22 Burst results for "Paul Butler"

"paul butler" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"Well apparently there's virtually no area of life that a communist government doesn't want to control that includes carry your playlists china's ministry of culture and tourism announced. It would introduce a list of songs. Banned from appearing on karaoke playlists effective october. First officials said karaoke. Singing should be restricted to songs that promote healthy lifestyles and generate a love of country at least as defined by the chinese communist party violence and sexually explicit songs will be prohibited but so too will songs like beijing who against which the government says. Megan courage misbehavior another on the list. Don't want to go to school as it could discourage school attendance. So much to the chagrin of pink floyd fans. I'm guessing we don't need. No education is probably somewhere on that list as well. It's the world and everything and Today is thursday. August twenty six. Thank you for attorney to world radio to help start your day. good morning. I'm ernie brown. And i'm paul butler coming next on the world and everything in it growing algae on purpose. Look would you look at that. And that's all thanks to you. You.

chinese communist party ministry of culture and touris china beijing Megan ernie brown government paul butler
"paul butler" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Death threats that you made against senator warnock and i'm very happy. The prosecutors took it seriously paul. If you're the prosecutor in this case what would you be asking As a sentence from the judge. I would ask the judge to throw the book at this. Defendant to give him something close to fifteen years that he's eligible for under the sentencing guidelines minimalistic lawrence even though there was no actual violence carried out. This was an extremely serious crime from other six extremely serious threat from a person who was arranged. One of the things that prosecutors want to do with sentences is to deter the send a message to other people who might be publishing crazy stuff on these right wing websites that if you cross the line you will do serious tar paul butler and eugene robinson. Thank you both for joining discussion tonight. Thank you coming up. Texas anti mask. Republican governor greg. Abbott has tested positive for cova nineteen. That's next hey everyone it's mainly msnbc correspondent and host of the podcast into america. When doing basell was eighteen years old. He was arrested for murder. He didn't commit and became one of the estimated. Tens of thousands of innocent people locked behind bars. Beverly family guilty. I fell on the floor started crying. I didn't do it got raw man. I didn't do it. this week. went into america. We bring you the incredible story of dewey bazala. A man who was sentenced to life in prison and spent decades literally fighting for.

senator warnock paul butler eugene robinson lawrence basell paul Abbott msnbc greg Texas america Beverly dewey bazala
"paul butler" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

02:11 min | 3 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"Sweeney got up here luke. Chapter four spoke about today. The sort of the laura's upon me to preach good news to the poor bring sight to the blind to And and to sit kept of street. And so i think is a moment that's been created in country for believes to save one. Is luke practic reporting for world uneasy or he kerry Jason robinson was fishing recently in south carolina when he felt something at the of his line. But it wasn't a fish. It was something much more valuable. At least it used to be moments after reeling in the lifeless mud-caked object. He figured out what. It was an iphone but inside. The case was a photograph of a laughing woman carrying a man in her arms. The fishermen decided to post the picture on his facebook page and just minutes later found the woman in the photo. Riley johnson said the photograph was of her and her then boyfriend. Who's now her husband. They took the photo at myrtle beach state park shortly after they started dating three years ago and the phone photo had been missing for almost a year. There's not much hope for the waterlog phone. But the photo survived intact and johnson said the couple plans to frame it. It's the world and everything. Today is wednesday july twenty eighth. You're listening to world radio. We're happy to have you along with us today. Good morning. i'm mary record. And i'm paul butler next up the summer olympics every.

luke practic kerry Jason robinson Sweeney Riley johnson luke laura myrtle beach state park south carolina facebook johnson paul butler olympics
Two U.S. Capitol police officers sue Trump

The World and Everything In It

00:57 sec | 7 months ago

Two U.S. Capitol police officers sue Trump

"To capitol police officers injured during the january. Six th capital riot suing former president. Donald trump world's paul butler reports officers. James blasingame in sydney hamby sustained injuries in hand to hand combat as they tried to hold off capital intruders and in a forty page lawsuit. They say trump is directly to blame for spawning the violent siege. Both officers are asking for unspecified. Compensation along with damages of more than seventy five thousand dollars. Each heavy said he's still receiving medical care for hand and knee injuries. Blasingame said riders shoved him into a stone. Column and some hurled. Racial slurs at him both said they're still suffering emotional trauma more than one hundred officers sustained injuries during the riot and one officer died the next day trump attorneys have maintained that the former president called only for a peaceful gathering and was not responsible for the capital

James Blasingame Capitol Police Paul Butler Donald Trump Blasingame Sydney
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 8 months ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
"paul butler" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:45 min | 9 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KCRW

"This'd is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Sarah McCammon president, Biden said. It's what faith and morality require. Among the executive orders he's signed since arriving in the Oval Office for are aimed at advancing racial equity and tribal sovereignty. Earlier this week, we spoke with the Brookings Institution's Andre Perry about one of those initiatives. Tackling discriminatory federal housing policies. I do think this is a start. You have to start somewhere you start with HUD and hopefully mo mentum from the public. Can encourage these other areas to make change. We called on three experts to address the other pillars of the Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branches. A former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler, is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very hopeful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration and also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need to start talking about Lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu, you have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission. That it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And, as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive. But I think anybody of actual Asian descent could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular. Which is You look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see his escape goat. President Biden simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to the other executive order ending the federal government's use of private prisons. Paul Butler, your professor, of course at Georgetown Law, You're a former prosecutor that you've been critical of the criminal justice system. Many aspects of it. What are your thoughts on that executive order and its effectiveness? I didn't roll back some of President Trump administration's most egregious policies like abolishing Trump 17 76 Commission, which tried to get schools to teach American history. Discounting the role of white supremacy. President Obama had banned federal private prisons. Trump reinstated them. And now Biden has re banned them. It's a decent but limited start. For example, Biden's executive order does not immediately close one prison. It says that when a contract with a private prison comes up, it should not be renewed. And it only applies to prisons not to immigration detention centers. The bigger problem is mass incarceration, and Biden's executive order doesn't make a dent in that. Only about 10% of all inmates are housed in federal prisons. Not one of those gets to go home. We've heard a lot about tone about undoing things that the Trump administration has done. About sort of reframing in each of these cases, but what needs to happen next? You talk about the president as POTUS. But there is another POTUS that's at play here, and that's the people of the United States. The great responsibility is on us. We the people us as citizens to take responsibility where we live in our own communities in our own institutions. For starting the same conversations naming these same ills, reading the map of power and decoding. How are we going to hold up our corner? How we're going to do our part to unwind these challenges and problems? This is Paul. I would push back from that orbit. The New York Times described the movement for Black lives is the most successful social justice movement in the history of this country. There was one day this past summer where there were demonstrations and 550 different cities. Citizens have been demanding change, so we've been on the case. And now that we have a sympathetic person in the Oval Office, I think it's time for us to demand that that person act. So I say every week US racial justice advocates should be asking the White House But what have you done for us lately? What have you done for us this week? If fighting does want to make the biggest bull transformative moves to advance racial equity and his equity in this country, Um, for all American citizens, I think we really need to be talking about moving from that civil rights framework to human rights framework. Everybody should be able to eat three meals a day. You know, everybody should have a right to have a job or whatever you know, a third of Navajo and Hopi lack indoor plumbing and direct access to clean drinking water in the face of covert. That's been devastating because it makes constant hand washing difficult and makes it hard to stay home because people have to travel to a windmill and and Halder water. Um or seek water in neighboring communities where the covert restrictions or not. Very strictly imposed. So you know, I really love to see President Biden start talking about human rights and setting that minimum standard for all Americans. This is Paul. The concern is that's a color blind approach that doesn't directly attack white supremacy. So human rights, not civil rights Reminds me of President Obama's color blind approach. He would say that a rising tide lifts all boats, so if you make things better for everybody than people of color will also benefit. The rising tide only helps if you have a boat and too many people of color, including native people, that African American people never had a boat in the first place. The point is that mass incarceration, police violence, the disproportion impact of the cove it pandemic on communities of color segregated in substandard housing. All of those are related And they're all symptoms of the disease. The disease is white supremacy. We've been talking with Georgetown laws. Paul Butler, Ethel Branch, former attorney general for the Navajo Nation, and Eric Liu, with Citizen University and the Aspen Institute..

President Biden president executive President Trump Paul Butler Eric Liu President Obama Georgetown Law Pacific Islanders Ethel Branch Navajo Nation United States NPR News Brookings Institution Aspen Institute Obama administration attorney prosecutor
"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branch, is a former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very helpful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration. And also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need you start talking about lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu. You have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission that it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive, but I think anybody of actual Asian descent Could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular, which is you look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see his escape goat President Biden Simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to the other executive order ending the federal government's used of private prisons. Paul Butler, your professor, of course at Georgetown Law, You're a former prosecutor that you've been critical of the criminal justice system. Many aspects of it. What are your thoughts on that executive order and its effectiveness? I didn't roll back some of President Trump administration's most egregious policies like abolishing Trump 17 76 Commission, which tried to get schools to teach American history. Discounting the role of white supremacy. President Obama had banned federal private prisons. Trump reinstated them. Now Biden has re banned them. It's a decent but limited start. For example, Biden's executive order does not immediately close one prison. It says that when our contract with the private prison comes up, it should not be renewed. And it only applies to prisons not to immigration detention centers. The bigger problem is mass incarceration, and Biden's executive order doesn't make a dent in that. Only about 10% of all inmates are housed in federal prisons. Not one of those gets to go home. We've heard a lot about tone about undoing things that the Trump administration has done. About sort of reframing in each of these cases, but what needs to happen next? We talk about the president as POTUS. But there is another POTUS that's at play here, and that's the people of the United States. The great responsibility is on us. We the people us as citizens to take responsibility where we live in our own communities in our own institutions for starting the same conversations naming these same ills. Reading the map of power and decoding. How are we going to hold up our corner? How we're going to do our part to unwind these challenges and problems. This is Paul. I would push back from that orbit. The New York Times described the movement for Black lives is the most successful social justice movement in the history of this country. There was one day this past summer where there were demonstrations and 550 different cities. Citizens have been demanding change, so we've been on the case. And now that we have a sympathetic person in the Oval Office, I think it's time for us to demand that that person act. So I say every week US racial justice advocates should be asking the White House But what have you done for us lately? What have you done for us this week? If fighting does want to make these bold, transformative moves to advance racial equity and his equity in this country, Um for all American citizens, I think we really need to be talking about moving from that civil rights framework to human rights framework. Everybody should be able to eat three meals a day. You know, everybody should have a right to have a job or whatever you know, a third of Navajo and Hopi lack indoor plumbing and direct access to clean drinking water in the face of covert. That's been devastating because it makes constant hand washing difficult on brakes hard to stay home because people have to travel to a windmill. And and holder water or seek water in neighboring communities where the covert restrictions are not very strictly imposed. So you know, I really love to see President Biden start talking about human rights and setting that minimum standard for all Americans. This is Paul. The concern is that's a color blind approach that doesn't directly attack white supremacy. So human rights, not civil rights Reminds me of President Obama's color blind approach. He would say that a rising tide lifts all boats. So if you make things better for everybody than people of color will also benefit. But the rising tide only helps if you have a boat. Into many people of color, including native people, that African American people never had a bolt in the first place. The point is that mass incarceration, police violence. The disproportion impact of the calls it a pandemic on communities of color segregated in substandard housing, all with those are related. And they're all symptoms of the disease. The disease is white supremacy. We've been talking with Georgetown laws. Paul Butler, Ethel Branch, former attorney general for the Navajo Nation, and Eric Liu, with Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Thanks so much to all.

President Biden President Trump Paul Butler executive president Eric Liu Georgetown Law President Obama Ethel Branch Pacific Islanders Navajo Nation United States Aspen Institute prosecutor Obama administration attorney Citizen University professor
"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:47 min | 9 months ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"E. D. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Sarah McCammon president, Biden said. It's what faith and morality require. Among the executive orders He's signed since arriving in the Oval Office for are aimed at advancing racial equity and tribal sovereignty. Earlier this week, We spoke with the Brookings Institution's Andre Perry about one of those initiatives tackling discriminatory federal housing policies. I do think this is a start. You have to start somewhere, you start with HUD. And hopefully moment um from the public can encourage these other areas to make change. We called on three experts to address the other pillars of the Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branches. A former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler, is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very hopeful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration. And also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need you start talking about lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu, you have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission. That it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And, as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive. But I think anybody of actual Asian descent could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular. Which is you look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see you as a scapegoat. President Biden simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to the other executive order ending the federal government's use of private prisons. Paul Butler, your professor, of course at Georgetown law, You're a former prosecutor that you've been critical of the criminal justice system. Many aspects of it. What are your thoughts on that executive order and its effectiveness? Well, I didn't roll back somewhere. President Trump Administration's most egregious policies like Abolishing Trump 17 76 Commission, which tried to get schools to teach American history. Discounting the role of white supremacy. President Obama had banned federal private prisons. Trump reinstated them. Now Biden has re banned them. It's a decent but limited start. For example, Biden's executive order does not immediately close one prison. It says that when a contract with a private prison comes up, it should not be renewed. And it only applies to prisons not to immigration detention centers. The bigger problem is mass incarceration, and Biden's executive order doesn't make a dent in that. Only about 10% of all inmates are housed in federal prisons. Not one of those gets to go home. We've heard a lot about tone about Undoing things that the Trump administration has done. About sort of reframing in each of these cases, but what needs to happen next? We talk about the president as POTUS. But there is another POTUS that's at play here, and that's the people of the United States. The great responsibility is on us. We the people us as citizens to take responsibility where we live in our own communities in our own institutions. For starting the same conversations naming these same ills, reading the map of power and decoding. How are we going to hold up our corner? How we're going to do our part to unwind these challenges and problems? This is Paul. I would push back from that orbit. The New York Times described the movement for Black lives is the most successful social justice movement in the history of this country. There was one day this past summer where there were demonstrations and 550 different cities. Citizens have been demanding change, so we've been on the case. And now that we have a sympathetic person in the Oval Office, I think it's time for us to demand that that person act. So I say every week US racial justice advocates should be asking the White House But what have you done for us lately? What have you done for us this week? If fighting does want to make these bold, transformative moves to advance racial equity and his equity in this country for all American citizens, I think we really need to be talking about moving from that civil rights framework to human rights framework. Everybody should be able to eat three meals a day. You know, everybody should have a right to have a job or whatever you know, a third of Navajo and Hopi lack indoor plumbing and direct access to clean drinking water in the face of covert. That's been devastating because it makes constant hand washing difficult on brakes hard to stay home because people have to travel to a windmill. And and Halder water or seek water in neighboring communities where the covert restrictions are not very strictly imposed. So you know, I really love to see President Biden start talking about human rights and setting that minimum standard for all Americans. This is Paul. The concern is that's a color blind approach that doesn't directly attack white supremacy. So human rights, not civil rights Reminds me of President Obama's color blind approach. He would say that a rising tide lifts all boats, so if you make things better for everybody than people of color will also benefit. The rising tide only helps if you have a boat and too many people of color, including native people, that African American people never had a boat in the first place. The point is that mass incarceration police violence, the disproportion impact of the calls it pandemic on communities of color segregated in substandard housing, all with those are related. And they're all symptoms of the disease. The disease is white supremacy. We've been talking with Georgetown laws. Paul Butler, Ethel Branch, former attorney general for the Navajo Nation, and Eric Liu with Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Thanks.

President Biden president executive Paul Butler Eric Liu President Trump President Obama President Trump Administration Georgetown Law Pacific Islanders Ethel Branch Navajo Nation United States NPR News Brookings Institution Aspen Institute Trump Obama administration
Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 9 months ago

Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

"Faith and morality require. Among the executive orders He's signed since arriving in the Oval Office for are aimed at advancing racial equity and tribal sovereignty. Earlier this week, we spoke with the Brookings Institution's Andre Perry about one of those initiatives. Tackling discriminatory federal housing policies. I do think this is a start. You have to start somewhere you start with HUD and hopefully mo mentum from the public. Can encourage these other areas to make change. We called on three experts to address the other pillars of the Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branches. A former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler, is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very hopeful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration and also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need to start talking about Lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu, you have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission. That it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And, as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive. But I think anybody of actual Asian descent could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular. Which is You look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see his escape goat President Biden Simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to

Eric Liu Andre Perry Mo Mentum Ethel Branches Georgetown Law And From Citize Ethel Branch President Trump Brookings Institution Oval Office President Biden Obama Administration Paul Butler Aspen Institute HUD Biden Federal Government Asia
Supreme Court to have Barrett confirmation hearing in Washington DC this week

Reveal

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court to have Barrett confirmation hearing in Washington DC this week

"News. I'm Barbara Klein, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Amy Cockney, Barrett is vowing to rule based on law, not her personal views. In prepared remarks released today ahead of her Senate confirmation hearing that begins tomorrow. Barrett also says courts are not designed to right every wrong in public life. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports It's expected to be a bitter four day process. Judge Barrett is likely to face a barrage of questions, including issues and cases involving abortion, specifically the landmark Roe vs Wade decision. Senate Democrats are also likely to press her on whether a justice Barritt would recuse herself from a potential election dispute. Post November Georgetown law professor Paul Butler would judge here it would choose herself. There's not much binding law about when injustice should recuse herself. The Supreme Court level, It's pretty much up to her. Barrett is also certain to face questions about the affordable care act. The high court is set to hear a challenge to the law next month. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington

Judge Barrett Supreme Court Barritt Windsor Johnston Amy Cockney Senate NPR Barbara Klein President Trump Washington Paul Butler Professor ROE Wade
"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Presidential election dispute. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler says Barrett will also face questions about a pending challenge to the affordable care act. She doesn't use herself with regard to this case, it's likely that she would tip the balance. And they were off overturning Obama care either in a narrow way, based on the specific provisions that the court is considering. For more broadly, the Supreme Court is expected to hear the legal challenge to the next month. Windsor Johnston NPR news This is NPR news. A Texas order that limits a ballot drop off boxes to one per county will stay in effect for now a federal judge had struck down the order is unconstitutional Friday. The appeals court has now granted an injunction to keep the limitation in place while it considers the case, activists say, restricting absentee ballot boxes to one per county. Infringes on the right to vote. The largest county in the state. Harris County is roughly 700 Square miles, and as millions of voters Broadway will be dark for at least the first five months of next year. As Jeff London reports. The Broadway League, which represents theater owners and producers, says that ticket sales are suspended until May 30th When Broadway shut down in March, it was enjoying a lucrative and busy season, 16 shows were preparing to open in the spring. Koven 19 stop the business, which has an impact of close to $15 billion on the New York economy and employees close to 100,000 people..

Harris County Broadway League Supreme Court NPR Obama Windsor Johnston Georgetown Paul Butler Jeff London professor Texas Barrett Koven New York
Senate Judiciary Takes Up Barrett Confirmation

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Senate Judiciary Takes Up Barrett Confirmation

"Confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett get underway on. Capitol Hill next week. NPR's went Johnston reports. Senate. Republicans. WanNa confirmation vote before the election. While Democrats continue to push back Senate Democrats are expected to press judge Barrett on several key issues including abortion and whether she would recuse herself from a potential presidential election dispute. Georgetown law professor Paul, Butler says, Barrett will also face questions about a pending challenge to the affordable care act. Herself with regard to this case, it's likely that she would tip the balance in favor of overturning obamacare either in a narrow way based on the specific provisions that the court is considering four more. Supreme Court is expected to hear the legal challenge to the ACA next month Windsor Johnston NPR

Judge Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Windsor Johnston Npr Senate NPR Johnston ACA Georgetown Professor Paul Butler
"paul butler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A source with knowledge of the events planning says all attending must bring masks with them and will be instructed to wear them on the White House complex. They will also submit to a temperature check and brief questionnaire trumps doctor hasn't yet cleared him to return to normal activity and has not released any test results. Certifying the president is no longer contagious. Tamara Keith NPR news Tropical depression. Delta is moving into the Tennessee Valley after slamming into Louisiana last night as a Category two hurricane. NPR's Amy held reports, flooding remains a threat. Lt is turned into mostly a rain event, bringing flood risk as it spreads into parts of Arkansas, Tennessee, Alabama and Kentucky through the weekend. But when it made landfall in Louisiana on Friday, it's winds were strong around 100 MPH, knocking out power to the city of Lake Charles and striking just six weeks after one of the most powerful hurricanes on record. Here's hurricane specialist Jack Beven. Unfortunately, a lot of it area was recovering from the impact of Hurricane Laura. Much stronger storm so certainly did not help matters. I have another hurricane hit that area damage assessments are still under way. But the mayor of Lake Charles says some residents are bailing out several inches of water from inside their homes. Amy held. NPR news Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney Barrett get underway on Capitol Hill next week. NPR's winced er Johnston reports. Senate Democrats are expected to press Judge Barrett on several key issues, including abortion and whether she would recuse herself from a potential presidential election dispute. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler says Barrett will also face questions about a pending challenge to the affordable care act. She.

Amy Cockney Barrett NPR Tamara Keith NPR Lake Charles Hurricane Laura Louisiana White House Georgetown Tennessee Valley Jack Beven president Senate er Johnston Delta Tennessee Paul Butler Arkansas
"paul butler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Same thing in acquitting OJ. He's guilty. He got off because the jury with manly and according to Jeffrey, these two cases together they sparked a national conversation about jury nullification. The day after the OJ Simpson verdict. The Wall Street Journal around the first page story, essentially arguing that in inner cities throughout the country Black jurors were remarkably acquittal Prom. In other words, according to the article, there was a spike in acquittals among black jurors in cases where the defendant was also black and the most likely explanation. Is a kind of jury revoked. Now. Jeffrey actually argues that this idea of a jury revolt was overstated, in part because, he says, you can never really know if a juror's actually ignoring the law. But sometimes we have prosecutors would persuade a jury beyond a reasonable doubt. But the jurors would still Find him not guilty. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler, who was a prosecutor in DC at the time says that's exactly what was happening. Did that feel wrong? To you. It deals you know, felt wrong personally, because you know, like every prosecutor, I wanted another notch in my belt. So, yeah, tick me off, but the reason they were doing this is because they didn't want to send another young black man to jail, Which Paul says was mostly what his job, Wass. If you go to criminal court in D C. You would think that white people don't commit crimes? They're just utterly absent from the criminal court. And Obviously, that's not a reflection of the real world. And over the years day today lock you know black people takes a psychic toll, Paul says. He started to ask himself that I go to law school to put black people in prison. And for me, the answer became no well. Now a black law professor is urging black Juries to use nullification. In their fight for Rachel. Just that led me to not only understand what these African American jurors were doing in D C, but in cases of nonviolent crimes to endorse it, if you let a guilty defendant off isn't that the same is really taking the law into your own hands? That absolutely is the same as taking the law in your own hands as a political protest..

Paul Butler prosecutor Jeffrey OJ Simpson professor DC Rachel The Wall Street Journal Wass Georgetown
"paul butler" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on 790 KABC

"You've heard of Murphy's law. But have you heard of derbies law? Anything that could go wrong can be made right now. Here are your hosts Carey case of at Allen Girl. Well, it's not carry case. Um, it's and Bremner and Alan curvy and Yeah, Anything that can go wrong can also be made. Right? And we're speaking with Martha Men, our former dean of the Harvard Law School from 94,017. Clerked for Justice Thurgood Marshall of the Frame Court of the United States and David Basil on of the US Court of Appeals will talk about that shortly. Also and Bremner and the two of them when I think of Martin and I think of two attorneys with hearts, and it's so important for people to understand about caring and that there are lawyers out there, Professors deans, who really Are thinking about doing the right thing and actually doing the right thing, making things that are wrong, right? Professor Paul Butler, who Waas a student of professor Mino Dean. You know he's had the Georgetown University Law Center described Martha the following way compassionate. Brilliant, wise and gently provocative. I love that gently provocative, and when Martha was introduced, the Harvard Law student, Beka said she has unparalleled grace and curiosity and unfailing caring. These air really important attributes that lawyers don't usually hear about themselves. How does it make you feel when people are recognizing Martha the good in you and how you have been able to be so effective? But, yeah, still having affect Well, it's very kind. I'm embarrassed by these very kind words. But ah, yes, I referred to my parents. Earlier in our conversation. I was brought up to believe that kindness and decency Are more important than brilliance or winning. Um and I think that's one of the lessons of this pandemic. For many of us is how important to stay today, Kindness is being gentle with one another. Life is hard enough. So I am so lucky. I get to work with very talented and creative and motivated people. My students like my colleagues, my staff But I also see such sadness and difficulties in the world. You know, I served for many years A CZ, the vice chair of the Legal Services Corporation, which is the largest funder of legal services for poor people in America. And in that role visited a lot of courtrooms and a lot of offices where poor people are trying to get help when they're dealing with domestic violence or eviction, or Failures to get their veterans benefits or other situations and you see the suffering and the challenges that people face. That means the police we can do is be kind to one another. Yeah, I know and feels the same way. She has devoted so much of her life to helping people and we can hear about that in a moment for man. But you brought up the legal Services Corporation. That is something that President Barack Obama appointed you to how did that appointment go? And, of course, was there any personal connection with respect to the fact that as and pointed out earlier That Barack Obama actually said in 2008. I had a teacher who changed my life. And that was Martha Mino. Well, I think Barack Obama was on his path, No matter who came toward him, but I was very lucky to have him as a student. I've had incredible students in my 40 years. You know Loretta Lynch, his attorney General, Karen Been Wilson, who became the mayor of Gary, Indiana. Paul Butler, you mentioned Paul Cappuccio became the vice president of Time Warner. I mean, just extraordinary and talented people, many whose names you haven't heard. President Obama was in a class of mine on law and society, And as I recall, he wrote a paper with a fellow students about the duties we owe to our fellow citizens. And we became friendly and stayed in touch. And when he ran for of his first offices in the state government of Illinois, I was supportive and Then, when he ran for the U. S Senate, I was as well and when he became president, United States I said The only thing that I wanted from him was a chance to have dinner with him, which is instead he asked me to serve as you noted on This largest funder of legal services for poor people was created actually, ah, under the administration of President Richard Nixon. It's a bipartisan effort. It's always been bipartisan. It's supported by the American Bar Association. Because so many people you know. In Texas, for example, 80 to 90% of people in family law cases don't have lawyers. So many people don't have access to lawyers and and navigating. The legal system when you are at risk of losing a child or losing your home or not getting benefits for in your disabled, they could be devastating. So I, of course, said Yes, I'd be happy to serve. And I learned a great great deal. A TTE this moment in the country because of the pandemic. We're about to have a tsunami of evictions. And it's the the low income people, of course, who were hit the hardest by any natural disaster, and this is no exception. I did have the chance to coach your attack force about tackling natural disasters for legal services. And I learned something very important, which is Every other field and profession has emergency planning preparedness..

Barack Obama Martha president Harvard Law School Professor Paul Butler Legal Services Corporation United States Bremner Martha Mino Martha Men Georgetown University Law Cent Justice Thurgood Marshall Murphy Allen Girl Mino Dean Carey US Court of Appeals vice president Alan curvy
"paul butler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Jamie Floyd six years ago today on Staten Island, Eric Garner was killed following a fatal chokehold by now. Former NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo. Medical examiner ruled Garner's death a homicide. But a grand jury's decision not to indict Pantaleo sparked widespread protests against police brutality, including chance of gunners dying right. Six years later, we're still hearing protesters chanting those same words following the killing of George Floyd, who also said I can't breathe as a police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes here to discuss this moment in policing in the criminal justice system is Paul Butler, author of the book Chokehold Policing Black Men. He's also a scholar of constitutional law at Georgetown. He spoke with W. N. Y C reporter Yasmeen Khan. So Professor Butler It's been exactly one year since you last joined us on WNYC to discuss Eric Garner's killing and a lot has happened. Actually, the NYPD fired Daniel Pantaleo last August. We've had mass protests against racist policing and new laws in New York now actually criminalized, choke holds and make police disciplinary records available to the public. Are these changes some form of justice to you? When we think about what's changed, and the gardener homicide. It took five years for the officer who put Mr Gardner in the van Choco to be fired. Another officer at the scene was docked 20 days vacation pay and the Floyd case. We saw much swifter justice, the cops who were evolved or fire the same wig. And now four of those officers are facing criminal prosecution. And if you measure justice by accountability, that's some sign of progress. Well, since the Gardner case is not fully resolved because other officers involved they are still on the force..

Officer Daniel Pantaleo Eric Garner officer NYPD Jamie Floyd gunners George Floyd Mr Gardner Staten Island Yasmeen Khan Floyd Paul Butler New York Georgetown Professor reporter W. N. Y C
"paul butler" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"paul butler" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Thank you so much for joining us thank you for having me on also with us is professor Paul Butler he teaches law at Georgetown University he's a former federal prosecutor he's also the author of chokehold policing black men Paul welcome back to when I it's great to be here Nicole this is kind of a trite question but how are you doing I am struggling like I think so many Americans and particularly black Americans because of course I'm a journalist who has to consume all of this news and has to be thinking about this news but also I'm a black woman in this country and it's it's a very difficult time right now same question for you Paul im traumatized her little book called choko it was about a case in which you're garner had been Trendall to death by cops in it was on video and I I should have known better than to think that that wouldn't happen again that we wouldn't see it again but we have and it's it's tough to deal with what's your what's your gut check reaction to the protests over the weekend inspiring to me because what I'm hearing from so many people of color is this is the worst time they can ever remember in this country you have these twin pandemics this pandemic of coronavirus in a Paul Nicole let's say that let's work on Paul's line you've been tweeting a lot what what are your thoughts on that the protests over the weekend I mean it the protests are clearly a sign that people have had enough every time we see one of these killings and and I guess I mean just make it clear the killings are the worst manifestation of police violence they don't account for all of the violence that black people face by police that doesn't end up in the killing the daily degradations searches you know we've seen several videos just in the past week there were that the man who was stopped by police for running a stop light allegedly and guns drawn in the yard is ninety seven year old grandmother I'll fall down right people don't get that that that spark that leads to these uprisings is years and years and years of living in a police state and then also being brutalized daily by a segregated schools and segregated housing in a segregated job market so when you see these protests that is people in a pandemic where black people are also bearing the brunt of layoffs where black people are missing the brunt out they think even fictions and also died highest rates of the corona virus a race that this is not acceptable anymore and people I think what's inspiring to me but also you know it also inspires hopelessness in me is people all over the country are joining in which shows that everywhere all of these communities our people are experiencing this level of violence and oppression and I think what makes me feel hopeless is is this is cyclical it comes it comes every five to ten years I don't think we've seen something like this since probably the nineteen sixties protests you know specifically destructive protests has played a big role since the the civil rights movement I want to play another clip here this is a nineteen sixty seven speech from Dr Martin Luther king junior at Stanford University final.

Paul Butler Georgetown University professor
"paul butler" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And tomorrow markets will be announcing a run for a major public. Great. Thank you very much. Really fantastic. Can you imagine? The coverage had Obama signed prison reform, the way Trump did. Those pushing this said that they tried to poach ObamaCare, Don couldn't get it done. Now regarding the number of people who are in prison for violent offenses. According to government stats in twenty twelve point seven percent where they are for other unspecified crimes. Thirteen point eight percent where they are for public order violations, this is a federal state. Seventeen percent, therefore property offenses. Twenty point five percent there for drug offenses. Forty seven point seven percent. For violent offenses. So the large paralysis of people behind bars there because they've heard other people as I said. I want to interview to southern sheriff. Talk to me about this idea that people were just being thrown behind bars for no reason. He said, look, you have to do something to jail. We have so many alternative program for young people. We don't want to put people in jail with afford it. All sorts of. Programs and second chances and. Juvenile programs. You have to do something to go to jail. You have to commit crime to go to jail. Forty seven point seven percent and twenty twelve state and federal prisoners. There for violent offenses. By far the largest of any other category by far. What do you wanna do? Let them out. Professor from George Washington University named Paul Butler. Who basically said that very thing because of the math incarceration of black men. He urges juries for non violent offenses to simply find them not guilty. Engage jury nullification. He's a frequent guest on either CNN, or MSNBC, Paul Butler, George Washington University. I'm not making this up. Your orders should simply vote, fine. Non violent criminal defendants who are black not guilty. We said..

Paul Butler George Washington University Obama Trump Don CNN MSNBC Professor seven percent Seventeen percent eight percent five percent
"paul butler" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Your breaking news and traffic. KTAR news time. It's eight oh two. I'm Taylor Kiner up. Here's our top story. KTAR is on the economy debate on the Republican proposed twenty twenty budget continues at the state capital this week. Valley political expert, and former state Representative stand Barnes, Till's KTAR. The eleven point nine billion dollar Bill has the chance of going all the way with the Republicans are doing for the moment lease is trying to make it an all Republican budget. And that makes it even more difficult because any one Republican has a great meal leverage over the others says there's a chance the budget will pass as late as Saturday. The department of corrections is being accused of censorship. It's banned prisoners from reading the book chokehold policing black men by Paul Butler, the book examines, the incarceration and treatment of African American men by law enforcement, the ACLU claims preventing inmates from reading the book, keeps them from learning about the criminal Justice system, and it's calling on the deal. See to reverse the ban. The corrections department says it has the right to prohibit mates. From receiving any book, that it feels could start a riot, or work, stoppage, Bob McClay, KTAR news and just two dollars a ride lift. We'll take south Phoenix residents to one of sixteen food city locations, allowing them to avoid long bus rights or walking with heavy bags of groceries and the heat, Wendy maneuver. Essentially functions as her mother in law's, lift driver, windy. I need groceries on something. And okay, he Masic king. If I manage one. No, I don't know. But this service is super lift.

Taylor Kiner Bob McClay state Representative Wendy maneuver ACLU Phoenix Paul Butler Barnes Masic king nine billion dollar two dollars
"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of that. Paul Butler is a professor at Georgetown University law school. He's also the author of the book chokehold policing black men. Thank you very much. Always a pleasure. Severe weather is taking its toll on the central US and as NPR's Shannon, bent reports residents who were already suffering from record breaking floods are scrambling for cover. That's the sound of a tornado touching down in Nebraska posted on Twitter by AccuWeather meteorologist, re Temer. It was one of dozens reported across the central US since Friday. The national weather service says a storm system, they are continues to evolve bringing severe weather including tornadoes, hail and rain in Abilene, Texas, Jim Bryant. The emergency management coordinator says an early morning thunderstorm turned into a tornado appears to be Karnak activity that drop down in fact, it active large area. We have about eighty homes impacted your Oklahoma City actually Hench of Comanche. County, emergency management says a tornado touch down there on Saturday morning. That were destroyed almost not quite Hench. This county officials are already preparing for another powerful storm system, expected to sweep through the area next week. Zack Taylor is a meteorologist with the national weather service. No monday. We're looking at another round of severe weather and could be more potentially dangerous with tornadoes. In addition to the damaging winds, and large hail the latest of your weather is a particular concern to farmers in the midwest. Where flooding has left acres of land unusable since March this year. Parts of the Mississippi River have been above flood stage for more than one hundred days, breaking records, Shannon sent.

Paul Butler US Shannon Georgetown University law scho Zack Taylor Mississippi River Karnak Twitter Abilene Oklahoma City NPR professor Jim Bryant coordinator Nebraska Texas one hundred days
"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The same thing in acquitting OJ guilty. Jerry was mainly. According to Geoffrey, these two cases together they've sparked a national conversation about jury nullification the day after the OJ Simpson verdict. The Wall Street Journal round first page story, essentially, arguing that in inner cities throughout the country. Black jurors were remarkably acquittal poem. In other words, according to the article, there was a spike in acquittals among black jurors in cases, where the defendant was also black and the most likely explanation is a kind of jury revoked now Jeffrey actually argues that this idea of a jury revolt was overstated in part because he says you can never really know of jurors actually ignoring the law, but sometimes we as prosecutors would persuade jury beyond a reasonable doubt. But the jurors would still find a MAC guilty, Georgetown law professor Paul Butler who was a prosecutor in DC at the time says that's exactly what Did that feel wrong to you felt wrong personally because you know, like every prosecutor I wanted another notch on my belt. So yeah. Tick me off. But the reason they were doing this is because they didn't want to send another young black man to jail which Paul says was mostly what his job was. If you go to criminal court in DC, you would think that white people don't commit crimes, they're just utterly absent from the criminal court, and obviously that's not a reflection of the real world. And over the years day to day locking up black people takes a psychic toll Paul says he started to ask himself. You've got to go to law school to put black people in prison, and for me, the answer became no, well now a black law professor is urging black juries to use nullification in their fight for racial. Just that led me to not only understand what these African American. Jurors were doing. DC, but in cases, non violent crimes to endorse it if you let a guilty defendant off isn't that the same as really taking the law into your own? And it absolutely is the same as taking the law in your own hands political now..

Paul Butler OJ Simpson DC prosecutor professor Jerry The Wall Street Journal Geoffrey Jeffrey Georgetown
"paul butler" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"paul butler" Discussed on AM Joy

"Yeah. We describe our sources here as federal law enforcement officials involved in the investigation of the matter of the Trump Tower Moscow, and we're not playing games with that characterization. These are strong sources close to the investigation involved in the investigation who we spoke to after the publication of the story as well as before who told us it was accurate, and for this isn't coming out of a blue sky. And this is a line of reporting that has been repeatedly been together. Good morning and welcome to AM joy. Well, that was Ben Smith the editor in chief of BuzzFeed speaking on the phone with a very own Rachel Maddow last night making the rounds and cleaning up on six his publications. Bombshell report just twenty four hours earlier claiming that Donald Trump as president directed. Michael Cohen to lie to congress about the Trump Tower Moscow deal blew up the political world and prompted Democrats to call for the president's impeachment late last night. A spokesman for special counsel. Robert Muller took the extrordinary step of refuting parts of the report, prompting even members of the media to doubt the entire reports. Credibility joining me now, Maya Wiley MSNBC legal analyst Ellie miss stone editor for bub the law dot com. Me Rocca MSNBC legal analyst and former assistant US attorney for the southern district of New York. Paul Butler MSNBC legal analyst and former federal prosecutor and NBC news reporter, can Delaney and Kim I'm going to start with you on this obviously much consternation across the media world about this BuzzFeed report, let me read you. What Muller spokesperson said the full statement was buzzfeed's description of specific statements to the special counsel's office and characterization of documents and testimony obtained by this office regarding Michael Coen's tests. Congressional testimony are not accurate. How do you read that you read that as reputation of the entire substance of the report or just of the characterizations of things? Said to the special counsel and given to the special counsel, joy, initially. I read it as a very carefully worded refutation of only part of the report..

special counsel Trump Tower Moscow Robert Muller Donald Trump analyst MSNBC president Rachel Maddow Ben Smith editor in chief Michael Cohen buzzfeed congress Michael Coen Kim New York NBC Paul Butler