19 Burst results for "Paul Butler"

Supreme Court to have Barrett confirmation hearing in Washington DC this week

Reveal

01:11 min | Last month

Supreme Court to have Barrett confirmation hearing in Washington DC this week

"News. I'm Barbara Klein, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Amy Cockney, Barrett is vowing to rule based on law, not her personal views. In prepared remarks released today ahead of her Senate confirmation hearing that begins tomorrow. Barrett also says courts are not designed to right every wrong in public life. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports It's expected to be a bitter four day process. Judge Barrett is likely to face a barrage of questions, including issues and cases involving abortion, specifically the landmark Roe vs Wade decision. Senate Democrats are also likely to press her on whether a justice Barritt would recuse herself from a potential election dispute. Post November Georgetown law professor Paul Butler would judge here it would choose herself. There's not much binding law about when injustice should recuse herself. The Supreme Court level, It's pretty much up to her. Barrett is also certain to face questions about the affordable care act. The high court is set to hear a challenge to the law next month. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington

Judge Barrett Supreme Court Barritt Windsor Johnston Amy Cockney Senate NPR Barbara Klein President Trump Washington Paul Butler Professor ROE Wade
Senate Judiciary Takes Up Barrett Confirmation

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | Last month

Senate Judiciary Takes Up Barrett Confirmation

"Confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett get underway on. Capitol Hill next week. NPR's went Johnston reports. Senate. Republicans. WanNa confirmation vote before the election. While Democrats continue to push back Senate Democrats are expected to press judge Barrett on several key issues including abortion and whether she would recuse herself from a potential presidential election dispute. Georgetown law professor Paul, Butler says, Barrett will also face questions about a pending challenge to the affordable care act. Herself with regard to this case, it's likely that she would tip the balance in favor of overturning obamacare either in a narrow way based on the specific provisions that the court is considering four more. Supreme Court is expected to hear the legal challenge to the ACA next month Windsor Johnston NPR

Judge Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Windsor Johnston Npr Senate NPR Johnston ACA Georgetown Professor Paul Butler
"paul butler" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Your emergency situation station following is a recorded program this is the best of the past what we show both Thompson back in two thousand eight when I first ran for governor a guy named Paul Butler who I'd never met before put a Pat McCrory for governor yard sign in his yard and he was in economic development director for that southeast region well after a loss that campaign that region was approached by a major democratic legislative leader and said if Paul Bulger doesn't resign you will not get funding any more for your organization for the state North Carolina because Paul Butler and put a Pat McCrory sign in his yard which was his constitutional right to do Paul Butler took the high road and resigned so the organization would continue to get state funding or support of love this guy ever since it was one of most heartbreaking stories are heard because after I lost the campaign is when I heard that story that a supporter of mine lost his job because he was a supporter of my gubernatorial campaigns five years later when I was elected governor I he is well qualified to be a member of the pro accountability committee so he was the one I reviewed all the parole releases prior to being released in the just a dear friend and I got a letter this morning with eighty dollars cash in the letter said I'm turning eighty years old this is eighty dollars for you to give to someone else and backed by the virus I just my heart just went wild Butler you're on the air welcome Happy Birthday Paul good morning governor thank you for having me itself it is a modern a privilege to serve the new administration will not listen to you sure but just at my argument marginal career when he was mayor of Charlotte for example certainly when you look down the mall I have flooded the Gulf business partners that once flattered that I was one of eighty friends that got sent eighty dollars in cash for your birthday and you told me to go spend it on someone who's impacted by this virus whether be first responders healthcare workers family members small business service providing organisations friends neighbors anybody and what made you come up with this I I loved it you just put it I I I got to open it up this morning by the way I opened up the cash first and then I read the letter what I got to give it away what made you come up with this idea because I think it's a super idea well governor eighty is a milestone in other admitted France before this that wonderful parties in the bathroom we we can't do that and this is just such a time in the years there's so many people out of work there's I mean down here to South Beach that shot that I have I haven't seen my grand children since since Alabama who live in Charlotte we live in Charlotte you know I love you to death that grass on mine lows in Manzanillo plays golf reviews all he takes my money yeah I really appreciate that but I just want to R. I was drinking water so that I can very and it just kind of came in they are I'd I'd thought about it and and then as I said there's there's such a need would what's more we are in our our economy and our society right now and then I've had known numerous people that it's called a lot of your good friend Joe garner called me yes former former lieutenant governor in my head at ABC alcohol commission a good friend of mine and yours was at least we've all been good Republicans for Walt and Jim was going to turn it into a food program that is helping folks and and the Rocky Mount area I just I don't have a number for our good friend street will recall needs just moves Justin Wallace yeah when we open this ladder and and and I'm getting at all I'm grateful to the young lady that helped me put it all together you know if you're down here white lake you don't exactly have the best of our use of the system but we we got it all together and you thanks does the you know you'd be on that list of a different most people don't have eighty friends include myself but you if you had to be you've got so many friends in the state and then this nation and and I so what do you recommend if you what are you doing with your eighty did you give yourself eighty dollars what are you doing with it and I'm helping some folks that are unemployed they're just I mean you know Floyd county was which one of four states in the four counties in the state in and out on this I'm helping a few folks out there just that is that that that are unemployed that just made money for basic basic food you know the answer to that so and on a number of people as I have mentioned that the that's what they're going through with it and I'm thinking about I hate to say I'm thinking about giving it as tips to service workers who are not making a lot of money but they're working and I admire you know of the Bojangles drive in through woman who gets up every morning at five four o'clock in the morning and you know working for probably just above minimum wage and I'm thinking about just giving it all out tips what do you think about that all up for the mine called me last night his wife is suffering from all the major and they said Paul on what we have a famous hamburger place years then was found by Janney said I'm a great boxer out five dollars gift certificates when you have all the workers in American law what a great the nursing homes workers so they're the ones risking their life probably more than anyone else the rest of their lives from we have a lot of our hardware the hamburger place your call Melvin was frowned upon I know Melvin's very well you know I beat Melvin's many time I love it love in downtown called me yesterday he loves you all of a sudden this sounded good clothing store right across street to stellar store about you without you all sure Farman Ricky call yes ma'am and Paul it's just it's just been very very nasty people call and say sure what they're talking about good for them but because of the the bottom shelves and all other this was when I was thirty years old he said I should all have a you're the best person in America and North Carolina today officially pronounced by the bat records show I love you I miss you and give my best to you know who all all will ever a hug for me I'm a Steeler from you one day buddy god bless you Paul Butler thank you take care the past Missouri show with Votel said Monday morning eight to ten your emergency situation station winter ball show all these things are going to be adjustments that we're going to have to make in our daily lives just to live our lives it's always been it's special occasions and special events the airport out large event that you're trying to attend that you put up with that stuff are you gonna put up with it to go in the supermarket.

Thompson Paul Butler Pat McCrory
"paul butler" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

13:33 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on At Liberty

"From the a._c._l._u. this is at liberty. I'm emerson sykes a staff attorney here at the a._c._l._u. and your host this week were replaying an interview from earlier this year with paul butler a scholar former prosecutor and the author of cold policing black men. When i spoke with paul his book had been banned in arizona prisons and after we recorded the interview thanks to the intervention of the a._c._l._u. Arizona lifted its band and incarcerated people in arizona can now read chokehold and benefit from its insightful the analysis of our mass incarceration problem for disclosure. I worked on the letter that forced arizona to lift the ban. Hope you enjoy the.

Arizona paul butler staff attorney prosecutor
"paul butler" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

15:34 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on At Liberty

"Commit and took it to a jury trial and beat my case, while I was working in that quickey book Trayvon Martin got killed, then Michael Brown and Ferguson. Eric garner in Staten Island. Sandra bland died in jail sale in Texas, and suddenly a book about how black men should act when they have a encounter with the police were prosecutor. It didn't seem to meet the times. It didn't seem to rise to the occasion, Trayvon Martin was on his way to dad's house when he was gunned down by George Zimmerman. He didn't need a male role model. Mike Brown in Ferguson was supposed to start college. The week after he was shot by police officer. Sandra blam was college. On her way to a new job, and Texas when she got pulled over for driving. Well luck. And so I wanted to make an intervention that was more profound than just a guide to St. law for African American men. So that's still a part of the book, but it's not the main part now, the main part is what I hope is really deep analysis of exactly what's going on with our criminal legal process, by the way, criminal legal processes attorney, that lots of us are using now rather than criminal Justice system because there's nothing just about our system, so true and full disclosure that we've actually been communicating because the book, Joe cold was actually recently banned in Arizona prisons in violation of inmates first amendment rights, and I'm curious, why do you think that the book was banned? You know, one of the provocative. Ideas in show code is Abba, Lucien. If we think about the prison abolition. Yes, if we think about the struggles for racial Justice for African Americans. They've always been about abolition firstly abolition of slavery, and the abolition of the old, Jim crow. And so in show code I recommend the abolition of the new Jim crow. So why would that make the book dangerous to the Arizona state prison system? Which is one of the phrases that I believe they use when they sent the letter saying that they weren't going to allow people who are locked up there to reach Okocha. I don't know sometimes people when they analyze the system, they think about a prison industrial complex the way that back in the day, we used to talk about military industrial complex. And so they're definitely a whole lot of peop-. People who are making a whole lot of money off of the people who are in custody in the United States right now. So maybe concern is that if prison abolition takes off that will eliminate jobs, obviously, there won't be prisoned. I have a lot of friends who work in the criminal legal process, people who are prosecutors who are police officers and some correctional officers. And these are working class people. They take those jobs because they're often good union jobs. You can retire early. And so I'm not mad at people who work in the system, and, in fact, in so-called, there's a wonderful story about a labor organizer who worked for union that advocates for abolition the concern was that union also represent some correctional officers and the it wanted. To get the officers to buy in. And so the first thing he did was say, well, how do you feel about your jobs again correctional officers? They don't like their workplaces. They're smelly. They're violent loud. They're not crazy about their jobs, most of the time, and they certainly know that the people who are locked up aren't getting any kind of rehabilitation from being there, but it's a job and terms of the wages and benefits. It's a good job so long story short. These guys mainly men in this. They were like if we could get this salary that we can get our early retirement and do something else. We're all in another reason I think that Arizona may have ban. My book is it does contain ideas that would transform not only the criminal legal process, but race relations. Social justice. They're not all my ideas. I use the research stories of people who've been in the system and experts who written about this system to come up with some transformative ideas. But to the extent that anybody thinks that my book is dangerous to the status quo. I'm kinda proud of that to almost a badge of honor and just to be clear to quote from the book. You say, I wanna suggest that violence against police officers or any other person is unjustified on moral grounds and because it would hurt the movement. So it certainly a radical take. But it is also a take the disavows violence, as a useful means of pushing back against the system. Absolutely. So that's section of the book where are looking at ways that the law and society have transformed to make things better for half. Americans, I'm looking at how resistance worked and the African American community. So I think about civil rights, Emmerson, I wouldn't be talking to you, but for civil rights so rights, are, what allow my mom and dad to go to integrated schools after round versus board of education. Civil rights are what accomplished affirmative action, which allowed me to go to fancy schools, like Yale for college harbor for law school doesn't mean I wasn't qualified, but the reality is before affirmative action, African American people simply weren't present in those elite institutions at the same time black people encountered discrimination every single market, we enter, whether it's trying to get a cab in the street or a mortgage for a home until civil rights turns out didn't do everything that we hoped. And I looked at other ways. Transform the system and the idea of self defense of responding to violence with violence is also a consistent theme. And African American resistance. We know that slavery, the abolition of was accomplished by violence and not just any violence, but the most bloody destructive war in American history. Jay Z said a few years ago, Obama change going com, or on by the hood guns on me and when I interrogated that idea. And so I said, as a moral person, I don't think that violence is right? I don't think that it's an appropriate response. And I say that based on my faith based on my ethics. If Ireland's means hurting another human being it's absolute. Not the way to go. I also don't think it would work as a political strategy. African Americans try to use violence, as a way of achieving some kind of Justice. I think that we would be summarily crushed. And so, when I think about the ways that chokehold might transform prisons is certainly not in any way that would involve violence or hurting any other human being. That's my whole problem with the system now especially if we think about prisons, what it does is, it's an official form of massive human suffering. It's a drip-by-drip day by day form of violence, and because I think any form of violence is immoral. I'm opposed to violence against Lisa. Officers violence against correctional officers in the same way that I'm opposed to the violence of prison and the violence of American policing today. Very powerful argument, and I do wanna come back to some of your ideas about how we move forward and how we achieve the goals that you're trying to reach. But I want to maybe take a step back and talk about your own passed to where you are. Now. You talked about the corrections officers and the police officers, you know, in your own experience, as a prosecutor why when you left, those fancy schools that you mentioned. Why did you decide to become a prosecutor, you know it's funny because I was the last person my friends from law school would expect to become a prosecutor. They could see me going to work for the ACLU or the legal defense fund, or even being a defense attorney, but a prosecutor Paul Butler. No way. I heard that prosecutors have all this power in all this discussion and really wanting to make an intervention in the criminal legal process that would be important. That would be meaningful. I thought, well, why do I go in as a undercover, brother? What if I see if I can use all that power and all that discretion to change the system from within? So that's what made me go into the office. At what I found was that rather than change the system, the system changed me. So it's not like on the first day on the job of the prosecutor's office. I started calling the defendants credence and deuce bags, which is the way that a lot of the. Prosecutors referred to them. I never got that bad. But, like a lot of lawyers on competitive. I'm ambitious the way that you move up in the prosecutor's office to lock up as many people as you can for as long as you can. It turned out that I was kinda good at that. I had the best conviction rate in my section I was doing misdemeanor crimes locking people for drugs for gun possession for simple assault, getting in the fight stuff like that. And in a bizarre way, I enjoyed it. Now when I thought, why is that? I don't know. I mean, some of it might be psychological in my be a form of the politics over specked ability, that if you go to criminal court in DC, you would think that why people don't commit crimes. You would think that why people don't you? Use drugs. They don't get into fight. They don't spill the black people man who system, bad dudes. And so, maybe one of the reasons I enjoy my work at the time that I was doing was that I was this plane to the jurors who were almost all African American in DC at that time, and to the judges into anybody else who is watching that we weren't all like that, that some of us know how to do the right thing, and maybe part of it was also the fact that at that time there was a crack epidemic. And the democ was marked by a lot of violence in DC, and it was easy to be seduced into the idea that we prosecutors were doing well lords work that we were the only thing that was standing between the good citizens of DC. And chaos. And of course, now that I've studied, the failed war on drugs, and understand that a lot of the violence, that's associated with drugs is actually about them being illegal when you take away that illegal market. You take away the violence and also understanding that there's no way that we can arrest and prosecute our way out of the drug problem. And so for some drugs where it is an issue that people shouldn't be using them the way to address that issue, isn't locking up folk. So I know that now I didn't know that. So all that say is I went into the prosecutor's office with some progressive intentions, hoping to make a difference, and that didn't happen. Well, I'm interested in what created the turn what open your eyes to these issues that you now, recognize two things. One was kind of slowly evolving understanding that I didn't go to Harvard Law, School, or lock black people. So even if there were some folks, who are prosecuted who I thought probably deserve some kind of close provisioned by the government. I don't know if that has to be in cages, but I do think that when people harm others, there's a role for the state, but the way that role was expressed in the district of Columbia was this laser focus on black men. And after a while I think for any prosecutor, but especially a prosecutor color that relentless day to day work of putting people in prison of making arguments when Kwami says that he didn't consent to the. A search of his backpack, and the cops is just call me did consent, the argument the prosecutor makes us. Kwami is a liar. Don't believe that day to day work takes a toll man. It grinds you down. And so that was the kind of slow berm that I couldn't continue to do this work, the big from dramatic thing that happened was that when I was doing public corruption, I left the local prosecutor's office and it was working for main just this had the biggest case in the section was the junior lawyer and a team that was prosecuting the United States, Senator for corruption while I was doing that case I got arrested, I'm prosecuted.

prosecutor officer Arizona United States DC Trayvon Martin Sandra blam Sandra bland Eric garner Texas Staten Island Jim crow attorney African American community Harvard Law Mike Brown George Zimmerman
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"What would you like to say study? After study your firms that the police talked to African American teen IX people very differently than how they talked to light, folks. And again, we've got lots of evidence of this from body cams that police are often required to use and also from cell phone videos. You know, the larger issue goes to a point that President Obama's task force twenty first century policing mate. And that's that police culture needs to change the problem. Obama's commission said is that cops think of themselves like warriors, especially in communities of color, their mentality is it's us against them. And in a democracy. Police shouldn't look at citizens. As enemy combatants. And so President Obama's commissioned set they ought to instead think of themselves as guardians as caretakers of the community. And if you think about that that would change the kind of people who want to be cops how they interact with citizens, and especially how they're perceived in communities of color, if they do go to that guardian mindset rather than that warrior mentality. Well, Paul Butler. I wanna explode with us in detail something else that that Brian Callister reminded of us in this case because it's very very common that there was the immediate claim made by the officer that he was in fear for his safety. I mean in case after case we hear this. This is the claim that officers make and in many many situations. One can imagine that. That's absolutely true. Because split-second decisions have to be made. There's a lot of there's a cloud of uncertainty when events are moving fast, totally understandable. But there are also cases that end up in court where ultimately video evidence is presented that that really sort of weakens. This argument that the officers were in fear for their safety or their lives. And yet in almost every single one of those cases, those officers have been found innocent. It's been it's been a successful defence. Is there a problem there? Absolutely. So police kill about one thousand people a year in the last fifteen years fewer than eighty police officers have been prosecuted for murder manslaughter in the majority of those were not convicted in the cases that happened charged..

President Obama officer Brian Callister Paul Butler murder fifteen years
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So bottom line street law lesson here during the traffic stop. Yes, the police do have that at thirty after the traffic stop in you are free to go. Okay. So let's take a step back now and get to this bigger question because it seems to happen over and over and over again that we have an incident that happens during unrest. And I know I I mean, I use the word incident broadly, right sometimes these incidents ends in the deaths of the people being arrested and time. And again, the first version of the story we hear as typical is from law enforcement themselves how and then and then in the months or even years later as shown here by the work of Brian. Alastair? We have other versions other pictures videos that come out over time that gives us a fuller sense of the actual event that happens so Paul Butler. My big story is how do we navigate? How do we handle what? Now seems to be repeated cases of emerging or changing narratives in in in these incidents. So the blue wall of silence means that when cops themselves are suspected of breaking the law. Police close rinks there's no stronger code of don't be a snitch, then among law enforcement officers and law and policy can also prevent the truth from getting out. So if you look at police union contracts police get to control the narrative because under these contracts, they talked to union representatives and lawyers before they make any statement. Sometimes the cop who did the shooting or use the forces made aware of what other witnesses have said. And then we see that victims and other witnesses are.

Alastair Paul Butler Brian
"paul butler" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The Young Turks

"And I'll give you some other examples we need to call this what it is eight crime. It is a hate crime. And until we change the law. This is going to keep happening. You knew in a context of business and civil law. If you frivolously sue people you get in trouble, we need a law. So that you can't frivolously call the police on in particular people of color because what was done to this individuals hate crime and needs to start being treated legally like it's a hate crime. So this is a really interesting point, let me back it up with a couple of examples and quote here. So Paul Butler is a professor at Georgetown law and the oath wrote chokehold policing black men, and he talks about an writes about unnecessary nine one one calls on what they. Lead to he said, it's one of the police are called on African Americans. It has a very negative impact on those black people, even if they are not arrested or beat up or killed. But remember, unfortunately that is a very real possibility in today's America. And we have a lot of instances where an innocent person is nine one one called on them. But then the cops think, oh, he might be armed. And then you've got a massive terrible situation. But professor rollers point is even if that doesn't happen. It has significant negative consequences. He says you're required to justify your existence and your presence in a white space makes you feel like less of a citizen and less of a human being it's impossible to overstate the adverse consequences, and that is exactly right because they put Paul in this case in a situation where he constantly justify his existence and his humanity. Yes, I'm a real person. Yes. That's a real check. Yes. I have a real job. We don't believe you. We don't believe you. We don't believe you. We don't believe you, need identification, etc. Fine. Okay. We don't believe you. We're not going to give you the money not buying. We don't believe we're going to arrest. You even though we have no evidence that what you're saying is wrong. Right. We're going to call the cops on you preemptively because we just we your black. We don't believe you. And we had a Cup on the show. Once who said, he's white anybody about policing, African Americans have brutal cops have been throughout. He said ever gonna Americans in this country have unanimously telling you they're cops have been abusing them for over one hundred years. Did you think they were all lying to you? And unfortunately for a lot of folks in this country, the answer is yes, they just don't believe them. No matter what happens, and that is a crazy extra burden to put on some of our citizens. And and the thing is if you're a minority in America, especially if you're a black man in America, there's no winning. There's literally. Nothing you can do to win because let's say your struggling financially, and you need some help automatically people make all sorts of assumptions about you. And they push all sorts of stereotypes about you. But even if you do what everyone demands that you do right? Go out there, work hard, earn a paycheck earn a living. You still have to deal with this. Like, there's no winning. There's literally nothing that's that some black men in this country can do that will erase, you You know. know years of stereotypes and nonsense about who they are. And what they're about our year to the comments below. There'll be some people say oh my job. He up this whole stretch me. But he doesn't matter because they're not listening. They don't care. They see the race. And they're done with it right now. We on the other hand defend everyone. If an old white guy, that's also terrible, but historically and currently disproportionately it happens African Americans more famous examples black women playing golf have cops called on them. A little golf course. What could they possibly smoke and don't want wrong? That's insane. Somebody eating at subway was like, oh what he's eating sandwiches subway. Anybody like? But seriously, like if you're a right wing, if you see a white guy in a subway, would you just be like, oh, we got to call the cops on him. No. You know, you wouldn't you know, you wouldn't..

Paul Butler America professor golf Georgetown law one hundred years
"paul butler" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"I'm like if you ever get confused about what the answer is just say money, and then work your way backwards, right? Because we also have to remember it's not just Michael Cohen, the lawyer of Donald Trump. It's Michael Cohen, the deputy finance chair of the RNC, which now implicate some of their members of their publican party who have been very quiet, and so very supportive of this president. So if Muller is doing his due-diligence of the wire doing their due diligence they're not just looking at the individuals who have money who have possibly been doing pay to play. But also, why are certain members of their publican party so supportive of this particular president, and what do they know? And so this this opens up a much larger conversation about not just the president. But his administration and the larger Republican party in the past two years can final word to you. Where does the investigation go from here? What is your big takeaway after what we learned tonight with this investigation? This is just another legal thorn in the side, probably not even the most damaging or dangerous one. But in a presidency that is. Increasingly dominated by an consumed by these various investigations, and it's going to be something that Trump is gonna take more and more of the president's time going forward, legal resources, personnel resources. It's going to be devil this presidency. A lot of people been saying this week has put the prisoner tremendous amount of pressure. We've seen some of that on Twitter and his reactions. I can only imagine what it's going to be like in the coming hours, Kevin Delaney and Paul Butler. Thank you very much Christina Nick stick around for a little bit longer. Coming up. NBC news confirming Trump was the third man in the room for those talks about a legally paying hush money to women also new reporting about the potential legal exposure for executive that the Trump organization, including the president's own family, plus a Russian agent pleading guilty for trying to influence American politics, and she's now cooperating with the feds and tonight conflicting reports about whether President Trump match be considering his son-in-law Jared Kushner to be the White House chief of staff one more thing on his plate. Mahyuddin in for Ari Melber buckle up because this is a wild night of breaking news. And we're just getting started..

president Donald Trump Michael Cohen Republican party Jared Kushner Twitter Ari Melber NBC Kevin Delaney Muller RNC Christina Nick chief of staff White House executive Paul Butler two years
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Georgetown law professor, Paul Butler and Stephen Brown from the urban institute, and we're taking your calls as well. Rochelle, Riley, I want to come back to you and just actually, I want to get you all to sort of comment what we heard before the break run a former police officer from. Mm, southeast Michigan, I think he said. Where he did a study in found that the majority of non emergency calls actually came from people in his district from from people of color. So does this suggest that this is a wider an even wider problem? Not the. Racially motivated calls isn't a huge problem, but is this, does this suggest an even wider problem? What do you think we're show? Well, I think that the scholars on the program right that these are all vestiges of a of a time when this country lived in segregation and there are people that still wish for it, and there are people who try to make it happen by either staying away from people or making it impossible for people to be around them. The idea that you don't want someone in a pool or you don't want a little girl selling water. It wasn't about the water. It was about not being comfortable with those people being in that space. I think that what we have to do is get to a point in this country where we decide that we don't wanna live with the color line anymore. When WBZ boys said that color would be the color line would be the problem of the twentieth century. I'm sure he had no idea that it would be the problem of the twenty-first and we have to do something before it's the problem of the twenty second. I think. One of the challenges here and Paul Butler. Let me come to you with this is is when these things happen for obvious reasons, they mean different things to different people. So I want to read a comment from our website from Brian four thousand who writes, I have to be honest most of these cases except for a couple don't look racially motivated. It seems like now, anytime a white person calls the police on a black person person, racism is simply assumed. This is not a recipe for a stable society. I think no one is taking time to evaluate each case before the social media mob ruins people's lives. Respond to that pole. So learn some history, my friend, there's a whole history year. So in the antebellum cells, when a white person made a false accusation against an African American, she was lynched. Lack people weren't even allowed to offer testimony in court against light folks. And yes, we've come a ways since then, but if we look at how our criminal legal process works, it still very focused on people of color and especially black men. So we have more black people in the criminal Justice system now than there were slaves in eighteen fifty. And so a lot of the starts with that nine one one call which isn't colorblind. Again often it's it's all about race. People say, well, what do you want. The police to do. So if we look at some of these instances, the four of black women who were moving luggage out of an Airbnb. The police are called that doesn't happen to life folks who at least life folks don't know about it because the police does role by I'm former prosecutor, I know how much discretion police have in. So Darren, the young man who was moving into the apartment in New York City. Again, the police showed up and they saw a young black man moving, but they still put you through the process you're force by armed officers of the government to justify your presence. What's your name? Show some idea. What are you doing here? Do you have your lease? All of that doesn't happen to why people anywhere near the rate. It happens to folks of color, Stephen Brown..

Paul Butler Stephen Brown Riley Michigan Georgetown urban institute Rochelle Airbnb officer professor Brian prosecutor New York City Darren twenty second
"paul butler" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"At home he's facing twenty to thirty years in jail is convicted and it seems likely he will be convicted he is under an enormous amount of pressure and muller has tried every step of this way to tighten the grip on him make him eventually cave and come in and tell him everything he knows paul butler as a former prosecutor i'm sure you've seen people under indictment try to affect possible witnesses in their cases but what do you make what what what appears to be the case here is that these witnesses were either immediately in contact with the government about this or had already been in contact with the government so it seems as if these unnamed witnesses knew exactly who to tell as soon as this happened yeah so the very day that manafort is indicted he starts reaching out to potential witnesses by techs and calls joe let's get our story together you know there's a that we should have registered because we were lobby in the united states but you know really lobbying in europe so we didn't have to register right right they wanna know they said i'm not going to have this conversation and so some of them actually called the prosecutor one because they don't want that kind of exposure and be this is so blatant it's so obviously wrong it really ticks judges off because it goes to the integrity of the judicial process so i think mother wants to get this in front of judge jackson because it's going to make her think very seriously about how the man afford sit in jail until the trial that gives muller more bargaining power the other thing lords is that this is evidence of consciousness of guilt for the actual trial because you don't try to suborn perjury you don't try to shape when his testimony unless you think they're going to incriminate you at the trial what do you think's going to happen on june fifteenth will she revoked the bail you know the judge has a lot of discretion but again this is something that when it goes to how the court operates judges take very seriously so i expect that the judge is going to various seriously.

muller paul butler prosecutor manafort united states jackson perjury joe europe thirty years
"paul butler" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on AM Joy

"Why my name wow a police investigation into the incident cleared the officers calling their actions justified but the teens family is considering suing and the case once again raises questions about how and when police used force back with me paul butler author of chokehold policing black men and maya wiley of the new school so those videos are really excruciating to why a parent you'd think if that was my kid of course i would sue and yet the neutral general in new jersey released their their policy on the use of forces physical forces employed when necessary to overcome subjects physical resistance to the exertion of law enforcement officers authority or to protect persons or property examples include wrestling resisting subs to the ground using wrist locks arm locks striking with the hands or feet you can't punch in the face or other similar methods of hand hand confrontation wisconsin report finds a police officer was justified they this is what the report said from watching the video and talking to po olsen it appears the strikes to the head knock on the punches in the face ffective even though peel olsen didn't put much behind those strikes there are five key rules for the use of force according to wisconsin da tee system and one of those reeds once you have gained control of subject you must reduce the level of force to that needed to main taint control and they say after peel olsen strikes the person the the teenager he falls down appeal olson's yes late so these officers are falling policy they punch you in the face were called use of force continuum which allow the police to start with harsh commands using their voice and then use their gestures it ratchets up to non lethal tragedies like stun guns all the way up to duds and so you know people say how can the police still be doing this don't they know at least that they could be videotape well part of it is there's something about there inside especially about african americans that still even if they're being videotaped it's still going to control.

officer olson paul butler wisconsin olsen
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"White americans feel or be seeing officers in the suspicious way because of the prevalence of these issues of misconduct and brutality paul butler you were giving me a look that you wanted to jump into this conversation because like the caller i'm an african american man and i'm a former law enforcement officer i was a prosecutor for years in the district of columbia and i'm very concerned about public safety including the safety of african american men on the street and so that makes me think about the ultimate sterling case thank god from video tape because all you have to do is look at that tape and understand that mister sterling did not have to die he was presenting no threat the police didn't even know that he had a gun so part of it is again about training every officer should learn in the academy that when you get the rather familiar call that someone has a gun you don't roll up in that person involuntarily exposure yourself and then use that as an excuse to shoot the person down use supposed to conceal yourself and communicate and that happens all the time with white male suspects who have gun it rarely happens with african americans specs i wanna sorry i didn't mean interrupted their ball do you wanna finish that that's not so again at the end of the day the concerns about public safety you know so roenick to me that i was in sacramento a couple of weeks ago and the chief of police chief han actually came to a presentation that i was giving about black men and the police and he gets it he like a number of black men has had his own bad experiences with the beliefs even though he's a cop when he was a teenager he got arrested for resisting arrest and so he understands the problem and i'm really looking to him now to you know not just talk the talk but walk the walk wants pacific concern is again these cops and sacramento they muted the of the immune it the the volume so that no one could hear what they were saying that's a crime that's conspiracy to obstruct justice as an african american man i wouldn't feel safe on the streets of sacramento with those police officer.

officer prosecutor columbia mister sterling paul butler sacramento han
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi thanks for taking my call i'm a first time caller i've got two points i wanna make it real quick the first thing is i think it's going to continue to happen if you don't have any type of real consequences i'm gonna military infantry been deployed twice before and we have rules of engagement and if you broke those rules of engagement with daily force it you weren't supposed to you better believe like you were going to get punished you only sensitive work you want to have to do some time i know a lot of soldiers overseas that have maybe treated you know a terrorist harshly and got time in prison where in america you have police officers that could kill somebody and nothing happens to them they just set free you know so my first point is that there's gotta be punishments but if it doesn't stop to happen and it continues to happen is is is making a huge divide you know as a black american you know i'm definitely very conservative you know i'm pro military i'm pro police officers lovely officers you know i have a lot of friends that are police officers but when you have incidents like this what you have is the black community is is is they're starting to be anti government anti police department they don't want to join the military they don't want to you on the place department and they look at them as the enemy you know so i there come so point to where you know you have everybody here in america with good you know i mean what is it gonna stop harrison had said to great points and i really appreciate your perspective and thank you for putting those points on the table paul butler when it come to you on the first part of what harrison was talking about why are there so few prosecutions i mean is this a case of prosecutors being reluctant to prosecute white police officers or or is it that the standard needs necessarily to be so high what.

america harrison paul butler
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Which is demanding these grotesque responses or is there something racially maybe or something bias with the police or a combination of both but i just wanted to offer that perspective it just such a horror that happened to us here well happen to those two officers here in tampa and of course the community is affected of course john and paul butler i'll come to you on that respond respond to john i mean he sort of raising the question again that i asked earlier i mean sort of not to lose sight of the fact about the the risk of police officer takes every time he or she approaches a closed door for example and you know i don't think as a society we lose sight of the valour and bravery that we expect of our first responders and evidence of that is that when someone takes the life of a police officer there's a counter bility as there should be there's transparency we know exactly the number of police officers who were killed in the line of duty thank god that number is going down every year we don't have that same transparency with a number of us citizens who are killed by cops we know it's way above one thousand but we don't know more and there's not accountability there's not prosecutions or not arrest when cops illegally killed african american people and after the break i want to come back to that very question and ask why so few prosecutions we're discussing police shootings and what we can or can't do about the we'll be right back i'm anthony brooks this is on point.

paul butler officer anthony brooks tampa john
"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Him and then execute him and again that is kind of a systemic cultural problem right that you know it's it's the snap judgment of implicit bias in some of these cases but it's also this kind of culture of racism that's invaded many police departments and gives them that kind of you know macho kind of masculine you know toxicity that allows them to treat all black men in this category and kind of a blanket categorization i think when we talk about any complicated issues in this country when we talk about a culture of racism i it's sort of hard to push back against that but i want to ask you about this one issue and i've talked to a lot of cops over the years and i'm always reminded by them and i'll come to come to you paul butler as a former prosecutor on this they're engaged in dangerous work they have to make split second life and death decisions and so the standard for prosecution for conviction is necessary sarily high because of the dangerous work there involved i mean can you just talk a little bit about that or respond to that idea because i don't wanna give the idea that we're sort of making the case that all cops out there are sort of trigger happy reckless crazy guys not at all i don't think the police officers are any more races than law professors are faith leaders or anybody else so again i think that when we look at the work that we ask our first responders to do it's very difficult and sometimes they're not a clip with the kinds of skills that they need to respond to the kind of crisis that make people call nine one one often those involve relationship trauma people who are in mental health crisis or sometimes even physical health crisis and cops often just don't have the skill to respond adequately to those circumstances but what we do know is that we police officers have this increase.

paul butler prosecutor
"paul butler" Discussed on Slate's Represent

Slate's Represent

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on Slate's Represent

"Uh uh sleep with anger we really lucky to the to get people like your ed pressman carry charlie nicholas as the people like that as produces involved in in it we were very lucky the timing was right in many ways so um because it was a film the people can really identify i mean a produces and things like that hollywood say why i could see this going to be do diverted while the box office as looking at one of these films that i are rich in ivory may they put it out and it didn't do what the box office on it and had a limited release but they allowed it to stay in the 80s and a long enough we started gaining momentum a word of mouth in word of mouth and finally it started doing very well and down it actually when academy award uh was it how it's innocent me later that he does article about in the paper here how in down here now in the film isn't doing well in the first three or four days maybe the first night it opens you know it's gone um you know so doesn't give a chance mia won't be so lit to sleep with anger like you said it's it's it's hard to classify it's it's a such rama a family drama about eight well danny glover plays harry mention harry mansion he is a now he's more of a drifter he says is a guy from the south who kind of just swoops in on an old old friends who have once and would witness alvin now live in la and there's a lot of uh their superstition going on there the lead character gideon who is pipe up by paul butler he's frequently telling his gr.

hollywood gideon paul butler charlie nicholas danny glover alvin la four days
"paul butler" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"Has a has been taking it no i don't think he's gonna play motsy i was thinking that i was the only i was thinking you would pick and so i could just take him last and he he will all joy since it all all weighed on that then um okay so arctic let me see i'll take a i'll take bradley beal i think he you know he played really well last year didn't get enough love average twenty points per game i have i have some nice shooters on my team now we could weaken rule out a steph curry klay thompson brad beal kevin durant lineup and i like that a lot on off on off until at least yeah with all the small thirds you happy but as llp up rather builder um i will take i will take gordon hayward because i think he impala george flavor similar again so that was one of your first sticks yeah that's a that's a good one yeah he's a steal pretty lay you got you gotta you've got chris paul butler and hayward very lay those are very good picks um i think my next pick than we'll be um church trail again the list of who we add who i missed on so far we're trying to run out of options here um i'll take optic kyrghiz now because well actually non how do i have onetwothree worth shelves i got about all these kyrghiz go it lasts for you to speak picked up this guy's netted completely destroyed well here's here's the thing though if i take high realize i don't feel bad about taking a player last because there a reason for it i knew you were going to take him so no one gets really embarrassed no one asked to be that last pick so cardi's going to be my last week for that reason i have a same way there in the actual allstar draft if they're glenn based on game theory.

gordon hayward chris paul butler bradley kevin durant glenn
"paul butler" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"So little that we've actually known until quite recently about how these these creatures offer excellent great emily what your chatter iron picking up on the philander casteel verdict that we talked a little bit about last week in sunday's other verdicts in police killings of unarmed people black people where jeurys have not been finding police officers guilty it's been a rough recent spate of that so i listen to a such an interesting by paul butler who is a law professor at georgetown calls himself a renegade prosecutor and he has because he used to be a prosecutor he has a new book coming out i think next month called choke hold about policing black man paul is an extraordinary thinker on these issues really provocative and there's a lot of law and this book but also a lot of culture and a lot about his own experience both as a prosecutor and then someone who was falsely accused of a crime so i recommend this book and then i also want to recommend a new podcast called cerebral naas i'm sure i am saying that wrong the women who started this podcast are stanford law students their names are yvette bore ha and cynthia amezcua i apologize for whatever pronunciation mistakes i just made with that but in any case set abhran us they tell me means brainy bad asses in spanish and they're talking about legal issues they're talking about their own responses to things like the full ondo casteel verdict and their voices are really worth listening to so check it out cerebral us on i tunes etcetera students boom.

paul butler professor prosecutor yvette georgetown cynthia amezcua