm MPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

Minnesota Kenny Blumenfeld Minnesota Dnr MPR Chief Meteorologist Caitlin Buckland Bank Of America Nissan Fdic Paul Hutton Alaska North America Baseball