25 Burst results for "Patti Smith"

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

08:31 min | Last week

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"You know. Well, like Sweden's. The Nobel people asked if I would sing for who ever won the literary lower you know who won for prize for literature and that year there was some talk it might be more Kami. At so I thought I would sing this song wing because of the wind. Up Bird Chronicle. Well it wasn't. It turned out to be Bob Dylan and then I thought Oh my Gosh I. Singing. I'm going to be singing. For Bob by I can't sing one of my songs, I should say one of his. Chose hard rain hard gonNA fall because I felt even though it was early song encompasses everything his poetry, his his humanity, his sense of the environment his sense of you know all of the things that he believed in that we all believe in our in that song and. I thought it was the perfect You know. Yes. Great. To introduce him. And of course. I. Had this terrible. Episode of strange white out nerves but One of the greatest moments of life performing I've ever seen in my life I. It's it is so personal. It's so odd the way it kind of I know it must have been just horrible for you. But as was I thought I would die yet and I I I can I really I don't have any. When it comes to perform I don't mind screwing up anything I screw up belied, but it's my own screw up. Yeah but Another person's work especially but Dylan who is meant so much to me. Right my whole. It was it was a it was terrible but but the self correction of it was beautiful because it was ultimately inactive respect and you know but it that moment where you make the decision to be like, wait a minute like every time I watched it I'm like Oh my God as a performer I it almost makes me cry because it's Because it's so honest though it's so honest and you know I don't know I thought it was great and everybody it seem like everybody kind of woke up and realized that they were seeing a human. It was kind of an amazing moment. Well it all. It seemed universally to stir people. That way and I'm grateful for that because at the moment. With the orchestra behind me. Giant. These cameras because they were global cameras going all over the world you know massive cameras and looking down the king and Queen. Of Sweden and and all of the Noble Lawrenson in all of this expectation. and. Then suddenly to just freeze. Froze. I mean a song that I knew backwards and forwards just suddenly escaped me. I didn't know what to do. I've never. I've had these things happen to me on stage right than laughs and make joe run say well, like we'll do this and then talk to the people I've had paranoid moments where I had to actually talk myself down with the people and say I don't know what's wrong with me but I feel really self conscious and people are always with you and I know that people most of the time people are with you if if they come, they are going to be with you right It was just The whistle humiliating and so frightening but. It turned out that. It made people. People seem to identify it because everybody has these moments where their their worst moments of their life everybody has these moments gets imports just. Had to be the poster poster girl for the s moment of your life but I. I don't. If. I feel about it now like I feel about. Everything if it's if it's served anybody than it's still gay. Even. Bob That says you got serve someone yet. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's seemed to serve people say anything about it not to me directly but I I know from the family that. Everyone seemed very happy. With with everything. Well it's great talking to you I wanted you know I was GonNa talk more about some of this this line. The the evidence of an awareness of the relative value of insignificant things like it seems that. You know that like I see some of your photographs to and I have a lot of little things that that really become personal magic objects sort of like you know triggers of of of emotion nostalgia and and place and time love that appreciation of that I like the way you look at them. Oh. Thank you mark. That's so nice. Well, I guess it's We've we've done Mosey on but I had this was really fun. Great. Wish sometimes a little more. But I'm just not my you know I've become very mentally abstract in these months but really funded talk no I thought it was great and I love talking to you and you know who is always telling me that he wanted us to talk to you know Berry. Skills you're all the way he's my one of my favorite people he is really I've been blessed to have him as a as A crew member in a friend and I don't know if you know this but you know he has my husband's motorcycle a really I didn't know this. My husband had A. a Harley. sportster and. Barry. I just had it in. No No. No none of us ride a motorcycle in was you know you can't leave a motorcycle for years? Not Right doing any you know and berries dreamlike found out was to have a Harley sports sports story. And he is really. Is, really taken. His loved that Barry also to say reminds me of my late brother. Todd so. I always say he gets the toddy award Barry, my brother was the head of our crew of when. When we performed in the seventies. And Berry became the head of our crew when I returned to performing in the nineties and He is really shepherded that that that motorcycle he goes everywhere in it he named at Sonic after France. Great. It's sleep. He had it painted on Oh. Wow that's great I didn't know that like I know him from doing Conan a as a comic and he he'll. He'll. He'll work guitars occasionally and we'll talk about this and that but he's a great guy but he always used to say like look talk to Patti you guys gotTa Talk. So he he's he's been the one he keeps saying you have to do this. And he talked about being in one's corner. He is in your corner. That's for sure. Well. I just wanted to acknowledge that that He's a great guy and that you know he's always championing this I'm glad it happened. Me Too we'll do it again sometime because there's a million things we could talk can sit helpfully personnel you know like maybe we'll get back to some sense of normal come to New York with the microphones and we'll do it. Although I forgot the I mean you know because I'm the any interviews I've done in the past six or seven months have been on television I haven't anybody. So actually I almost forgot that we're not. Just talking. So it's Yeah. Yeah. No. Great I'm so happy that you we got involved in zoom thing. And and it's working out. All right. We'll take care of yourself. I officially Zoom Zoom you've been zoomed Patti Smith. Thanks Mark Talk to you again soon?.

Bob Dylan Barry Sweden Patti Smith Bob That Berry Mark Talk Bird Chronicle Bob Noble Lawrenson joe Todd Conan New York A. Sonic France
"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

06:15 min | Last week

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It was Allen who came Allen came right to my birth skew. Drew me back into working again actually talked to Bob Dylan to s Bob maybe take me on a tower helped me get work. So these men. In I met these men both in nineteen seventy. In humor circumstances but they were lifelong friends. So when when you started to do Like. It seemed like you landed on poetry like you seem like you were doing a lot of stuff and you continue to do a lot of stuff but poetry seem to be the thing was that a decision you made at some point like this is it you know I, I wanted to be an artist that's what I want hear in. The whole spectrum right and. Know I dreamed of being a painter and I always wrote and I wrote poetry since I was about fourteen year But when I first came to New York, working at a Bookstore Robert Nigh lift in a little apartment and I did little drawings but it was really a the lion's share of my energy went into poetry and. That's really how I wound up. Performing or a Recording. Later it's all poetry is the genesis and even horses. The first lines of horses is Gloria is from a poem I wrote. In Nineteen, seventy right and. And Redondo Beach. King from a poem a lot of the in the idea of. improvising. Came from the way I wrote and performed poems so I guess I've always been. You know. Poetry centric when it comes to my work even now when I write. A lot less poetry I still feel it invading my books like in in your the monkey on any of these books that I write I'll be something in all. Thank you know that's three quarters poem but oh definitely yeah there's a guy ended up like last night I don't know I was listening to a Tangerine dream you know reading the Sauce reading the rest of your book and I read over half of it already. But I've got Tangerine Dream on I'm reading your book and all of a sudden like underline and shit. Like this poetry. Yeah, there's Definitely See Parts where. You know if you just spaced it differently, they just be poetry a lot of the poetry I wrote I was younger. Love centric or relationship set trigger. Ended it's just as I got older, I've written. I don't write some much of that anymore. So I am I, find myself. Gravitating almost completely to pros. Well yeah I mean I was thinking about that like what you just said about. The. You wanted to be an artist and an artist is all of it and I, and I think it seems to me like even that this being your first zoom and I I'm I'm very excited to be part of a Patti Smith I. AM, it's not so bad I. Mean I I have to say I was a little worried about it. I thought well. I don't know I just didn't know what to expect ads. It's alright. It's fun so far it works. But like yeah, you talk about being full artist in that. You know that you did you had to do all these things whatever it was that there is this general sense of the artist and art I was talking to my buddy Samlip site last night he's a writer genius I love him. And you know it struck me that even your know the that you don't you don't zoom you don't have the headphones and you live the life of an artist but you also it seems to me in reading the books that you look to art to resolve all the fundamental questions of of existence you look to art for relief you look to art to make sense of the world you look to it when you're just hanging out having coffee that there's is almost a religiosity to to what it can do for somebody if they surrender to a wholly and fully and it seems that the life you live. That's thank you that that's really a nice thing to say. But I think it's also I. Look at when I was very young. I always looked at being. Well. One is called to be an artist. Hauling to be a poet, well, it could be anything calling to be a good be a priest for musician or maybe I? Mean it's you know one has a calling. But. I felt like it. It was my calling I've never wanted to do anything else. But I don't really not that adept to do anything else it's been a part of my life, my whole life and even when I was very ill anytime I've been very ill or at the you know the brink of despair. It always come comes to me. It always gives me refuge juror. It always gives me a voice always or or makes me feel that I have some worth in that terror that I have something to? You know to. To offer the Canon of art or offer to people are offered to the future. In it, it's just. But you know, I think of all of these things are linked together. If one has a call is the calling come from you know one can save from God from nature. From some kind of a vast energy pool and and I believe in those those things I mean hell I believe in it shifts. As I evolved but I've always connected. art from me has not been godless pursuit. So I I always I have it all within my work I connection with everything within my work but I Understood that..

Bob Dylan Allen Redondo Beach Patti Smith New York Gloria writer
"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

08:18 min | Last week

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The okay. Odi because we're working on a project with William Burroughs is William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg and Carl Solomon and Dennis Hopper. Then Sam Sheppard came in and it was just another night. Terry southern he was writing a script for William? VERSION OF A. Of a junkie a really an play Mary but the it all fell apart. But for a while just hanging out with them was pretty great. I, can't imagine I I just. Like when I read this book, you know wh the the new one that's coming out in paperback. Now you're on the monkey, it seems like You're straddling some of this stuff that burrows did you know moving between reality not reality dream not dream you having guides you know and and because like when when all this shit started to go down for some reason, I went back to burroughs to try to decode some stuff because I in my life I always feel like it's all in there somewhere that you all the answers are within burrows somewhere. You just have to figure out how to find them and sort it out. From some of the other science fiction and weirdness he believed it was all out was all out there and he believed also if you were lucky enough to have suffered scarlet fever, which votes tonight had your you had an open channel for all of these things to come from this great pool. So he what you were getting from William, he was a good portal because William got all of those things from everywhere else he believed in that. So he was the right guide for you. So. So the scarlet fever created the the the the the ability, well He. Didn't create the the ability, but it opened the portal wider in the wild boys Johnny in the wild boys of had scarlet fever. We have club Man William called the scarlet fever club and. You really believed that if you had suffered a really deep fever at a very young age, it opens your portable forever. That's interesting. Yeah. I. Went I for some reason I started to plow into. The Western lands. You know which it seemed to me that I and I think that maybe you're dealing with a bit of a to that like he had to somehow. Reckon with mortality in a very sort of practical way for himself and it seemed like you know his interpretation of the book of the dead was how he was going to go about it. Is that true? I suppose I don't I've never analyzed I. Never, thought about it. I mean to me I mean that's the kind of thing enough to talk i. just read his stuff me to like I wanted to answer somehow and like I keep going back because structurally he's a little tricky for me. But like you know when I started to see that he was dealing with all these different levels that that once the guy person dies goes through and he created characters with names for each of those levels that were very borough characters I was able to figure out. Oh, this is the journeyman you know so. You think leaper than I do I mean to me Williams sometimes reading William. Or reading certain writers is like listening to Coltrane or something. Or a saxophone solo right I never analyze it i. just I'm just there and I just go with them and I go away as far as they're gonNA, take me and by. Comeback and don't even remember where we been because. I'm so immersed in the go and. I. Think that's right. I think that's the best way to do it. I always assume like I missing something there and Now. He's got so many blanks there he wants to to fill in I. Mean you have to be the third mind with with William Right because I I remember one williams great disappointment himself was that he couldn't write a straight laced detective story. Or straight laced novel he and we talked about this all of these books if you if you think about it, they start. Very conventional. Eight. Yes. You're going on your you're gone with this old guy sitting there with his. Shotgun barrel or something you're going to go straight through some plot with him and then starts cutting things up in going into several layers of worlds and he told me, he just couldn't help it. That's that's the way his mind works in that it's his process. He would have loved to have written even a two bit detective novel that's for sure. I've read his essays. It's interesting when he writes with that type of clarity or you read the interviews but like yeah and I get it there's a magic to it. He you guys I mean you're a magician as well. There is a magic to this idea of of transcending space and time through cut ups and through I mean I get it and I like it. So you were able to spend time with burroughs early on your before you started singing or as a poet I met him in. Nineteen. Seventy I think I met him I had a big crush on him. So I was always A. United pet. He would come into the Chelsea hotel and he was so handsome and he was always so well dressed and I just had the biggest crush on him and I would try to. Know, I would talk to him and I think he was amused by me. But also he got to trust me he I. Don't know we became friends but also sometimes in the course of night, William would get extremely shoveled because the come into the Chelsea. And you had to come through the lobby and then go through the door into the bar. WOULD START OUT WITH HIS Perfect, tie in ensued to an overcoat, and then when he left, he was a bit stumbling. He'd get a bit intoxicated and I would wait and then I would get him a cab and make sure that you know he didn't leave anything behind in. Just you know be as like little. Guardian Angel Girl. Three. We just got to be friends and friends throughout. His whole life. And right to the end of his life and he was a very kind and very principled man. I know people know. Different Aspects of William? And he was many things and but to me, he was very good to May. He. Was a good teacher when my husband died he was So supportive he was kind to my children. You know I'd Love I. Loved Him why feel a lot I mean? That's one thing that comes through the writing and your life is at like the. The sort of using deep and Lasting friendships. Is Really I. It's like enviable I I mean you know when the way you talk about William and the way talk about Sam Sheppard in the book just these. This real appreciation of of friends and people you love and and and other artists that you respect. It's just it really struck me because I I don't. I don't I think things have become kind of chaotic odd and I guess people still do it. But when I look at my life I have a few friends but there's such because you the generation and the people that you guys the crew of you are so. Daunting in in in in your output in in who you were in the world I just loved that you you're not only friends but you stay together until the end I mean it's really kind of amazing and it really is what life is about at least half of it. Right? Well, you find a few people that you. Really, trust. To feel you know understand you. I was just lucky. The people that that I? was close to his young girl run remained closed till you know they're passing We all of us had worked centric relationships as well.

Man William William Burroughs fever Sam Sheppard William Right Terry southern burrows Mary Dennis Hopper Chelsea hotel Allen Ginsberg Johnny Carl Solomon Williams Coltrane A. United Chelsea
"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:23 min | Last week

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Great time to launch that idea that you've never got off the ground and squarespace can help you turn your dream into a reality. You can easily make a beautiful website for whatever it is. You're looking to do do you want to showcase your writing or do a streaming video show or have a place to sell the things you make squares race makes it easy With. Beautiful templates created by world class designers and the ability to customize just about anything with a few clicks they also have twenty four, seven customer support. So there were always be someone there to help. And you'll never need to do a software update squarespace takes care of that for you. Everything is optimized for mobile right out of the box, and there's nothing to patch or upgrade ever squarespace empowers millions of people to turn great ideas into something real. So what are you waiting for head to squarespace DOT COM slash W. T. F for a free trial, and then you're ready to launch us the AFRICO WPF to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com. So I W F offer code. W T.F. My buddy deemed del got a big show dropping today. You got all all the fellas from ACDC over the Ark of a couple of interviews SA- big day. It's like when I interviewed Obama Dean interviewing. ACDC is a big day. The podcast is called. Let there be talk. Go. Dig On that he talked to Angus and Brian. Fill and the other guy but you know. They're back. And Dean talked to him. Sinaga Patti Smith here. Just so So, fucking excited about it. Seriously I was your first zoom I. Hope it went. Well, I. Hope she enjoyed it. Right. Her third and latest memoir called year the Monkey. It's now available in paperback wherever you get books and this is me. And Patti. Smith. Doing her I zoom. DIG It..

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

07:49 min | Last week

"patti smith" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"All right. Let's do this. How are you? What? The fuckers? What the fuck buddies, what the Fuck Spurs what's happening? I'm Marc Maron. This is my podcast WPF. Welcome to it. How's it going? What do we in month seven of this, Shit. How are you? Good Morning. Good afternoon. Good evening. How's the exercise going? How's the walk has your dog has your kid. Has You leg? How's your hand? How's your fucking head? Are you using whatever options you have at your disposal to maintain your sanity? Without hurting yourself or others. Are you trying to mind your mind? So they don't mind your mind. The, you know what a mark is. Do. You know what a mark is. Not me a mark. The intended victim of a swindler hustler or the like A mark. An object of derision scorn manipulation or the like. Example he was an easy mark. For this Trumpian Bullshit. Marks. A Nation of Mark's. Why am I bringing that up? Why am I bringing that up I? Tell you man. President alluded to leaving the country if he loses good riddance. If, he can't maintain powering continued to degrade. The nature of the rule of law as we drift further into. Authoritarianism email me the three fucking. Trump supporters who listen to me email me with your fucking delusional bullshit. About what's really happening? Don't do it. Not My fault that your mark. that. You didn't mind your mind. Or that you're so myopic. That your ability to conceptualize or. See through the veil of garbage. Is Muted. Or destroyed. Wouldn't it be beautiful if he loses and then moved to the entire operation and family to Russia where he can be protected wouldn't it be the best thing in the world if this motherfucker? lived. In, exile in Moscow. Scott allow debt gala charges hanging over his head. I with the I, I would just I love that story that's the best possible ending as the world ends. Patti Smith is on the show today Patty Fuck and Smith is on the show today. Patti Smith, are you fucking kidding me when was the last time you listen to her first three albums in a row? she's got her latest book out year the Monkey, it's now available in paperback. Might have read some of her other stuff just kids and devotion and few other books but she's here and I've been wanting to talk to her for a while. And she here I am her I resume interview. I. Was her first Zoom Call. Patti Smith was zoom virgin before me. And I'm thrilled to have. Had that honour? And you'll hear me talking to Patty I just love her what there's she's the real fucking deal. She is the one and only Patti Smith she's the raw goods man all there all the time. Right up front. fucking lover. True Beatnik legacy. That's what I was trying to get at. There's no context anymore. Really. History is dissolving everything is all the time. Nothing is true. Everything is permitted. That's not true. That's an old riff on Sin Saba a bit that burrows used to do. And then. Jim Carroll. Did it in a Song I can't think like that but the context of history. Is diminished when everything happens all the time and no one is educated properly no one is really schooled in critical thinking or. Or civics. Or. Even American history and a proper way global history myself included. It's just all are all the time. Nobody knows who did wetter what anyone's importance was in the context of history, the big monsters and the do gooders nobody knows. Really how they fit in. The generation of young people. Who might say? Yeah, you know. Oh. Hitler the guy with the mustache right. That's the context but history is being diminished. And that's why on some level. I was happy to talk to patty because she comes directly from the New York. That was still being occupied by a beatnik idea that was still being occupied by artists sort of like really pushing the envelope that first wave of performance artists the first wave of punk. You know in the sort of like the beaten up city of the early Seventies. Stuff was forming things were happening. There was no internet everything was raw and dirty. Yeah, that history but she is a direct legacy. She knew borough she knew Ginsburg they both took her under her wing. She's friends with the Mapplethorpe she dated Sam Sheppard Tom Verlaine but she was air at the in the cauldron of that stuff in the seventies. When those old timers were kind of fading out a bit but still had some wisdom to share. Because I wanted to be part of the Beatnik legacy, I respected that history. I was a hero worshipper even though I didn't quite understand it. And I don't think any of those people exist anymore. The people that sort of worship these times is an Algebra Is it wanting to live in the past? Or is it honoring? The arc of history and and where you land in it. And where you come from. When I was in college I was like all up in it reading the books about the beat Knicks reading the Beatnik books reading the Beatnik? Heroes. Arthur Rambeau Baudelaire Blake Ginsburg was a great guy. A Ram, bow guy, they're all rainbow guys. Patti Smith Seromba woman. A Blake woman. That Poetic Legacy, the Poetic Journey of that particular type of poetry. Shadow your senses man. Break it all down. By Guy got some quotes here from the from these people from Rambeau. The poet therefore is truly the thief of fire. He is responsible for humanity for animals even he will have to make sure his visions can be smelled fondled listen to if what he brings back from beyond has form he gives it form. If it has none, he gives it none a- language must be found of the soul for the soul and will include everything perfume sounds colors thought. With thought. Arthur Rambo. Hero Patti.

Patti Smith Patty Fuck Arthur Rambeau Baudelaire Blak Patti Smith Seromba Marc Maron Patti Mark Russia Moscow Guy Knicks President Arthur Rambo Trump Rambeau Scott Jim Carroll Smith Hitler Sin Saba
Annual Lennon tribute, in 40th year, goes online

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | Last month

Annual Lennon tribute, in 40th year, goes online

"Change of plans for a milestone musical tribute. Falintil telling us about it. Correspondent Deborah Rodriguez John Lennon would have turned 80 years old this October night 40 years after he was killed, an annual memorial concert in New York will be held on line because of the pandemic. Jackson Browne, Patti Smith, Natalie Merchant, and a slew of other musicians have already taped performances. Organizer's are hoping the free stream on the website Lenin tribute dot org's Get even Morrell exposure than past Once. Debra Rodriguez, CBS News

Debra Rodriguez Deborah Rodriguez Falintil Jackson Browne Natalie Merchant Patti Smith John Lennon Lenin Morrell Cbs News New York
Annual Lennon tribute, in 40th year, goes online

KYW 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | Last month

Annual Lennon tribute, in 40th year, goes online

"On an annual tribute to John Lennon, held in his adopted city of New York will go online. Like so many other events during the Corona virus, pandemic organizer's say There's no way they'd miss it. Not on what would have been the former Beatles 80th birthday and their 40th year of gathering to pay homage. A five hour event will be streamed for free on Lenin's birthday. That's October 9th. It starts at 7 P.m. on the Lenin tribute dot org's website featuring recorded performances by Patti Smith. Rosanne Cash, Natalie Merchant, Jackson Browne and so many more

Lenin Rosanne Cash John Lennon Patti Smith Jackson Browne Natalie Merchant Beatles New York
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair DAN Patti Smith Hugh Laura Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

05:19 min | 2 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"I've been approached about the student teacher story before by people who always seem to have this moralistic agenda to tell this cautionary tale of young people who are in over their heads or taken advantage of with too much freedom and sex and drugs, and rock and roll. And I definitely want to be clear with you that I actually believe that artistic exploration and that. Freedom is worth a certain amount of existential risk and I'd rather live next door to junkies than millionaires any day. And I'm endlessly grateful. That we came of age in a place time like that. And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair Laura Patti Smith DAN Hugh Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
"patti smith" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"So! That was just like. I realized that I wasn't going to lake make. It, as a ballet dancer, so I watched ballet, and on TV and I did my own. My Own, my own private ballet. Yeah, I don't I. Don't have any trouble in in failing if I do the best I can. That was the that was when you asked me earlier, you know. How do I deal? Or how can I go through all the things that go through and score well or make a big mistake in front of so many people, and then just own up to it and try again because my mother always said to to us. Just do the best you can. If you've done the best you can. If you've held back if you're lazy than that's another thing you've done. Your all then feel good about that. And I told that to my my son and daughter. They've come on stage with me since they were young and you know. I wanted them to see me make mistakes on stage. Both of them are musicians. I wanted them to see that. The world doesn't end. If you ruin a line or you you. Mess up the chorus or you know you hit the wrong note that you just simply. Take a deep breath and. Connect with people as. I can mistake wakes everybody up in the audience I. Remember you saying one thing along those lines about when that happened the Nobel Prize and he said off to you. Forgot some lines you picked up and you finish this, I'm GonNa went well all these Nobel. Prize winners came up to you and said this happens to us all the time. These mistakes we've made is that. Well, they said. They said that was so great and I said I wish I was in tears. I said I. Wish I could have been better for you. I wanted it to be perfect. And they said no, no, no, it was like invalidated all of our awkward moments. and. That was very nice. So that was Patti Smith Darling Darling Patty. Great Netflix again one of my favorites and also she said that lovely thing to me that I'll never forget. It's not a failure. If you tried your hardest. No, I love that. She's a very philosophical person. Makes Phil simple in.

Nobel Prize Patty Patti Smith Netflix Phil
"patti smith" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

04:29 min | 3 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Just a reminder that this episode was recorded pre lockdown back when we could be in a room together. Enjoy listening. My friend said to me. She said mental health is. Good exercise, good sleep and sex of wealth. And I don't think people took good. Sex is being good human to ever really. Good Point. Youtube better. Cookie I talk about it. Aren't sex very important? That's why I feel the lacking right now. I feel like I have more angst dreams I. Normally do right now because I'm not having any sex because my husband is no here. But but no one talks about that. Have you ever but right now? I'm saying we both agree that is a really good thing. That, people don't talk about sex mental health. Fiercely not help. Masturbation is great. That's why I think it must be awful. Being people who don't do it I also think. Sex and masturbation and very different things. Don't you? But as groundbreaking today. I'm incoming. Will I'm glad company. And I'm Christopher. Sweeney, and this is Homo sapiens. Away from you I'm normally. Closer. Yeah. Let's talk about. Our Guest Patti Smith. It's an extreme privileged to party. Because you really doesn't talk to many. Things and you guys and she's a huge Allen coming. Inbound she's a darling. Wants my job. She was at your job. As the host of must be mystery on PBS. Smith coolest person on the planet potentially is a huge fan of English mysteries including. Mystery, TV. Show loves broad church, which I just thought was. But. A lot of what? I spend a lot of people. I think my way into Patti. Smith was because of her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe right. Because they were both artists who moved to New, York in one thousand, nine hundred sixty s sixty nine. No, that's not right. Seventies maybe. A long time ago. The, whistle, one point. Glad, go two thousand the interview, but they were. He was gay, but they would relationship and they I. Think and we talk about this interview that they were a lovely motto for. Idea relationship I think it's interesting that you say you say that. There were no religion I think. They were in a relationship. And later he was gay. Do. You think that was the way round. A. Relationship before her. Yes, perhaps but I mean they were in a relationship. And then he was again there, but I mean they had a very big sexual autumn saying I'm really. And Cheek, but we kind of a raise. Gay Men's heterosexual sexual relationships and experiences. Yes so. Asthma none of it I. Think it. Something happens. You evolve. You change give. They always had a great relationship..

Patti Smith Robert Mapplethorpe Allen Asthma Cheek Sweeney Christopher York
Beowulf Sheehan

Photography Radio

07:33 min | 5 months ago

Beowulf Sheehan

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have

New York Miami Dolphins Fort Lauderdale New York University Scott Olsen Magnet High School Beowulf Sheehan Oprah Winfrey Bill Dan Marino Wrestling Morrison Patti Smith Florida Everglades Yale Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewar Paul Simon Getting
Patti Smith Celebrates Greta Thunberg's 17th Birthday With Poem

KNX Programming

00:22 sec | 10 months ago

Patti Smith Celebrates Greta Thunberg's 17th Birthday With Poem

"Greta timber turned seventeen Friday among her presence a poem by a rock and roll hall of Famer and one of our most iconic artist Patti Smith tumors mentor birthday as she spends each Friday at the Swedish parliament demanding action on the climate crisis Harry Smith took to Instagram of the poem including the final line Happy Birthday to Greta who stood today as every Friday refusing to be

Swedish Parliament Harry Smith Greta Patti Smith
"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Day. Maybe you sign her the long. Hey Hey that's me you don't turn me home again Anna. So you're scared and your Louis shore duty Instead Sir Sir. Yeah aw aw..

"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:44 min | 10 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The you know it's It's not quite there's a big difference between what you see on stage and then my general daily my daily existence you write about your. I'm sorry I'm talking to myself. Don't let that bother. I use part of my illness. I do all the time. You're you're right about how being on stage is almost like medicine for you. Sure does it get you out of yourself does it all. Of course you're immediately pulled out of the year you the inside of your head and it immediately immediately changes your frame of mind. I've I've never been on stage where I've not true. I have been on stage on a few occasions where I felt. I couldn't escape the interior of my my interior thoughts but uh Peter Wolf once said. What's the strangest thing you can do on stage? Think about what Nothing where you can do. If you're up there thinking about what you're doing you're just not there and it's not going to happen so trying to learn how to overcome those which is a normal thing to do. You're in front of a lot of people. People are going to get very self conscious so you have to learn to sort of overcome that tendency toward self consciousness end just blow it wide open and you jump in and join join all those people that are out there enjoying what you're doing together together During the depression there's a period of a year and a half when you weren't on the road with one of your sons guess with your youngest and did that contribute to the depression because you couldn't be on stage and you couldn't have that kind of experience tend to be not my own best company. I can get a little lost when I don't have my work to occasionally focused me but at the same time you've got to be able to figure that Out The year and a half. I was home. My son was in his last year of high school. And and it was kind of my last opportunity to to be here with him in the House and and wanted to get that right as you mentioned in your book you. You wanted to write songs that you wouldn't outgrow that you could sing as as an adult kids in you know done accomplished born. You're seeing some of your early songs now as you still do like born to run. Does those assange a different meaning to you than it did. When you first started forming we just had a series of concerts where the show was very interesting? Because we'd start with my earliest material curiel and we played about half a record off of our of our first record and then half or three quarters of the second record so going back to my earliest music and singing my earliest songs that I wrote when I was twenty two and it was funny that they just fit perfectly. Well you know there is a sort of gathered the years up as time passes and you can revisit the wonderful thing about my job as you can revisit at your twenty two year old self your twenty four year old self any particular night you want songs pick up some extra resonance. I hope nope but they're still there there. And I can revisit that period of my life when I choose so it's quite a nice experience in and The songs themselves broaden out as time passes and take on subtly different meanings take on a little more meaning I find What's an example of a song? Let's take on a different meaning or more meaning for you. A lot of the ones that are people's favorites in born to run I that expands every time we go out. It just seems to be more of your life fills it in fills in the story and when we hit it every night. It's always a huge catharsis. It's fascinating to see the audience singing it back to me It's quite wonderful In people that intensely singing your song as someone who grew up in Brooklyn and now lives in Philadelphia. I love that you've continued to live in New Jersey not only only New Jersey but not far from where you grew up. Why have you stayed close to the home that your father left your father went to teenager? It is it's rather ironic but I just felt very comfortable here and I was uncomfortable with city life. I was was more or less a kid that came out of a small town and I was beach bomb and and love EA- ocean and loved the Sun and like the people that were here alike to I was when I was here. I wanted to continue writing about the things that I felt. Were important in those. Those things were pretty much here. Felt like a lot of my heroes from the past lost themselves in in different ways once they had a certain amount of success and I was nervous about that and I wanted to remain grounded and Living in this part of New Jersey was something that was it was essential to who I was and continues to this day to be to be that way. Bruce springsteen and I can't thank you enough for the studio and allowing us to do the module enjoyable. I appreciate and I really liked the book. Thanks Bruce Bruce springsteen speaking to Terry Gross at his Home Studio in New Jersey in two thousand sixteen he had just published his memoir called born to run and their conversation was one of our staff staff picks for favourite interviews of the past decade on Monday show. Our guests will be Todd Phillips who wrote and directed. The new film joker a realistic origin story. On the Batman Comic Book Villain. The joker played by Joaquin. Phoenix is troubled. Man With a history of serious mental health problems Phillips also directed the hangover films. Hope you join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham with additional engineering. Yeah nearing support from Joyce Lieberman angeline hurts them. Our associate producer for digital media. Is Molly Seavy Nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show Terry Gross Screen doors grisly divisions you down sales across the Porch.

New Jersey Bruce Bruce springsteen Todd Phillips depression Molly Seavy Nesper Peter Wolf Joyce Lieberman Roberta shorrock Danny Miller assange producer Philadelphia Audrey Bentham Fresh Air EA executive producer Brooklyn Terry Gross Home Studio
"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:31 min | 10 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Built it to suit him to some degree I was looking for when I was looking for voice to mix with my voice. I put on my father's work close as I say in the book. Oh Can I. And I went to work whether it was the result of wanting to emulate him so I felt closer whether it was I want aren't as I say in the book. I wanted to be reasonable. Voice of revenge for what his his life come to. It was all of these this things and It was an unusual creation but it but most of these most people stage personas are creative out of the flotsam and Jetsam there Internal geography. And they're trying to. They're trying to create something that solves a series is a very complex problems inside of them or in their history. And I think when I- annoyingly when I want to do that that's what I was. I was trying integrate all of these very difficult things that I've been unable to integrate in my life. And in my life with my parents Bruce springsteen speaking with Terry Gross in two thousand sixteen more after a break this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age. Aws Dot Org. This is Terry Gross. The host of fresh I share from whyy and NPR. We do long form interviews with journalists breaking the big news stories and with the authors filmmakers and musicians behind find the best in pop culture. So listen and subscribe. Let's get back to Terry's twenty sixteen interview with Bruce Springsteen during your earlier's musician you were Asbury very park. Boardwalk carnival atmosphere What did you love about that kind of urban beach? uh-huh yeah and you know Madame Marie and all of the like all the boardwalk regulars. You made great stories out of those characters lead songs that are less characters but what what appealed to you about about knowing them in writing about them. It was just my location at the time I didn't move to Asbury with the thought of you. Know it wasn't an anthropological But I went in and I just fit in there as Berry. Okay was down on its luck but not as bad as it would get and so there was a lot of room to move clubs were opened on five. AM There were gay clubs in even the late sixties. It was a bit of an open city. So as young. Ne'er or do wells. We fit very you know we fit very comfortably in that picture and then when I went to write I just wrote about what was around me. It fired my imagination. It was of course was a colorful locale. The city was filled with characters and plenty of people that loose ends and so it would just just became a very natural thing to write about. I didn't give it too much thought at the time but I did think that it gave me a very individual identity. Not and that. If I was going to go out into the musical world on a national level I was very interested in being connected to my home own. My Home State. Wasn't anyone else writing in this way about these things at that time so it was something I did adver intentionally in the sense as creating a certain very very specific and original identity. And that's one of the things that really interests me in comparing Dan you too dylan because when you first started people comparing to Dylan. One of the new Dylan's thing in some ways like persona wiser. The opposite he changed his name. He surrounded himself in mystery. His lyrics are very Obscure your lyrics. Tell stories you all about a plate eight you reveal so much about yourself in the world around you in your songs that you know what I mean like. I know I know that that you're more art than what you literally tell us about in songs but still you have an identity and tell us something of who you are in your sauce. Just go we're your psychology leads you. I think you know a voice. Love the fact that Bob's been able to sustain his mystery over fifty or sixty years is that's in this day and age that's quite a feat in itself and you know the things that I loved about Bob's music and I describe in the book is the father of my country three which he really is Were things that just didn't fit when I went to do my job. You know I'd come out of Tim. What different circumstance and Shoe the close just didn't fit. I want to quote you again. See she right this towards the beginning of your career. I wanted to be a voice that reflected experience and the world I live in so I knew in Nineteen seventy-two to do this. I would need to ride very well and and more individually than I had ever written before And this was it some point you realized to that although you had like the most popular bar are banned in Asbury Park and there was a bigger world there was a lot of talented people and in order to be someone in the world to have a career to make a difference prince that you had to figure out what was unique about you and you had to write great songs and in fact you achieve that you wrote great songs but you know How did you go about trying to write the best songs that you could? I mean when you when you knew there are a lot of this was going to depend on the songwriting when I thought thought about signing record deal or or writing something that Might put me in the position because I'd already had plenty of things that had fallen through with my rock band's I looked at myself and I said well you know I can sing. I'm not the greatest singer in the world. I can play guitar very well. But I'm not the greatest guitar player in the world What what excites me about a lot of the artists? I love when I realized well. They created their own personal world that I could enter into through their music and through their songwriting There's people that can do it instrumentally. You're mentally like Jimi Hendrix edge of Youtube or P townsend. I didn't have as unique a purely musical signature. I was a creature of a lot of different influences and so I said well if I'm going to project an individuality is going to have to be in my writing at the time for one of the few times in my life. I didn't have a band. I just had myself in the guitar so I was going to have have to do something with just my voice just the guitar and just my songs that was going to move someone enough to give me a shot so I wrote songs that were very lyrically alive in lyrically dense and They were unique but it it really came out of the motivation. To R- understood it was I was going to have to make my mark that way. Bruce springsteen speaking with Terry Gross in two thousand sixteen more after a break. This is fresh air support for NPR comes from whyy presenting the pulse. PODCAST that takes you on adventures into who unexpected corners of health and science plastic and the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full full of fascinating stories and big ideas the pulse available. Where you get your podcasts or at whyy dot org? Hi It's Terry Gross inviting getting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews and reviews. You can hear my interviews with people like David Bowie aretha the Franklin Johnny Cash John Updike Tony Morrison Search for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at fresh air. Archived Dot Org. That's fresh air archive dot org. Let's get back to Terry's twenty sixteen interview with songwriter and performer. Bruce springsteen conducted at his home studio in New Jersey. You started going to therapy in nineteen eighty three and at some point you say in your sixty s you had a really bad depression and and I'm wondering if you thought about during that period when you were very depressed how many people in the world really wanted to be you and doesn't account for that much time. Yeah people see you on stage in. I'd WanNa be that Guy Guy. I WanNa be that guy myself very plenty plenty of days where I go man. I wish I could be that guy..

Terry Gross Bruce springsteen whyy NPR American Jewish World Service Dylan Asbury Park Bob Asbury Madame Marie Aws New Jersey Tim Jimi Hendrix depression Berry adver Youtube
"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:55 min | 10 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Robert Mapplethorpe did the very iconic photograph for the cover of horses. Would you briefly describe the the photo. Well it's very a classic photograph by Robert Very Simple. I'm standing against a white wall all with a triangular shadow and dressed in the clothes. Typical of myself thin and Just an old white shirt a clean old white shirt Sort of a black ribbon that symbolizes a tie or CRAVAT Black Pants Jacket slung over my shoulder looking directly at Robert it's Has a little bit of little bit of Baudelaire little bit of Catholic boy a little bit of Frank Sinatra and a lot of Robert. What impact do you think that photo hat on how people perceive you well I you know I. I don't know I know people really liked it. I know the record company. Didn't they didn't let such a great photo. Why didn't the record company like it because my hair was messy because You know it just. It was a little incomprehensible sensible to to them at the time but I fought for it and They did try to air. Brush my hair but I made sure that was yes fixed people were very upset constantly about my appearance when I was young I don't know what what it was. You know they just just. It was very hard for them to factor. But I've always had. That problem is even as a child. You Know I. I used to go to the beach when I was a little kid. And just is one where my dungarees and a flannel shirt and the whole time people would be. Why are you wearing that? Why don't you get a bathing suit? You know why it's like. Leave me alone this this is just like I'm not bothering you. Why are you worried about you know what I looked like? You know. It's just I'm not trying to bother anybody but But people love the photograph. The people on the streets loved the photograph and It gave Robert Some instant attention. I think it was his. You know the where he it really helped launch his work into the public consciousness and And so we were both very happy about that and the funniest thing and sort of the sweetest thing was when I started performing after the record came out I would go to clubs anywhere could be. Denmark could be in Youngstown. Ohio and I would come on stage and at least half of the kids had white shirts and black ties on was it was it was Kinda cool. We were all. We all had suddenly turned Catholic. You write that you know when when Mapplethorpe died of AIDS in March of eighty nine the morning that he died. You describe your feelings and you say that you were shuttering overwhelmed by a sense of excitement acceleration as if because of the closeness that you experience with Robert you're to be privy to his new adventure the miracle of his death. You say this wild sensation stay with you for some days. Could you they describe that. Did you know he was dying when you did. Have you gotten the phone call when you felt this. Or you're just feeling this. You know without even know. I felt that after he died after he died I had already received the call that he had died. I mean we knew that he was dying. We knew that he was dying the last couple of weeks of his life. I talked to him Tom. I talked to Robert in the last hour that he could still speak and I listened to his breathing before I went to sleep. His brother called me and let me listen to his breathing and he died that morning. So that sensation that I felt was his You know acceleration into his next place after death. I could really feel that. I've experienced a lot of death since Robert. I sat with Allen Ginsberg when he died I was with my husband when he died. My parents but Robert the acceleration in energy. I felt after Robert's death was unique. And it did stay with me for quite a while and I think that each of us you know our energy leaves in a different way. According to the person you know according to the energy the person the the the way the spirit manifests. Each of us die died differently and we have You know I believe that I believe we all have a unique journey whether it's a journey of pure energy if there's any intelligence within the journey but I think each of us have our own way of of dissipating or entering a new field. You say that one of the people who you were with when he died was Allen Ginsberg and in your memoir you mentioned some advice that Ginsberg had given you after your husband died he said let go of the spirit of the departed and continue your life's celebration Having experienced as much Beth with death as you have. Is that good advice. Do you think yes. I mean I think that The idea that time heals all wounds is not really true. Our wounds aren't really ever healed. We just learned to Walk with them. We learned that some days. We're GONNA feel intense pain all over again and we and we just have to say okay. Okay I know you if you can come along with me today in the same way that sometimes we start laughing out in the middle of nowhere remembering something that happened with someone we've lost and life is the best thing that we have. We have a life. We each have to negotiate it navigate. It and I think it's very important that we Enjoy our life that we get everything we can out of it and it doesn't take away from a our love departed. I mean I I take Fred along with me in the things that I do or Robert or my father or my mother. You know whoever wants to come along they can be with me and you know if I want them I can sense them. You know we we We have our own life but we we we can still walk with the people that we miss or the that we lose and I think it's very important to Not Not be afraid to experience joy in the middle of sorrow. Because you know that's what our life is you know our it's the fearful symmetry symmetry of Blake. You know joy and sorrow. You don't WanNa just feel wanted them. They're both they're both valuable to the Spirit Patti Smith thank you so much for talking with us. Oh you're welcome nice to talk to you too. Poet Songwriter and performer. Patti Smith speaking to Terry Gross in two thousand ten. They're talk was one of our staff picks for favorite interviews of the past decade after a break another favourite staff pick. Terry's interview with Bruce Springsteen. I'm David Being Cooley. And this is fresh air support for. NPR comes from Newman's own foundation working to nourish the the common good by donating all profits from Newman's own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at the Newman's own foundation dot org. Today we're continuing. Our series of staff picks a favourite interviews from the past decade. This one is with Bruce springsteen and his special not only because of the conversation itself and the music we hear but also because Terry visited springsteen at his home studio in New Jersey to record it the rare on-location interview took place in two thousand sixteen when he was publishing his memoir which shares its title with one of his biggest hits born to run. We'll start by hearing a demo recording of his song growing up from the album chapter and verse Dicta.

Robert Mapplethorpe Allen Ginsberg Bruce Springsteen Frank Sinatra Patti Smith Newman NPR Baudelaire AIDS Terry Gross David Being Cooley Denmark Youngstown Ohio Tom New Jersey Blake Fred Beth
"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:39 min | 10 months ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Thousand nine hundred nine Patti Smith. Welcome back to fresh air. It's in New York that you met Robert Mapplethorpe and E- either you change the course of each other's lives. Would you tell the story of how you met met Robert Mapplethorpe well. Our my first meeting was very simple. I had some friends at Pride Institute. People that went to my high school that had the means to go to art school and I I was looking for them hoping for a little shelter since I had nowhere to sleep that night but when I went to visit them they had moved and the the boy that answered the door didn't know where my friends had moved and Said said well go in there and maybe my roommate will know where they are and I went in a room and there was a boy sleeping lying on a little the iron bed and just with the mass of dark curls and I soon as I walked in he he awoke and looked at me and smiled and then I talked and he knew where my friends had lived but the thing that I remember the very first impression Russian I have of Robert is waking up and smiling at some point you realize that Mapplethorpe was gay at some point. He realized that he was gay. how did it affect his relationship with you when he came to terms with being gay and had lovers lovers and eventually had a along time lover. Were you able to stay as close. Even though the relationship had changed a Robert Nigh always just as close I mean we had to work out obviously the physical aspect of our relationship and it was really may who in the end severed the physical aspect of our relationship. You know in the end. We worked that out. I mean because we were so close and our love reach other was so deep that the absence sense of And we were still physical with one. Another he was always very affectionate till the day he died. We were still affectionate toward one. Another in your book you write about how Mapplethorpe's work started to change and become more serum masochistic in its imagery which which he became quite famous for and and you're right that That imagery was bewildering. And frightening to you you you right. He couldn't share things with me because it was so outside our Rome and that you couldn't comprehend the brutality of his images ages of self inflicted pain. It was hard feud match it with the boy you had met. Can you talk a little bit about a little bit more about your action to his images and in what what you found disturbing an incomprehensible about it. Well they're disturbing images they're meant. I'm just I'm just I mean Robert I mean a lot of my my Reaction was out of first of all negatively. I didn't know anything the thing about that world. I still know very little about that. World and my protective instincts for Robert they frightened me. I worried that he would be hurt. Her door something bad would happen to him but he was all always assured may that All of these situations were controlled. Consensual situations yes. I mean there were few of these images that I thought were actually brilliant and so we were able after I processed the subject matter to talk about these images as art but I was never really curious to talk about them in any other way and he respected respected. That you say that until a friend suggested that you be in a rock and roll band. It had never occurred to you. It was just like not part of your your. Why would it you know Oh is I'm not a musician you know? I didn't play any instrument. I didn't have any specific talents. I mean I came from the South Jersey Philadelphia area and in the early sixties. Everybody sang they sang on street corners. Three part harmonies Acapella. Most of my friends were better singers than me There was nothing in what I did. That would give a sense that I should pan rock and roll band. Also girls weren't in rock and roll bands. I mean they sang thing. But you know the closest thing to a rock singer a real rock singer that we had was grace slick and I certainly didn't have gray. Slicks voice you're saying that you didn't have you. Didn't think of yourself as a singer per se that your friends had better voices than you did but you created this new style. Israel really that was a combination of poetry and music. It wasn't about having like a perfect singer's voice it. It was the style that you performed in the personality that you put into it. The kind of defiance that you had in some songs the energy would you talk about what you felt you. They were doing early on. That was different from what you've seen other people do. I think my perception of myself was really as a performer and a communicator. I had a mission When we recorded horses my mission was Fisher first album? My first album horses My my mission in and collective band mission was really on one level to merge poetry and rock and roll but More humanistic likely to reach out two other disenfranchised people in one thousand nine hundred seventy five. The you know young homosexual kids were You know being Disowned by their families. The kids were you know kids like me. who were a little weird or a little different? Were often persecuted in their Small towns and it wasn't just because of sexual persuasion. It was for any reason for being an artist for being different for having political views for just wanting to be free and I really Recorded the record to connect with these the people and also in terms of our place in rock roll just to create some bridge between our great artists that we had just lost Jimi Hendrix. Jim Morrison among them and to create space for what I felt would be the new guard which I didn't really include myself. I was really anticipating people are or bands like the clash and the ramones. I was anticipating in my my mind that a new breed would come television. A new breed would come and they would be less materialistic More bonded ended with people and Not so glamorous. I wasn't thinking so much of music. I wasn't thinking so much of Perfection Or stardom or any of that stuff. I was thinking I had this mission and I thought I would do this. Record and then go back to my writing and my hi drawing and return to my you know my my Somewhat abnormal normal life but sources took me on a whole different path. Is there a track from Horses that particularly illustrates what you were describing as what your mission was bird land. Okay I think bird land because for various reasons. Bird land was An improvisation -ation build on an improvisation it so much exemplifies the communication of my band. Especially between Richard Lenny and I and It speaks of this new breed. You know the the the new generations who will be dreaming an animation. You know the new generations nations. That will race across the fields no longer presidents but prophets That that it's that that was my My telegram to the new greed. Oh let's hear it. This bird land from Patti. Smith's first album horses.

Robert Mapplethorpe Patti Smith New York Pride Institute Jimi Hendrix E Richard Lenny Rome Israel South Jersey Philadelphia Jim Morrison Fisher
Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

The Frame

10:25 min | 11 months ago

Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

"Start with a new film that opens this Christmas Day. It's an adaptation of Louisa May alcott novel Little Women and it is a lovely little gift of a movie yourself theory someday. So you'll need me. You'll wish you have behaved better. Thank you so much for your employment and your many kindnesses I intend to make my own way in the world. No no one makes their own way. Not really we civil woman. You'll need to marry. Well you are not married. Because I'm rich wjr. The film is from writer director. Greta GERWIG stars. Sir Sha Ronin. She played the lead in Greenwich Direct. To`real debut lady bird and the rest of the march sisters are played played by Emma Watson Elisa scanlon and Florence pugh Laura dern plays their mom and Meryl Streep is they're wealthy aunt March gerwig has been thinking about little the women for a very long time well before she even found out that producer Amy Pascal was developing a new adaptation of the novel. Here's Greta Gerwig little women and has been a book that I have loved my whole life in a very deep way to the point. Where my memories? And the memories of the March sisters were intertwined in that way that I think books of your youth can means something even beyond being books because th- they they're the they become part of your family I think that's that's the magic of Reading when you're a child is the the distinction between fiction and reality is thin for you or it. It was for me anyway But I hadn't read it since I was about fourteen or fifteen and then I read it in my early thirties when I turned thirty and I All this stuff came out at me in the book that I it not. When I was a child I can passion get so savage could hurt anyone and I enjoyed it? You remind me of myself never angry. I'm angry nearly every damn I li- reading as an adult. I heard all of these different things. I saw it as much touch spike easier and sadder and stranger and almost more triumphant in a certain way and also just is this kind of being aware of an author was another layer of it for me that Joe both wants to be an author but then Louisa as author and so even though Joe March march by the end of the book says she stops her ink well and stops writing and gets married and has children opens a school Louisa though wrote and she wrote that book and we know what. Because there's the book you know. I just sort of had an idol saw about well if I made this. I'd want to center center on this. I'd WanNa Center on all these themes that I felt I hadn't really seen yet about it which was ambition and money money and women an art and I heard in passing my agent said at a dinner. Oh they're interested making little women again again and I was like what I have to go. I have to talk to them. I have an idea and I hadn't made anything at that point. But he got me a meaning and I I went and I talked talk to them and I told them some version of what I wanted to do and And I said I want to direct it and they wanNA write in Iraq and I hadn't had nothing to really show that I could do that so but they very luckily hired me to write it. And then I wrote my draft in in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and then I went away and I may lady bird and then by the time I was finishing that up they said well what what do you think about making little women and I thought I said well I knew you'd ask. I'm ready but it was a it was one one of those for two. It's turns events. I want to ask about that perspective that you had a reading the book as an adult versus as a young woman woman sure and the perspective you have as somebody who is a creative person gas writing movies and making movies because so much of the movie and certainly in the book as well is about the challenges of being a creative person and how you value your own art how you compromise with people who are financing it and how you find your voice even in those parameters that's right now there's a you you picked up all the cards I put down. No it's a it's funny. It's that the opening scene between Joe March and her publisher Mr Dash would which the majority of it is actually word for word from the book when she says took care to have a few of my sinners repent and he says people want to be amused not preach that morals. Don't sell nowadays. That could be me talking to a studio head about something. I WANNA do But it was. It was all there for me to be discovered. I didn't invent it like like I said that. That scene is a scene from the book but it felt too so relevant to right now and then beyond that when when I was researching Louisa Mail Cart and it became clear that that who Lewis male caught was was equally the subjects that I was interested in and then you learn about her life. Is You know unlike Joe. She never got married. She never had children and but she kept writing and she did keep her copyright copyright of little women which is a you know huge thing that she did and I mean there are so many things about her life and what she did. It felt eerily familiar and I think even even in the fact that Her publisher sure and even herself but her publisher truly didn't know what a hit he had. And I find that happens all the time that there's a constant underestimating of audiences that are not the same audience of the people who are in charge of publishing or whatever that may be the the first half of little win because it is really to books as written ends so group. The curtain falls upon big. Joe Beth and amy whether it ever arises again depends upon the reception given to the first act of the domestic drama called little women death. It's almost like she's saying I've got a a sequel but I hope people by the I know she's She's a business lady no she and and and it it. It's worth saying that the the initial printing sold out in two weeks and it has not been out of print for one hundred fifty years in one thousand nine hundred four. There was a story. Little women leads poll novel level rated ahead of Bible for influence on high school pupils. Yeah that's nice. I mean I mean it's just nice for her and it raises his other question like what people take away from the book because you can interpret it in very different ways. I'm going to give you two prominent women who have thoughts. That's about it. The first is Gloria Steinem. WHO said in Nineteen ninety-two? Where else could we read about an all female group who discussed work art and all the great questions or found girls who wanted to be women and not vice versa? Oh that's beautiful found girls that wanted to be women not the versa. And here's the author meal Paalea who says the whole thing is like a horror movie. I know I think if you have an idea in your head of the it can be of little women. It's usually from the first book. It's the kind of Christmas to Christmas structure. And the you know the second half of the book Louis Male jokes. She should've called the wedding marches. Because they all got married and truly British version is called good wise exactly zoo you know. It was in this to book structure which is part of why I is structured the film I did starting with them as adults Because I wanted to start with the second half but I also think there's two books embedded in it because if you you just read the book on its face value with this. Kind of pre Victorian morality of Domesticity in virtue tied to femininity communitty. And all of these kind of tidy bows put on each chapter. Then I think you miss what's really roiling roiling underneath and if you read it that way of course Camille Paglia is completely right. It is something that would be a horror show if that is all you're seeing but I'd the way I look at it is if you can take the ending of the book where she felt she must marry Joe off to someone because that's what the readers demanded and she made this economic decision. That's what she would do Because she had so books then if you if you read everything through the Lens of will she had to make it all kind of tidy for the time time then if you take away the tidiness what's left is a whole bunch of am Bishen and mess and anger and lust and craziness and things things that don't fit neatly into any box. And so what I wanted to do was not update the text. The text doesn't need updating. I wanted to take away the constraints constraints of the time in some ways. Because that's what was interesting to me and even in those constraints. Louisa really did do her best to try. I to imagine what what would in a gala -tarian marriage look like. What would something that was? Not Essentially INDENTURED SERVITUDE BE As a marriage and I feel that you know Gloria Steinem being one of them with a Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith Orlando Toronto or J. K. Rowling rallying. There's a long list of women for whom this book meant very specific freedom an ambition and what I wanted to do was make a film film that was in the tradition of why that inspired them. Because it's there's gotta be a reason more than she got married to Professor Bear Sogo to see you. Thanks for coming as really

Louisa JOE Gloria Steinem Joe March Publisher Greta Gerwig Amy Pascal Wanna Center Greenwich Direct Sir Sha Ronin Meryl Streep Camille Paglia Iraq Professor Bear Sogo Emma Watson Elisa Scanlon Joe Beth Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith J. K. Rowling Writer
"patti smith" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"patti smith" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"The. Sixty. This is Jocelyn Gonzales from studio three sixty. I've learned a lot about the records. I love and don't love from classic album Sundays. It's a program of listening events created by broadcaster and journalist Pauline. Cosmo Murphy, which for music fan can sometimes feel like going to church, and that's fitting because they're always held on Sundays at these events. I learned about an album from artists producers and other smart music people. Then the lights went down the phones went off and the audience listened to the album together straight through no interruptions. That's it. It seems really simple. But hearing a record on pristine vinyl through a world class sound system revealed things I never noticed before the experience was eliminating an often moving even when the needle skipped to bring some of that album worship here to studio. Three sixty were teaming up with CAS for a series of stories called this woman's work, highlighting classic albums by female artists. The title. You probably figured out borrows from the song by Kate. Bush an artist we hope to feature in this series. These records represent women musicians at the peak of their creative powers, and whose influences felt all over the musical map. And this first story focuses on one of the most significant albums of the American punk movement. One that fused rock with free form poetry and drew many into the artistic nexus of New York City in the mid nineteen seventies. Here's Colleen this is arguably one of the most arresting opening lines on a debut album. Jesus dad for somebody sends banana Matton it's deliver with unequivocal power. And for many is the first introduction to an artist who become one of the most important game changers of rock and roll amass Lee. Stew. Mrs my oh, Lee belonged to may. Number hearing this opening indictment when listening to the album for the first time in my teenage bedroom. It's through me into the nucleus of Patti Smith's thrilling and scary environs worlds away from my suburban hometown to the dirt the chaos and the raw energy of New York City, and it made me feel like I could do anything. In fact, I moved to the city of few short years later. Punk is built upon a DIY attitude and along with the stooges EMC five Patti Smith is considered by many to be one of punk rocks founding mothers her debut album, horses was released at the end of nineteen seventy five a full five months before the first Ramones album. But it Agneta the punk explosion more impersonal, easy, rather than musicality, the album's sprawling free form music and poetry was the until of the three minute three court sound for which punk would eventually become known as the Patti Smith group. Guitarist Lenny Kaye remembers especially at that time Peng had yet to harden into specific definition. It wasn't say the Ramones template that it would become miss. Mostly an attitude of wanting to assume some kind of responsibility for oneself and. And find your own way. Will return to the show in a moment. But first I want to remind you that you can keep up with what we're looking at and working on by following us on Twitter at studio three sixty show. And now back to our story as the sixties slipped into the seventies. New York City was experiencing an identity crisis and rock and roll was experiencing a spirituality crisis. There was a general cynicism toward hippie ideals and New York City in particular was more adept at celebrating the individual a cohesive cultural center had not yet replaced the unifying force field of the sixties counterculture movement. This was especially true with music is different. Experimental strains began to fan out and spire by other forward thinking late sixties New York acts like the velvet underground and the east village electric duo the silver apples. Around this time. Lenny Kaye was working in a record shop and doing some writing on the side. And he remembers there were few venues for local bounds in new acts to play. But then he saw poster for the New York dolls and welcomed it as a new chapter in the downtown music. Sing. With their flamboyant crossdressing and defiant posturing, the New York dolls set the stage for glam rock, a fusion of the edgy rock and roll of the stooges and the theatrical cabaret scene that was flourishing in Greenwich village's gay community a community galvanized by the stonewall uprising in nineteen sixty nine. The

New York City Lenny Kaye Patti Smith New York Lee Jocelyn Gonzales Pauline Cosmo Murphy Twitter Peng Kate Colleen Stew Bush Greenwich village three minute five months
This Womans Work: Patti Smiths Horses

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:27 min | 1 year ago

This Womans Work: Patti Smiths Horses

"I've learned a lot about the records. I love and don't love from classic album Sundays. It's a program of listening events created by broadcaster and journalist Pauline. Cosmo Murphy, which for music fan can sometimes feel like going to church, and that's fitting because they're always held on Sundays at these events. I learned about an album from artists producers and other smart music people. Then the lights went down the phones went off and the audience listened to the album together straight through no interruptions. That's it. It seems really simple. But hearing a record on pristine vinyl through a world class sound system revealed things I never noticed before the experience was eliminating an often moving even when the needle skipped to bring some of that album worship here to studio. Three sixty were teaming up with CAS for a series of stories called this woman's work, highlighting classic albums by female artists. The title. You probably figured out borrows from the song by Kate. Bush an artist we hope to feature in this series. These records represent women musicians at the peak of their creative powers, and whose influences felt all over the musical map. And this first story focuses on one of the most significant albums of the American punk movement. One that fused rock with free form poetry and drew many into the artistic nexus of New York City in the mid nineteen seventies. Here's Colleen this is arguably one of the most arresting opening lines on a debut album. Jesus dad for somebody sends banana Matton it's deliver with unequivocal power. And for many is the first introduction to an artist who become one of the most important game changers of rock and roll amass Lee. Stew. Mrs my oh, Lee belonged to may. Number hearing this opening indictment when listening to the album for the first time in my teenage bedroom. It's through me into the nucleus of Patti Smith's thrilling and scary environs worlds away from my suburban hometown to the dirt the chaos and the raw energy of New York City, and it made me feel like I could do anything. In fact, I moved to the city of few short years later. Punk is built upon a DIY attitude and along with the stooges EMC five Patti Smith is considered by many to be one of punk rocks founding mothers her debut album, horses was released at the end of nineteen seventy five a full five months before the first Ramones album. But it Agneta the punk explosion more impersonal, easy, rather than musicality, the album's sprawling free form music and poetry was the until of the three minute three court sound for which punk would eventually become known as the Patti Smith group. Guitarist Lenny Kaye remembers especially at that time Peng had yet to harden into specific definition. It wasn't say the Ramones template that it would become miss. Mostly an attitude of wanting to assume some kind of responsibility for oneself and. And find your own way. Will return to the show in a moment. But first I want to remind you that you can keep up with what we're looking at and working on by following us on Twitter at studio three sixty show. And now back to our story as the sixties slipped into the seventies. New York City was experiencing an identity crisis and rock and roll was experiencing a spirituality crisis. There was a general cynicism toward hippie ideals and New York City in particular was more adept at celebrating the individual a cohesive cultural center had not yet replaced the unifying force field of the sixties counterculture movement. This was especially true with music is different. Experimental strains began to fan out and spire by other forward thinking late sixties New York acts like the velvet underground and the east village electric duo the silver apples. Around this time. Lenny Kaye was working in a record shop and doing some writing on the side. And he remembers there were few venues for local bounds in new acts to play. But then he saw poster for the New York dolls and welcomed it as a new chapter in the downtown music. Sing. With their flamboyant crossdressing and defiant posturing, the New York dolls set the stage for glam rock, a fusion of the edgy rock and roll of the stooges and the theatrical cabaret scene that was flourishing in Greenwich village's gay community a community galvanized by the stonewall uprising in nineteen sixty nine.

New York City Patti Smith Lenny Kaye New York LEE Peng Cosmo Murphy Pauline Twitter Kate Colleen Stew Bush Greenwich Village Three Minute Five Months
"patti smith" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"patti smith" Discussed on The Takeaway

"In so the petition that we launched is really a citizen action tool to get regular people to push for their cities so that's what we're really focused on now and then hopefully they'll be just all the cities of the world will join on patti smith why are we here in this moment when it comes to climate change uh there are a lot of aspects to president trump's candidacy as we all know one of them wasn't just scepticism or reluctance on climate change it was saying this is a hoax this is a hoax invented by the chinese and and for all of the other attributes at his campaign a lot of americans are there didn't mind that message or responded positively to it i think the reason that citizens react in this way is because these kind of initiatives require sacrifice when jimmy carter was president and we had the oil crisis he asked the american people to carpool to put their a thermostat down the sixty eight to find a way to conserve energy not to use so much gas and a lot of the population felt a very affronted they felt that people out on them while they laughed at him were angry at him and didn't reelect him and part of it is they don't want to sacrifice but we we have to find language or some way to communicate to people that in sacrificing to meet these measures they are giving a gift to their children and their grandchildren and we need people to start looking into the future and actually the future is coming right addis patti smith is your art better in angry times are hopeful times i hear both from you right now you say you're hopeful in energized by what your daughters doing and i and i get that you're also angry i think about what's going on in the world and you're an artist everybody knows that when is your art better well as a private artist i mean when i.

climate change trump jimmy carter president patti smith
"patti smith" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"patti smith" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Big h r nair wires across never going to give us the big crowds or gonul five may two than they alone civil rights river i'm drawing a total blank uh the first one was randy quaid and lbj the early years night on eighty seven on nbc in the second when you gotta get that's brian cranston in all the way john hbo 2016 you got me as usual rafique's mont film critic tuesday and for us thanks for thanks to us it's the takeaway on todd's will iq and this weekend artist patti smith will seeing that song people have the power in a concert in carnegie hall and nudging moon now you might not expect carnegie hall to host an artist like patti smith or for a punk legend like patti smith to wanna play carnegie hall the patti smith is on a mission the trump administration backed away from the paris climate agreement back in june but many cities across the country have been trying to meet carbon emissions targets on their own and that's where patti smith and her daughter jesse peres smith come in jesse cofounded the group pathways to paris advocating for climate change policies around the world patti and jessie are now behind what they called the thousand cds initiative and they join me here in the studio ahead of this week's concert at carnegie hall to talk about why the time is now to address climate change as i travel i mean just to take it on a simple personal level i have seen the changes in our environment from city to city all over the world as such an escalation of cars more use of fossil fuels and gas in every way.

randy quaid nbc brian cranston john hbo todd carnegie hall paris climate change civil rights lbj patti smith carbon emissions jesse peres smith jessie
"patti smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"patti smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Consciously at some level tell the truth patti smith consciously collecting material well i think we're all in all a one yes i mean not it's consciously unconsciously whether i'd like it or not i'm the things often um become you know sort of sacred fodder for one's work uh sometimes i just want to be left alone and not think about anything i don't wanna rate i don't wanna take a photograph i don't want to think of anything but the mind that's why the first section is called held the mind works because our mind is like a little computer it's it's taking all these impulses in and creating despite ourselves we're gonna come back and look at patti smith telling a public mind works when it comes to creativity she writes about it in her new book devotion you can join us this hour are you ready to talk creativity with patty smith is she exhibit a for you the coolest role model what gets you in the groove to create to let loose top of wien hear the music inside were eight hundred four two three eight two five five eight hundred four two three talk patti smith please stand by their new york i'm thomas brooke this is on point will be right back anyway maggie.

patti smith maggie thomas brooke
"patti smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"patti smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Patti smith is some messed up kind of saint shrouded in the darkness of gotham hardboiled in sharpshooting on the other hand xi glides along the clouds of laps catholicism innocent and the'real uh smith seems both closer to herself into our god than most mere mortals feel collapsed some kinda messed up saint in he days these days petty well highly assait on i would agree with the messed up part in imo at least messy who i am often a bit too shuffled but that was very nice which she said but in others there's always the equalisers at the book has also been cited as claptrap so um i i think that we just uh i look at all of these things that people say in and just remember that what really defines you whether it's positive or negative is the work itself so um a lot of can't say i can't say led any people would agree with that but i still think it's really nice what she said and very well written it really was a messed up kind of saint for punk rocker maybe that serb highest accolade i'm not sure uh which is interesting how she picked up on your lapsed catholicism in the new book you you refer back to soon be quite often intellectual mystic and uh and all the rest and made me wonder plus the fact that you're always trucking heroes down to the gravestones uh about about your relationship with.

Patti smith gotham