21 Burst results for "Paul Ehrlich"

Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

Mark Levin

02:05 min | 11 months ago

Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

"Dot com Mr Producer This goes back to April. 22nd 2009 and I dug this up. Birthday predictions of 1970. This may have been on Instapundit actually. The reason you shouldn't believe Earth Day predictions of 2000 and nine And they point out even back then, 12 years ago. For the next 24 hours. The media wall saw this with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom and gloom extravaganza. Oh, it's only gotten worse. Ignore them. They'll be wrong. We're confident in saying that because they've always been wrong and always will be need proof. Here's some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970. That's when it was founded. We have about five more years at the outside to do something, Kenneth what Ecologists. Civilization will end within 15, or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind. George Wald, Harvard biologist. We're in an environmental crisis, which threatens the survival of this nation and the world as a suitable place of human habitation. Barry Commoner. Remember him? Washington University biologist Man must stop pollution and conservatives resources not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration of possible extinction. New York Times editorial the day after the first birthday. Population will inevitably and completely outstripped whatever small increases in food supplies. We make that death rate will increase until at least 1 to 200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next 10 years. Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist. 1975. Some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation in the famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts more optimistic. The ultimate phone population collision will not occur until the decade of the 19 eighties. Paul Ehrlich,

Mr Producer George Wald Barry Commoner Kenneth Washington University Harvard New York Times Paul Ehrlich Stanford University
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Was 1/10 of what it is now. So you're back it Paul Ehrlich what he wrote his famous population bomb. That she has materialized. But since since when Did failed predictions to tear apocalyptic doom saying, Well, it's not stopped the powers that be Plus. I mean, it was Bill Gates. Who had a Ted talk spoke of the population reduction and how vaccines can help in this endeavor. So what he's trying to say, Say it is that once again the vaccine is like a biotechnology. It could be used to reduce population. And is the Skip. Whole thing, because I mean I was you know, I was I was talking earlier. About Charles Dickens's Christmas, Carol. And if you have you read it, Christmas girl if you see it if you see it anytime this weekend. Was actually a scene where Ebony's or screw just talking. I think with his nephew And he says he talks about the poor. And that they had better die quickly because it would decrease the surplus population to which you know. He also said the same thing I believe to the ghost of Christmas present. And Christmas presents said. Well, look, I mean, do you decide which men live which bin die? And so here we are in this moment. Where we're facing it. This stuff dystopic still pick rubble, feudalism that's in our future. And there are those in power that CIA policy of this neo exterminate ism. May have to be enacted, and it's always been the worry Vigilant watchers that there would come a time when the excess population would be shown the door. But how would they do it? And what could be done to confirm the the idea of this happening? Well, I mean, you got Bill Gates.

Bill Gates Paul Ehrlich Charles Dickens Ebony Ted CIA Carol
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twenty ten I spoke with Paul Ehrlich the Bing professor of population studies and professor of biology at Stanford University about his book the dominant animal human evolution and the environment one surprising fact I learned from Paul Ehrlich's latest book is that Charles Darwin never use the word evolution it was a surprise to me when I learned to do what I had read the book and I learn just where is it where their religion you know it's a wonderful book to read if you already know a lot about evolution because he was one smart guy and I'm always finding stuff in it that most people think is more recent proving so yep star was one of my heroes he got everything pretty much right yeah for for what they knew in those days he got it as right as you can possibly get it and I think all of us still consider ourselves Darwinian even though of course a lot is number fifty in genetics since then that's the the big area of changes we now know a lot about the mechanism the exact ways the genes work although we still got a lot to learn there too and if we'd never thought of evolution before when we saw the genetics we go yeah no it is I mean it one of the funny things is people say well it's just a theory well it's like the theory that the earth goes around the sun rather than vice versa nothing is ever certain in scientific if I could show the Darwin was dead wrong and convince my colleagues I have a manuscript off the journal science tomorrow and so would any other evolutionists because I tell you you know as I you do well in science is to show that the conventional view is wrong so the theory of why they didn't have any ham at lunch today is that's not a scientific theory no that's not a scientific theories certainly isn't your genes driving you to that that's your well you can explain it as part of a an evolutionary theory but its cultural evolution other words we have it turns out a roll of the limited amount of genetic information R. D. and I you know I first started out doing selection experiments on fruit flies forty some years ago fifty some years ago now I thought there was hundreds of thousands or millions of genes and that allowed us to explain it pretty well now we know that in fruit flies is only something like fourteen thousand jeans that's a lot less than a million and trying to figure out how the genome how old the genes work together has become infinitely more complex but just think about the complexity of our cultural evolution I mean you and I are victims of a culture gap if we had been together say in a hunter gatherer group both of us with no virtually all of the non genetic information that the group possessed in other words a hundred percent of it it's very close to some shaman might have a weird that there might be a little something about herbs and some women do that men didn't in there might have been a hunting technique that meant but basically everybody knew everything now I would wager certainly I and I suspect you can't tell exactly how this microphone and that thing works it means there's non genetic information all around us and how the building is constructed and chairs are put together exactly and or or where you know where this call came from and how it was designed and so on so now not the smartest person not the most knowledge of her person even has one millionth of a non genetic information of their culture I guess one of our big problems we don't have that broad understanding that everybody until ten thousand years ago everybody had what you're talking about is everything is evolving everything living is involving and co evolving streaming portent it's one of these everything affects everything else situations but the main thing that we've done is develop these incredible brains and develop this huge supply of non genetic information others culture in other animals chimps for instance do different things in different populations and and they learn from it even some birds learn techniques oyster catchers learn how to open oysters from their parents but no other organism has ever had the level of non genetic information that we have and that's what's made us the dominant animal that's why we are changing the atmosphere we change the wind surface were ruining the oceans were spreading toxic chemicals everywhere because we're really ingenious and develop this huge body of non genetic information the problem is of course what we're doing with it you've been listening to a twenty ten technician interview with Paul Ehrlich about his book the dominant animal human evolution and the environment well now retired he's still a Stanford professor the professor.

Paul Ehrlich professor Stanford University
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Q. E. I. F. M. north highland Sacramento the time now is ten o'clock coming up on technician Matt Ridley you know him from his books including the rational optimist or from this column in the times of London on science the environment and economic today we're talking about how innovation works and why it flourishes in freedom then chief correspondent Dr Daniel Kraft heads up the coast in nineteen response task force for the X. prize pandemic Allianz companies universities and others are coming together all this and more coming up on this week's technician let's take five with more guns this is five minutes in twenty ten I spoke with Paul Ehrlich the Bing professor of population studies and professor of biology at Stanford University about his book the dominant animal human evolution and the environment one surprising fact.

technician Matt Ridley London Paul Ehrlich professor Stanford University Sacramento chief correspondent Dr Daniel Kraft
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

11:34 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Almost a rite of passage for a lot of middle school students about three and a half million of them every year it's a practice that's come a long way in the last fifty years obviously thousands of years ago braces didn't exist but apparently people didn't need them according to Dr Paul Ehrlich professor emeritus of population studies at Stanford University hunter gatherers just didn't have crooked teeth and we didn't start getting cavities in the song really until we settle down the practice agriculture and got a different bacterial load in our mail because of the change in diet grinding down yes in those days there was a lot of great in the food but crooked teeth and cavities we're not a problem for hunter gatherers we have the people in colleges then the payment that's a positive step look at this every day they tell us that they never hold any drive calls for lives and also areas that have to compete like we have today Dr Sandra Kahn is a California orthodontist specializing in craniofacial growth and development there is a lot of evidence and it's very easy to find because we do have the tricycles that date three there are cultural evolution so we know that those calls had enormous John is here they fit the wisdom teeth which were the last molars the arch it's very rare that you will find crowding on any of these old remains and even only from a couple hundred years ago before the industrial revolution Konnan Ehrlich are co authors of the book jaws the story of a hidden epidemic an epidemic they say of crooked teeth it's becoming almost universal and it's it's just a symptom of a much more serious epidemic of shrinking draws and the most serious part of that of course is not having enough room in our joys for our town so when we try I in the sleep often hard tongue slot back into our throats blocking our airway and causing first story and then what's called obstructive sleep apnea which is a pretty scientific term for waking up in the middle of the night because you're choking and being incredibly stressed and that that's what leads to the most serious health problems or concerned with and that can include greater chance of heart disease cancer of our timers disease of ADHD of depression and actually even a bigger chance of being killed on the highway because more people are killed in accidents colds by sleep deprivation than they are by drunk drivers experts say about seventy five percent of kids have alignment problems with their teeth by the time they hit age thirteen mostly early can con se because our jaws never get as big as they were meant to be or as big as they used to be more and more kids are now wearing braces my daughter is on a so called C. pap machine as are a good number of my colleagues these are machines that pump air into you while you sleep to prevent the joking though you've struck the sleep apnea that causes so much stress it's a big expense of public health problem the traces basically to settling down practicing farming moving indoors and industrializing our jaws just don't get enough exercise among other things Ehrlich says the problem starts at birth when we veer away from the caveman diet we don't breastfeed long enough if women were able to they ought to be breast feeding for years there's also you know he draws work much more when you're nursing but when you're getting milk from a bottle and we then we need to soft foods the baby foods when of course in the good old days when we were hunter gatherers we we do the foods that adults eight so we basically have brought hunter gatherer jaws and teeth into a McDonald's environment it has to be done in the first decade of life I like a analogy that I use with patients if you were baking a cake and you want to have a round cake by mistake you pour your batter into a square mold and you put it on and you realize your mistake right away within a few minutes you take it out of the church more often you will have a beautiful red cake but if you know it ten twenty minutes later you realize your mistake and you try to change mobile number have a good cake so we have to do the changes in the environment in the first decade when the bulls are still malleable when the kids can change when we can really create the environment that will make them develop as opposed to braces which are really just dealing with the symptoms after the don't have practically grown all the way in early see the examination of school remains shows the problems all started about eight thousand years ago jars of them were much larger and more prominent than they are now but it's not a genetic change their faces a lot fuller just like let's imagine you have a child and the child will walk for several years blacks wouldn't develop so we're not having all that stimulation early in life in our faces but dropping back and we can see it if you just look at the children that live in and very industrialized environments that they need a lot of processed foods but there hasn't been enough evolutionary time for us to have had a genetic change so this has to be a compartmental paternity component you know you would have to have a trade that just keeps me from being able to reproduce and then you need a lot of generations to really have a genetic change so these changes are happening in a very short it was night time so we know that it's in the violence we know very well and evolutionary biology that every character is the good people is an interaction between their genetic code and the environment and if you change the environment dramatically you're going to change how the genetic code operates to make the individual and the biggest environmental change human beings I've ever made was settling down to practice agriculture moving inside with agriculture you can have specialization because not everybody's got to do nothing but get food at the specialization led to industrialization and here we are slapping braces on kids and adults sleeping in C. pap machines Ehrlich says we've also turned away out of necessity from the way we're supposed to brief and that's contributed to receding jaws as well one of the worst things for our choices mouth breathing one of the worst things from moving indoors is the concentration of allergens of things that give you allergies so the kids tend to have stuffy noses for the first few years of their lives and we know for some major experiments if you stop the noses of monkeys their joint development goes to hell the same thing happens unfortunately with human beings and if you watch kids now when they're not paying attention when they're watching the se TV show or something they often are hanging their mouths open mouth breathing has been known for almost two hundred years could be very bad for human health Khan says the difference between hunter gatherers and people living in a modern society could be seen as Americans conquered the old west she says native Americans had two nicknames for the intruders pale face and black mouth they would see their wives with their mouths open and we think that it was because they would get stuffy nose just like we do today a lot of the children have stuffy noses we feel like that is probably one of the drivers of the stroll with a job that would make the children just hang their mouth open all the time and in addition to that we're not chewing the hard foods that your ancestors were evil hunter gathers before we had a we culture do you eat the same foods that they're adults were eating the mothers would breast feed the children for three or four years but even though some experts have noted for more than a hundred years the differences in jaw size of indigenous people and modern city dwellers nobody really put together why it was happening as an evolutionary biologist I'm embarrassed that I didn't ask myself why suddenly do we have things called wisdom teeth which are just the last molars is no longer often have room to erupt why do we have all these breathing problems and so on I just didn't see it and neither did other experts just as Ehrlich says researchers have spent plenty of time examining our foods but only some of their qualities there's a huge literature on changes in the human diet and needs in the diet in terms of the nutritional quality of the foods but the issue of how tough they are how much chewing may require is really not represented well in the literature at all it's not represented well in the many health bulletins of people subscribed to now I remember in one board and then my wife subscribes to a big article on whether some movies have the same nutritional value as the fruit itself and they never mention the fact that smoothies don't exercise your jaw muscles at all that in fact we have selected fruit so they're damn near liquid now I can easily go to the supermarket and buy a peach that you could almost drink you could just you know suck a hole in it and suck it down if you want to do about the only fruit we now choose apples and chewing is what looking Kansei we need but as they've said it has to start young with lengthy breast feeding and then winning to foods that are hard to choose given our mushy modern diets it may even take extra measures were recommending going back to chewing gum and there are special gums you can get that you don't have to paste on the bottom of the chair because you can chew them repeatedly we need more exercise in our joint muscles just like we need more exercise in other parts of our bodies and we spend a lot of time doing that imagine what children's legs would look like if they weren't allowed to walk until we were twelve years old for some reason we've separated the jaw from the rest of the body every all our other muscles we keep being told exercise them with our jaws we're making more and more process than liquid diet for everybody and we're paying a huge price for it in health costs and shortens lives in misery and in money after about age ten Connor like say it's too late to straighten things out on our own and by the time a child eleven or twelve many parents will look to an orthodontist to fix what they think the problem is people are moved to go to orthodontist for cosmetic reasons they want their kids to look good and so on but actually you got to be very careful because sometimes the orthodontic treatment can satisfactorily make people look better but actually shrank the joys further and cause more problems with the airway but happily oblige orthodontists are moving to what they call their way centric orthodontics where they pay a lot of attention to not shrinking the root to take here from your nose down into your lungs raising kids with roomy jaws isn't necessarily easy fuel moms these days may find it practical to breast feed for years and the diet of tough to chew foods may not win praise around the dinner table but Lincoln Kansei steps in that direction have.

Dr Paul Ehrlich
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The crops the harvest in some school buildings even had to be closed temporarily so that they can be used for grain storage so in just a few years India and Pakistan that had been written off by others the M. environmentalists like Paul Ehrlich had said that we just have to forget about impacts on they will die because it's impossible to supply them with enough food well in just a matter of a few years Norman Borlaug his team managed to help them to become self sufficient in the production of cereals and if that's not a true hero I don't know who is and one of the last things that she did was that he talked a lot about the problems in Africa because the problem was that the green revolution wasn't repeated in Africa the big foundations who used to support his work the Ford and Rockefeller foundations they began to be a bit more skeptical and so was the World Bank because Singh varmint lists they weren't that eager on artificial fertilizer and modern agricultural technologies so the number of undernourished continue to grow they kept destroying wind habitats would slash and burn subsistence agriculture and these really made Borlaug angry and Johan now reads Borlaug intense response some of the environmental lobbyists of the western nations of the salt of the earth but many of them are elitists they never experience.

India Pakistan Paul Ehrlich Norman Borlaug Africa World Bank Johan Ford Singh
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on GrowthBusters

GrowthBusters

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on GrowthBusters

"And now we're having being run by a really stupid. Narcissistic Evil Imbecile. Who is not doing any of the things that need to be done now? You may think of that as a political statement it sure as hell is we have because the second thing is that we are facing a whole series of existential threats that you and we and many other scientists have warned about for decades and doing nothing about it in fact trump is now loosening the cafe standards in order to get his businesses more prophets or the businesses of his buddies more prophets at the cost of killing many many many people in the future. Because if you think the health problems of this virus pandemic are serious there. Nothing absolutely nothing compared to the health threat of climate change. There's no chance as far as we can tell that this particular corona virus will kill everybody but climate disruption can kill everybody and we have very little time to act and instead of acting in the right direction. This moronic imbecile is working very hard to kill Americans and other human beings in the future for his personal gain and profit. So why do you think? The Corona virus pandemic has captured attention like climate. Change should have and hasn't yet I think people can relate to it more readily after all their parents dying. Their friends are dying. The news is covered with it. It's global it's one of the interesting advantages of the web and the level of communication. We now have so that everybody who at least can turn on a TV or turn on a computer knows to a degree. What's going on? The sad thing is of course the bad planning of the entire world listening to the idiots in economics we talk about things like perpetual growth you may have heard of that Or Comparative Advantage you know. Comparative Advantage is why we don't have a good supply of respirators now because to the comparative advantage thing is spread production all over the world to wherever the rich people who run the world can find the cheapest labor so the parts are made everywhere. If you then have a thing like this that breaks down starts to break down the international movement system all of a sudden. You can't get respirators made easily. I yelled about this a long time. One of my favorite places Costa Rica and they gradually moved away from growing food to take care of their population to growing cash crops for China and US and so where so if the transportation system based on fossil fuels we shouldn't be burning breaks down the Costa Ricans may have trouble feeding themselves. The whole idea of comparative advantage has been on efficiency rather than distribution. It was put forward originally by Ricardo at a time when they thought that capital was nailed in place because capital was largely land and Labour. Could move around and we got exactly the opposite situation. You could move a trillion of your dollars to Arizona or Australia in a nanosecond now. I wouldn't do it. I'd hold onto your trillion dollars but you can't move the Labor that fast. So how did I get on? That ran We didn't do the planning and we're not doing planning now. I'm trying for the world record of rejected op. Eds with my colleagues trying the point out that this is a blip. But what's coming down the road not just in climate disruption but also in toxication of the planet in destruction of soils. You Know D'Amato people don't realize how much of their food comes at a distance. Many years ago John Holdren. I did a little calculation of how many Hiroshima size atomic bombs it would take to destroy either the United States or the Soviet Union then as functional entities easer small bombs fifteen kilotonnes roughly and we figured about twelve with do the United States and about nine would do the Soviet Union. Because all you have to do is bring down the electricity grid and hit the transportation centers like Kansas City and Chicago. And so on and most people would starve to death. Because you're the whole food. Supply is based on supply chains that are spread around the world and very very vulnerable is not much food stored anywhere now. The system has to keep working and the pandemic of course is likely to disrupt that system. Paul I'm I'm a little embarrassed to say that I just barely started reading your book. A very ancient. It's wonderful and I love it so much. I'm almost done with it and I'm Kinda glad that I haven't finished it yet. Just because I get to talk to you but David I have been talking for over a year about getting you on our podcast and I've just been really really excited. So so she has no excuse for not finishing the book. The book that you just showed me yes. Pick it up and look I think in the lower left hand corner of the front page front cover. What does it say? There's a little diagram at says? The population bond keeps ticking. Is the bomb. Ticking yes no it isn't. It's got a fuse. Nobody has ever noticed that population bomb fuses burning and that was because they hadn't invented clocks yet. When you wrote that was our glass..

United States Soviet Union John Holdren Eds Arizona Costa Rica Costa Ricans Ricardo D'Amato toxication China Paul David Australia Kansas City Chicago
Paul Ehrlich - Uncensored on Earth Day 50th Anniversary

GrowthBusters

08:08 min | 2 years ago

Paul Ehrlich - Uncensored on Earth Day 50th Anniversary

"This is the growth busters. Podcast about sustainable living. We are deep into overshoot. So we're busy trying to save the planet. If we succeed with your help maybe there'll be something left for the next generation and the one after that. Sometimes we talk about simple things we can all do in our daily lives to shrink our footprint. Sometimes we dig into deep heavy duty subjects like it's been fifty years since the first Earth Day. What the happened. I'm Dave Gardner. One of your guides on this journey to sustainability and I'm Eric Areas Co host and Co producer of the growth busters podcast for cutting edge information about our cultures unsustainable love affair with growth. And what we can do about it. Visit GROWTH BUSTERS DOT ORG. The special day episode is really extra special because we are joined by. Stanford biologist. Dr Paul Ehrlich the man who launched me on this path of planet saving. But before we talk to Paul. I have a couple of quick bits of News Erica. We also want to do a quick follow up on her last episode forty to the silver lining of Kobe induced recession with Brian. Check Executive Director of the Center for the advancement of the steady state economy. We discussed how reduced economic activity like we're having now during. The Corona virus lockdown is actually a step in the right direction for preservation of her life. Supporting Ecosystems will since we published that episode. Erica to interesting. Commentaries have been published. That are quite relevant. Maybe even read it. We should talk about briefly but try to keep this pretty quick. Because we know everybody's waiting to hear from Dr Paul Erlich. There's one that I hesitate to even mention. I really hate to give it any oxygen. It was called. Beware the left's De Growth Movement and it was written by Stephen Moore. He's got a syndicated column which is a tragedy in itself green and that name may ring a bell to you. Stephen Moore was floated for a while as potential fed position. Donald Trump wanted Stephen Moore but the guy just looked qualifications and eventually they had to pull his name basically works for these think. Tanks that are propaganda machines for growth pushers and growth profiteers. So this piece. Beware the Left de Growth Movement by Stephen Moore. We just want Issue a warning about I guess and you know what I remember. Erica evening that I I read that. I sent you an email with a link to that and boy. I got your attention. If you know growl when I get mad and this article definitely deserved a few girls from me. I found it hilarious. How Stephen Moore? Who is supposed to be? You know sort of a big deal out there in his area. I thought it was really funny that he refers to the growth movement as sort of this chic fad as if environmental protection which is the quintessential of the De Growth Movement. Somehow became fashionable. Sure let's go ahead and talk about how sexy climate changes and all the catastrophe that's happening because of the climate change. Let's go ahead and talk about how sexy that as people started carrying about the planet a longtime ago when it became apparent that there's an everybody else's health and social wellbeing are actually dependent on the planet's ability to support kind of water is all about in fact because that was kind of the peak of environmental care little. Did people know back in nineteen seventy that. It was peeking. They thought it was just beginning and we should talk about that a little bit so we will include Lincoln the show notes to this piece of garbage. And if you do go and read it be sure to scroll down and read the notes because there are some good notes in effect. Brian Check. Who was our guest on the last episode about the silver lining of the coveted induced recession? Rebrand check wrote a comment to that piece that made a very good rebuttal and it didn't take him long because the truth is this thing is just full of unsubstantiated generalizations. Wouldn't you say Erica? But there's hope because we got the antidote and shortly after sent you the link to that I sent you a link to this really amazing and wonderful essay that we cannot recommend to highly. We're GONNA definitely put the link in the show notes and all whatever I can do to star in highlight it and bring it to your attention will and we have to sell it because it's I don't know it takes a little while to read a little bit a time. Rating that myself. It's titled the end of Economic Growth by going to butcher those SAR Mitijda sub Ramadan survey on an Subramanian. Somebody awesome somebody. I'm GonNa Start Worshiping so a shout out to you. Sobre Mista and forgiveness for butchering your name. But boy we love you in your work and this is actually going to be in the May print issue of mcleans which is a big magazine in Canada but they posted at mcleans dot ca on April fifteenth. And we will put a link in the show notes so online. It's called the end of the economic growth and imprint. The headline is the death of growth. I think we've kind of already obscene. That disasters have a way of slowing climate. Change not to mention slowing down economy and when we also start to see oil prices decline and suddenly there's no more funds available to invest in all these green technologies that all of our techno enthusiasts friends have been raving about. What do we do what we left with? Is Technology still going to save? The world is at saving the world right. Now it's kind of a really scary time that I hope. More people are starting to question whether that is going to be the fix for everything going forward and another positive thing. I took from. This article was just hope for the future where people begin to see how one person's or even just a group of people's misfortune collective misfortune affects all of us economically health wise a now more than ever those most vulnerable to climate and deuce catastrophe while this might seem like it's such a faraway problem and that doesn't directly affect us. I hope that we're starting to see that it really does. It really does. And it's only a matter of time before it does directly affect us. I think what excites me? Most about this is. This is a really Almost like a little mini course for for people with short attention span. Or if you don't have the time or you can't find a good semester long college course in real economics that understands that the economy is a subset of the Environment. This is a good primer. She talks about polar limits to growth Vaclav smell than I think. One of the most important things in here is this notion. And apparently more and more economists and other smart people are starting to talk about the fact that you know what comic growth is slowing down. And maybe that's just a normal part of the process. Maybe that's a sign of a a mature economy. In fact a she mentions a book called fully grown. Why stagnant economy is a sign of success. Imagine that I mean this is blasphemy to somebody like Stephen Moore. But this is intelligent. This isn't full of unsubstantiated generalizations. This is a really good piece. That's required reading. So if you're a little bit new to the idea that pursuit of robust economic growth is a suicide mission. This'll be a good primer for you if you've been following along with what we've been talking about for years now and this isn't a new idea to you. This is something you can share with somebody who might be rational enough and open minded enough that you can say that's what I'm talking about.

Stephen Moore Erica De Growth Movement Brian Check Dr Paul Ehrlich Dr Paul Erlich Dave Gardner Eric Areas Co Stanford Kobe Co Producer Donald Trump Paul FED Executive Director Canada Lincoln
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Any anybody and this is the fact that that we did it and I know why we did here came the projections here came the models remember I was out for two weeks because of a very bad reactions some side effects the my phase one cancer treatment amount two weeks the first day back is when the models are being used to project all this and I remember the for the first hour my voice was really weak I was still trying to get back in in shape and I remembered I'm plugging through and warning everybody these models didn't have a prayer being right because they're never right and I correlated them the climate change models who have yet to be correct and with climate change man made climate change we don't have any data all we've got our model projections of what the fears are twenty and thirty years down the road we don't have there isn't any don't doubt me on this there isn't any actual data are you can have left wing blogs sites give you pictures fraudulent pictures of polar bears on little thin sheets of ice that are made up and you can talk about rising sea levels in Borneo Bora Bora that may be temporary but they're portrayed as prominent you can talk about the king tides that happen in Honolulu and in Miami which temporary flood downtown areas and you can have a picture of that published as though it's permanent sea level rise but legitimate legitimate change has he yet to occur it remains model projections and they haven't been right Paul Ehrlich's models on what would happen if the world population became half what it is today you realize it was three masturbation and this guy still go well he still is a golden source he's never been right these models haven't been right so this this shut down it has I'm telling you it has ripped my heart out because of the effect that it's having on the people of this country who are just powerless in the face of their government they have to trust that they have to trust that what they're being told to do is for their own benefit and this well a permanent shutdowns certainly doable I mean that there's there's there's no solution in the midst of a shutdown otherwise we shut down permanently if shut down to way to go if shut down all the way to never die if shut down for the word of the word the word the way that eliminate risk in life then we would be living in permanent shut down and of course were not hang on I gotta take.

Borneo Bora Bora Honolulu Miami Paul Ehrlich
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The idea of a movement to get humanity to pay attention to existential risks sounds a more stress and far off but we founded movements on far off ideas before if enough people start talking others will listen just a handful of books at the environmental movement started like the ones written by the club of Rome and Paul Ehrlich but especially Rachel Carson's nineteen sixty to book silent spring which warned of the widespread ecological destruction from the pesticide DDT Carson's book is credited with showing the public how fragile ecosystems of the natural world can be and how much of an effect we humans have on them awareness of things like fertilizer runoff deforestation indicator species concepts that you can find being taught in middle schools today were on heard of at the beginning of the nineteen sixties most people just didn't think about things like that well when the environmental movement began to gain steam awareness of environmental issues started to spread within a decade of silence brings release nations around the world started opening government agencies that were responsible for defending the environment the world went from ignorance about environmental issues to establishing policy agencies in less than ten years and I think that we could do some of that and it really shows that it is possible to take something which is not really part of common sense morality.

Paul Ehrlich Rachel Carson club of Rome
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Attention to their looks books until Dr Ehrlich appeared on late night with Johnny Carson in nineteen seventy and spoke about the coming quarter for an hour then they really began to pay attention around the time Paul Ehrlich was on late night a handful of scientists from around the world have been assembled into groups by wealthy Italian industrialist they were called the club of Rome the scientists have devised computer models to build forecasts of humanity's future based on trends like resource use pollution and population growth they saw pretty much the same doom and their crystal ball there like this S. starvation collapsing society widespread pollution and the attendant negative impacts on health the Kerry the only silver lining to the club of Rome's report which they called the limits to growth was that we had perhaps until twenty one hundred before we saw the worst of both books and the media's coverage of them got the world's attention but this is not a new idea the club of Rome and Paul Ehrlich followed in the tradition of Thomas Malthus the eighteenth century clergyman and demographer who is the first to write about the limits of agriculture well just pointed out that while humans can multiply exponentially the resources we get from the earth what we call natural capital do not which means that because of our propensity to place an emphasis on growing our species we humans are essentially doomed to out strip earth's resources at some point including as Mathis pointed out our food supply in the mid sixties before Ehrlich's book was published there was widespread famine in India and during the seventies and eighties there were additional widespread famine in the horn of Africa but if anything the population bomb is the.

Johnny Carson Paul Ehrlich Kerry Rome Thomas Malthus Mathis India Africa club of Rome
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on WDRC

"Your children get an a required to get by state law thousand divided into the amount of money spent for every hour out of school it costs about eighteen million dollars in wasted resources number two for all the people that I've heard speaking the young people especially out of school who say the climate or the planet is going to end in twelve years if we don't act or that climate change will become your reversible I'll remind you I shared with you a couple of days ago a piece by my ring a bell of the competitive enterprise institute about all the predictions of doom and gloom going back a full have sentry fifty years from Paul Ehrlich from James Hansen the rest saying well you know it's the world is coming to an end and for about half of that time they were projecting global cooling another ice age the other half they were projecting global warming and they were all going to bake to death up so that kind of gives you a picture of what is going on as literally around the country millions of kids walk out of school and waste precious and limited education time Todd Myers joins me now from the Washington policy center Todd I want to get your take on on what's going on today and whether or not you think the schools should be allowing this and in some cases even helping to facilitate the kids wasting this kind of time. planners to parts here the first is. if the lesson that these kids take is is that walking out of school is the way that you make things happen right there teaching these kids the wrong thing the way that you make things happen the is by inventing by taking action by taking personal responsibility and that's one of the things that.

Paul Ehrlich James Hansen Todd Myers Washington eighteen million dollars twelve years fifty years
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Believe it they all believe it. I mean there might be a few exceptions what have you been through public school in the United States you've been pretty well indoctrinated the global warming is real I got them with my own kids at least one of them is totally into it yes totally sold on global warming and I keep telling week nine degrees it is not catastrophic. it's not a catastrophic problem how do you account for the global warming and the global cooling in the past did you see the story that came out yesterday about you know all of the emergencies that didn't happen yeah in the past yeah I saw it on the weather will wrong over over over his thought on the blaze yesterday I'll see if I have a do you happen to have an I do yeah in nineteen sixty seven in the Salt Lake Tribune dire famine by nineteen seventy five. Dyer famine forecast by ninety it's already too late was the sub headline. Salt Lake Tribune also nineteen sixty seven everyone will disappear in a cloud of blue steam by nineteen eighty nine wow I'll remember that day I don't believe in god yeah The New York Times in nineteen sixty nine full of pollution sees lack of time the trouble with almost all environmental problems according to Paul Ehrlich the population biologist is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people years dead so we lay we must.

Salt Lake Tribune Paul Ehrlich United States Dyer The New York Times nine degrees
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on WTVN

"Believe it they all believe it. I mean there might be a few exceptions what have you been through public school in the United States you've been pretty well indoctrinated the global warming is real I got them with my own kids at least one of them is totally into it yes totally sold on global warming and I keep telling week nine degrees it is not catastrophic. it's not a catastrophic problem how do you account for the global warming and the global cooling in the past did you see the story that came out yesterday about you know all of the emergencies that didn't happen yeah in the past yeah yeah he saw it on the weather will wrong over and over and over again not on the blaze yesterday I'll see if I have a do you happen to have an I do yeah in nineteen sixty seven in the Salt Lake Tribune dire famine by nineteen seventy five. Dyer famine forecast by ninety it's already too late was the sub headline. Salt Lake Tribune also nineteen sixty seven everyone will disappear in a cloud of blue steam by nineteen eighty nine wow how you remember that day I don't believe in god yeah The New York Times in nineteen sixty nine full of pollution sees lack of time the trouble with almost all environmental problems according to Paul Ehrlich the population biologist is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people years dad so we lay we must.

Salt Lake Tribune Paul Ehrlich United States Dyer The New York Times nine degrees
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Believe it they all believe it. I mean there might be a few exceptions what have you been through public school in the United States you've been pretty well indoctrinated the global warming is real I got them with my own kids at least one of them is totally into it yes totally sold on global warming and I keep talking we nine degrees it is not catastrophic. it's not a catastrophic problem how do you account for the global warming and the global cooling in the past did you see the story that came out yesterday about you know all of the emergencies that didn't happen yeah in the past yeah yeah he saw it on the weather will wrong over and over and over again not on the blaze yesterday I'll see if I have a do you happen to have it I do yeah in nineteen sixty seven in the Salt Lake Tribune dire famine by nineteen seventy five. Dyer famine forecast by ninety it's already too late was the sub headline. Salt Lake Tribune also nineteen sixty seven everyone will disappear in a cloud of blue steam and play nineteen eighty nine wow wow you remember that day I don't believe in god yeah The New York Times in nineteen sixty nine full of pollution sees lack of time the trouble with almost all environmental problems according to Paul Ehrlich the population biologist is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people years dead so we lay we must.

Salt Lake Tribune Paul Ehrlich United States Dyer The New York Times nine degrees
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Believe it they all believe it. I mean there might be a few exceptions what have you been through public school in the United States you've been pretty well indoctrinated the global warming is real I got them with my own kids at least one of them is totally into it yes totally sold on global warming and I keep telling week nine degrees it is not catastrophic. it's not a catastrophic problem how do you account for the global warming and the global cooling in the past did you see the story that came out yesterday about you know all of the emergencies that didn't happen yeah in the past yeah yeah he saw it on the weather wrong over over over his son on the blaze yesterday I'll see if I have a do you happen to have an I do yeah in nineteen sixty seven in the Salt Lake Tribune dire famine by nineteen seventy five. Dyer famine forecast by ninety it's already too late was the sub headline. Salt Lake Tribune also nineteen sixty seven everyone will disappear in a cloud of blue steam like nineteen eighty nine wow I'll remember that day I don't believe we got yeah The New York Times in nineteen sixty nine full of pollution sees lack of time the trouble with almost all environmental problems according to Paul Ehrlich the population biologist is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people years dead so we lay we must.

Salt Lake Tribune Paul Ehrlich United States Dyer The New York Times nine degrees
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on KTOK

"Believe it they all believe it. I mean there might be a few exceptions what have you been through public school in the United States you've been pretty well indoctrinated the global warming is real I got them with my own kids at least one of them is totally into it yes totally sold on global warming and I keep telling week nine degrees it is not catastrophic. it's not a catastrophic problem how do you account for the global warming and the global cooling in the past did you see the story that came out yesterday about you know all of the emergencies that didn't happen yeah in the past yeah yeah he saw it on the weather wrong over and over and over again not on the blaze yesterday I'll see if I have a do you happen to have it I do yeah in nineteen sixty seven in the Salt Lake Tribune dire famine by nineteen seventy five. Dyer famine forecast by ninety it's already too late was the sub headline. Salt Lake Tribune also nineteen sixty seven everyone will disappear in a cloud of blue steam like nineteen eighty nine wow wow you remember that day I don't believe we got yeah The New York Times in nineteen sixty nine full of pollution sees lack of time the trouble with almost all environmental problems according to Paul Ehrlich the population biologist is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people years dead so we lay we must.

Salt Lake Tribune Paul Ehrlich United States Dyer The New York Times nine degrees
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"All believe it they all believe it. I mean there might be a few exceptions but have you been through public school in the United States you've been pretty well indoctrinated the global warming is real I got them with my own kids at least one of them is totally into it yes totally sold on global warming and I keep telling week nine degrees it is not catastrophic. it's not a catastrophic problem how do you account for the global warming and the global cooling in the past did you see the story that came out yesterday about you know all of the emergencies that didn't happen yeah in the past yeah yeah I saw it on the weather wrong over and over not on the blaze yesterday let's see if I have a do you happen to have an I do yeah in nineteen sixty seven in the Salt Lake Tribune dire famine by nineteen seventy five. Dyer famine forecast by ninety it's already too late was the sub headline. Salt Lake Tribune also nineteen sixty seven everyone will disappear in a cloud of blue steam and play nineteen eighty nine wow how you remember that day I don't believe we got now yeah The New York Times in nineteen sixty nine full of pollution sees lack of time the trouble with almost all environmental problems according to Paul Ehrlich the population biologist is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people years dad so we lay we must.

Salt Lake Tribune Paul Ehrlich United States Dyer The New York Times nine degrees
"paul ehrlich" Discussed on GrowthBusters

GrowthBusters

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"paul ehrlich" Discussed on GrowthBusters

"Obviously if you have five people your impact on life support systems is going to be less than if you have five billion people so the formulas Liz. I equals P Times eight times. T. P. is the population is the impact P. is the population size a is affluence. It's basically how much each person consumes. If you have five million people well driving hummers you have more impact than if you have five million people walking to work so p population times affluence or per capita consumption times t which is the technologies that you use to service that consumption Asian William Reese again so we've got a situation in which we're saying the growth in human technological capacity and human populations in the scale of the economy. That's completely unprecedented Paul Ehrlich again humanity.

Paul Ehrlich William Reese Liz T. P.
Paul Ehrlich, Dyes And Drugs

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Paul Ehrlich, Dyes And Drugs

"From synthetic dyes to wonder drugs by leap of scientific imagination on today's moment of science, one hundred thirty years ago, close available and nearly as many colors as they are now but things were improving among the most exciting new chemical products of the nineteenth century, where synthetic dyes with names like mauve amaranth, and Congo. Read a German medical student. Paul early was fascinated with what he learned about dies in his anatomy, classes, in the eighteen seventies, just as some dies stick to cotton, but not the wool. Some dies, staying only certain kinds of tissue or certain parts of a cell, but not others. The die Medellin blue, for example, stains, nerve cells, but not other cells. So methylene blue highlights the nerve cells in a tissue specimen. There was what early called chemical. Affinity between the methylene blue and the nerve cells now for early. She's great leap of scientific imagination. Maybe he thought a sick person or animal could be cured with a die that was stake, only to the bacteria causing the disease. If the ride I could be found and put into the bloodstream would attack the harmful bacteria like a magic bullet leaving the regular cells. Untouched early spent most of his career developing. This idea in nineteen ninety nine he developed the first safe and effective drug to treat syphilis in people polars work on the chemical affinity of dies and his magic bullet idea who had all the way to a self drugs and other edible attics. Still in use today. This moment of science comes from Indiana University, where on the web at a moment of science dot org. I'm Don glass.

Paul Congo Don Glass Syphilis Indiana University One Hundred Thirty Years
Climate Change’s Giant Impact on the Economy: 4 Key Issues

GrowthBusters

07:17 min | 3 years ago

Climate Change’s Giant Impact on the Economy: 4 Key Issues

"His human civilisation doomed. Are we living out our final years on earth? And is that good reason for despair? Let's explore these questions on this episode of the growth busters podcast. Before we dig in. Let's go to breaking news and listener feedback. I on the news front the organization having kids has created an action to urge the United Nations to support better, family planning. Include linked to this page where your action is requested. And I recommend it at this page. Having kids tells us several new studies have confirmed the dire threat posed by climate change, including its impact on the increasing threat of pestilence and crop losses. The severity of hurricanes. Another weather threats and the degradation of all ecosystems on earth fare start family planning is not only the most effective way to mitigate the dangers of climate change. It also addresses children's welfare crises such as poverty, inequality, hunger disease and threats of violence and terrorism a better family, planning model would advance all seventeen of the UN's. Sustainable development goals. All nations have a responsibility to act, please add your name to urge the secretary general to speak out for sustainable, family planning across the world. See the show notes for a link. So that you can add your name to this request having kids in case, you haven't heard of them they developed the child centered fair start family planning model the fair start model promotes smaller sustainable and more equitable families. So that we can all invest more in each child right from the start I'll include a link to their website as well. Next up a new green revolution a story in Yale environment. Three sixty and all include Lincoln the show notes. Has this headline scientists fix photosynthetic inefficiency boost crop yields forty percent? Tillis that scientists have found a way to boost crop growth by fixing a glitch in the photosynthesis process. And it's characterized as a breakthrough way for farmers to feed more people on less land. Now turns out that when plants convert carbon dioxide into water and sugars that fuel their growth, they apparently can't distinguish oxygen from carbon dioxide so they try to convert oxygen instead of CO two about twenty percent of the time. And this yields a toxin that the plants eliminate through photo respiration photo respiration uses energy, and reduces the plant's photosynthetic efficiency. Researchers believe they've found a way to shortcut photo respiration boosting plant growth by forty percent. This is from a study published in the journal science and co author of that study Donald or a professor of planting crops sciences at Illinois Carl are woes institute for genomic biology made this statement, and I'm quoting we could. Feed up to two hundred million additional people with the calories. Lost to photo respiration in the mid western US each year reclaiming even a portion of these calories across the world could go a long way to meeting the twenty first centuries rapidly expanding food demands driven by population growth and more affluent high-calorie diets. Oh, what can I say? Most people are without further thought going to think this is good news. We get another green revolution. Because if you're paying attention at all we're getting these forecasts that human population is going to just continue exploding from today's some point six or some point seven billion up to over eleven billion by the turn of the century. And a lot of hand wringing going on about how we're gonna feed all those people interesting because shoot back in the sixties and seventies. We were warned that we couldn't feed a growing population that we needed to end population growth because there would not be enough food to feed the growing population. Well, and it turns out the critics love to say Paul ehrlich's predictions were wrong. We innovated the green revolution came along. And we've been able to feed a growing population. Ever since now that lulls boosters into complacency, and they just assume we'll always be able to innovate our way into beating more and more people. I had my doubts. I really felt like, you know, there's no reason we should be able to count on another green revolution and affect the green revolution had an awful lot of flaws, and even if we stopped population growth at some point seven billion people, we can't using current technology feed all of those people in perpetuity, in fact, feeding most of those people is responsible for a huge percentage of the climate disruption that we are experiencing will be experiencing thanks to the carbon emissions of that. And ocean dead zones are result of all of the artificial fertilizers that are being used to magnify the crop yields to feed all those people unintended consequences of the green revolution are huge and unfortunate. So I'm not a big fan of searching for new technology to feed eleven billion. People. I think the innovative thing to do would be to just. Not go there. Find ways to end population growth long before we hit eleven billion people turned the corner and start letting population contract back to a sustainable level where we don't have to bet the farm so to speak on some new technological innovation hoping that it will feed eleven billion people, and that it won't have the negative consequences that the last technological revolution had that's just so risky. So I wasn't happy to see this story at Yale three sixty. I don't think it's good news. I think it's a big mistake for us to keep finding ways to feed more and more people because number one we have climate change the more people we have on the planet the more carbon emissions. We're gonna have no matter how clean and green. We become also what about water freshwater crises? We just don't have the water to grow the food to feed those people, even if we do improve crop efficiencies. We also don't have there are a number of raw

United Nations Yale United States Paul Ehrlich Tillis Lincoln Donald Trump Professor Illinois Forty Percent Twenty Percent