17 Burst results for "Paul Hawkin"

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Now right now you've seen Clara by every small station. There is in the country. And you have you know, we don't get a free press is what you're asking create a free crew press about this. But there was something called the fairness doctrine which was repealed under Reagan which because the government owns the airwaves. They license the airwaves, and they changed the regulations to remove the fairness doctrine, which stated that all the reporting and all the information had to be fairly presented, according to the facts, and that led to the rise of all these polarizing media on their work. You don't even know what you're reading watch Fox News. And you watch CNN you feel like you're two different planets that khloe that's corporations both corporations both making money, but the making money basically off the. Neuro-scientists there, and they know how to actually make people addicted to that form of news does matter was left to right. And and the thing is not you cannot have democracy and less, you're fully informed. Yeah. It doesn't matter who you vote for and less. The policy is informed in a fair and objective way. And they cannot make decisions have a lot of faith in human beings making good decisions. If they have good information, but without good information. And so I feel like the thing that's holding us back is that however at the same time the thing that's going to push us away are into is that climate change is not linear system mean the raider with CO two is going up his very linear. It's almost a straight line. But climate changes complex adaptive system that had changes in the non linear way and have resume changes where like this year, the jet stream broke and only went down deep deep south and baked everybody, but it actually Br. Broke. It's never broken like that before how can adjust mean break, it's like a rivers, and is that a regime change is that permanent or go back to the old gesture even next year? I mean, so I think you're going to have like Mexico beach, and you had the Gulf hurricane, Michael. I mean, I think you're going to have extreme events, you know, where regions by region by region by region too often the poor, unfortunately, but basically get it and they didn't get the science. They didn't get the news. They didn't get the information. They may not have the literacy that required under to make a decision or even economic wherewithal to do so, but they're going to have the understanding that everybody who was a denier everybody who was basically fobbing them off and so forth was dead to rights wrong. And that the true climate movement is about carrying it's about it's about hardest by going to comed- starts here and goes out. And the really the people who really want to you know, care for all of life, not yet humanity, but all living, peaches, and bacteria and microbes, and by Salem, so forth. You know, are the ones who are at the forefront of this movement. And that's really what it's about. It's extraordinary thing. So beautiful sentiment. You know, there were all in this together. And so that's one organism. And we're all connected like it or not. Well, that's why we try to. We've void all polarizing language. We we avoid all the I mean, the metoo movement is by making about we made women other right? Okay. Fighting climate change is same mind that may women others making the climate other. It's us, it's it's all connected. And it says, and what would you do to yourself? I'll take you all thank you fought. What an amazing conversation. I hope you all enjoyed it. He been listening to the doctors pharmacy with Dr Mark Hyman and Paul Hawkin. And if you like this podcast, please. Leave us a review at a comment share with your friends and family on Facebook and social media, and we'll see next time on the doctors harmlessly. Thanks so much, Mark..

Fox News government Clara Dr Mark Hyman Reagan CNN Facebook Mexico beach Salem khloe Michael Paul Hawkin
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"That's where we are on around the world. Now, you you have been doing this for a long time, and you publish the book and early twenty seventeen and it's not just a book. It's a movement. In you've been then called around the world to talk to leaders about how to start to implement this. What have you seen says, you publish the book? And speaking about this all around the world, that's given you hope what are the kinds of solutions and things that are beginning to happen been catalyzed by this while the several things that were said I set out in the beginning as sort of. Principals are either of you know, ethics in how we go about things. One was we wanted to create the conditions for self organization around drought as opposed. He is so down. You wanna be non top centralized? Well, yeah. Because top downs too slow. And doesn't work anyway. And because you say, you're right. You know, that means someone else doesn't know in. They're not right. I mean that is not as Robert communicate. Yeah. In the world. So number one, we don't say, right. We don't say that we'd say we think it's approximately right? And here's a data. And here's our sources and help us number two where deeply Clarita there were small we of two hundred and twenty some odd people scientific advisors advisors. And then we searched fellows who are scholars scientists page tease post docs, cetera working together really to create the data points. And then a small group meeting customers over actually wrote to file copy that came from copy of his bitten by over sixty people around the world. So we're deeply collaborative and so we are a small week talking to the bigger way reflecting back to the bigger way. This is what we know. This is we know this not we are Lil end Jones hustler. But we the big way so important for people to understand this. About our collective understanding as opposed to a small group knows this and yet. Right. So that's number three is language is that we use language that is not devicive that isn't a sports in war metaphors. We don't take combat and fight and win. And in you know, it's like I just walking up central park west last night and said curb your dog and people say curb climate change isn't going. That's what they do in New York with. He knows I down. You can't curb it and just go sit on the curb. Yeah, anything is like the idea that climate change is something we can curb fight combat crusade. I mean, all metaphors are so stupid because climate change is a miracle. And it's a lasting the world. You'd wanna fight the problem is warming. That's the problem. In warming is caused by us in warming changes to circulation models all climate models are about how decamp Mata climate all she model is the circulation of these rivers of air and the north and southern hemispheres and those rivers of air, you know, bring weather bring rain or they move and they bring drought. And so we know from the predictions are made that as you get warmer, the Jetstream gets more wonky. And so you get more rain or you get hydrological weirdness, which is no rain. Jay get drought and flood instead of the more conventional Raynham sit with. Were there every year? So we're very careful not to others the right language. Well, not make other because making it other is the problem that is not the solution to think of climate is a problem to teach our children to climate is a disaster when they should be learning. How to fall in love with it. And it's a miracle is you know. And so one of the things come out of drought is it..

Mata climate Clarita New York Robert Jay Raynham Jones
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"You know, it was talking about a rainforest ocean attic rainforests, and what happens that's gone today. So bringing back help and bringing back oceanic life actually is actually not so difficult. It takes intention it takes design, but there are now companies were marine promo culture, which is like in a sense regenerative ocean farm me, you know, where you not only bring back, you know, phytoplankton zooplankton algae kelp, but you bring back data fish FARs fishy ring back while sharks. I mean, you the hall trophy cascade got back, and you can bring it back within. Weeks. If you bring up the thermic life, you bring up the cold waters that are now being suppressed by these heat blankets caused by global warming raises. And if you produce like, these marine pump culture has self actuated pumps, you know, they're just actually by the rise and fall follow the water tubes down to thermic line. You bring up the cold water. You have frames there. We Cyclope T whatever. So for and Yoshimi gyrates itself. Insecurities more carbon per acre per hectare than any other single source real genitive farming in the oceans, exactly right exactly that we can do that. Are you going to a little bit of a sticky issue? Controversial, which is the whole idea of meat because on one hand, I think we all agree that Cafo farming because how the food is grown depletes the soil and water is industrial farming and the Cappos themself where the cows release methane and get tribute and all the runoff all. That's a big mess, isn't this? No one thinks that's good. But when you start thinking about using. Animals to restore soils to restore water to drown carbon. You know, should we be eating more meat or should we be eating the right kinds of meat that are grown in that way? What are the arguments for and against that? Because somebody will say, oh, yes, we do regenerate egg portraits scale, we can have lots of meat. It's not gonna be as much as we have with Cafo. But it's still will be able to supply the where with me, but it will actually reverse climate change. Well, pretended tobacco two dozen dozen have animals. I mean, I think the healthiest began farms. I've seen do use pulse. Grazing that is to say they use ruminants and and post grazing is just with the buffalo. Did you talked about earlier, which is basically they graze a move grays? Moved move moved a over. They don't stay in the same place in destroy grazing. And Furthermore, they have Prentice grasses Prado grasses or deeper to grasses, and when they're bitten off so to speak by, you know, a cow Goethe sheep, or whatever it stimulates production. And so it comes back stronger in an stimulates carbon going deeper into the soil. So it is very much regenerative when you have that if you just crop it crop crop crop crop it and that plans has gives up. Okay. So and you gotta annuals and you plan annual. And annuals don't do darn thing for this, frankly. So. So the idea of need not meet what we know is that all grasslands in the world revolves with animals and just happened by writing Grasser and blowing in the wind and plant replanning seeds. They call all the great soils and praise this hang gatty and all his grasslands were even even the sub Arctic circle. Yeah. You know, which is was heavily populated by ruminants and wolves and Buffalo's Yakutian horses, and the Willingham and elk and and things that could survive minus one hundred degrees Fahrenheit in the winters joy, and they could survive, and they ate grasses and Imbros and produced a very healthy co system they were exterminated two thousand years ago. So all the lands that we have co evolves. Now, he's taken animals off the land. There goes the land by sea. So lots of happen. We went from sixty million bison in the eighteen hundred. Kids ten almost none. And then the dust bowl in the thirties. Yeah. Absolutely..

Willingham Grasser Imbros one hundred degrees Fahrenheit two thousand years one hand
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Greater water attention because there's more carbon in the soil carbon is life until you're racing that and then using perennial crops or deep-rooted crops that is to say our crops, the whose roots go down instead of laterally does collab- Akaba misses the first six inches of the soil. That actually when you have depression crops. They the carbon goes down about forty percent goes down into the roots, and that carbon is in the form of sugar like carbon molecule and that sugar feeds the micro organisms arise OEMs. Yeah. Silia and and it's food. And so the plan gives the food away those things and turn breakdown minerals that is to say, the rocks, and the salt sand, whatever their breaks it down and makes us minerals bioavailable to the plant which makes a plan healthier row and grow and both together then create soil that retains from three to ten to twenty times more water. And so it gives the source of floods and droughts because I can absorb the Warren's orbited and can't keep it. But on the other hand, if Armagh has kind of soil, you do have a drought, you actually have a is still going to make it as opposed to being perishing right away because you have no water in the soil. So you create a water Bank, which prevents flooding at the same time, you Terada Bank which protects crop and the water is a huge issue. I mean, I remember being an talk by Jim Kim, the ahead of the World Bank. And he said the wars of the future will be fought over water not oil. And when you think about it five percent of their earth surface is freshwater one percent is in Russia under Putin. So who knows going out of that Lake Baikal those four percent of the rest of us, and we're depleting it and rapid rates are unsustainable. And I mean, imagine if we run into water I like the guy the good side though, which is that global wearing produces more water in the air. And that's when the hurricane. So if you haven't agricultural system that is much more attentive of water. I mean, I remember farmer we talked to and he pointed to some ground over there. He said, you know, we'd get half an inch rainy pool you would pull right on that low the land. He said we had thirteen inches. The water, and we didn't pull it all. And so so we can actually do something which is very interesting not talked about so much which is create an agricultural system that brings a water back. Okay. And when you rehydrate the soil, you cool, there's yeah. Just like we perspire, right? And we call the body while the earth is the same. So when his dry, which is it's getting buried dry, right? Then it gets hotter. If it's full of water in a as then it responds in a close it on while the other part of this whole soil story is that the soil if it's not holding the carbon then it's releasing the environment. I think of the soil is sort of the rainforest of the prairies it goes environment. And it goes into the oceans the, and then you get the death of a fight. Oh, plankton which. Fifty percent of our oxygen. So not only we're going to overheat and die from a heat. We're gonna actually suffocate 'cause there's not an auction for us to breathe. Yeah. And I'm you kind of go into wherever else is going to all the things that go wrong. Yeah. And the fixed, but the soil the whole thing, but also fixing our relationship to the oceans, which is the oceans can be farmed in such a way that transforms right now, the CEO's going carbonic acid and acidifying oceans, and then killing off fighter plankton and other things. And so we can start to look at the oceans as places that can be farmed kelp is number one sequester quiz sequestration. Organism in the planet is kelp not bamboos kelp and decided I know Sal the other night. It's great. Yeah. Well, when Drake, you know, went up because the California, and and and to Oregon, Washington, the explorer Clinton. Yes, sir Francis. I mean, they described the kelp beds off Cascadia, which is what I call that whole area. Because Gade yet as eighth wonder of the world, he went out forty fifty miles. It was just just CR's everywhere. You couldn't even almost pick the fish out with your hands..

Terada Bank Jim Kim Gade Lake Baikal World Bank Silia Russia Armagh Warren sir Francis Putin CEO Drake Sal Clinton California Oregon Washington thirteen inches Fifty percent
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"A restaurants happens everywhere, which is unfortunate push it away. I did it today somebody complimentary gave us a bowl of Harissa, and I don't eat her and they just put their Mark away. And it was a compliment. It was the shaft going. I can't eat that. And so I felt really bad about it. I mean, you know, just like, oh, you know, what I think of them in time and sunny to say. We don't want your compliment. But I mean, this is a bunch of climate activists who like dumpster diving. Oh, yeah, they go back. They it's amazing. These big food companies will actually in grocery social, actually, please their garbage. So that people steal their garnering. Why don't you? Let them take the expired this at expired that cause. But then I mean besides that those restaurants where we push the plate away that supply thing to do. Right. You know, I'm Paul. Thank you. That's enough. I didn't order that IRA too much. Sorry. I didn't think it was always give people too much. We give too much. And then the thing is we put food in the frigerator where it goes to die. I mean, that's really refrigerators mostly as my favorite thing is to go. The fridge. I give some away for chocks for all the time. I going on a hunt for all these different things will looks like there's nothing in the fridge and Yankees, delicious meals out of all the almost bad food. I caught bottom in the refrigerator soup. Yeah. Yeah. I caught. Yeah. It's like w I f whatever's in the free it was ever there. Yeah. But but I mean, so it's extraordinarily, you know, then in processing on the farm itself. I mean when we got a some romaine lettuce all the real Greenlees are left. They're just cut the inequalities which is not so green not. So it's true. When you go on your gardening. Wow. This is what it looks like a big plan. Yeah. Just taking the court in even broccoli like when I grow Brocker, my backyard. I don't interested head. I eat Leow believes you can cook them there. Everything's edible. Yeah. It's all it's so we must but forty percent the United States, which is one hundred thirteen billion tons of food. I mean, it's ridiculous. And then but in the rest of the world in countries put people don't waste food. But I mean, they can't afford you. Yeah. But on their farms, they can't get food to market its boils. They don't have whole chains. They don't have the support you know to. To actually preserve protect the food. Yeah. So they lose a lot too. And they lose it. Insects Eliza to mice. You know, there is a permanent in transported, and so those only the front end in. But on the back end inputs when it goes into landfills it for Mets and it breaks down and it releases methane, which is former powerful in terms of affecting climate missing oxidise was the number three solution. But we didn't measure them Thana Genesis from Lanta food because we don't have the data. We know it's twenty eight to thirty five times more powerful. Wow. Then CO two in terms of CO, two equivalents surname include that mkaku relation. Maybe it's number one choice number one. If you do that. No question about it. Unbelievable. No question about that one. So how do we fix that? Well, you know, again, we Matt measured Mara. If we don't have good data. We could include it, it doesn't mean the data aren't there? Or that? The fact isn't there it is Sunday well known, but if we couldn't provide you. Ample evidence of it being measured by a third party that was credible in recognized. We couldn't included in our models. So in this is an interesting point because it's not just waste the the number you, see Android on all dairy conservative by intention..

Mets Yankees United States Leow Lanta Matt Mara one hundred thirteen billion t forty percent
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"You're seeing today in terms of children's allergies autism. It's cetera et cetera with a certain mineral this demonization that food or that, you know, fake, food or whatever. But you gotta you step back, and you look at the two ago, our children aren't getting urged and the mother's aren't getting those, and, you know, and it's not their fault in a sense. It's not like their intention to be that way. It is the result. Of the type of food industry, we have and the type of agriculture that the food industry demands it be supported by. So let's dig a little bit into the way in which the food system today actually is driving climate. We talked a little bit about things like transportation and the use of fossil fuels, and I were culture, what are the kinds of things we should be aware of in terms of food. We eaten at how would our choices just in that make a difference? Well, first of all I to quote of driving a Prius in terms of eating. Well, first of all, I mean, there's about ten calories of energy that goes into everyone calorie of food. And so there's your quick calculation and it used to be the other way around he used to be. We got ten calories out very calorie we put in. So there's been a hundred one to go ten times ten is one hundred times different aspects difference in the energy quired to produce food which. Being well it can be diesel. It can be the manufacturing of the tractors and equipment. It can be the the fertilizers the minimize fertilizers can be the pesticides herbicides, which all by the way are made from fossil their petrochemicals. And you're not even counting example the dead zones in the Gulf and other parts of the world from the runoff nitrous oxide from the fertilizer nitrogen that goes in generally Mississippi River and ends up in the Gulf of Mexico. So soluble zone the size of the jersey. Right. So Cy -able nitrogen in the soil doesn't exist and that way, you know, the plans have access to it. But it's not high up on the sense of personnel involved in the liver. And so when you add all that up. I mean now you also have to go to processing, which is instead of eating whole foods eating foods that are processed at home. So to speak. You know, they're sent to wear their center your ours. The elevators are claimed. But then they're sent to companies that mass-produce, you know, what wipe flour hydrogenated oils sugar, etc. Those are sent companies that manufactured into Michael pollen's famous food like substances, which is not really good at all. And those things are then packaged in plastic and so forth and center distributors in those centers stores in those assent in people drive to the store and pick those up and take them home. And either eat it, which is bad for them or waste, which is bad for everything. So I mean, this is the food system we have today. People realize we're cutting down rainforests to grow corn. And soy in ways. We'll talk about that deplete the cell further contribute to climate change, and then produce animals that contribute further to climate change. Yes. To the Cafo, it's like, his horrible. I wouldn't say it's a virtuous cycle. It's vicious cycle that leads to more and more degradation environment and degradation of her health. I mean, what are solutions is woman sm-? Smallholders women smallholders and and like what does have to do with climate. You know? Seventy percent of the food and the world is produced by smallholders, which is defined by FAO as upon that his smaller than to heck, there's five acres and forty four three depends. But forty three forty two percent of that as women. Okay. Those are the smallholders. Okay. Well, we know is that big. You know, the Cape owes GMO's soy corn. Bigeye produces twenty seven percent of the world's food. And you would think listening to them that if we didn't support what they wanna do. They would all starve. But if you actually look at what they produce actually is producing big pharma. Yup. Because it's producing obesity, diabetes ru chokes, heart disease, business, Android company, and probably dementia and Alzheimer's too..

Gulf allergies Bigeye nitrous oxide Michael pollen Alzheimer Mexico Mississippi River FAO ten calories forty three forty two percent twenty seven percent Seventy percent five acres
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"But end of the day. You have to tell stories is that's thousand by hundred. That's a lot of a lot of rain. But it so but invitation agriculture one of the things that was true with almost without exception. Was it truly great regenerative? Farmers are very conservative. I mean, they're not hippies running around with talks to the contrary. I bet you anyone interview was a Trump voter every one of them hit the wall. They Bank the Bank came and said, hey, we're taking a machinery or you got another year or had to three years of crop failure due to weather. I mean, every one of them hit the walls of farmer and Nisha second third fourth fifth, sixth generation larmer's in those family land and pride and so forth. And it wasn't until then that they actually turned and looked at another way of doing it. In fact, I'm member one Palmer saying saying, oh, yeah. Well, this kid in baseball cap and tennis shoes came out here and told me I should be doing this. And that is the balta some I don't listen to kids in baseball, caps and tennis shoes. Okay. And they almost without exception. Every single farm. We talked to was a conservative Republican, hardcore heartland. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And and some of them actually, even reduce interested in climate, but they had hit the wall, economically and tend to dart their prophecy turn to law. Passes. The Bank was coming to take away the machinery, they're gonna foreclose on land deserve multi generational farms. You know, whether it's pride family familial pride. And and that is when they turn to other methods. And I remember when farmers saying, you know, my wife said I should talk to this kid. You know about me genitive agriculture, and he came out here with a baseball cap and shoes he said, I don't listen to kids in baseball. And she's and then you see he said an and like I don't have any years later. He said I call that kid back in. And his farm has completely transformed and he's making so much money. Now that he's buying land next to him, you know, that has actually been degraded, and and his as gay Brown said he said, I got tired of writing signing my name on the front of the checks. He said now I signed on the back of the check now. Now, if there was it was a direct like a realization that where they were going was a dead end, economically agronomical, you know, in terms of agronomy, no question about it. In terms of yield in terms of quality turns of and they talk about my vet bills down ninety ninety five percent. Yeah. You don't think so animals because the soils healthy the crops are healthy? The process is healthy, the rotations healthy. They don't till the soil got rid of the tractor the Bank wanted to get because they don't need it anymore. They easier Gatien, especially, you know, we we actually don't farm we mind. Yeah, we mind the so we we got lucky in this country because we had sixty million bison generating tens of feet of topsoil peeing and pooping on a digging around moving around Christmas massive fertile country, tog Resper, and all that soil holes carbon all that soil holes water, and what we did we started mining the soil. Now, I've heard that we may only. Have topsoil enough for another thirty years. Yeah. Thirty six years, and the one of the same thing aglow aquifer, the massive aquifers in the middle of a country that does mostly are Gatien. We're depleting it at one point three trillion gallons faster every year than we replenish with rainfall. That's not sustainable. I remember reading about Saudi Arabia. They said we're going to be self sustaining. I recall they have these these fossil aquifers at don't replenish because there's no rain, and they just had culture for five years, and then they ran out of water, and they have to buy the groceries elsewhere now, but it we're in that situation..

Bank the Bank baseball Gatien Saudi Arabia Nisha tennis Palmer Brown ninety ninety five percent three trillion gallons Thirty six years thirty years three years five years
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"That is emblematic of almost every solution the book, which is a which is that if we had no idea of the cause of extreme weather, if there wasn't even Clem apology as a science, and we know clueless as to the atmospheric influence on global circulation models and warming. We would want to do ninety eight of these one hundred solution. The they have so many cascading beneficial effects on society. Good for every time me on human health on the future on our traveling on water on you, just go right on down the line. Yeah. So it is not as we have this problem. So therefore, we should divert, you know, and put these things away and go do that to save our ask know, which is kind of the kind of rhetoric that has been around climate. It's just the other way around is like if we want to leave. Verse called a warming less actually save each other. Yeah. Let's actually take care of each other. Yeah. And all that comprises human need in this world. And that is how you reverse global warming. So it's very different narrative and the narrative of alarm bells ringing in you're in trouble. And you know, I mean, even Al Gore this amazing spokesperson, and certainly his book on early nineteen Ninety-two was his Bill McKenna's book road. Just absolutely. You know extraordinary in terms of breaking the news in the balance L gross book. But to this day, he's still saying, you know, solar wind solar wind and ebays zephyr. I actually just saw him two weekends ago. I did you and I said this to him. Yeah. I said, you know, it's seems like you don't really focus on the food sector as a solution to climate is actually we are now starting to think about it. And we are working on this. And I was like, wow. This is awesome now. Yes, that's climate reality thing, but it's like is. Because drawdown. Yeah. I mean with all due respect. Yeah. No. It's it's is people are saying, hey, hey, hey, 'cause you know, the there have the book the reading the body going in this doesn't comport with what we're saying. It's not again that wind solar EV on crucial sellers. Of course. But I mean, the fact that that when you go out into the public fair, and basically say, you know, when solar vs, you go were you, I hope they do it who are they are who's going to put the solid harms who's gonna pump the wind turbines that are bigger the Eiffel tower who's gonna make, you know, electric vehicles not going to be me. Right. And so therefore, it's another form of disempowerment. Yeah. Right. You don't feel you. But your fork, you got that. Right. You got your it's interesting. I want to break down what you said because there's so much in their first, you know, there is a lot of connection between climate change and health and their many articles in major medical journals like Lancet on climate change in health everything from climate refugees, the effects of temperature and so forth on human health. But there's another level which is the. Food were growing and the way we're growing the food is contributing to climate change, whether it's depleting soils through basically mining the soil to pleading are aquifers, really depleting water supplies was these floods and droughts and on Ron a growing food that actually makes us sick. So we're destroying the environment. Where grind for the makes us six sixty percent of the food that we eat. It is country is commodities, basically soybean oil processed white flour. And high fructose corn syrup earned into various forms of junk food and the people consume the sickest, and yet we subsidize that. So our own government policies are perpetuating the cycle. And so we've got a very real tangible way to think about this, and it's not just some abstract idea. But quality of the food that we grow. How we grow it impacts our health, and is destroying our health and also destroying the environment, absolutely true. In one of the real surprising things and maybe not so surprising. We think about, but when we wrote the book, I mean, I would have with Kathryn Wilkinson. And because we had to author the the book in such a way there's readable accessible in. Did you read it? We had sixty six seven fellows from twenty one countries. Who did? So white papers theses on each solution in ten thousand words, so we had this amazing amount of information to draw him..

Bill McKenna Ron Clem Al Gore Eiffel tower Kathryn Wilkinson Lancet six sixty percent
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Lands to their original stand which helps sequester carbon. Yeah. And the four sector was girls and women. Yeah. Which I thought was fascinating said that. Yeah. Educating women family planning were combined among the top solutions or the number number one. So it aggregate is top solution. Never went. So there's. Yeah. And food aggregate. You said also is a sector is. Yeah. Yeah. The girls and women is number four as a sector. Yeah. But if you combine girls education and family planning together, which they really are because when you educate a girl support her to get her education. She becomes a woman on her terms, more or less, depending on the nation. But a lot more than when she's yanked out of school narrator early or put to work to put her brother through school when she's eleven or twelve years old and that girl has an average of five plus children. We've known this for forty years. This is not new data. But if she's supported to get her high school education, the equivalency of that she has to us children and not only that I mean, she earns more says a better to -cation she put some more resources into those children and better health outcome says the girl effect has been taught about and those children repeat the mother's behavior. Boy, girl doesn't make any difference. And so you have a very different Victor in terms of growth population. And so it's a pathway to family planning. But it it is the pathway of empowerment, it's very important verb. I mean member once at UC Santa Cruz, I gave a talk just said, but I just said about pros education at the end of Ataka professor raised his hand and said, yeah, but how do we control population? I said lose the verb control lose it. Yeah. It's about empowerment, and the fact is when women are supported they make decisions for themselves dairy, very sensible decision. And it's doable. I mean, I I once heard the Queen of Jordan Queen Rania say American spend the amount they spent on pets to this country ever educate every kid on the planet, which is a stunning statistic. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. So since ninety eight million girls, by the way, who are not in school. We should be. Yeah. Am not just in any school either. But a grade school, let's go with latrines for men and women boys and girls, not just. One. And I mean, there's so many reasons that they are not enfranchised. And none of them are good. Yeah. So we got food land-use energy transportation. Nothing's in cities, illegal cities, women's materials and transport. Yeah. Seven so those are all the sectors. And when you look to the food sector. It was stunning. You put some statistics in your book. So it's not just a bunch of narrative stories, you've got hard data, and I was struck by when you look at the food sector as a whole that by twenty fifty if all these solutions were limited scale, you could reduce three hundred twenty one point nine Gigot tons of carbon out of the environment. It would cost seven hundred seventy seven billion dollars. But you would save ten trillion dollars. Now. That's a good investment. Yeah. That's almost you know, more than ten times your money. And and so these are all implementation issues and their political will issues and there. Governmental issues on there. There's competing political and economic and business interests that are opposing some of these ideas. But when you look at that sector, this is unbelievable to me. How our food sector is such a big factor is something that we actually have a lot of control over because we're the consumers of food. Yeah. We're all consumers food on this planet, and the choices we make what we put on our for has huge impact, not only for your health, but for your communities for the environment and clearly for climate, and it's it's staggering. We think about it in that way. It really is and thing is human health soil agricultural health land, health and the atmosphere. Health are incomplete alignment, not like version CO what so ever the healthier the soil more carbon sequester is in hose healthy, the soil, the healthier the plants if you eat the plants instead. Meeting. People are the things that are eating the plants. You're a hell of a lot healthier. Then I mean, so it's kind of a solution..

Santa Cruz professor seven hundred seventy seven bi ten trillion dollars twelve years forty years
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"That you think if these solutions were implemented scale would be twenty fifty oh, well, we get it just we just scaled them. And then we start to tweak them say realis- exceleron this one little more. Do this. You know, so forth, and we can do at twenty forty five. We can do at twenty forty. I mean, we can do it even sooner. It's it's interesting. But what we did is just took the scaling rates that were there rather than sort of imposing projecting upon them. And when we hit the total button because you can't model a solution by itself. Nothing exists by itself, and every solution interacts dynamically with so many other sectors of society. I mean food being probably the most complex in that sense. And so two months before the book came out, April seventeenth, we had laid it out we designed it. We had the plates not the publisher. And we waited the last moment to put in the numbers because you never down with a model every single model is. Wrong. And every so often you can make a model, that's useful. The only time they grind them as useful. You it's about the future. Nobody knows if you so we waited right into the end cosmologists better and better and we hit the tone about in February twenty seventeen and we were shocked. We were so surprised they're going how big my gosh. Oh, yeah. It's like this. Who would we get down to times or how how far back can we get in? What sense? Well, if we implement all these hundred solutions. Well, what to say is that when we hit the toll about an eight of the top twenty or food related. Yeah. Food. That's what I want to get back to food related like who knew right? Exactly. It's shock to me. I mean, I always knew that climate change in issue right here about factory farming of animals, methane and the release criminal side the way we farm here about the use of energy through the fertilizers. We use the pest size. We were all petrochemical and transporting foods was one fifth of all our fossil fuels are used to fuel animal production and also agriculture practices. So that's a. That's a lot twenty percent. But you know, I didn't think it was such a big solution. Like, you said it was a big hot for me. And I've been in this business for a while. So I was sort of shocked to hear that. What what you're saying? Is that the food sector isn't necessarily the biggest contributor to climate change. Although it is the second biggest right after energy apt to transport transportation, which is a lot of energy right cars or see us as ships. Yeah. So that that's pretty big. Yeah. Number two. Yeah. And and yet it's the number one solution to climate change. Which is because it's a twofer. Yeah. It does two things one is when you take agricultural practices and move away from Kato's confined footing feeding operations for ruminants an picks you not only reduce and avoid emissions. Stop putting greenhouse gases up there. But you can actually sa- question. Right. And you know in regenerative agriculture food for us. It goes on and on getting rid of wait Huckle to cops. I mean, it's such centers. So no other sector can really do that. That is stop emitting and put back home because all the carbon that's up there. That's in question in the sense that it's greater than the proximity. Two hundred eighty AM that was their up and down during the Holocene period pill last ten thousand years that carbon the extra carbon which is now CO two at Faro nine PPM. We put it up there. And so really drawdowns about coming bring it back home because it actually is ancient sunlight, that's what call gas and oil is ancient sunlight, it's ancient photosynthesis and his photo, synthesis. That can actually bring it back home and start in the soil per centuries and thousands of years so on to break the conversation down. There's there's the big picture of what are the top sectors? And I just want to briefly go over those who will put it in context. They wanna talk about the food sector in a sense of how is our food system, contributing the climate change. What are those big things that are happening that we're doing in our food system that are making it worse. And then let's go through the saloon. So I'm going to walk you through. Let's start with the big picture..

publisher Huckle Kato Holocene ten thousand years twenty percent two months one fifth
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So I want you to stay tuned. But it is stunning. How many things are actually already being done that had been proven scientifically because you didn't look at anything. That was a hope you look at things that were actually measurable where there was data. We're actually they could be implemented at scale, and they could save enormous amounts of money with little investment and actually sa- question enormous amounts of carbon so the food sectors, whose how did that sort of come out when we started that is because you didn't you come in with a set of predisposed ideas. We did looked at the idea to me. Did you think everybody has them, and they're saying predisposes ideas, you spoke of which is while he's going to solve the problem is going to be solar and wind right away energy. I was gonna say before driving oppressor test smoke to join on Joe Rogan show. The point being is that we all thought of energy as an it makes logical sense because two thirds of the greenhouse gas emissions are caused by the combustion of coal gas and oil, so duh. But actually, how you get back from where you came from is not the way you go that is to say you can't just replace energy sources and solve the problem crucial solutions. So we because that's only putting less into the environment. As not actually it's not rowing down at all. It's not reversal at all. It's just slowing down. It's kind of like we're going to cliff say looks everybody slow down saying, oh, great resigned, where you going over the cliff you just going slower, and that sense we caught by chronic disease management, not reversal of chronic disease. Which is what I'm all about. We call it Thelma and Louise solutions. Yeah. Yeah. It's just like it doesn't make any difference. You're going the wrong way. And so leaving you and you came into this. You thought, oh, it's the energy sector. That's where the solution. Oh my gosh. I mean, when we went into it all of us is all five of us, but we had a hun- over two hundred other people, but we all had our bias. We all knew kind of what the top five or ten where we could have them down. We were all wrong. And what is interesting about that is that we kinda knew we were wrong. We didn't know what the top runs when be around Paris on three years ago and the conference of the parties to Paris agreement was created that time in December fifteen. And I realized then that you had thirty thousand people going to Paris who are climate experts. Scientists activists politicians government leaders, etc. And not one single person could have written down the top five or ten solutions. Not an order. Yeah. To lever single roaming. And isn't that astonishing at depauw logically speaking here? We are thirty thousand headings were looking at question Mehta's problem civilization has ever faced. And nobody knows what the solutions are. And it Kurdi me when I was in Seattle and has giving a talk, and I noticed several times to my right worthies young lads, fourteen fifteen years old, you know, is great that they're there. But I said that I turn to them and said, how do you United on thirteen fifteen hundred can you name the top five in the NBA teams? And they said sure Bloomberg. Okay. And nobody knew were hook and name the five top Ciller since. So we did not measure. Model them we had methodology for fended and prohibited bias because there was two hundred. And so our bias was fine you park it. But the method and allow it had to be purely viewed science had to be multiple scientific reports on that solution had to be scaling had to be robust economic data Fanti or the World Bank FAO Bloomberg energy. I e c so the data and draw down that we amassed actually as data. We are actually holding up to the world saying this is what we're doing. This is what we know. And this is what a cost this is how much would save, and what we did do is continue to scale scaling solutions already scaling got until twenty fifty at a rigorous, but reasonable rate to see if in fact, we could achieve that point in the future where greenhouse gases peak and go down on a year to year basis that start out as..

Paris Joe Rogan Bloomberg cliff World Bank depauw Thelma NBA hun Seattle Mehta fourteen fifteen years three years
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"I mean, this was imagined something comes Jerry, come to your diagnosis. And they have I h cancer of some Oregon. Okay. The come to you. And you say, hey, you know, John, you're you have four stage cancer, and then and that's it. And then John tells all his friends, and they say, John, you know, he's talked to Hymie yet. I it's cancer lever Lescot liver cancer and every week and day that keep telling him he has cancer his cancer. And after month, you John. Kospi month is probably worse because my toe SIS. That's catch likes to do like says and John's never going to get better. You know? I mean, his third state seconds as he's never going to get better. Because everything he hears his about how sick he is. And that's pretty much what was happening with climate. And I was watching it for years and years, and I realize it every problem every problem, without exception is a solution in disguise in disguise. And the doctor is to say, hey, this is the solution. Yeah. The problem symptomatic of a 'cause this is solution to the cause. So that's true with every problem, we have and it's certainly true with climate change because it is the most super wicked gnarly problem ever, you know, surfaced in the history of civilization, and therefore within it because plethora of transformative solutions. That makes us a far better place and world for everyone in the one we live in now yesterday, the Chinese word for crisis is two characters opportunity endanger. Yes. So embedded within every crisis like the climate crisis our health crisis. Yeah. Are these issues and the thing that struck me about this is when most of us think of climate we think of coal-burning we think of cars, we think of energy use. We think of all these things that are really about solving through the energy sector. Ryan win solar nuclear whatever. The thing that struck me was that the food system as a whole is the biggest solution when you aggregate all the solutions, and we're going to go into each of these solutions during this podcast..

John cancer Oregon Hymie Jerry Ryan
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Schools that is no small feat and his book natural capitalism, creating the next industrial revolution co authored with the Amri Levin's. Another environmentalist has been read and referred to by several of heads of state, including President Bill Clinton who called it. One of the five most important books in the world today that is quite a pedigree, Paul. Thank you for joining us today in the doctor's harmlessly pleasure to be here with you. So what struck me was the first time. I heard you speak at an event you laid out a vision of climate that was very different than any. I'd ever heard before it was a vision that was hopeful as opposed to depressing and made you wonder run hide under a table, which mostly here that storms and floods and heating of the planet and people dying and ice caps melting and polar bears dying. This is where we mostly reside. When it comes to that. And then of course, we have climate deniers, and we have climate activists, and it's all a big mess, and you crystallize it into this extraordinary story narrative, which was that. Hey, we can do something about this. Not only can we slow global warming climate change, but we can actually reverse it. What you call draw down carbon in the environment. That is a big statement. And it's something that most of us have hard time grappling with and yet these hundred solutions you mapped out where we're pretty profound in their ability to be implemented. And literally save trillions and trillions of dollars and sequester Giga and Gigi tons even know what's bigger than a gig a ton, but many guitars of carbon out of the environment. Which is not how we normally think of it. So how did this idea come about? And what inspired you to bring together a hundred of the top scientists and researchers in the world. To call these solutions and make them practical again about I think for the same reason that you just referred to which is that primarily what people hear about is the probability of what's going to go wrong. How it is going wrong. How fast is going wrong sooner than we thought. It was going to go wrong. And the it's about impact it's about impact is happening today. More and more. But it's also about the impact it's going to happen. And that is the mandate of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, the UN sponsored agent, you know, really Claverie. And that was a new report they just release thoughts. Thirty years old today. It started in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight six assessment comes out and just last week that one point five see sort of report came out, which is if we don't meet again, very cautionary, very sort of apocalyptic, if we don't hit one if we go over one point five see we're in big trouble in him, very little chance of hitting that was sort of the report, and it really continued to. Repeat a pattern of climate communication, which emphasizes glue threat, doom fear. You highlights up the magdala so to speak and fight or flight. But it makes people disempowered. Yeah. That's the most important thing about it. Not that the science isn't valid the VAT science has good. But his kind of like being a doctor would if you know diagnosis is not prognosis. You know that right? I you have to do diagnosis IPCC does a really good job diagnosis, but is conflicted. Everything else has prognosis. Right. And that is where people get basically Nali empowerment numb turn away. They'll deny because this is really about life and death. And so it's not surprising. Lot of people say, screw you. It's not true. I don't believe it, blah, blah, blah, blah, you know, because the science is so hard to basically take in. It's very hard to take. And from my point of view. I saw Al Gore. Speak at a conference recently. And he showed a slide a picture of an octopus in a parking lot in Miami. Because the water levels have risen, and now we see fish and seafood in the parking lots..

Al Gore Amri Levin Bill Clinton President Paul IPCC UN Miami Thirty years
"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Doctors pharmacy. I'm Dr Mark Hyman. That's pharmacy. F A R M C Y A place for conversations that matter and today's conversation really matters because our guest is Paul Hawkin on the leading environmentalists and who's going to help us. Learn about climate change, not from the bad point of view of how it sucks, and it's all going to kill us, but how to fix it which is something that people really don't talk about. And he's got the street cred to prove it. He's start out in Boston in ninety sixty six with the first natural foods store where they had whole grains in bulk and sees where they had cold pressed was the first place ever sold vegetables. It was the first kind of whole foods in a way, and you went on to do much bigger work as an environmentalists as an entrepreneur as an author, and activist, and you've dedicated your life to environmental sustainability and changing your relationship between business and the environment and your books have been profound in that in that way. And I'm going to talk about them in a minute. But you're one of the environmental movements leading voices the year painting architect of corporate form. With respect to ecological practices. Your work includes founding successful ecologically conscious businesses writing about the impacts of commerce on living systems and consulting with heads of state and CEO's on economic development industrial ecology, whatever that is. We'll talk about that and environmental policy and Paul is now the executive director of one of the most extraordinary projects that's going on today in the face of our climate crisis is called project draw down. It's a nonprofit is dedicated to researching when and how global warming can be reversed not just stopped, but actually reversed the organization maps and models the scaling of one hundred substantive technological social and ecological solutions to global warming. These are things that actually exists right now that people are doing that can be scaled not to mention all the new innovative things. It can also happen in the coming years. Now, Paul writes, articles, op EDS, pure view papers. He's written seven books, including four bestsellers the next. Economy growing business. The ecology of commerce and blessed unrest, ecology of commerce was voted the number one college tech on business and environment by professors in sixty seven business.

Paul Hawkin Dr Mark Hyman Boston R M C CEO executive director
"paul hawken" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"In a we did the math and we did a properly we had some traction signed so it wasn't just what it can do but also what impact but it how in so doing it's one of the other surprises to me was food and particularly three out of a thing it was what three of the top solutions were laid the foods or food waste plant plantbased diet and to have a better version of a pastor ah about to ask for ya well through to prices to it's an number one sector if we have reince huge everyone eats every day to an i mean it was like under a knows literally uh that's n not on analogy the food is number one for two reasons one is it collectively is the largest source of emissions i mean because you have liquid fuel add diesel if nitrous oxide which is three hundred times more powerful nuncio to his greenhouse gas you have methane emissions and technicians from ruminants cows cattle plus you know um you have then emissions from the tillage for co 2 on an so you put all that together and then you put in food waste as well and once again you have food's it had this big footprint being just thrown away forty percent of us food is thrown away and discarded and that most of it goes into lantos and becomes anaerobic and once you have organic waste in an anaerobic environment you have meth added genesis which is a bacterial produce methane and so you and that's thirty four times more powerful than co 2 utah adding all this up in you realize if food is an enormous source of emissions however.

nitrous oxide greenhouse gas food waste lantos forty percent
"paul hawken" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Right down which you think i can be the top five ah solutions we would have got it wrong what what what would you have gas i'll solar wind that we would at her uh definitely talked about transport which is electric vehicles he vis on deafening talk about you know stop cutting trees and power shore you know on endo need so much meat i mean those those would have won that all was in there we'll so as windy ah helped us to were in there but the solar wasn't oddly enough and he vis not and were worded 80s fall pretty far level i've had pretty far down the line in the reason for this is um millie the modelling which is more and more people are going to be involved with transport churning they want transport whether they own it over the use it in terms of ridesharing sure i wanna talk about that too yeah and so you have increases in the efficiency at you move from internal combustion engines tvs and big reduction in emissions if the electric vehicles are powered by renewable energy however you have more more people basically wanting to have the have mobility sure and so we have to factor the end so it sort of cancelled out some of their savings that you would expect from he vis versus icees and people also have to understand that there is a big carbon footprint from even making the darn car not like inaugu copper mines are the copper in the steel and whatever it is even the carbon fibre the carbon fibre carso.

renewable energy carbon footprint
"paul hawken" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"paul hawken" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Greenhouse gas analysis and so in a sense that background really came to the fore there as well you know which is to note that that was relevant important in terms of communication sure to people policymakers business people and everyone but i think um i just couldn't imagine doing one thing i think if i just stuck with one thing i probably be very wealthy right now but i wasn't interested in money actually will do you think i am curious about the inspiration as you talk about business here also known two books that all out entrepreneurs have on there must read list natural capitalism ecology of commerce and silly growing and growing ability oliver yeah so like where those books inspiration we're like okay like i'm an entrepreneur or like these are the things entrepreneurs build businesses if they've got these tools maybe we can make what was your thinking of like what do you want to accomplish with facebook leconte comments came out when i was has been hawkin and and as we grew in we grew a law we have to mimic cannon foreign sales one hundred million dollars and i couldn't help it notice he know the through tata's boxes send in our footprint has as called now we didn't use that time then but and even at the time i did analysis like is this better to ship stuck to people or is it better for them to get in the congo storm by ad and it was quite surprising is much better actually the ship and to have people stay home in have delivered to them them for them to get in the congo out but even but in we just flicking are for pride and then i gotta war an us a word from which award you've got hogg awards uh not manner.

tata congo Greenhouse gas facebook one hundred million dollars