18 Burst results for "Paul Baran"

"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Big the heat lamps and i mean carmella put up Screening so the birds couldn't get up there in a nest. And if i let's say. I had left those lights on and gone up to the house. My part goes up. There's no doubt. I mean and this happened within a few minutes so you know it so many things that can go wrong and as you do your best to try to eliminate as many of those possibilities as possible. Well and they're the immediate speculation on the other night was that in fact that was exactly the thought and of course i That's a bar that that gary was in for twenty five years. So and paul baran was on track and paul took a bunch of horses over to the new barn. Which a bizarre confluence was the site of the campo barn in eighty six. I mean very strange but they left that space empty for a very long time long time. They'll basically until everybody's memory hopefully you pretty much Raced it but Paul paul said That he thought it was. It was a bird's nest On on him socket near socket because of course during the winter so yeah the birds. The birds got babies. They want the yeah they want. They want to be warm. The wildlife living In that barn. You're also dealing with rodents that are chewing on wiring and drive installation. I mean there's a it. I said to somebody last week. It's a miracle there aren't more incidents and again the sprinkler systems. They put in every bar. You know certainly helps certainly helped in this situation to keep it from spreading faster and again having experienced i i it was. I still have a hard time believing how fast it happened. you know. It's like a tinderbox you talking about wooden hey in shavings or straw and it it absolutely crazy but again you know i i applaud and and really hope that people realize that all the people that jumped in and help you know. Make this less of a tragedy than it was are really true. Heroes exactly beautifully rich. Let me out Also talk to you about saturday. And of course the coverage on america's day at the races and you guys you guys are involved From from nose to tail and the feature the kind of nice to have a race like that apple blossom that completely lives. Up to the hype. Talk today and yesterday. And he pointed out the the unusual aspect that you know the two horses that were the principals they didn't end up being the shoulder to shoulder foes lotrowska forced herself on on the the whole proceeding. But it doesn't matter it. It you know you got to have the three potential players that just threw down and explain how rare it is for a worse to do. What lotrowska did well. You know i it. It delivered.

yesterday today paul baran twenty five years last week Paul paul saturday paul lotrowska two horses three potential players campo barn america's day minutes eighty six
"paul baran" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

05:51 min | 4 months ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"Have power phone service you've water and hopefully you also have the source this episode. We're going to break down. The environment that led to the creation of the source. What factors made this specific type of product offering possible. How did the source itself form. What was service on this new information utility actually like and ultimately. Why don't we all use the source today. So let's get into it if we want to get a well rounded image of what makes the source so interesting. We're going to need as always to gather up. Some context specifically what consumer networking was like leading up to nineteen seventy nine. So here's a good place to take stock and have a look at networking infrastructure in the middle of the twentieth century. The best way to describe digital network backbones in this era would be lacking and a little bit hacky. Fiber wasn't really a thing. In the nineteen sixties digital traffic didn't really travel unadulterated across america. Most often it was ferried from site to site analog phone lines as digital pulses or sometimes radio or microwave. If you've ever used dial up internet then that shouldn't sound so out of the ordinary to you but why would anyone want to send digital ish data over phone lines in the first place while it gets complicated. There are a number of good reasons for this kind of distribution method on the most simplistic level. The us was already wired up with a phone grid. So just plug into that adds some hardware to deal with turning sound data and vice versa. And you have pre built networking infrastructure. But there were also more calculated reasons. The best explanation that i can point to comes from a series of reports drafted by paul baran in the early nineteen sixties at rand corp. These reports would eventually influenced the development of the arpanet. The series is called on distributed communications and basically lays out all the particulars about making a nationwide network to help. Coordinate the cold war. There's a specific focus on how to create a network capable of surviving a nuclear war. But that's a whole other component. The key for us isn't nuclear holocaust per se. It's specifically phone lines. Just keep in mind that the name of the game for arpanet was reliability and strangely enough. The internet was devised pretty explicitly as a tool for fighting communism. Anyway in the final volume of the series the summary volume barron wrote quote highly reliable and error free digital communication systems using noisy links and unreliable components can be built without exceeding the present day state of the art of electronic components..

paul baran america barron nineteen sixties early nineteen sixties middle of the twentieth centur today nineteen seventy nine first place arpanet corp.
"paul baran" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right <hes>. So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays <hes>. And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain <hes>. He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here <hes>. So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay <noise> so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway <hes>. He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in <hes>. that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

mike explorer steve lauren julia wilson library Julia microsoft syracuse liverpool gene white house Steve vint cerf
The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
"paul baran" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"And millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas.

wells christopher stray cheesy newman inc paul baran oxford university Donald davies national physical laboratory unesco mit derek paris baron davies charlie Defense department darpa Uk mike Pto arpaio
"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"This must have been how you're doing it for X. number of years and they were sort of going after them for back back wages. But I think it's important to note that people who take jobs They know you know when they when they signed up. They know what they're getting salary. And they can either agree to it or not agree to it and the Agree to it. And take the job you know they. That's what they're going to but The Department of Labor disagrees with that Methodology and basically these are hourly wages. And it's led to Outrageous fines For a lot of trainers some can afford it. Some canton Gary Contessa who also left very much. I can't I can't do it and care. Mclaughlin doesn't want to do it and you can't blame the only two. I don't think I think there'll be more now. They got me not retire. Guys may move elsewhere but I do think there'll be more and I you know I've I've mentioned that Gary Are Gary Ceac Gary's dealt with it and you know he's paid paying schedule of payments and You know at the same time I in fact I talked to Paul Baran yesterday. Paul said Gary is GonNa try to limit. The number of visa The Programs that that he gets involved in and He says it's just you know they. They've made it so that it they're they're setting landmines. Essentially I mean no matter what no matter what you try to do their you know. They'll they'll make an agreement and then they'll come back and say oh and you know what about this and you know the county. The county regulations is just mind boggling putting somebody on a van from Belmont to Akwa docked and and the whole rate scheduled has changed i. It's and they're basically they're basically just using the backstretch as a Pinata. At this point it's true.

Gary Ceac Gary Gary Contessa Mclaughlin Paul Baran Department of Labor Belmont Akwa
"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"I thought it was something I had an article wanted to talk about it with you. Maybe we have more time but the idea surfaces and and in sports and also the kind of where athletes excuse me are are using these days Comparing compared to China united with a high tops. You know the the old those goes classic things meddle in the middle was. Oh please where in the services now you know we had when we went to ASTROTURF. Originally you remember what we found out. Oh this is great. You know you'd be able to squeeze water right off it and you'll be able to play when it's raining and but we found out how it was awful. It was terrible because it would get it would overheat in the sun it would get like one hundred and twenty degrees on the field okay And then the burns one burns players would get from it and hope ball baseball and then the ball member the you know actually it became away. They hit a ball. Larry Boys to do it and veteran stadium. We hit down on the ball and hit a high chopper and on the first base. No it was a it changed helping we're done and then of course. The famous Veterans Day Turf Ned had wrinkles in it and And players hated the play on it and it was bald in some spots and so we went to this new surf now that they have. And it's it's it's a combination of park different particles of things and seems to be much better. I don't WanNa hear the complaints I used to hear so and and the reason I thought it is when you're talking maybe there's something down the road that will help us. If it's it's not Michael's product now or you know whatever it maybe there's something down the road maybe in the future it will be surface. That is more. We're close to their and breeders will be happy and courses will be happy trainers and everybody happy horse players you know. We tried the first kind of revolution of it and it didn't really there. Were problems or issues particularly California more familiar with those gives us what around the country. The weather would affect it sir. So maybe there's something down the road that's GonNa make a difference and that's my hope for the future as we started new year and we can figure out a way to solve that problem. He'd worked on being worked on happy. Hannukah happy holidays. You and I know you guys have a grandchild. Joe On the way and twenty twenty you will be so we will fall in love like never before. I wish you all the best. Yes thank you my friend for all you do. Even though I don't always agree with you. I always list now johnny as always I can't thank you enough. And they expressed bad team and for you and gale and The extended families all the best. Let's get Casey in here you too. We can pull it all together and Because I know how this will go happy Hannukah to everybody last night. We got the first and we had our first Hanukkah miracle the the oil lasted sixty minutes and then a merry Christmas and happy New Year. I want also quickly thank The for DT our partners. And Gary CEAC and Paul Baran everybody the Barn Sixty team got a couple more starts yet. The before. The season season ends but It's been a good year. And of course Mikey Farrow and Patty. Farrell got us to wins in Philly and Chuck Simon and now Susan Bitter Down to Florida with cloud Autrey. I want to thank all of their teams and Tina. Who puts up with all my all my nonsense? I think Casey ready to add some year year. End Thoughts case. How you doing? Excellent and Johnny Will you talk. You probably talked to Johnny as much or more than anybody you buddy over the years For right from the very beginning it was one of the people I kind of got familiar with and happy a couple years ago to actually meet him down. Eh Gulfstream Park. So that was cool for me well cases as I alluded Th the three of us the three of us all had varying degrees. He's a of challenges and really Some ways none more so than you and He really end the year on the upswing. And we're all happy the For that in and of course all the listeners have been have been under so understanding and we should you know acknowledge Adeje and Joe to WHO All the all the support we wouldn't have gotten through the year otherwise and Feels like you got a lot of momentum for toward good health ebbing into the new year. Everything is looking up now. I have no complaints and I really WanNa thank you for your support for the six months that I was in out of hospital fighting cancer and lymphoma. I really appreciated And as you said John and Deja did a great job holding and things down. I'm Kinda back in regular rotation now working there show a couple of days a week and hopefully as I continue to get better increase that and get back to my full-time time status but definitely think the listeners for all the messages emails facebook notes and everything it really so help me through this time of recovery to keep my spirits up so I think you guys as well. We'll see you in February. We'll do a couple of weeks. The shows from the studio for Jackson who I I'm guessing Jackson's GonNa make four course. Christmas dinner she. She's been cooking cooking up a storm. I it's unbelievable. She's well on her way to be in the Shafiq. The the kind of see that that that's written in the stars already master chef junior so trying to assist in in whatever way possible. Well I always tell you whenever the Horse I love Jackson and runs Let's say case we'll talk soon. I'll see you soon and Enjoy the time off Johnny again. Thanks for everything and listeners Everything we do and all the regulars and then all of the the horsemen and industry people that come on so quickly and willingly whenever we reach out to them all design to help you enjoy this great game as much as possible. Best wishes for a wonderful holiday season. A a healthy happy twenty twenty. We'll talk to you on the third..

johnny Casey Jackson Joe China baseball facebook Larry Boys Adeje Gulfstream Park Ned Michael California lymphoma Gary CEAC Mikey Farrow Tina Paul Baran
"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

16:55 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Handicapping interviews. This is really stupid in a very good Tuesday race fans serious to nineteen except to a one sports zone nine sixty four. If you're listening to Siriusxm online at our website as well Steve Dot com it is just I mean exquisite Wisit Crisp Fall Day here beautiful upstate New York and how about a little a little self-indulgent commentary for a minute it is it is the the eighth anniversary of My Tina's marriage and we went went way this weekend as we do every two years. It seems every other year we go up to the thousand islands. Let's where we remarried both castle heart island just out in the bay. They're out in the you know kind onto that wide area away from Alexandria Bay and a spotty. We've come to rather than say at Alex Pay. We've been saying Clayton more and more the last the last few times we've gone up and having never been married up until the Tina I I hadn't I really hadn't realized or you know how special it is. When you go back to where you were married and we we just love going what up there it's? That's the first thing that we we had our first field as husband wife there. You're out of your first your first breakfast the morning after you were married over there and it's just so funny and it it's really an amazing amazing. You know the Bolt Castle concept and what the story behind it then we've mentioned it before just not believable and you know the Construction George Bolton building this this vacation paradise I mean basically a hearst castle the to some extent and not to some extent I mean very similar and and would literally weeks before its completion the wife up and died and they ceased construction and just left it there I it it's it's remarkable and that it you know for for years and years I it was in disrepair and opened the vandals in landing on the island and just marauding and then the state of New York he the CYA commissioner whatever it is took it over and it's constantly being it's very slow and involved renovation of and they're doing all kinds of projects so every time we go now eight years and we've been three time since there's always there's there's always something improving and and something being worked on just I can't recommend the whole will read enough. I mean the The New York there's so much between literally from the North country you know down the seaway the Western everywhere you go everywhere you go a teen and I discovered on the way back from Breeders Cup last year. I never really noticed just the southern tier in Jamestown and the lake down there aqua- and I wanna go there. It looks unbelievable achievable so we had a wonderful just got their Friday night. We stay at the Saint Lawrence distillery for the first time and they got they got some rooms upstairs in another chateau kind of thing that was reclaimed and renovated it just food is spectacular and and I D- I don't drink but tina does for both of us and we had a fabulous and dinner Friday night and Saturday we went out to the island and then Clayton there was an antique car show and we we just had we just had a wonderful time and then even Sunday coming coming back we swung down through the toward Syracuse and went to cazenove and where where Zachary and Andrew were married the summer and we hiked down Chit Nangle falls which I'd never done I known about it for literally for forty years and have been by it and see from the road and this is the first time you hike down into a gorge and it's a little treacherous to go down and I'm not exactly in a hammer hammer comes back next summer for his for his tours. He wants to go. He he saw the pictures he wants to go to thousand islands and and so and and the reeves the patio says she wants to go the thousand islands now didn't really know it existed but we hiked down in the bottom two chip nangle falls and then often over it gorgeous just really really a wonderful anniversary weekend for today's the day a Tuesday on on the calendar and the way we even got married. I don't know why I'm telling you all this but so this way you can tell Tina that you steve spoke lovingly about his life being completely overhauled and changed by meeting Earth the racetrack. We met it for those of you that are fairly new listeners. Don't know don't know all the back story. the rest of you the rest of you heard this but I I was working at the barbecue and and we had the Carolina Barbecue at Saratoga and triple crown events and breeders cups at Cetera and Tina was in the pavilion punching tickets schoolteacher a lot of schoolteachers schoolteacher's work at the track work at Saratoga and these the bat with her and that's how we met so it's another racetrack romance. It's a classic Eh one of those stories but when we went and did this when we went and got married eight years ago we had she'd seen that there was a wine festival. I Paul Baran Gary Gary His longtime assistant pause Paul's got a friend that has a bed and breakfast that up on the river and he's the one even put it in in my head to go. I never I've I'd been through the thousand islands a million times but I'd never stopped there and when I was working out of Montreal he used to pass through all the time and what are the picked islands actually which is on the Ontario side had actually meet manufacturer meat packer picked violence but hey I I was inspired to go the two of us and so she saw this she was looking at it and she found this wine festival and so we were going to go and it just so happened that that Saturday was September seventeenth which is my late mother's birthday and if she and and I were planning our getting married and we weren't we were GonNa do it elopement style but more or less but she had the idea. I'd always wanted to get married on my parents. Anniversary which is Christmas Eve which I always thought was the coolest anniversary wedding day but she said Ed. Why don't we get married on the thousand islands on your mother's birth? It'll be a great memorial to her all right. That's the deal so we got a justice of the peace and said you know we wanted. We're going to be on bolt. at Bow Castle be on the island. She said I've got a wedding there myself. At four thirty. I am officiating want to you want to do it at three third so literally four five days four days before we went on this trip after after Saratoga was over at the go see this you know to go to this wine festival. There's a big wine producing there up up on the northern tier. You're north country and that was it so we decided so we didn't tell anybody and we got married. Then we started calling people later that evening after we got back from the island and it's about about his wonderful a portion of my life as I could possibly APSO thanks and thanks for having me honey the we have a lot of fun just to the two of US enjoy each other's company mentally mentally so there you have to get this in I was I was compelled and to my mother she ate today and we we continue to miss her everyday. She loved the racetrack my mother. I've told you this before she she loves them. She loved the racetrack. My and her father introduced me to the racetrack but okay you want you. Okay you want one my mother my mother at the Racetrack Travers Day a this has got to be travers day probably about two thousand and five I'd say the two thousand and five give or take and I had the table off to the side of the barbecue and so we had a big group of people hanging out and including Bobby Frankel so Franklin Franklin would come all the time and it would make bobby launch and mothers there with my what compelled my parents that come travers day but they did and my mother's sitting there there and everybody's handicapping looking and they're looking at the race and the mother who sitting next to Frankel outwith Bobby Franken's got two horses in this race my friend who's sitting next to my mother says is you're sitting next to what Mrs Beck. She looks at Bobby who was big abuse a big man and she looked up at him. She goes really bobby. Looks down and says yeah. I'll I'll. I'll I'll treasure that that's of sorry. I don't have a picture sorry. I don't have a pig. I wish that I wish it was. I don't think I had a camera phone at the time I think I had a crappy flip phone. Maybe and I'd love to picture her with Bobby. She's GonNa choose ten years. My mother's been gone all right enough and I understand you're in Algebra mood the whole thing you know it's your adversary cetera there in the time. We got a very busy day and I'm falling away frittering away ten minutes to start the show as I said Eddie what's in fact Eddie beyond with us. A ten does have my name on its I I get indulge here there the the race last night and we will talk the the Dick Powell so I won't put do put too much into because we'll talk about it with Dick but you Robertson congratulations to him this hotshot Anna I mean she just it was an as she pleased victory sixty five and just you know I couldn't have been couldn't one easier super super impressive hotshot Anna two years in a row. Oh Talk to me as as we talked with the with Doug she ran very well and the Topeka certainly didn't didn't hold her back. Jose Ortiz come into town to ride and really had no had no answer her when China just cruised up under a Ardo and one how about the log on the board running a mammoth race the rudy the colts neck at the Horse George Duarte these are Concordia visit accordia under Julia Toledo. Although third at sixty three to one didn't do a whole lot I try though because a little bit got it up to eighty seven dollars eighty seven thirty for a buck and it boosted the try because Regal Chan Tim Ham source gotta get a hold of Tim him it timmy hung in in Ohio and kept Breeden Ohio breads and saw things through who well before there was even any hope that gaming would come to Ohio and he does a very good job and is it. He's got started partnered up the at a lot of horses and I think I saw three chimneys to these got the some horses with breath powwow really didn't take the pizza that didn't really work for her so doc hotshot. Anna moves on the trap shot five year old. She's now with record is Gaudy that this point eight hundred over eight fifty fifty thousand and she's one ten of twenty two starts tremendous. I'm a fan and the light for you. Robertson had a little little health scare over the summer the we'll talk about the Pennsylvania Derby situation a very strange Marcus Zuleta they supplemented had a maiden who's run for that was claimed for forty. I supplemented this Shanghai superfly I I I don't get it horse that that would have to improve twenty thanks to be competitive in Pennsylvania Derby. I don't get it math wizard for sappy Joseph improbable the Bayden war of wells spun to run one coming out of the Smarty Jones Mr money and maximum security a terrific group of sex and then this maiden who has no business being in here and racing secretary denied entry. It's right in the conditions the conciliation eleven lineup and Guarani. I don't know I don't know how they beat. Goran going to be interesting to see what she goes off. Let's take a break gail..

Tina Bobby New York Saratoga Clayton Steve Dot Anna I Bobby Frankel Siriusxm Alexandria Bay Alex Pay Paul Baran Jamestown hearst castle Bolt Castle Eddie Dick Powell Regal Chan Tim Ham US
"paul baran" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:06 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"It's worth, and get it all the contributions from the great people there who gave us so many locations for free. You know, the school the stadium, you know, restaurants all sorts of places where we had seen that, you know, he was able to put all that together and not cost a lot of money, and then spend the money when where they to be. And we just had a great little DP that shot beautiful pictures and a great sound guy. And, and everybody was enthusiastic. So, you know, I gotta tell you this one thing, and I and I saw this from quitting there and see. No rental in told me about it. He said, you know, when we did jangling change brand. You check yourself out the gate. No, no actor. No producer. No one on the set ever has a cell phone. And if he found one then then you're fired a media thought, what a great idea how cool it would be people standing around working. Being doing a film, like we used to when we didn't have cell phones, and we actually had conversations with each other, and we were doing our job. And we're focused on shooting the picture, and we're all in the room and we didn't have to be looking at our cell phone, so. He said, Brad what, what, what would you like? And that's what I would like is if we have no cell phones on the set. That's a cool idea. And we did it, we had twenty five years of thirty year olds on the set. All day. Twelve hours a day. No, I refuse to be an actor. That van I did. And I mean it has a millennial that's my worst nightmare. But if you want to be an actor, I guess you gotta do what you gotta do. That's Monday real. When we go out to dinner. No. So you tell that the dad right here on the worst. Now. Brad, by the way, revisit with Bradley Lynn, the movies, call the last whistle. Tell everybody, what you're doing these days, besides trying to be a member of the champion's tour on the PGA tour affect them wise, our TV wise. What are you doing? What are we getting our Friday into lights? That's what it all comes down to. Lights gonna ever happen, buddy. But, you know, if it did, if we all believe that there was enough of the big real people that were there to begin with. I think it'd be fabulous. I'm one of the ones. I'm a proponent for some out, you know, somehow reviving it in some strange way. But I would never wanna do it unless all the main players, including the crew, and the riders and blah, blah, blah were all involved. I just don't think it would be the same thing. And I and I know Kyle says, no, it's gonna happen to, and they all say, no and sailor, and all those people were the right group if it was the right thing, and it's not gonna be the series. But if it was a right, little script, or whatever I believe everybody would would love to do, especially if it was something like a reunion. Now and you just went what are these people doing now? Live, you know, later on and they were still the same characters, but they were doing whatever they're doing. You know, hall divorces child is. You know, that's gotta be bullshit. They've moved back, but works hard at that. Well, we'll we'll we'll move. We'll move on now. What are you working on these days? And, and do you have any projects working on Texas? What are you working on these days? I've got a film that my buddy and I, you know, my buddy that I've for years he's written, so many scripts for me, and we're trying to get a couple of scripts off the ground that he's written as written, so many movies. And with the same group of guy these young people who right now are really good at making things happen. We're, we've got a couple of scripts with them. And then I'm about to picture up in Iceland. And I got to go to Iceland, and Oregon, and it's kind of a supernatural the Miller emotional things story about a girl and play this, so character lives out in the wilderness, and she, she comes to him and gets sage advice. So I don't know what that sage vice is, but that I would be this old man, that lives out the woods, and I'm kind of a magical mystery. Wizard kind of modern day wizard strange, old hippie character. Hey Brent I got a one more. Real question. This kinda random have you had any interactions or any movie offers from either Netflix or Hulu or any of these new streaming sites that are kind of becoming the new thing. Oh, yeah. I mean my age is constantly on new shows that than those, you know, had some chances here and there and I didn't get it or whatever. But there's a lot is happening right now in those markets opens up the ton of opportunities for all of us. Yeah. The, you know, the fact that there's more production than there ever has been. That's true. But what's good? You know, there, there are good shows out there. There's what if you show that I would mention that I won't mention right now that, that I would love to be on that. I've had some chances that so hopefully those have come to fruition and get to keep doing what we like to do. Bradley Lynn, thank you so much, the name of the movie, the last whistle you can find it on many, many services. Much success. Dear friend and come back to Austin soon. And thank you for playing my swing for the art golf tournament few weeks ago. That was a lot of fun to be with you, and with Kyle and John Paul Baran Scotty and the gang. But thanks so much, and we look forward to great things. And congratulations on the great review so far for the last whistle. And thanks for being with us on the end zone club X. Brad, thank you. And thank you so much for everything, man, for the fast thing years, we've known each other, and it's funny that we knew each other before when plano flight brownwood, we have. Over there, in Ireland Carter study, I know you remember that will, but no thank you guys. I really appreciate you having me. And I if thanks for supporting all of our stuff beyond the lights tournaments and everything along it's done for you. Guys are awesome Austin, I'm not guys. Thanks, a million RAD. Good luck with it. Yeah. All right. We're gonna take a break after the break. We're going to close out the show, the end zone club on kale. Jay more KLBJ right after.

Brad Bradley Lynn Kyle Iceland producer van I Austin RAD Carter Netflix Jay Brent Texas Miller Oregon plano John Paul Baran Scotty Hulu brownwood
"paul baran" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"A smell, but it doesn't have that toxic or the same toxic environment that polyester resins create do the boards, perform the same. In our view. They do you know this quote, a debate around a poxy, surfboards, and EPS phone, which is expanded polystyrene, which is the other material we use. So instead of the p u polyurethane foam we use EPS, which is expanded polystyrene, foam, which is also less toxic than p you phone and it depends on who you talk to them. And there's a lot of entrenched interests around PUP, it's very cost effective and easy to work with and quite candidly, a lot of pro surface swayed by it. So there is a segment of the market that just believes that no matter what those are the best materials to use when building bullets, we're of the mindset that poxy resins EPS foams on not only less toxic, but when built correctly can certainly equal, if not surpass the performance characteristics of p you slash PE. I wanna ask about another material, which is wool. I know that fire wire introduced a wool surfboard very recently, which sounds, absolutely nuts. Will you tell us a little bit about what that looks like how wolf it's into this sustainable movement, and, and sort of what it does for a surfboard? Yeah. No, that's a great question. And it's quite an interesting story about six or eight years ago, a very talented, New Zealand surfboard builder by the name of Paul Baran, who was also concerned about the environment and wanted to use role materials that were indigenous to New Zealand started experimenting with sheep's wool as a replacement for traditional fiberglass and after many years of trial and error. He perfected, a technique, whereby the she'd wool with minimal processing, so it's not the wool in a sweater or a wool suiting material. It's pretty role fiber. So there's not a lot of energy going into the processing of it to create to create the material to build a surfboard, but it does require some fairly unique manufacturing processes in order to apply it to the exterior of a surfboard. But anyway, basically what we do is, we impregnate the wool with resin and it replaced. The exterior five gloss that you would use on a surfboard with the wool from a sustainability perspective. It's quite a nuanced, nuanced debate in the sense that. The wool itself is obviously biodegradable. It's compulsory vehicle. It's way less toxic than the filaments that go into fiberglass. So there's a real strong sustainability story behind the wolf fiber itself. And in addition to that we only by our wool, from a New Zealand co op that has the highest standards of animal welfare, for example, x number of sheep per hectare. They ordered the fawns every six months to make sure that they are adhering to the co ops practices. And so we're confident that we have the supply chain transparency in the sense that the animals are looked often the entire process is being done correctly..

Paul Baran New Zealand eight years six months
"paul baran" Discussed on The Agostinho Zinga Show

The Agostinho Zinga Show

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on The Agostinho Zinga Show

"It be worked out the same way. So they're laying the Delano comedy in the same way that, you know. Some of the guys on YouTube get annoyed. We've all those. Bind comedians is not the committee that we're used to. Right. It's not the. Punchline committee is not the really intricate stories telling comedy that we used to some of the real pure kind of comedians, but it's a type of comedy. Right. And a type of audience that like it. And if you watch the show, the Brennan be surprised show it looks like people were laughing people having a good time. He was having a good time on stage. And if you go freeze Instagram's stories reposted people that have had a good experience watching people do where he puts out there, right there. Big fan of it. So I think for some of that hate is out people that don't like what he's doing. I think it's okay to have to force in your brain right to hold to that same time. Yes. He's maybe undeserving on paper of this special, and especially lacks in quality or it may be obvious talent. There's some people out there, but again, comparing it to talk one percent of tachometers isn't fit. He's only free as in, and he didn't just get a professional based on ability alone. It because of all the other things go for him. All these other basis, he's been able to cover and I think he's probably the only one may be in that kind of area, maybe outside of Jerusalem. He's really been able to ace. All of those kind of areas right with his pug, causing rivers appears. Poke us with his writing is really, really trying to kind of build up. He's overall brand empire and into a point where, you know, the numbers people themselves, right? Regardless of what people say, well, how they review stuff, they're gonna keep checking the Showtime, especially when the next one comes out, people are gonna wanna hate what you're anyway. So I think sometimes like I said, I commissioned, you have a day, I wish we could get to a point in life. Where if you didn't like something, you just didn't watch it. You just didn't pay any mind. But I think sometimes with never met him hate that they're giving this with the amount of attention to giving it with the, the amount of time with people go in these comments and trying to say stuff to him and turn them right by reviews. You're only garnering more attention, and more is to go just going to be naturally intrigued about what you want is training is. And when you watch it, it's seventy a train wrecks just Novus. It's just a really it's just a very young coming doing these things. But again, like I said, he's taking the punt. He's put himself out there, which is a look it's a lot again. But some people out there compensated. You don't care right about that whole line of thinking, but it's a big deal, man. Pulling your. Off out even me on this low level of doing this podcast, including rid of webcam sitting here my fucking. You know, in my jeans, and Mme. Jackie, right. Took shit. So microphone is lots of about that takes a lot of balls. It's not easy to, to say, okay. Cool. I think I'm good at this, and I'm gonna put it out there because, you know, you're essentially think you're essentially what you're saying. You are essentially rating yourself in some regards, right? You are you say to yourself, you know what I'm good at this. I'm gonna put it out there and then people are having to judge it. You for free as you've been harnessed. I've been covering. He said he did over one hundred shows with that, same routine, and tighten up bits and pieces of this. You've done you've done the work you've put in as many represents, you can write. And then people have just gone our to kind of critique you maybe less than an hour to critique. You see people say they stop watching off the half and hour or something right? I'll even ten minutes, so that instantly making the snap judgment of your product that you spent so much time. And again, people don't need to know how much time we spend in it. It doesn't really matter them bomb, just saying, let's have that kind of empathy to understand that it's against first thing it's gonna take time he's going to get better over time. And I think he's getting the right people around him who are going to say, say how to grow and I think, you know, by by just feet now is getting a point if you just being nasty in winter kind of put him of doing it. I was special to see how that serves any purpose to anyone, right way. Trying to make him do show. Have they wanted to have a breakdown? They get annoyed that he's not upset. They get the heave saying the people that I've seen people get annoyed. Brennan. Keep saying all fence with a good supply. People are thank you for the good messages, another match reviews, what else do you think he's going to say, do you think he's going to feed into your negative St Paul Baran, your back? Like they gave excited when he loosely. Aw. Brutally vaguely mentioned something to do with the subway or something to do some people's comments online, people get really excited. It'd be passed the addresses a user, it's looking to end. Whoa. Look how much. Hey, look how much vitriol, Kevin Durant guests. It was getting when it was discovered he was making. He had burner account defending himself when he starts arguing with fifty follows on Twitter. People look at it mcelwain widow, like e caught have buffets, you can't be annoying that he's gonna addressing you as a troll as a hater and you also company annoyed when he does come at you and blocks Llosa's on impartial. He's too sensitive, Sigua doesn't make any sense come home. And so, again, I give the guy a break layoff him again, Sony Sony the first special. Yes, it's only free as in you maybe should have done it so soon. But again, will we say when you shouldn't shouldn't do anything window creating specials out on the stage when out there with the way of the world on us, the way of our family? If petition from an entire network like it's a lot of pressure to be nothing. Recent appearance on Joe Rogan kind of shows like you know, he's. The pressure of it, and then he needs love them. Love a Besson if the Bev understanding look is your first one it probably didn't go the way you wanted to go. But again, recoup brain comeback, and stronger, and you'll be fine as what is so again, like I said, I'm layoff left Brennan show lame grow. And if he doesn't cool by, like I said to knob episode if you don't like something, just don't watch it, what, what went to maybe that's the nature of social media because it's just a common thing you have to kind of say things. But what, what, what, what happened to the just not what is up yourself? You don't care about like Don Standish just has to be this. Vitriol him council. Hammers I come home, and it doesn't make any sense. But again, maybe that's me leave by digital below. What's the next one list here, did it, we offer civil stampede? Obvious reasons, those laughing anyway, but I'm sure they went well. There's nothing more. Certain in life. Right. I think I'm I tweeted the other day about it. You know. London festivals and organizational issues, right? Will sound issues. There's no better Jew in the world, right? So over the years, I think I mentioned on here previously, you know, my relationship with love the festivals has been a little bit strange, especially since. Had the blessing or had the opportunity to go to Creamer Barra, I think, free as in a row. This is the first year. I'm gonna go look going the shakers some friends dropped out. The lineup wasn't really that great well for the friends of ours going with even I'm a big fan of presser wa still, I think sometimes festivals. I would I would out argued that festivals. I know about the lineup. Their most about the, the headliners there about the lineup right? It's about going to a space or a park, and seeing lows of people for a really great value for money. Right. Primavera. Being a good example up and it tickets at one fifty to two hundred pounds for the free days. Which is what sixty quid a day or something like that, right? So if a sixty day you'll see people that, you know, at least one band will be equivalent you can use. I don't think you see a band for less than twenty pounds, these as what I think slow tie, does a few shows where he promotes them for, like a five or ten pounds of one pound. Every may be those special promotion. But for the most part, most, you'd be going to see it. If you go see them into Roussel venues, it's going to be between fifteen to thirty pounds. So you already made your money back instantly by seeing free bounds. In one day you can easily see more than that, if you're if you wake up early, and you have a plan, and you market, we want to see on the kind of settlers, and whatever may be you can see as many people as possible. So sometimes, I think especially my friends who period Friday go a little bit. You know, it was a little bit annoying that because the headline is one great. They kind of dropped out. It's about the people down on the lineup of rule. But the problem with festivals in London, isn't the lineup because usually live to always stellar. You must see most artists, especially indie ones are based here, or based in Europe. They want to come and play some of the American guys wanna come play. Because, you know, the London this is like, no, not an offer. You get people coming down from up north. Festivals here. We've really, really able to travel the stuff. I'm with the abundance of low travel travel fast from coaches trains, with Airbnb. There's no real obstacle in your way to kind of come to a festival and have a good time. But the issue that we have in London festival is the same issue. We have London club miss is that most of the festivals are going to take part in parks, where they're in really densely. Populated residential areas. Right. And these densely populated residential areas have a real issue with sound at a real issue just general congregation of young, people that tend to not to like that sort of stuff. So it takes a long time for festival really gonna a relationship with the local council. Get to a point of agreement make some compromises, it'd be able to port festival, and I think any every festival have been in London, wherever it's love books wherever it's filled day. Weber's Paulina park. Whatever may be has always had the consistent issue that sound, snuck Oganization sound, right. You have to weigh ages at the ball to get served because there's bartenders enough BAAs and. You have to wait ages to get in. And you also the sound is terrible, if you know, ride the front, they come put the volume up really loud, and just as horrible experience, I haven't been to Primavera and having stood out of no. One hundred meet maybe two hundred meters away, four hundred from the stage when vampire weekend was playing in this still being loud as fuck. I really do. Appreciate I really do. Appreciate how much better those festivals art because it's impossible in it. They don't care about that fucking sounder. The Playa del Weber is called is, is right next to the beach. No. Again, no sound pollution dead houses are really far away from main site. If you've been to if you've been to prevail, you know, you have to walk up really long ramp way food gates in fruit and impossible much denser until he gets in a main part of the actual festival. So again, there's no room nuisance with, with the neighbors they and exactly eleven PM people will head back where they're going is kind of out the way visited areas. It's really sapping away that they can play the salary loudly, but other places. Con so we all festival. Yes that they had issue with sound. But with organization where people having to wait outside for six hours or so in the in the baking sun because the posibly there. Only had six security guards at the front of the gates, searching banks, six it took too long to get through. And then people just got fed up and just rushing the gates. Because of course, you know, I'm assuming this, the stages were not filling up people assigned to play in your missing people that you wanted to come and see. And it's just a just a classic kind of like pole position festival have ever been a year. Where was hasn't fucked up somewhere? You ever that festival last year in south London where he will wait for ages to get in that had salon du playing was horrible. Just a constant issue that keeps happening again, again, again, I think he maybe that most people that are operating festivals on Nove say to kind of come from the club night.

London Brennan YouTube Delano Kevin Durant Playa del Weber Joe Rogan Nove Twitter Europe Jerusalem south London Sony Sony Jackie Airbnb St Paul Baran Llosa Sigua Don Standish
"paul baran" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"That'd be great could blow your bucks for two hours, Paul bearing a tough business. How long do you think it takes the body? Geico, do like five day five hundred bucks if you have any body. So the success of your business is the demise of others tough business. So when you sad yet. But if you're in that is a good day financially people are dying to get in there. Oh, jesus. You know, all the dad jokes. That's the one we go to right now. I guess it's to two hours. Address. He said as a pallbearer it takes about two hours. Okay. To go through whatever service. There may be. Know, obviously, carry the coffin gotta get it to be said he was doing the other stuff to those the other stuff. Well, that's Paul bearing is that what you would call it, Paul Baran. Yeah. Guess. Yeah. Right. So you would get one hundred bucks for that. And that takes about two hours. So the way he looked at it bucks an hour dead guy. Fifty bucks an hour. Pretty his answer was in. What are you doing post? Retirement funeral home stuff. That was his answer. All hey, how many people enter that way? Go to Florida. Do this is gonna take time off to relax. Got to be there for my kids to school dead people. Yeah. Right. Fewer stuff. All right. Good luck. All right. Jerry recco. Is back with his update. What's happening? Jerry. Brought to you by the Ray Catena auto group. Schedule an appointment today to Katina service in our first class service at affordable prices Yankees Diamondbacks. What a week. Arizona's about that for. Because I thought about it after we had the conversation. We just had that conversation. You actually did the joke. It is. See if I can play this the microphone, the the the the horror of him missing. Yeah..

Paul Baran Jerry recco Geico Yankees Ray Catena Arizona Florida two hours five day
"paul baran" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:50 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I think if you were to tell the average person under twenty five or thirty for example. Yes, the SEC considers the marketplace for information, shall we say to be solely newspapers broadcast TV stations broadcast radio stations would look at you. As if you have you heard of this thing called the internet. Well, can you let speaking rules don't take into account some of the effects of the internet. And so that's part of the reason why we wanna make sure we have an intellectually honest discussion about what is competition in this market place. Where for example, do we see the impact of digital advertising on broadcasters? And like, I mean, that's the kind of thing we want encourage conversation about because ultimately the SEC's rules cannot reflect the marketplace of two thousand eighteen if the marketplace consent. Action that we can create it for ourselves is one that's based on one thousand nine hundred six hundred nineteen seventy five. Tom Wheeler would you here? So I think that chairman pie is correct. When he says that the world is changing and the marketplace is changing. He and I have vastly different approaches to how to deal with that change. And. And I believe that we have a collective responsibility to set a set of ground rules that establish expectations for companies. And I don't have to micromanage. You don't have to fort innovation. But you do have to say, you know, here the four corners of expectations. And I think the chairman and I disagree. On that. Before we get too far. I've mentioned that this book is about individuals. We talked about Gutenberg we talked about Samuel Morris. And we're talking about railroads who who are the fathers and mothers of the third revolution. That we're in is Mark Zuckerberg because it Steve Jobs as Bill Gates are they derivatives. So I had the great privilege, and that's the only word you can use in life of knowing Paul Barron and Paul Barron is the man who developed the concept of digital packet switching, and that is at the heart of everything that we do today on the internet. And so I begin the book by talking about Paul Baran and the development of a digital packet. Switching. And the interesting thing, Peter. Is that what Paul did? Was to pick up on some ideas that Gutenberg had. And and to to break a connection into its smallest parts. Send it out over a distributed network. And then reassemble it just like good merg said, let's they break the parade the page down into its smallest part. The letter. And then reassemble that and reuse it. And so there is a history of these kinds of ideas repeating themselves, and and I just found that terribly fascinating. You also talk about somebody. I've never heard from Iowa thirty seven John Vincent tennis off. Thank you. Who was amazing professor at Iowa State University. Who developed the first electronic of digital computer as the world was trying to figure out how this computing idea works. And the story, and I'm not going to preempt it because I want your your your viewers to go buy from Gutenberg to Google. So they can read this wonderful story, but he developed it. You just can't make this stuff up. He developed it on the back of a cocktail napkin over a bourbon and soda in a roadhouse in Illinois in Illinois because he had the drive from dry Iowa across the the Mississippi River to Illinois where he could get a break. So is he one of the fathers of the third revolution without a doubt? And he never got his recognition is idea was swiped by some folks over here in east coast academic institutions, he went off to do other things because the second World War intervened. Eventually. His work was recognized by the United States court of appeals in a lawsuit is to just wear did this idea come from and the poor guy. His decision occurred the day before Nixon Saturday night massacre and all of the newspapers all the media outlets were all about that. And not about who the true father of the electronic computer is so Tom Wheeler when you look back to twenty fifteen and the beginning of our net neutrality debate and regulation here in the states. How does that fit into Gutenberg Google that was that wasn't that wasn't the beginning? I mean, you know, it was we we pass our rules in in two thousand fifteen and I think it is quite a consistent with with what we've seen over time. You know? I talked about the railroad is the first high-speed network. The railroads got abusive in the way in which they were handling traffic and the congress stepped in and created the Interstate Commerce Commission in eighteen eighty seven. And much like the FCC the ICC head of fits and starts on. What's the way to deal with the networks until until teddy Roosevelt became president and lead the country too? To reframe ING the power of the ICC to around judgments as to what is Justin reasonable. And the idea of open access to networks on Justin reasonable terms is exactly what we enacted in twenty fifteen in the open internet rules. So if net neutrality as enacted by the FCC under your chairmanship, does not exist is it, okay? In your view for California to develop its own net neutrality rules will think it's a consequence. It follows as the night of the day that whereas the day the night, I never get that straight. But but, but if the federal government has stepped aside and the agency responsible for America's network says, no, we don't have this responsibility anymore for internet that works, and we. We are a federal system. Then why should we be surprised if the states step up, and you know, the interesting thing here? Is that one of my favorite? Oscar Wilde quotes is that there are two great tragedies in life. Not getting what you want and getting it. And I think with Trump FCC that those networks regulated by the FCC have gotten everything they want and they turn around and they say, oh my goodness. There's a void there. We need some kind of rules, and so they turn around, and they go to congress, and they say we need to preempt what California has done. Adam Smith in of all people the ultimate lay safe, fair market economist Adam Smith said, you know, a market can't work without roles. And I think that the companies were probably discovering that now, and that's why they're now. But congress in congress saying, oh, you can't have all these different rules around the country. Will they had a uniform set of rules on open internet? They had a uniform set of rules on privacy. That got overturned in the Trump administration. And and the consequences are clear so something else you've out is the oncoming five G revolution in a sense right with five GD fear, a cyber war you fear for our security. But one of the things that I talk about in from Gutenberg to Google is is how one of the big four forces that will determine what our future looks like because remember it's called from Gutenberg to Google the history of our future. And what are the big four that are that will determine our future cybersecurity because networks have always been attack Vickers. I don't care whether it's the road network or the water network or the airwaves, or whatever those of all. Always been attack vectors and. Why should we therefore be surprised when we see that the network of the twenty first century is being used to attack us? So if we know that. The question then becomes what are they going to do about it? And if the most important network is probably going to be the wireless network. Now in shorthand described as five g the fifth generation where network what are we doing? Now. To get in front of the threats that we know are coming, and it's one of the things that we tried to do at the FCC when I was there. And unfortunately, the Trump FCC has walked away from. In a recent New York Times op-ed, you wrote that security needs to be baked into this internet of things we had a we had a simple idea. We said look. We'll make spectrum available for five G, but you need to build into the five G standard. And a standards that will protect in anticipation cyberthreats first time ever that a network standard was as a forethought rather than afterthought dealing with cyber. And then we opened what's called the notice of inquiry in which we asked the best minds in technology to tell us. Okay. How do you provide those kinds of protections? And again, unfortunately, when the Trump FCC came in they shut down both of those activities. And so I think we have reason to ask ourselves. What is our government doing today? And by the way, the things that are being done in so far as a what can be bought in. This sort of stuff are is important steps. Don't I'm not making light of them. But we also. Need to think about how does that network operate and who's going to oversee that? So Tom Wheeler in ten years. Are we going to recognize the internet? That we know today is it going to is it a new internet. Yeah. I think we're gonna say is where the other forces that I talk about as the forces that will determine our future. The internet came alive with the World Wide Web. Right. It allowed us to go. Find information and retrieve it it allowed us to go send the emails of find video do our own blogs and things like this. But that was always a transportation activity. I'm transporting things from point eight point b. What we're going to see now with five G, and with the with the combination of ubiquitous networks as in five G, and ubiquitous computing as to low cost Moore's law has come to life with chips in everything. Is that our network is not going to be about transportation as much as it's going to be about orchestration? What is an autonomous vehicle? For instance. It's the orchestration of vast amounts of data on the fly to produce a new product. The ability of guards to avoid it each other. Somebody wants estimated that. In a day. An autonomous vehicle will produce three thousand times more data. Than an individual produces today. And that data is going to have to be orchestrated at orchestration is going to be Vanu.

FCC Tom Wheeler congress Google chairman Gutenberg SEC Interstate Commerce Commission Paul Barron Illinois Paul Baran Iowa Vanu California fort innovation Justin Oscar Wilde teddy Roosevelt
"paul baran" Discussed on Something to Wrestle with Bruce Prichard

Something to Wrestle with Bruce Prichard

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Something to Wrestle with Bruce Prichard

"Jack lands just somebody next to me. Just so I can say let's finish kids. All move. The business come along way that times were changing. And I think that as old timers lot of a lot of times all throw myself in there. You look at what the fuck it was entertainment. It was it was Gaga. It was different. And you got on border. You didn't so joy get out there with them. When did you come around to get on board? I mean is this something you're on board with right away? Or or do you feel some pushback internally? Like are you thinking fuck, I don't know if this is a good idea, or because it's, you know, Vince day, you're just always great, Mr. back, man. I love it. No. The problem was I would always say, I don't think this is a great idea, and I will take the ass chewing. If you know that was to come. But I was the other side where I would usually say. Not sure about this one. And what if and take the ashen once it was decided by Venice, we're going to go on board one hundred percent. Yeah. I when I comes out I had reputation that which is just that's why it's so funny. When you hear about the s men, and I was one that would always go. No, no, listen. I know I know from working with you. That's not true like even in my personal life. I'll call you and say, hey, man shit on this because looking for somebody to shit on idea, I'll go to dollar number, and I'll shit on wanna God a lot of times you asked me to have to shit on shit on barely finished the idea shitting all over. So I know it's easy for you. Jim. This is hard for me. That's true. You know, it is. Yeah. And that's the way. I mean you with me all week. Oh, yeah. So. Yeah. But again, once it's once it's time to go on board man lescoe made. I'm all for it. You remember that time while who McNabb Nannu and Dory. Funk junior went to the embalming room with that. Yeah. I like to bring that up all the time and just say home. What if remember that time Jerry Lawler dug a hole? Doug lot of him. Maybe too many. This is this the most out there Russo idea at the time or can you? I'll be honest. I kind of didn't even remember any of this happened. I'm blocked it out. Well, God knows you can't lock some of this shit out like the symbol more than I do this. I just remember thinking what the fuck is that? But with this when you read this. Holy cow. Why joined it because it was so true to the undertaker character and Paul Baran and Paul actually embalmed people for a living. So that part of it intrigued me I liked it because I'm gonna well this could logically happen. Just said this could logically happen. And I got nothing because I'm not I'm not selling it. I'm not respond just letting rod baby. Yeah. But I liked it. I liked the undertaker stuff part of it. Which is probably why. Why could try on a little bit better? But this to me this was. A whole lot less than what was to come with the the human sacrifice a median to me that was that was the breaking point for me. That we embalm somebody. That's fine. But if we're gonna sacrifice them one avast too, damn far sexy. The sacra the sacrifice and the limitation was just a little too much. Sometime with man, I'm cool everything. L E can embalm the mother fucker alive. Gonna have bury live match all the shit. God damn some bitch. Go levitating be humanly sacrificed live on TV today in par. Gets our main event as I mentioned, Sean Michael set up his buddy POC with a title shot against the rock, the finish sees the rock. Grab a chair. But Sean takes it from him teases hitting rock, but then nails XBox revealing his alliance with vents, the rockets the corporate elbow scores the pan and Now Sean celebrating with Vince and the rest of the corporation..

Sean Michael Vince day Paul Baran Jerry Lawler Jack undertaker Venice McNabb Nannu Jim Russo Funk Doug one hundred percent
"paul baran" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

11:47 min | 3 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Come up somewhat frequently in the conversations. With other computer scientists recently. And there's this question of kids days who are being trained as software engineers or dealing with such higher level abstractions than the ones that we were dealing with when we were up and coming as programmers. And the question that I hear people asking over and over again is whether or not they're missing something by not being exposed just this wide differential between the top level understanding of the problem, just these absolute nitty-gritty, Automic details of how to get a solution. And I don't know what the answer the question is, I know that I learned to code on apple two es a radio shack color computer to which hooked up to a little thirteen inch television and subsequently got the chance to muck around with manufacturing equipment that were controlled by PD aids and systems that had wire wrap. That plane buses and whatnot, but I've never coded with hundred cards and you know, just sort of wonder, like, what did I miss my? Not having that. So I don't think it's the punch cards, key mess. Meaning I do think you really onto something here. The punch cards are part of it, which has to do with a little bit of friction a little bit of obstacle being put in, but let me start this off by saying, yes, we're missing something, but it isn't that everybody needs to go back to doing that. It's that we need to recognize that there's a certain type of training that is not happening and figuring out how to be additive. The underlying thing I would say is we've lost system thinking in the days one computer science was about building systems, building, infrastructure, understanding how compilers work, how you talked computer, all of those things. Taught you a sense of learning system thinking. And when I say system thinking, I mean two different things. One is how pieces are interconnected into a whole. So there's an architectural sense there as opposed to looking at things as just individual points. And then the second thing is thinking about the consequences of things. One year building system, you have inputs in than a complex set of interaction that may have different outputs and poking it in different ways that unless you're thinking about systems that are complicated, you don't think about consequences, intended and unintended consequences. And so those two things are really important. And I think that, whereas the abstraction in some ways is so beneficial because you know, I remember writing assembly code for problem for grammar, you know, at wasn't. Necessarily good use of how many hours it took to do it or the punch cards. But it seems to me, we have three side effects. One is, do people know how to tackle heart problems or do they only look for things that can be easily solved? And do we turn away or avoid or actually try to simplify the problem to something we can solve and then their world problems that get delayed. The second is this whole thing of pieces in a hole. And as I mentioned before, I really worry about the extreme of everybody take a little piece and not enough thinking about the architecture how they fit together. Do you have a foundation that is not brittle? I worry about reactive nece, but there's a third thing, which is it is so easy to it. Rate on things. We all talk about iterating iterating rendering. So what happens is that you don't take as much time to think about what you're doing, and that's one of the things, the batch cards, it wasn't so easy to do a turnaround and try again. And so you thought a little bit more about how you were fixing it before you submitted the guards when you have very rapid iteration on one hand, it is, we all know this. It's wonderful. You can fix problems quickly. You can do AB testing. You. It also makes you sloppy in your thinking at times I shouldn't say sloppy lazy. We don't have to put the same amount of thought into it. And if you're talking about failure that is not just inconvenient but can be harmful. You can't just say oops, right? So whether it is a self driving car that hit somebody or a social media system, whose implications is threatening democracy. We're not allowed to just say, oops, we have to be thinking about the consequences of the technologies that we are bringing to market because we are now in the center of everything in our lives. And I just concerned that as that happened as we became more and more consequential to the world. We also have not been training ourselves or training new engineers and computer scientists to think about those systems and consequences in the same way. And actually the culture is in the other direction which is move faster, get at a minimum viable product, get out your feature, and then we'll learn from our mistakes. I'm a big believer in learning from mistakes and learning from failure and taking risks, but we need to take back and say, what are those risks? What are the consequences on the risks and our couldn't agree with you more? I think there were a bunch of really powerful points. He made their like sometimes the struggle itself, like having to sort of slow down and think about something really sharpens your thinking. And some of the most interesting breakthroughs happen that way are more being irradiated when I was a senior in high school, taking my first real. Pewter science class at my professor who made us right the solutions to a programming assignments down on paper before we type them into the computer. And he could tell if you type the thing into the computer done this, like iterative debugged cycle to try to get it right, and I didn't appreciate it the time, like what slowing down was doing to help me be better thinker about what it was that I was doing. And then your whole point about this sort of crossing of these two curves, the importance of technology and its ubiquity in our day-to-day lives at the same time where we're sort of more fragmented in the way that we do software development, and we've atomised things up into a bunch of different pieces which on the one hand, you've got to have some mechanism to deal with complexity, but just because you're trying to solve a complex problem, doesn't absolve you of the responsibility of having to think very carefully about the problem in its second order affects. So I bring up these issues to say, what we need to do is shift our values or remind ourselves of the values that drive that talent right now. So much of what is going on in the industry is driven by the values of scale and speed. It is about maximizing growth. It is about even in some ways which it sounds like a good value, maximizing connectivity. What about thinking about what we're losing in those values? There's nothing wrong with growth, but not at the expense of humanity, not at the expense of society. It might be nice to think that maximum flat borderless connectivity should be a goal. But if you actually look at the way humans act and understand. Little bit more about people. You might say, you know what with connectivity needs to be some containment. Look what happens when we build fast in Houston and don't think about how waters move and a hurricane comes and the floods were way worse because we built for scale and we didn't pay attention to containment when you're fighting a wildfire, you think about containment. Well, misinformation spreads if you have maximum connectivity without thinking about where you need to contain, cause bad things can happen. So our industry is filled with so many talented, wonderful people. But I think sometimes we, as leaders are pointing those people in a direction and setting values, which are not in the end, changing the world for. Good. So I want to dig in more on this whole notion of values, but through the lens of some of your early experience. So you were present at the literal creation of the modern internet. So tell us a little bit about that story like how after you graduated UCLA goes back a little bit more in that. Again. My dad was chairman of for a time at the computer science department at UCLA and actually UCLA Stanford compete for where the internet began, because one of the initial Arpanet nodes was at UCLA. Paul Baran who's the father of packet switching was one of my dad's students. And so I, you know, again, I s most this. I'm being exposed to this. The other person who is one of my dad's PHD students was Vint CERF who is known as the father of the internet. So I ended up coming to Stanford doing my masters and Vint CERF was my adviser, and he was lead. Ding, the team that was developing the initial TCP protocol spec at that time. It wasn't TCP IP yet it was just TCP, Carl sunshine, yoga LOL. And so there was no computer science department. Then it was e- e, computer engineering and I was one of three women in the master's program. They hit already mapped out the initial spec for TCP and it was my job to do. The testing of the initial implementations can still remember the basement lab that is to go sometimes at three o'clock in the morning because the two sites we tested was BBN in Boston and the university of College London. So we don't think of it today because one of the beauties of the internet is that you have a synchronous communication, but we would send packets and then we would have a teletype machine in real time to say, did you get it? So we had to be on the same time. Mm firm. So it was a pretty exciting time in terms of being part of that, I will say that it was also my

UCLA Vint CERF Paul Baran Ding Carl sunshine Boston professor Houston Stanford university of College London chairman
"paul baran" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"One of my favorite promos I've ever watched was Jake, the snake being interviewed and they put the mic up to his mouth and he's moving his mouth and you can't hear God damn word and you're, you're like turning up. The volume on your computer, your TV, however, you're watching it. You're sitting at the edge of your bed, your couch, wherever you're at and you're like, God damn it. What does this guy saying? I want to know, and then he goes see that I don't have to say anything to get your attention and I lost my ship. That was the coolest thing ever. It was so cool. Just the idea, even the creativity and to be able to draw you in just by just by being himself just by being present in the moment was absolutely insane. One of my favorite promos Jake ever did. It was a segment, whatever it was. It was pallbearer when he was managing the undertaker and Jake was out there and I guess he had done something to trap undertaker's hand inside the casket. So he couldn't defend Paul Baran any DDT pallbearer right there on the floor, and it gets up and he just deadpanned goes. Short, ride bad landing. And I was leading. Spot. Short ride it as a real real bad landing, but but Jake presence about him as far as a little bit of this, I know you're just being MJ f and to Mike roud, which I love and ignore. They've been with me for damn near six years. Five years, however, long I've been doing this, you don't think very much of them, obviously. But you're overweight, not too many people, and I'm going to tell you this straight up max coming here and just overwhelming. But I mean, you came in here with it. Bad s what shirt is that fabric is at very expensive. It's actually one hundred percent silk, but again, I don't. I don't wanna turn your viewers off. I don't want them to feel jealousy. I just want them to be able to listen to the smooth, smooth sound of my voice and just enjoy this podcast. How.

Jake undertaker Mike roud Paul Baran one hundred percent Five years six years
"paul baran" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"He says one hundred percent of city buses will be electric in time for the Olympics in thousand twenty eight Garcetti quoted poetry and talked religion at the global climate action summit. I just heard without gore. A man who is both. Our pastor and our prophet Garcetti says L A is trying to get twenty five thousand electric vehicle chargers on the streets. Andrew mollenbeck, KFI, news gops and Long Beach have promised. There will be no surprises for people who show up to fix outstanding arrest. Warrants restrictions. Do apply. Commander Paul Baran says tomorrow's event allows people with low level warrants to show up and get a new court date without handcuffs lower grade. Things such as open, containers and urinating in public possibly things like vandalism, but if someone shows up with a warrant involving violence guns resisting arrest restraining or protective order violations to they would be arrested for people with that kind of warrant were jail is the only option he says the event is a safe and peaceful way to gone and knock it out Corbin. Carson KFI news workers ever moved in one thousand nine th century statue near San Francisco city hall that has been called racist and demeaning to indigenous peoples workers used a crane to remove the statue yesterday. As group of native Americans chanted beat drums and burn sage statue depicts, a native American at the feet of a Spanish cowboy and Catholic missionary. It's part of a group of statues. Depicting the founding of California Florence is now a tropical storm as it pushes inland from the California. Carolina coast, rather, North Carolina. Governor ROY Cooper says that's not good Lawrenceville, slowly and painfully grinding its way across North Carolina. Punishing winds flooding. South carolina. Governor Henry McMaster says the rain will be around for the next couple of days. This is something that we have not seen before this much rain a hurricane. Stay on time food for this long. Hundreds of people have had to be rescued from flooded neighborhoods at least five deaths are blamed in the storm. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has pleaded guilty to federal crimes as part of a plea deal. Aaron Katersky says Manafort has admitted to conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct Justice over ten years court records said Manafort laundered, more than thirty million dollars through scores of foreign and domestic corporations partnerships in Bank accounts and used hidden overseas wealth to fund a lavish lifestyle in this country. You'll have to forfeit properties and Bank accounts. He's also agreed to cooperate with special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation and a powerful typhoon is hit the north eastern coast of the Philippines. More than five million. People are at risk from the storm, which the Hawaii-based joint typhoon warning center categorizes as a super typhoon equip. To a category. Five atlantic. Hurricane.

Paul Manafort Garcetti North Carolina Hurricane Commander Paul Baran Governor Henry McMaster Carson KFI Governor ROY Cooper Carolina coast South carolina KFI Olympics gore vandalism Long Beach Andrew mollenbeck San Francisco California Florence
"paul baran" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"paul baran" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Hour newsroom. Cops in Long Beach have promised. There will be no surprises for people who show up to fix outstanding arrest. Warrants restrictions. Do apply. Commander Paul Baran says tomorrow's event allows people with low level wars to show up and get a new court date without handcuffs, lower grade, things such as open containers and urinating in public possibly things like vandalism, but if someone shows up with a warrant involving violence guns resisting arrest restraining or protective order violations to they would be arrested for people with that kind of warrant were jail is the only option he says the event is the safe and peaceful way to gone and knock it out Corbin. Carson KFI news. A federal court has sided with L A and a fight over federal law enforcement grants city attorney, Mike viewers who sued the federal government. Wind conditions were added to a giant require a grant requiring local law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration law. The court ruled the administration exceeded its authority and placing. And conditions on the public safety. Grant almost two thousand people in studio city of signed a petition against changes to flights leaving Burbank airport. The FAA plans to move the flight path for departing flights farther south that will send planes right over studio city, Sherman oaks and Encino, lots of people in the area. Say play noise has already increased because of lower approaches. It's terrible the way too loud way, way way, too loud, just horrible. I mean, it's getting so bad that we're thinking of moving out of state homeowners say they feel stonewalled by the FAA. The new flight paths are supposed to start in November in studio city. Andrew mollenbeck, KFI new wildfire that burned more than twenty three thousand acres origin, riverside counties is contained it started about five weeks ago in the holy Jim canyon area of Orange County destroyed eighteen homes, including some cabins a man who's cabin was not burned has been charged in the arson fire Florence's now tropical storm as it pushes inland from the Carolina coast, North Carolina. Governor roy. Cooper says that's not good still slowly and painfully grinding its way across North Carolina. Punishing winds, flooding rains, South Carolina. Governor Henry McMaster says the rain will be around for the next couple days. This is something that we have not seen before this much rain a hurricane. Stay on top of Louis for this long. Hundreds of people have had to be rescued from flooded neighborhoods, at least five deaths are blamed in the storm fomer Trump campaign chairman, Paul Manafort pleaded guilty to federal crimes as part of a plea deal. Aaron Katersky says Manafort is admitted to conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct Justice over ten years court records said Manafort laundered, more than thirty million dollars through scores of foreign and domestic corporations partnerships in Bank accounts and used hidden overseas wealth to fund a lavish lifestyle in this country. You'll have to forfeit properties and Bank accounts. He's also agreed agreed to cooperate with special counsel, Robert Muller's Russia investigation and Volkswagen. Is going to stop making the beetle. The bug has been around since the thirties when Hitler asked carmakers for an affordable practical card hit the height of its popularity in the US in the sixties. It was reintroduced in the late nineties one point more VW bugs had been made than any vehicle ever..

Paul Manafort FAA North Carolina Carson KFI Long Beach Commander Paul Baran United States Governor Henry McMaster South Carolina Burbank Governor roy holy Jim canyon KFI Robert Muller vandalism Volkswagen