20 Burst results for "Patrick Win"

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You've got to be at least partially vaccinated to do a whole bunch of stuff in New York City. So how bars and restaurants are handling that next time on marketplace and marketplace is ahead this afternoon at four Repeat broadcast scheduled 46 30 on KQED. Marco woman, This is the world in Myanmar. The army has had a firm grip on the government ever since the coup there back in February, But the Democratic resistance is not going away and now the leaders of Myanmar's opposition are declaring all out war against the country's military rulers. Dolan. Eddie. You do Lou to it. But that is the official call for all citizens of Myanmar to revolt was posted on Facebook. The man speaking as La Sheila, the acting president of the national Unity government, a government in exile composed of elected officials who fled into hiding after the February coup. Their goal now is to launch an armed uprising against the military and revive Myanmar's democracy. The world Southeast Asia correspondent Patrick Wind is on the line with me. How will this declaration of war change things on the ground in Myanmar? Well, I think it's a warning Marco that this resistance which has already started is about to really intensify. After this declaration of war, they're asking everyday people to stockpile food and medicine. Everyday. People are told to spy on troop movements and informed the revolutionaries. If anyone works for the military government, even just as like a tax collector or engineer or even a secretary, they are put on notice that you should quit and join our movement instead. Or else. Do have to say I'm mostly seeing positive reactions from people in Myanmar about this declaration of war. There's just so much rage Marco at the military, which is quite vicious and not very competent at running a country. I mean, since they've taken over The banking system has collapsed. The hospital system has collapsed in Covid is rampant. So I do have to caution that this revolutionary government, it mostly exist online. With these exiled politicians hiding out and communicating over encrypted apps and making statements over social media. They don't have any buildings or any liberated area just yet. So how will the resistance of the hunt to actually fight this war They have now declared. Do they have an army? And can it match with the generals have At this point it can't match with the generals have they do have an army but one in a very embryonic state, and not a conventional one. So after the coup, all of these people, young and old started slipping into the jungles. Contacting armed indigenous rebel groups in Myanmar and asking them for help, you know? Can you train us so that we can take this fight back to the cities where we live? In recent months? You've seen this Embryonic army spring into action, assassinating officials by the hundreds, bombing police stations and on a weekly basis, carrying out all sorts of sabotage operations, like blowing up cell phone towers owned by the military. So this is going to be a guerilla war. It's going to be more like the IRA than two armies going toe to toe. We'll see what happens. I should note that monsoon season is just now ending in Myanmar. Things are starting to dry out, and that's when people usually start the real fighting. What did the military government have to say about this Declaration of war, Patrick? Oh, well, they said this, uh, National unity government. This revolutionary government are terrorist. They've also criticized them as saying. They're just an online government that don't don't exist. And that people should not overreact by stockpiling food and basically that they will be crushed very soon and outside of Myanmar houses Declaration of war being received Well, you see the usual very tepid calls for peace and Nonviolence coming from the U. S. Chinese State media has warned outside powers not to get involved there, probably referring to the U. S and the U. S shows no signs of really getting deeply involved. I think big picture. This is significant because for decades, Myanmar's pro democracy movement has been stoic and peaceful and people have compared it to Gandhi's resistance. It was led by Aung San Suu Kyi, who fell from grace, but you'll remember that for much of her life. She was held up as this icon of peaceful resistance by the U. S. So now she's in a prison cell and the remnants of her party. These politicians who have escaped from the military are declaring war from hiding. So times are changing. There's not going to be so many peace marches now It's going to be more like people shooting back. And I think ultimately what this revolutionary government wants is to be taken seriously as the rightful government And now that they've started an armed struggle, it may be a little more difficult for other countries to give them full throated support. Even if other outside countries are also appalled by the military. The world Southeast Asia correspondent Patrick Win speaking with us about the call by the resistance in Myanmar for an uprising against the military junta there, Patrick. Thank you. Thanks, Marco. Okay for this next item, you need to listen really closely to this. It's like if you strain yourself. I think you can sort of kind of make out the words. You bloody fool. Here it is again. But that was not just some drunken slur to pub. It was a musk duck in Australia discovered on a recording made 34 years ago, Professor Carlton Kata of Leiden University in the Netherlands found the recording while researching vocal learning in birds. He believes this musk duck marks the first documented instance of the species mimicking sounds, they hear Ripper is the name of the bird, and he is not a one hit wonder Ripper was also recorded, mimicking a door slamming The duck was raised at a reserve in Australia. Researcher 10 Kata suggest Ripper learned the sounds at the A V ery there. He spoke with Canadian public radio. The only thing it hurt or the sounds of the A very door and death of the animal caretaker looking after him, so dose were taken as the model for its own focal is ations. So most dogs now joined the ranks of other birds that mimic human sounds like songbirds or parrots. And, of course other famous ducks. I am I'm just loving.

New York City Gandhi Aung San Suu Kyi Patrick Australia Patrick Wind Myanmar Netherlands February Patrick Win La Sheila Dolan Carlton Kata Leiden University Marco hundreds two armies Southeast Asia Democratic Covid
"patrick win" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"patrick win" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Being olympian. And i'd rather be on the side of history of the people fighting for their freedom than no on my on my own side. Try to find personal. Glory winter at the top swimmer from myanmar speaking there with the world patrick win about his decision to not compete at the olympic games in tokyo. North and south korea are speaking again according to reuters today. The two nations are in talks to reopen a joint liaison office that north korea demolished last year. They also reportedly hoped to hold a summit between the leaders of the two nations part of a wider effort to restore relations joining me. Now is jenny town. She's a senior fellow at the simpson center and director of their thirty eight north program. What's your reaction to these developments. Jenin how do you explain the timing. Well i do think anytime we can reopen. Communications channels is a good thing being able to have lines of communication to be able to try and avoid any kind of miss communications mishaps especially in flash points like the dmz. I think you know if it plays well into president moon and condemned guns broader inter-korean peace regime campaign for north korea. Is this just a friendly overture. Does this attempt to reopen communication with south korea suggests some domestic desperation in the north could be mollified with diplomacy. I think that's yet to be seen. I think both of those possibilities are real that there may be some willingness to cooperate especially on humanitarian assistance. Going forward from what. I understand that the situation in north korea is getting. There's a lot of hardship going on now because of the prolonged Or lockdowns so you know. It's hard to get import foodstuffs as well as import inputs like fertilisers stuff to help the crops in This year's crop will matter more than it has in past years so without a mind. We've seen south korean. President moon jae in go down this path of trying to bring all the sides together a similar narrative now or is this different president moon is likely to try again to bring all the parties together in to try and get both. Us dprk in inter-korean relations back on track. I don't know that. That's necessarily the intention of the north koreans in trying to resume some level of talks with the south koreans. But i think president moon does also need to be very careful this time around in managing expectations of what's coming next because it is a political cycle right now with the south korean presidential elections early next year so building up high expectations. That things are going to move very quickly in a positive direction can work against him. If it doesn't work out can work against his party so trying. to build. Too high of expectations on inter-korean relations could be politically damaging to his party. If it doesn't work out looking back to president clinton in the nineteen nineties one white house administration after another have said that the us has to deal with north korean so they can get rid of their nuclear program. Do you have any greater confidence journey. This time under biden. It's going to work certainly not going to be easy. will require as well as concessions on the us side. What is the us willing to do to change north korea's strategic calculus. We oftentimes think too much about north korea as an exception like that. It's odd that they wouldn't want to have better relations with the us that they should be willing to give up their nuclear program to have better relations with the us. But i think you have to ask yourself what causes any country that has nuclear weapons to voluntarily. Relinquish that program. And so. I think until we really solve the broader security situation any administration is going to have a very difficult time trying to incentivize the north koreans to give up their nuclear program. Johnny town career specialist at the simpson center and the director of their thirty eight north program. Johnny thank you very much for your thoughts grabbing me moorhead in the second half of the show your with the world these olympics are like none other and i'm not just talking about the pandemic athletes can now take you behind the scenes. Thanks to talk. What the athletes are doing in their off time and it's from their perspective is not like sending a camera crew from one network to follow this person around or anything like that most see. Tv that's not on tv coming up. You're on the world. i'm marco werman. You're with the world where co-production of gbh boston npr x. For many years to dan in east africa was singled out for religious intolerance. Critics came after the regime of omar al-bashir for imposing strict islamist rule and allowing the persecution of religious minorities but after the two thousand nineteen uprising. That ousted bashir from power. The new transitional government in sudan has been taking a different approach working to improve its international image when it comes to religious freedom. The world's halima jakande reports from khartoum sunday morning. Mass is about to begin at saint matthews catholic cathedral and cartoon.

north korea simpson center south korea President moon jae president moon Jenin myanmar olympic games white house administration Us reuters tokyo jenny patrick North president clinton biden Johnny marco werman moorhead
"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Fruit with rubber mallets to check how ripe they are and that one vendor named doom. She's been selling durians for more than twenty years and businesses. Great these days. She says so. When i told her about during his reputation in america she was genuinely baffled. Job todd one monticello wait. People don't like the taste of sweetness. She asked well. I said some of them. They say it stinks. I man maybe let that will. Gordon doesn't stink. She says some people might say that but they're wrong. It's so fragrant home indica. Yes ma'am i tell her. I agree now so far. I've just been talking about fresh durians. I haven't even touched on the growing craze for durian flavored products in asia. There's during an ice cream. Which is my favorite enduring bubble gum during pizza from pizza hut and in malaysia durian flavored condoms. Apparently oh and at the mcdonalds in singapore introducing the new d- twenty four durian mcflurry made with real twenty four d- twenty four by the way that's just a breed of durian. There's a zillion varieties d twenty. Four d eighty eight the golden pillow blackthorn and a rare woman called jackie. Chan's wife see there are drian connoisseurs just like with cheese and wine. People are crazy about it. The way people are crazy about any heart grow valuable item item. People are crazy about caviar. People are crazy. About four gra by the way buzzfeed also films people eating flog raw for the first time and no one went you or spit anything out. Charity thinks those gross out during videos a really not going to age well especially as asian cuisine keeps gaining global respect and the twenty first century and more people find out that during isn't like rotten cheese at all that it's more like well sweet and ice creamy with honey. Apricot undertones the days of jury and being like a weird thing. That people are grossed out by are going to disappear. I truly believe that because the world is a small place now. The world patrick win bangkok thailand. We originally brought you the story in two thousand nineteen the latest news from charity. Newell care her food. Blog is thriving. Respect you can find her. At bangkok glutton dot com anyone out there watching the copa america. The soccer tournament underway in brazil will crown a champion from the south american continent. Next saturday you may have come across the.

monticello todd Gordon mcdonalds america malaysia asia Chan singapore jackie bangkok patrick Newell thailand soccer brazil
Ten years after Fukushima, Japan remembers 'man-made' nuclear disaster

The World

06:52 min | 1 year ago

Ten years after Fukushima, Japan remembers 'man-made' nuclear disaster

"Japan then caused a nuclear power plant in Fukushima to go into meltdown. It was a traumatizing event, one that left the Japanese public and the world wanting guarantees that a nuclear disaster like that would never happen again. But can Japan make that promise? Some of Japan's most prominent earthquake, experts say. Not really the world's Patrick win has more. Okumura. Koji is a paleo seismologist. That means he studies earthquakes, old earthquakes that may have shaken the earth. When wooly mammoths were still around. It's like archaeology off course Quake. Archaeology of earthquakes. Sounds really nish on Lee. It's not. It's actually a matter of life and death because if they fault erupted even 10,000 years ago, that's a sign that it might erupt again in our lifetime, and you really shouldn't build a nuclear reactor anywhere near it. Because this could happen. In 2011 tsunami created by an undersea earthquake that squeaking noise, those air buildings crumbling in a torrent of water. And at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Waves pounded the power plant, causing a meltdown. It happened on March 11 and Japanese people still call it 3 11 shorthand for catastrophe now, Okumura. He is one of the top earthquake experts in Japan. And before 3 11. He was on a government safety panel as a caveat. He wants to say this. Nobody knew and nobody could have predicted kid. What he means is no one could have predicted this earthquake at this specific time. But Okumura and a few others were warning the nuclear industry that some of their reactors were sitting on potentially shaky ground. In those days, nuclear companies were almost regulating themselves. But after 3 11, Japan started over what they knew nuclear watchdog agency one with an unofficial motto, the new nuclear regulatory regime in Japan must be the world's strictest, which tracks with an acknowledgement that seismic risk in Japan is among the world's worst. Drew Richard is an author whose new book, Every Human Intention follows Scientists struggling to figure out how to prevent another Fukushima because that's what people want to hear. Alice that this will never happen again. Okamura, the seismologist says. That's almost an impossible request. We cannot tell when underwear a big Oscar eco cars, he can tell you this, like it or not. No nuclear problem. These profit pretty save Every nuclear power plant, he says, comes with risk, especially in Japan. Here's the deal. Japan just doesn't have much oil or gas. So starting in the 19 sixties, with lots of American help, it went heavy on nuclear to power, one of the world's biggest economies. And they did this. Knowing Japan as a lot of earthquakes again. Here's Drew Richard nearly all of Japan in nearly all the sites where nuclear reactors are built, our seismically hazardous. It's a nation that faces a level of seismic risk that's almost uniformly comparable to Seismically active areas of California on Lee, California has one nuclear plant. Japan was running 50 Woz after 3 11 that nuclear watchdog shut down all of them. It has since allowed only five to reopen. Watchdog is so strict that even experts who were advising the government before the disaster are effectively not allowed to join. That includes scientists like Okumura, Koji. And others who were warning the government, Okumura says. They just scrap the whole system for them, or the system was useless and I'm used to, and I'm useless to, he says. Other Japanese seismologists, who could join the watchdog agency won't because well, scientists don't want the spotlight the immense political pressure Okumura says. Right now, the agency actually does not have a solid team of earthquake specialist say Don't Tall, you know, professional scientists. Yes, it's a big laws. Drew Richard says. Most earthquake experts agree seismic safety is a real blind spot in a real weak spot for the current regulatory agency. And that's glaring because the Fukushima disaster was a seismic event. That's bad, Richard says. The current top seismic safety regulator isn't really an earthquake expert. He's more of a geologist, so it's a little bit like asking an influential kidney doctor to operate on your heart. Richard says most officials mean well, yet they face a traumatized public. Still looking to scientist for peace of mind the expertise of these earthquakes, scientists has been applied to Ah, fundamentally impossible question that question. Are any of those dozens of reactor sites absolutely safe from earthquakes. And as it turns out on the basis of the limits of human knowledge At this time, the answer is maybe we don't know. At this point half of all Japanese people just don't want nuclear power at all. Nuclear companies are pushing to reopen their reactors, but keep getting denied. Try again, Regulators say, Make it safer. Meanwhile, with most nuclear plants closed, Japan has had to import way more coal, dirty polluting coal warming the whole planet and people aren't happy with that, either. Just listen to these protesters. Follows at US. I'll call, you know, Call Japan. They're chanting, Okamoto says. There are no easy solutions here. He knows the public. Just want scientist to tell them their energy source is safe. What science can never be published again. It's the nature or not. You're Hauser. I admit he also admits that actually, he wants more nuclear plants to open up. That's coming from the scientist who foresaw Lay Fukushima like nuclear nightmare. Look, some of Japan's plans should clearly never open again, He says. They're just too close to fault lines. For others. The odds of another earthquake seem low enough that Japan should take the risk. He says. The country needs power. Yes, I'm afraid people against nuclear power may be hungry after me. Just try not to be too angry at me, Okumura says. He's just a guy who wanted to study prehistoric earthquakes, never imagining that pursuit could affect the fate of his country. And the entire planet. For the world. I'm Patrick Quinn.

Okumura Japan Drew Richard Undersea Earthquake Fukushima Nuclear Plant Koji Earthquake Okamura Fukushima Tsunami Patrick LEE California Oscar Earthquakes Alice Richard Okamoto Hauser
Protests Persist In Myanmar Even As The Military Tightens Its Grip On Power

The World

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Protests Persist In Myanmar Even As The Military Tightens Its Grip On Power

"Saying they'll hand over authority to whomever wins. What they're not saying, though, is when that election will happen. Huge protests are still happening across me and marred by day and by night when police come to neighborhood searching for protesters to arrest Residents turn out banging pots and pans. Many people just want their democracy back. But Myanmar's ethnic minorities say this uprising needs to go much further as the world's Patrick win reports When Stella Naw was a little girl going to school in the hilly northern part of Myanmar, she learned all about the greatness of the Burmese, the country's dominant ethnic group. She learned about their ancient kings, how they built Golden temples and had mighty armies. That was fine. But what about her ethnic group, the kitchen with more than a million people, mostly living in the mountains? Well, the textbooks didn't say much about them at all about the kitchen people with about two lines. We were just learning as we were learning about some people who were extinct, already not totally extinct, the school, said. The kitchen where farmers who like to do this neat dance Stella says that was about it. We were nothing more than some cute people with not much history. This is how the country's military rulers who are all ethnically Burmese tend to see minorities as people who should just assimilate. Get out of the way. But in Myanmar more than a third of all people are minorities groups such as the Sean Kitchen Corin kn mon, wiry, kind Chen Rohingya. It is a very diverse place yet the army has been trying to colonize their indigenous lands for decades. Often brutally even blasting villages with fighter jets. I asked Elena, who is now a political writer and activist how her people the kitchen tend to feel about the army. Disgust, fear they feel disgust set off the military for all the human rights abuses that they have committed against the community members. Two weeks ago, when the general sees total power in a coup rolling tanks through major cities, including the Heartland where most Burmese people live, Stella gnaw and other minorities were like Yeah, looks familiar. I even have someone asking me how do you feel to lose their freedom? All of us sudden, like I never felt like we had the freedom to begin where, right? Myanmar is now in the throes of a huge uprising at people's uprising, with doctors and students and factory work per person. Strike everyday people standing up the tanks and riot cops and rarely has the whole country. All the racial groups been united United in anger at the military. For Stella. Naw, it feels pivotal, like okay, now, maybe we're all on the same page. This is an opportunity, maybe to help them understand a bit, but also, we can really hope and expect too much because they are so focused on releasing freeing often Sergi Aung San Suu cheat the most popular political leader in the country ever. Especially among the Burmese majority. She's backed by the US and for the past five years on sense, UCI has shared power with the Army until the coup That was the status quo. What many minorities are now telling their Burmese brothers and sisters is let's fight for a real democracy because that status quo For many, it was miserable. It's a village on fire the village once home to Rohingya Muslims following an army purge about three years ago. The army has violently driven more than one million Rohingya out of the country. Years. Nay Sandlin, a Rohingya activist, You know military is the one who committed the genocide against the Rohingya. So we have no reason to support this military coup. But he does say that for his people. The coup doesn't change much. Many already live under an apartheid like system. For example, most Rohingya can't vote. And, yes, he says, some Rohingya refugees did enjoy seeing on Sans Souci get ousted after all on San Souci did go to The Hague in 2019 to defend the army against charges of genocide. Niece. Unwin says that celebrating was just a knee jerk reaction. We informed them. This is not the right way to enjoy detention off society. We have to support the public movement, even if we don't want to support heart or the whole party. They take the long view. He says that the army will never change its ways. But maybe in the future elected officials might begin to stick up for the Romanian. So now in refugee camps, you can hear this growing in survivors of genocide, beating pots and pans in solidarity with Burmese protesters. Nation. Lin is even seeing Burmese people who never stood up for the Rohingya saying Sorry we should have done something they realized their cruelty off this military. And they have the sympathy for us. But like Stella, non, he knows racism won't just go away overnight. This racism is deeply rooted in the country, so it will take a lot of time to change. Only they don't have time. This mass resistance is happening now. And Stellan Aw says it needs to become a more inclusive fight, not just for democracy, but to get the army off. Minorities backs once and for all. That's what brings kitchen people out on the streets in her hometown machina. You see fewer protest signs about Aung San Souci, and more that say, Abolish the Constitution basically overhaul the entire system. But this is how security forces responded to that. Over the weekend, Paul getting a boat, a barrage of rubber bullet, Maybe some real bullets seemingly fired in the air. No confirmed casualties That's from a Facebook live stream. But the army keeps blocking the Internet nationwide, in part to keep the world from seeing these crackdowns. What's clear is that resistance is becoming very dangerous for everyone. That's why Stella Naw says the only solution is to stick together, so we need to work together for this country to work and not become a failed nation, which is already on the way Myanmar's minority groups know quite well, she says that this army will not back down easily. For the world. I'm Patrick Win. Francis Cyber Security Agency says several French entities have been breached in a hacking campaign. They say the G R U

Myanmar Army Stella Naw Chen Rohingya Stella Stella Gnaw United United Sergi Aung San Suu Nay Sandlin San Souci Patrick Elena UCI Sans Souci Unwin Stellan Aw Aung San Souci LIN United States
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"S. Carries out a complicated dance with Taiwan, with DUIs and dolts do sell billions of dollars worth of weaponry to the island to deter against a potential Chinese invasion. But don't ever ever ever say Taiwan is a sovereign country because that will provoke China to invade. There are all these rules because without rules, you're inviting potentially chaos. You're inviting the potential for mistakes to be made. Drew Thompson was once beholden to those rules helping guide Taiwan policy at the U. S. Defense Department. Now He's an analyst at the National University of Singapore, and the mistakes he refers to those are mistakes that could trigger a war between the U. S and China. But now Trump's administration is saying those rules. They were just quote attempts to appease the Communist regime in Beijing. No more, says Mike Pompeo, Those rules are now null and void. Now, Some say this is dangerous. But others are saying finally became Shall Taiwan's representative to the U. S. Says This is quote decades of discrimination removed. And that sort of talk also resonates back home. A recent rally in Taiwan they're chanting fight for Trump! He's got fans. They're people who love that He doesn't tiptoe around China. They're thrilled that maybe the U. S country Taiwan more like a real country. America usually limits high level contact with the island. But now all bets are off. Chinese state media says Pompeo himself dares to go there get ready for a quote Avalanche because his madness will bring annihilation. I asked Drew Thompson it Pompeo's decision is a game changer. If this decision had been made at the beginning of the administration, then I think the gig would have been changed. But that's the thing this administration has a week left in office. Pompeo spokeswoman has already said he won't be visiting Taiwan and all this could be reversed by the new White House. According to Drew Thompson, they can either revert back or ideally, the body administration takes this opportunity to review how it engages Taiwan hard to say what Biden will do. Trump isn't the only one putting off anti China vibes. There will be Democrats who, like what Pompeo just did even if they won't admit it publicly. But you also have to consider how Taiwan interprets these changes and how Taiwan behaves. I mean, the big Red line of all Is Taiwan declaring independence. That is the risk treat Taiwan like a real country, and its leaders may eventually say, Well, if America's really got our back Let's just declare it we are independent. For now. That scenario still feels like a remote possibility whether it becomes more likely what everything to do with the rules Biden sets when he comes to the White House. For the world. I'm Patrick Win. Ambassador William Burns has never worked in an intelligence agency. He's a career foreign service officer known for his diplomatic record. So it came as a bit of a surprise to many this week when President elect bite and tap burns as his pick to be the next director of the CIA. Former CIA director John Brennan was not surprised, he says Biden has good reasons for choosing an experienced diplomat as America's spy chief president looked Buyten wants to have a knack security team that has worked together before so that they can hit the ground running bill brings a combination of experiences as well as the right temperament. To deal with these very, very challenging issues. You What does that mean? The right temperament. What would the CIA look like under burns his direction. How do you think it would be different? He is a soft spoken individual. But his words carry tremendous weight and influence. I think he's going to be able to explain to the CIA and very clear terms just how their work is going to factor into the national security policy making process. He has excellent interpersonal skills. He knows and has worked with everyone. Haynes, the nominee to be director of national intelligence for many years, and so, therefore I think he's going to be able to demonstrate to the CIA workforce that he is going to be able to represent CIA interests as well as be able to present CIA intelligence and a very effective fashion..

Taiwan Mike Pompeo CIA Drew Thompson China Trump William Burns Biden Pompeo America White House director Beijing National University of Singapo U. S. Defense Department U. S Patrick Win representative Haynes
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the social order. The world's Patrick win reports from Bangkok. Young protesters breaking through the wall of riot cops this week passed spools of razor wire and marching towards government headquarters where the prime minister is giving a televised speech. Asking them to dial it down when they reach government headquarters. Protesters have a message for the prime minister. He's a former Army general named Chan OCHA. They say, Hey, resign soon or we'll dial it up. Even if you keep threatening to put us in jail. Why are they ready to risk so much? I asked one of the protesters, a college student who goes by ginseng to sum it all up, But I am a people called Thailand, a developing country, he says. But is that even true? Did we stop developing and are they holding us back? Many young ties feel the country is stuck in a time warp. This is the generation of K pop and queer pride and social media, where everyone has a voice. Yet they say the country is under the sway of army generals with a 19 fifties mindset, telling them how to cut their hair Who to bow to what not to say. Six years ago during the last military coup, they've been more than a dozen in Thailand. These students were in their early teens and the general who seized power, he wrote a song and made every kid singing Love Your Nation. Your religion loved the Thai royal family, it says. It's a song about being moral and obedient. Written by a man who just taken over the government that would be prime minister, are you that song is actually sort of a remix of a song that the parents and grand parents of these protesters had to sing when they Pretty much the same lyrics about being obedient on Lee. It was put out by a Thai dictator in 1955. This is why these young protesters say the country is stuck in the past. So they want the prime minister gone. They want to rewrite the Constitution, changing the whole power structure. And this is the most radical part they want to quote reform the monarchy. Every Thai student is taught that the military upholds the nation, but the king embodies the glory of the Thai people. Thailand's king is 68. He took the throne four years ago after the death of his father, who ruled for seven decades Coronation. People shouted Long live the king! Now! The King actually spends most of his time living in Germany with the queen. But they both returned to Bangkok last week amidst all this turmoil. And at one point the Queen is riding through the city and a cream colored Rolls Royce Irish out Long live the queen as she rides past. But then her motorcade passes a group of protesters. Some screamed my taxes, my taxes, seeming to allude to the luxurious car. A few yelled something worse. Take one Tine here to TV news anchors talk about the offensive remarks. They didn't repeat them, but said the people who said that stuff they're not even tie, one said it makes me want to cry. What the protesters want is a monarchy more like the UK or Japan. One people can criticize and in Thailand that is blasphemous. You just do not make demands of the monarchy. You praise it full stop, and there is a steep price for crossing that line as one protester named Boone Boone Bolton, who was near the queen's motorcade explained in a video on Twitter. Well, I am right now in front of the police station, where I'm being accused of intention to harm them. He says he didn't yell anything of scene. Still, he was charged with infringing on the Queen's liberty. He's out on bail now, but he could go to prison for life. This point in time.

prime minister Thailand Boone Boone Bolton Long Chan OCHA Bangkok Twitter Army Germany Lee UK Japan
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The world we're a co production of GBH NPR X Lots of people are ready for November 3rd to get here. World leaders everywhere are also anxious to see the outcome of the US presidential race. That may be especially true for Kim Jeong Eun. North Korean leader has had unusual connection with President Trump. They've met face to face three times in exchange personal letters. How would a Biden administration deal with Kim differently? The world's Patrick win reports. North Korea has said Joe Biden is an idiot. But he's in the final stage of dementia and that he's a quote rabid dog that should be beaten to death. So Pyongyang's feelings about Biden not a mystery, says do young Kim from the international crisis Group. It clearly sounds like Kyung Young has no regard does not think highly of binding at all. Not that Biden has kind words for Kim Jeong Eun. Here he is at a campaign rally. Are we a nation that embraces dictators and tires like Putin and Kim Jeong? So what happens if Biden wins and it's his job to somehow take away Kim Jong un's most prized possession his nuclear weapons? Well, we might see some drama soon after the election, says, Do Young Kim. If Biden is elected, then I would not be surprised if North Korea returns to a range of weapons testing. She means the heavier weapons the scarier ones, maybe long range missiles the ones North Korea is always dying to test an improved She even has a time frame for this the time between Election Day and Inauguration Day Now this makes sense because putting the U. S and crisis mode That would give Kim Jong un leverage to say, O Biden. You want to negotiate? Well, I'll stop these tests if America gives up something in return. Since Trump and Kim Jeong Eun made nice. North Korea has mostly backed off testing nukes Our long range missiles But they're now getting annoyed. They think the US owes them something for this. According to somehow machine of Seoul National University from no spring perspective, Chesapeake condition they have made So what does North Korea really want, anyway? Well, For starters, they want less of this. US South Korea War Games, which North Korea sees as a rehearsal for invasion under Trump, the U. S military has stopped doing some of the biggest war games. Professor Sheen says Pyongyang assumes they are gone for good from the North Korean perspective. This is a done deal. It's a done deal. So what North Korea really wants now is to get rid of the crushing sanctions from the U. S and the U. N that shut them out of the global economy. America is probably not going to budge on that unless North Korea gets rid of some of its nukes, and there's only one guy who could make that decision about the nuclear weapons. North Korean negotiators are not allowed to talk about that. They always say it's up to him, Dylan, but that's a crucial core element for Team America. This gets tricky for Biden, who's North Korea. Policy is honestly pretty vague, but he has said that he's not going to do flashy trump style summits that go nowhere. He'd want negotiators to hammer out a deal before he shows up. But to move forward on the nukes. At least, Biden himself might have to do a face to face meeting with Kim Jong un. If North Korea grocers are not a lot to talk about the nuclear should then on leaking Jolan and an American president will have to talk about that. Even if Biden does say, okay, fine. Let's meet Dion Kim says it might be Kim Jeong Eun, who refuses because since the Trump meetings didn't get rid of sanctions, North Korea has been sounding more irritated, giving more ultimatums, even issuing this demand after a U. S official called them a rogue nation. They basically said America and American officials to not call us names. If you call, it seems we will not show up at the table. Yep, the fate of North Asia could hinge on name calling. Of course, Joe Biden is less of a name caller than Trump, who last year joined Kim Jong un. In mocking Biden. Well, Tim's young woman made a statement that Joe Biden is a low I Q individual, he probably is based on his record, no matter what. If Biden wins, there will be some tension if and when he reaches out to Kim Jong, UN. So the first person team Biden might want to approach is not Kim Jong UN. It's one of his top advisers. His sister, Kim Yourjob. That when you're young meeting South Korean President Moon Jae and two years ago with cameras popping its one of very few clips of her voice, as professor, Sheen says, talking about the Kim siblings between those two Ah runs very deep. The trust runs so deep that a potential bite and White House should make contacting Kim Yo Jong a priority says Do Young Kim. It might be best to also aim for reaching his sister to try to get any type of either headway or understanding about North Korean thinking. I think we can expect to see and hear from Kenya down more often. Here's the bottom line. Fighting and Trump are wildly different when it comes to demeanor. Yes, But do you think in points out every American administration has basically followed the same broad policy toward North Korea. The U. S wants North Korea to give up its nukes The Kim dynasty holds on to them for dear life. Yet both sides are very hesitant to spark a horrific war. So that's it. They're stuck calling each other tyrants and idiots and rabid imperialist dogs. And so do you. And Kim says, no matter who wins the election. I do not expect a drastic change in American policy toward North Korea, regardless of who is in the White House next year, still on Election night Kim Jong UN and his team will probably be following the results along with the rest of us for the world. Patrick Win..

Joe Biden North Korea Kim Jong un Kim Jeong Eun Dion Kim Kim Yo Jong President Trump Kim Jong Kim Jeong Kim Yourjob US America North Asia Patrick Win NPR Professor Sheen Kyung Young UN
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The country's new leader is ABS, longtime disciple. His name is Yoshihide Suga, and he was chosen by his party to steer Japan through some rough waters. Koven 19 pandemic, sluggish economy and his predecessors unfinished mission to restore some of Japan's past glory. The world's Patrick win helps break down what this means for Japan and the world why I was chosen to lead the country, Patrick Well, he's a very predictable, stable choice. He's 71. He's not too flashy. He's known as a workaholic, and the main takeaway here is he is going to carry on the legacy of Shinzo Abe. He's basically been abs, right hand man and the word that comes to my mind when I think of saga is loyal. One important thing Marco to understand is that Japanese politics is dominated by this elite circle with many politicians. Coming from influential families and sue Go, was not born into that world. His dad was a strawberry farmer used to drive a truck at a fish market, and he worked his way into politics slowly starting off on a City council, and he got this reputation for being competent and loyal to more powerful figures like so It's expected that he will loyally carry out the agenda of the party. And that party is the Liberal Democratic Party, which, despite its name runs conservative and it's run Japan almost every year since the 19 fifties, Andi, I spoke to an analyst named Koichi Nakano, who explained what the party's modern agenda is. It's often quite flexible with the ideology more recently and then stab it has taken a turn to the right. And actually, even Steve Bannon praised Mr before being trump before Trump even before President Trump came up with make America Great again, Mr B, campaigned on the slogan off taking back Japan. I think we can expect Su got to continue that nationalist streak. So with this emphasis, that suit is placed on continuity with ABS leadership. How will that actually play out? Well, this has been his main message. I am going to carry out the policies of Shinzo Abe and even the Cabinet. He's mostly keeping all of his Cabinet and so for Japanese people, they're going to see a lot of the same faces from the Shinzo Abe years and it's not going to look very different from the past eight years. So let's look at foreign policy. For example, Japan's one of America's top allies in the world. How will Will Ciga affect that relationship with the U. S? Well, he's definitely expected to keep pushing ABS foreign policy, which has been really pro American. The two countries have this mutual distrust of China, and that's bringing them closer together. You know, Marco, A lot of world leaders have at some point, been frustrated with President Trump, but not Abhay, who's always got along with him really well, especially on the golf course. I asked Professor Nagano if he expects the new prime minister to get along with Trump is well, America is going through a very turbine imputed to even if Mr Sieger wants to meet Mr Trump as soon as possible and to be liked by President Trump. Well, maybe he's not gonna have time for that. And what he means there. Marco is, Trump might not have time to think much of Japan, especially going into the election. You know, Japan is this huge economic force in the world, but especially in Asia, and it's really active in diplomacy on the side of the world. But Professor Nagano told me that he thinks this is one of Soga's biggest weakness is Mr Sugar has very little to show in terms ofthe foreign policy expertise. Oh, experience or even interest. And so he's a complete novice. Who's going to try to learn a new trick? Patrick and we expect you today, so go to remain prime minister for long. It's a really good question. It's hard to say so far. He's been chosen to lead by his party and not the general public's of the next general election isn't about a year in 2021. So he could wait until then, Or he could call a snap election and prove that he's got the support of the Japanese public or the party could let him stay on for a while, but then replacing the fiends of not being so hot with someone younger and more dynamic before the general election. So we'll see if people do embrace him. I mean, he's he's a pretty serious guy. Personality wise, maybe even a bit Stern. It doesn't drink. He's a workaholic. He's not flashy, but you know, in a pandemic and in a bad economy, Maybe the public doesn't want someone who's being bombastic on Twitter and someone who likes drama. I think the deal with Sudha is like him or not. You know what you're getting well, Either way you should eat. A single new prime minister is a new chapter for Japan, The world's Asia correspondent. Patrick Win Thanks very much. Thanks, Marco. Pandemic and the economy are top priorities for Japan's new prime minister. But there's another that's taking root in Japan. Racial justice Japans also been impacted by the global movement for countries to confront their own histories and their responsibility to change. The world's Bianca Hillier. Reports. Jamie Smith remembers the days and weeks after May 25th She watched online videos of people marching.

Japan President Trump Liberal Democratic Party Patrick Well ABS prime minister Marco Shinzo Abe Patrick Su America Professor Nagano Yoshihide Suga Asia Pandemic Koichi Nakano sue Go Mr B
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In handcuffs and later led through his newspapers Newsroom with reporters live streaming his ordeal. Jimmy Lai is charged with collusion with foreign forces. The world's Patrick Quinn joins me now. So what did this media tycoon do to upset Beijing so much? Patrick? Yeah, Marco. I mean, this guy doesn't just merely dislike the Chinese Communist Party. He abhors them. Just he's this very rich tycoon who does not ever seem to be afraid of going to prison. Or even having his media empire taken away, And now it looks like that is happening. You know, he does come out and say things like this, which is from an interview this year with Fox News. Of the value of the West. The value of America We are actually fighting the same war your new Cold War. We are fighting, probably because we share the same values with you. So when you say you're fighting a Cold War and one American support that is a huge red line for China's Communist Party, and Jimmy Lie just says stuff like this all the time. So if Jimmy lives been criticizing China's government in Beijing for years, why arrest him now? You know, as we all can see the U. S and China are in what may be the beginnings of some sort of cold War over trade technology who controls territory in Asia. So many things, and Hong Kong has really been this flashpoint. You see US politicians like Nancy Pelosi and Ted Cruz. Cheering on. These protesters will in response to that. Over the weekend, the US put out sanctions against Hong Kong's top leader who is Carrie Lam, and that has provoked them to go after Jimmy Lai, or at least that's what it looks like. He's been this golden boy for certain US politicians. And then suddenly he gets swept away in retaliation. So police also arrested Agnes Joe, someone who conforms more with the activists we've seen in the streets for the past year in Hong Kong. Remind us who Agnes Chow is Patrick and what you represent to the central government in Beijing. Everybody in Hong Kong knows who Agnes Chow is. She was a teenage protester in 2014 for what was called the umbrella revolution. And since then she's now in her early twenties. She has become sort of this is a very young protest movement, Marco So a 23 year old can be an elder statesman and this in this movement and in a sense, that's what she has been. I just think it really sends a strong signal that no one is untouchable. So if you have Agnes Child being taken down Jimmy Live being taken down. The Chinese Communist Party knows it's going to create a huge fuss. They know that the American media is going to make a big deal out of this and they know that it can heighten tensions in this, you know. Call it What you want Cold War. We also saw today that China has sanctioned 11 Americans, including lawmakers. Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz. What's the thinking behind that The sanctions have gone after senators that are very active and cheering on the Hong Kong protesters, But they've also gone after the head of human rights, Watch anyone that the Chinese Communist Party views as an American agitator. Towards the Hong Kong protests, and so what you're seeing is more tit for tat sanctioning so the U. S sanctions Hong Kong's political leader, they sanction Ted Cruz and some other senators, and it keeps escalating and escalating with no end in sight. The world Southeast Asia correspondent Patrick Win Thanks for being with us. Thanks, Marco. You're listening to the world and you're listening to the world here on.

Hong Kong Chinese Communist Party Jimmy Lai Beijing Marco Rubio China Ted Cruz US Patrick Patrick Quinn Agnes Chow Jimmy Agnes Joe Jimmy Lie Patrick Win Fox News U. S Agnes Child
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Someone to the committing. The crime of succession could be, he says. The problem is, you can say I don't want secession. I just want free elections. But again, the final arbiter might be the Communist Party. They won't catch everyone, but it's risky. Oh, yeah? Oh, yeah. My advice, of course, is to stay well away from Don't test the law simply because the consequences are going to be great. Now a fringe group of protesters, they sometimes seeing a different anthem, Rob. Does that amount to the crime of collusion with foreign powers? Possibly some Hong Kongers will drape themselves in U. S flags and ask for support from US politicians, and sometimes it works. The law is a brutal, sweeping crackdown against the people of Hong Kong intended to destroy. The freedoms they were promised. But no matter what Nancy Pelosi says, Carrie Lam is making it clear that there's a red line if Hong Kongers invite foreign governments to interfere in Hong Kong surface or even to impose sanctions on Hong Kong, no central government could turn a blind eye to such threats to sovereignty. Meaning if you say Hey, America, please sanction China. They can definitely get you for that. Most of these national security crimes will be handled in Hong Kong by Hong Kong courts under guidance from Beijing. But if Chinese officials really don't like someone they can decide to prosecute them in mainland China. Again here, Simon Young. Well, someone just be arrested in the night and whisked away across the border. In a matter of a couple of hours. We don't know There's a lot of uncertainty there. That's why it's a bit scary. Despite the new law, some Hong Kongers air still going up. Protesters. Police arrested more than 400 people this week. Many Hong Kongers are frantically deleting tweets the leading messages on their phone and by the way, if you've gone online to say anything that might be construed as promoting Hong Kong independence. Be careful about visiting. You also may have incited a Hong Konger to rise up. If you tweeted that is a message sent to the whole world, basically, and we know that this applies extra territorially to anyone. Anyone. The law is very clear that everyone on Earth is subject to it. And if you come to Hong Kong, you can face arrest too. For the world. I'm Patrick Win. In Ethiopia, The killing of popular musician Endesa has triggered widespread protests across the country. This week. More than 80 people have died, and s it was a powerful political voice for the Oromo ethnic group. His death earlier this week is just the latest in nearly a year of troubling developments in Ethiopia and have become a rallying cry for the opposition to speak out against Prime Minister Be Ahmed. I just rushed it, too, is a fellow at the Brookings Institution and joins us from Washington. Let's start with the death of the singer Calhoun Desa. It's drawn the attention of the world the wider problems in Ethiopia. Why did him justice killing spark? Such huge protests, symbol of resistance against oppression among the almost one of the largest Senate utopia, so his days install, angered and frustrated a lot of people. Ondo, let Teo kind of clash of it and communities with security forces. His songs were very poor something five or more people doing. The protest got started in 20 thing that actually helped bring in the office serious later into 18. Songs became an anthem for the protesters, which helped galvanize the movement. So that's interesting..

Hong Kong Hong Kongers Hong Konger Ethiopia China Communist Party Calhoun Desa Senate Brookings Institution Nancy Pelosi Rob US Beijing Simon Young America Carrie Lam Patrick Win Prime Minister Ondo
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Marco Woman, This is the world where a co production of WGBH Boston NPR X China moved quickly this week to implement a harsh new security law in Hong Kong. Critics say the law destroys the one country, two systems concept that Beijing agreed to in 1997. That's when great Britain handed Hong Kong over to China free speech has long been a core value in the semi autonomous territory, but is the world's Patrick win reports The new security law means there are now a lot of things. You just can't say any more. In Hong Kong unless you want to risk going to prison. Liberate Hong Kong here shouting the revolution of our times. Everyone in Hong Kong has heard this. It's the go to chant for this popular movement to liberate Hong Kong, at least from Beijing's authoritarian rules. But wait, liberate Hong Kong, which is part of China. He's saying that against the law here, Simon Young, a Hong Kong legal scholar, if you used these terms and might well be regarded as an intention to secede, Yet Hong Kong officials just put out a warning that said exactly that, and under this new security law imposed Getting found guilty of inciting secession is really bad. You could get hit with a minimum three year prison term. Worst case if they think you're really plotting for independence even peacefully. 10 years to life in prison. This is a rather shocking for us to see that our courts are going to have to in very serious cases order a minimum sentence of 10 years imprisonment. Right and their hands were bound regardless of the circumstances. Here's how Hong Kong's Beijing backed leader Carrie Lam describes the law. The legislation aims to prevent curb and punish acts off cessation. Subversion of state power, terrorist activities and collusion with foreign or external forces. Okay, secession, terrorism. Most countries try to stop that. But this new law, it's not really about stopping rebels with bombs. It targets people for having the wrong opinion. If the government decides you are inciting secession, Young says. You're in big trouble. Here's Carrie Lam again, saying that the law will go after protesters who have radicalized young people to desecrate and burn the national flag. Vandalized the national anthem. OK, a couple of things here burning China's flag. They really hate that and vandalizing the national anthem that seems to mean something like this. HONGKONG Protesters dislike of China is so strong They wrote this song in Hong Kong anthem, which they seeing instead of China's national anthem. Now that may be punishable under this law again, Here's attorney Simon Young where you might get caught, of course, is incitement, right? Singing a song like that? Is it capable of inciting?.

Hong Kong China Beijing Simon Young Carrie Lam Patrick Britain Marco Woman Boston NPR WGBH HONGKONG attorney
Stripe: Patrick and John Collison

How I Built This

06:58 min | 2 years ago

Stripe: Patrick and John Collison

"Did you guys get into coding. How did that happen? I bought a book when I was thirteen. And I read it one Saturday and started writing some web pages and really. It was all certify. It was all downhill from there. Yeah and how about you John? Did you like seen Patrick get into coding? Did you think I won't try to? Yeah those definitely influence and I think I had an experience That a lot of people I know who've learned code had which is it's often an end result the pulls you along and you're making everything up as you go and you don't really understand you know you're copying things from a book or from website and typing them into a computer to get it to work and it seems like the two big motivations that people often have our websites or video games Answer in my case the initial website I made was not very good aftertaste. Patrick taught me a lesson in insecurity. I was probably fourteen at the time and I call it together. This website and there were vulnerabilities issues and stuff patrick. Then hacked this is to teach me a lesson on that. Okay so Patrick. I mention this because you're not going to mention this. The in two thousand and five. You won an award like the young scientist award of Ireland fifteen and Or sixteen or something like that. And I'm assuming and maybe weren't cognizant of this but we're I mean people must have said. Oh they're the collison boys you know. There's those two S- really smart boys. Were you aware that you guys were just really smart? I mean did did you would you? Would you wear the people? Were aware of the two of you when you were kids. I don't think they were when we were kids. I think actually this kind of science contest is that was really the first time where anyone might have had even the slightest. 'cause yeah to have kind of come across or heard of either of us What would you do? What was your invention or experiment or submission when you young scientist of Ireland. Well as we touched on I'd gotten really into programming and In particular become interested in this program language called Lisp and I was Kinda fascinated by list because it had been invented in the late fifties like really early in the history of technology. But it'd been kind of forgotten and ignored. The thing I worked on was a new version of less trying to kind of update it making it really straightforward to build sort of complicated applications and things like that and you know it's funny Tony kind of looking back on. It becomes clear for a very early stage. I was interested in working on tools or just going to building things that created leverage for other is in that basically the whole point of working on this programming language was to provide a tool would make it easier for others to build things. And so I. I didn't consciously think about it this way at the time. He kind of running stripe or whatever but basically all the things that I've worked. I'm kind of somewhat seriously. Having some ways been kind of tools for creation show in two thousand six. After Patrick won the young scientists of the year award he decided to go to the US to mit for college and two years later John would follow his brother to Cambridge to attend Harvard. But all the while the brothers were always working and conspiring ways to solve problems they come across the Internet for example why it seemed so hard to buy and sell secondhand things in an efficient way so one afternoon while mulling over some ideas at their local pub Patrick. John came up with a potential solution back end technology for Ebay users to manage inventory and they found two other guys who were working on a similar problem so they joined up with them moved to San Francisco and called their company optimistic. What automatic did was? It made it really easy to kind of manage and to list items for sale on existing platforms things like Ebay Or you know other marketplaces for for selling some of these items. You could use automatic to sort of track your inventory and to upload your items and to manage the listing photos and said basically who's a tool for people who are selling significant amounts of stuff online and so with software to help. Those people do that job better and the idea was kind of that could help us gain kind of one side of the marketplace such that over time we could come and then build a better user experience for customers so you guys build this thing and who is the public face of automatic because I mean obviously you guys are super smart and talented. But you know you were really young right like eighteen and sixteen years old so were you guys sort of staying in the background. And with the other founders. The public face was really the website right. The great line about how on the Internet. Nobody knows that you're you know. We kind of took full advantage of that but the company must have done pretty well right because I I guess just over a year after you've had your original idea I it sold reportedly for five million dollars. So was this strange to all of a sudden at that age land into that kind of money. I mean no. You didn't get five million yourself yet to divide it up and it's still you prominent pastors and yeah you still probably walked away with a couple of hundred thousand bucks. That was probably more money than you'd ever seen in Your Life. Who certainly more money than we'd ever seen in our lives. Yeah was enough money that it afforded a kind of freedom and really I think just kind of forced to the kind of reflection that had we been or had. Ibm kind of on. Just the treadmill of you go to college and you get your debris in his first job and so on such that I I can certainly imagine sort of a different version of my life or my career where I didn't do some of that thinking on until I was much older. Yeah so I guess this was like right around the time you were at at Harvard John and Patrick you eventually went back to mit for For a while right. That's exactly right in the fall of cousin nine and I should just prefaces was saying both of you with dropout and never return But in that in that brief moment of time where John Hubbard and Patrick you're at Mit Is that really this around? Two thousand nine is that were the early sort of idea That would become stripe began. That's interesting question. 'cause on the one hand stripe was the most interesting idea. We had come across during the course of automatic in this It was the single hardest thing about developing an Internet. Business was just the the business side of the accepting money. So the pain inside. Yeah it's and it seemed like a really important problem at and we thought there should be something really easy. Folks developers instance at up to people started to starting accepting money but on the other. Hand what we

Patrick John Hubbard Tony Kind Scientist Ebay Ireland Harvard John IBM San Francisco United States MIT Harvard Cambridge
"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

"It is increasingly increasingly split and it's sort of redefining the city. A lot of people have told the on both sides that hong kong isn't the same as it was before something something has changed and on the protests side. You're really seeing that where they're starting to use this phrase chai nazi and their spray painting it all over town comparing airing beijing powers in beijing to nazis and once you've gone into nazi territory. It's really hard to come back from that and consider you're reconciling wow vivid stuff coming out of hong kong from the world's patrick win. Who's following the protests there. Thanks a lot patrick. Thanks carol more more political drama unfolding in london. The british parliament reconvenes tomorrow with just a handful of days left to prevent prime minister boris johnson from leading the u._k. Crash cash out of the european union yesterday johnston threatened to expel any m._p.'s from his own conservative party that try to vote against a so-called hard brexit today hey the prime minister made a fresh appeal to his m._p.'s to support him in a televised statement outside ten downing street as protesters roared stopped the coup and so i you say to show off in brussels that we are united in our purpose in peace should vote with the government against corbin's vince events seemed to be moving at a bewildering speed but the world's orla barry in london is here to make everything clear or parliament will be in session tomorrow. What are the prime minister's political opponents trying to accomplish with such little time on the clock very simply to prevent a no deal breaks it. They are coming coming together from different parties. Some will be tores. The government conservative party some would be from the opposition benches all with different views news on brexit but all not wanting no deal breaks as and how can they do that at this point so what the bill we understand is going to do is to ask that if boris ars johnson hasn't reached an agreement with the e._u. By mid october then he will have to seek an extension on the deal until the end of january and why hi is a possible extension so unacceptable johnson very simply. You might remember carl when he entered ten downing street's. He said <hes> the goal of his premiership mayorship was that the u._k. Would leave the e._u. On october thirty first dealer no deal and for him to go back on that now will be seen as he's gone back doc in his words now is to be the first time the bars john's will go back on his word but for this <hes> it it does seem like very much red line for him that he simply will not do that. Okay orla. We've been here before you know. There's a whole lot at stake so what's really at stake tomorrow. Are we at a breaking point. We've been at a breaking point for so long john carl at this point. What's what's most likely to happen. Tomorrow is that we will see this parliamentary to base get under way. We'll see how the votes go this evening. It looks like it may not go on boris johnson's favourite and if that happens if the opposition wins that vote and the bill starts being pushed through cetera the greatest likelihood is that he will have to call all s nap election and then we're into general election mode. It should be said <hes> for the general election to snap election to happen here. It does have to be voted on in the house of parliament so there is that but also we do feel like we've been in general election mode for at well since he came into office because the the amount of funding that he's announced for the police for the end. Hey jess et cetera et cetera..

boris johnson john carl prime minister hong kong boris ars johnson patrick london beijing british parliament orla barry european union carol jess brussels johnston corbin vince
"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

"He is the consideration Ford says the fact that this process even exist in any form could be a good thing because maybe maybe in the future if they local politician is really awful. North Korea might allow citizens sends to vote them out over in China where the Communist Party also holds four or against elections officials will sometimes let that happen though is impossible some point the Korean system may move in the same way. Certainly I unanticipated seeing a banner headline fifteen percents swing against the Workers Party career yet any change to the system would be crazy longshot assume that this weekend North Korea will keep on holding the most rigged elections in the world but hey there is one thing the North Koreans do have over the American system. At least they're voters. Get the day off or the world on Patrick win today. The Netherlands Supreme Court ruled that the Dutch military was partly responsible for the shredded needs a massacre shredder neat so was the worst atrocity in Europe since World War Two in July nineteen ninety-five have Bosnian Serb forces rounded up Muslim men and boys and killed more than eight thousand of them. The Dutch role in the massacre was that Dutch soldiers failed to defend the U._N.. so-called safe zone of SHREDDER NITSA The court said the Dutch state had ten percent liability ready for the desks Amir Halo Vich is from shredder Nitsa now resettled in London. His father was killed in the massacre in one thousand nine hundred five Halevi shared his reaction to the ruling today with the B._B._C.. Today's very emotional day <hes> but it he's good to see that the reason some judgment and all these people that was killed cleese families now received some sort of <hes> but at least we can see there is people the helped helped this so there is somebody responsible even ten percent. Dr Walker is me as chairman of remembering shredder Nitsa. That's a nonprofit in Britain dedicated to keep the memory of what happened in Shrub Anita Alive today Supreme Court ruling <hes> as you know says the Dutch State Bears Limited responsibility for the massacre ten percents <hes> there was a previous ruling boy lower court that said thirty percent. What does that mean exactly <hes> what this means really is in terms of the three hundred fifty <hes> men and boys that they had expelled from their camp compound that I have been not expelled Ma'am than they would have had ten percent chance of surviving because the serve would have murdered added them anyway and that's what it actually means? How did you react when you heard this news well we we've had pain mother's <hes> as an organization? We work with the survivors <hes> we we should have pain. We agreed with them in that. <hes> we had hoped that the <hes> the courts would've in terms of reducing the liability would have held <hes> that govern responsible <hes> but we also acknowledge that it is a historic ruling in that state has been found guilty for not protecting <hes> the the people that they had promised in the U._n.. Safe Haven <hes> they had promised to protect what was the Dutch royal shredder NATO was their mission and what did they actually do well. There was sent as part of <hes> the <hes> peacekeeping force in nineteen ninety four to into surveys that U._n.. Peacekeeping..

North Korea Netherlands Supreme Court Dutch State Bears Supreme Court Communist Party Nitsa NATO Amir Halo Vich Workers Party Dr Walker Ford China Halevi cleese Europe Patrick chairman Britain
"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Embrace somehow that u s at dprk relations can prove the voice there of australian graduate student alex sigli in a report we aired in february by the world's patrick win sigli disappeared of young young ten days ago an today reappeared safe and sound in beijing swedish diplomats helped australia ranges released from north korea finally today a shocker at the wimbledon tennis tournament in england not talking about venus williams getting eliminated eliminated by fifteen year old cocoa golf this is about the outcome of a first round match on the men's side of the tournament australian bernard tomac lost in straight sets the joe wilfred songa france that wasn't the surprising part what took everyone back was he apparent apparent lack of effort by tomic even the tv commentators written to the tomac performance all through the match that lost their photos rentis oh that'd be so many adjective used to describe an out summit is performance all through the match that lost their photos rentis oh that'd be so many adjective used to describe an out summit is bordering ordering embarrassment is not a very good practice session at the moment i mean it's just too there's no there's nothing small bubbly that was just abysmal that includes your guys is at wimbledon today they announced their stripping tomac of his earnings from tuesdays distasteful match about fifty six thousand dollars basically you're not even trying trying a statement said the referee felt the players performance did not meet the required professional standards at wimbledon out double fault stomach later claimed he was trying but when questioned by reporters he also admitted that he played terribly played pretty bad if i was happy labor day just full i wish next question please he mumbled not much effort in that answer either this is not the first time bernard tomic performance on the tennis court

graduate student alex sigli north korea england bernard tomac dprk patrick australia joe wilfred songa france bernard tomic tennis fifty six thousand dollars fifteen year ten days
"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Kong, generally would like to choose who's going to lead them in elections. Well, Beijing has interfered and said, no, you can only choose people that we filter. So we're gonna filter out the most radical voices in the room or any voices that push for more autonomy. So the, the long game of China is erosion, they just keep picking away picking away picking away at the rights and freedoms that make Hong Kong distinct. How do people in Hong Kong view, their own local government, as opposed to the Beijing government? Well, if you are inclined to protest, you are worried that the Hong Kong government is completely under the influence of Beijing the government in Hong Kong, very often goes along with the wishes of Beijing. And again, what China is doing here. It's taking a very gradual approach, and just knocking off little rights and freedoms bit by bit year-by-year. It's not a scenario where tanks are gonna come rolling in, you know, from mainland China, it's not like that. It's just an erosion and the executive branch in Hong Kong is the administrator of that erosion. And so that's why a lot of people are extraordinarily frustrated with them right now. Patrick there were tons of people on the streets yesterday in Hong Kong. What are they most afraid of about this new law? Well, you don't wanna be charged with a crime and China. China has a ninety nine percent conviction rates. If you're charged with something in China, you're very likely going to be punished perhaps, much more severely than you would be punished in Hong Kong. What people are worried about is that you could be charged with some sort of petty crime as a resident of Hong Kong and be swept into China. Hong Kong's executive branch said look, you guys are freaking out. This is not necessarily gonna cover free speech, and it's only going to cover crimes that have a penalty of more than seven years, well, in China, there was recently, a novelist who wrote some gay erotica. She got ten years in prison for that. Okay. That's something that would be totally fine in Hong Kong, he wouldn't get punished for at all. So people are worried that the, the, you know, the creeping influence of China, China, just be able to reach into Hong Kong and pluck out, people who they see as problems people who are criticizing the current system. Patrick purchase yesterday came week after that same park was filled with demonstration. Commemorating the anniversary of ten AMAN square. Do you see a connection between the two I do? Because in the minds of people in Hong Kong who are prone to protest Tianmen represents big bad, China at its worst. And just so happened that the commemoration of that horrible atrocity in China really lined up with the protest about this proposed law in Hong Kong. So I think it really injected life into the protests. And I think it reminded people in Hong Kong of what the stakes are the world's Asia reporter Patrick win. Thanks a lot. Thanks, carol. We don't cover proposed corporate mergers on the world. But then again, most mergers don't have the potential to create a new giant in the defense industry across the night sky are layers of continuous protection. We rely on Raytheon's missile defense solutions span, the entire spectrum a threat detection, and response to make the world a safer place. Raytheon and United Technologies plan to. Create a new aerospace and military company, this coming together of corporate behemoths could have a big impact on the US military, and our national security. Andrew Hunter is with the center for strategic and international studies. He's the director of their defense industrial initiatives group. Andrew, can you tell us a bit about Raytheon and United Technologies? What can they do together that they weren't able to do alone while I think the biggest thing they'll have together is size? They're both obviously large companies even apart. But when combined they will be one of the biggest companies in the United States than they will be certainly one of the largest traditional technology companies, I'm leaving aside companies like Google and Facebook, and that size allows them to compete with a lot of resources behind them than particular..

Hong Kong China Beijing Patrick win Raytheon Beijing government executive Andrew Hunter United Technologies AMAN square United States Asia administrator carol Google Facebook reporter ninety nine percent seven years
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:24 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Carol hills. This is the world. The sounds of protests this weekend in Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands came out into the streets, there to show their dissatisfaction with the way China is trying to run the city. Hong Kong is a fishery part of the People's Republic of China, but it's -joyed special status for years, one that allows for more political freedoms, they're now Bill would allow thorns to extradite Hong Kongers to stand trial in China. And that's what brought the protesters out, Chris Chang journalist with independent Hong Kong free press we caught up with him earlier outside one of the city's metro stations. The protests yesterday was, perhaps the largest protests in Hong Kong history. So a March on Sunday with a million of turnout at very high, and if troll the exceeded everyone's expectation was there, something fundamentally different about this protest compared to those that happened in two thousand fourteen with the umbrella movement. I guess, regardless of how we think about the rela movement. There was deficient in society about whether to support that move than this tro tests against the extradition, Bill. It's quite a uniting factor is society because many people even including the conservative fisa sector, find difficulty in accepting, this Phil motza than agreed that there is a danger, even for the business community that they may be sent to China for trial. A lot of people who have idea never joined protests in Hong Kong, or grad, each gravity, any marches in Hong Kong had joined this protests on Sunday. What's the mood among protest leaders? I mean what what's their next step? This issue is moving very fast. It will be sent to let you say console Hong Kong's congress, so the speak. So moving onto the by no photons sages of the Bill on Wednesday. Today, the organizers of the March have another test saying that they will have a rally outside the legislative council. So every single meeting that the console would debate still, there are looming fresher for different sectors science to call for general strike, including people going to work of business. Stop running for that day. So this moving to us the direction of even wide scale of protests, is Chris how're you failing personally at this point having observed these over the years? I think a reason change in, in my own fitting is, I've seen a lot of my friends who are highly educated, who have very successful careers. They sought to want to look into ways to move out of Hong Kong because all the difficulties all the drop season on gone, and there is no way out of that. So the only way out is to actually move on, and that could be a reset thing because Hong Kong has been such a fortunate place for many years of all this talent development. And now that the Hong Kong government's way of governance of Hong Kong and Beijing government's position on how to rule Hong Kong has forces very group of talented people to actually think of leaving Hong Kong as very sad thing, Chris. Where are you right now? I'm outside Hong Kong island near the process site and. What does it look like they're today? I mean, the remnants of the protests from yesterday. The processes have left all clear out by the police officers around, midnight, the band that the us says, in English, no extradition, China. Many of them were left on the ground. Chris Chang is a journalist with the independent Hong Kong free press, when the U K handed Hong Kong back to China in one thousand nine hundred seven everyone agreed to an arrangement called one country two systems meaning for the next fifty years. Hong Kong hang onto its own laws, its own courts and its own civil liberties civil liberties that aren't available to people living in mainland China, except now, China looks to be chipping away at those freedoms, including as the world's Patrick win points out, freedom of speech, Hong Kong feels like very different place than Beijing. It's almost as if there's a magic barrier. When you go to Hong Kong, you can say things that you would never say standing on a public square in Beijing. You can pretty much say whatever you want, at least. That's the idea, I wouldn't want to test the integrity of that magic free speech barrier these days, but that is what a lot of people want to preserve. Now since Hong Kong went from British control back to Chinese control in nineteen ninety seven how has the city's relationship to mainland China change. I mean what have been the challenges people in Hong Kong are frustrated that there's more of an intrusion of the Mandarin spoken in schools, as opposed to Cantonese. They are frustrated with how much power and influence mainland. Chinese investors have over Hong Kong people in Hong Kong, generally would like to choose who's going to lead them in elections. Well, Beijing has interfered and said, no, you can only choose people that we filter. So we're going to filter out the most radical voices in the room or any voices that push for more autonomy. So the long game of China is erosion, they just keep picking away taking away picking away the rights and freedoms that make Hong Kong stink. How do people in Hong Kong view, their own local government, as opposed to the Beijing government? Well, if you are inclined to protest, you are worried that the Hong Kong government is completely under the influence of Beijing the government in Hong Kong, very often goes along with the wishes of Beijing. And again, what China is doing? Here is taking a very gradual approach, and just knocking off little rights and freedoms bit by bit year by year. It's not a scenario where tanks are gonna come rolling in, you know, from mainland China, it's not like that. It's just an erosion and the executive branch in Hong Kong is the administrator of that erosion. And so that's why a lot of people are extraordinarily frustrated with them right now. Patrick. There were tons of people on the streets yesterday in Hong Kong. What are they most afraid of about this new law? Well, you don't wanna be charged with a crime and China. China has a ninety nine percent conviction rates charged with something in China. You're very likely going to be punished perhaps, much more severely than you would be punished in Hong Kong. What people are worried about is that you could be charged with some sort of petty crime as a resident of Hong Kong and be swept into China. Hong Kong's executive branch said look, you guys are freaking out. This is not necessarily gonna cover free speech, and it's only going to cover crimes that have a penalty of more than seven years, well, in China, there was recently, a novelist who wrote some gay erotica. She got ten years in prison for that. Okay. That's something that would be totally fine in Hong Kong wouldn't get punished for at all. So people are worried that the, the creeping influence of China, China will just be able to reach into Hong Kong and pluck out, people who they see as problems people who are criticizing the current system. Patrick purchase yesterday came a week after that same park was filled with demonstrate. Commemorating the anniversary of Tiananmen Square. Do you see a connection between the two? I do. Because in the minds of people in Hong Kong who are prone to protest tinman represents big bad, China at its worst. And just so happened that the commemoration of that horrible atrocity in China really lined up with the protest about this proposed law in Hong Kong. So I think it really injected life into the protests. And I think it reminded people in Hong Kong of what the stakes are the world's Asia reporter Patrick win. Thanks a lot. Thanks, carol..

Hong Kong China Hong Kong island Hong Kongers Beijing People's Republic of China Chris Chang Patrick win Bill Carol hills Beijing government Tiananmen Square executive congress fisa legislative council Asia Phil motza reporter
"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on PRI's The World

"She gets taxed border patrol is dropping off more migrants tonight, thirty five coming from border patrol at six thirty. We we'll send them out immediately. She rushes to arrange a pickup because if not migrants won't have a place to sleep that night. We're keeping them from being dropped at the bus stop right on the interstate. But Adams also worries that efforts here might max out. I don't know how sustainable, it will be volunteer was, we do have the medical reserve corps and they've been wonderful. But again, my dream is that we would have teams teams it would come in and stay awake or two because she doesn't see this situation, the number of people migrating north families ending anytime soon. We're not talking about two or three months. I'm looking at probably two or three years for the world Monica Campbell. Las Cruces, New Mexico. Tomorrow on the World Health story that starts here in the US and takes us halfway around the globe, it begins with the tens of thousands of computers that Americans throw out each day. Many of those devices are recycled not here in the US, but in scrap yards in southeast Asia. The recycling at places like this. It looks more like medieval alchemy people are hunched over vats of hot metallic sludge bathing in black smoke. That's all reporter Patrick win in Thailand. He takes us to one of those factories to learn about the health effects tomorrow, here on the world. Also on the show, what happens to the plastic bottles, and packaging, we put out on the street to be recycled. It's cheaper, for example, to send those shipments from the US countries like Indonesia, Malaysia for so-called recycling rather than send them to a landfill in the US on the global trail of America's plastic and e waste. That's on the show tomorrow. You're listening to the world. I'm Marco werman in Antarctica, scientists are visualizing the sea floor like never before it changes the of the massive, no one has ever seen that candidate Doug before. And I've been blind on my life. And now I've put on glasses what that tells us about climate change still ahead here on the world. I'm Marco werman, and this is the world. We're a co production of the BBC World Service, PRI and WG be h here in Boston. Gathering sound underwater will always yield interesting results as the world's Caroline Baylor can attest that.

America BBC World Service Marco werman medical reserve corps southeast Asia Caroline Baylor Monica Campbell Las Cruces New Mexico Patrick Adams Antarctica reporter Boston Thailand Doug Malaysia Indonesia three months
"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"patrick win" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Iran spent fourteen point five billion dollars on its cherry Israel spent two billion more than that. And compare those two countries to Saudi Arabia. This is Saudi Arabia's military spending from two thousand seventeen. How long is this going to go on about thirty seconds while it's seventy measures long the Saudi spent seventy billion dollars in two thousand seventeen. Well, Steven Snyder, counting weapons in the Middle East sonically up before you go Stephen if we use at Jimi Hendrix sound to represent the US military budget, then how long would apply in two thousand seventeen the US spent seven hundred billion dollars go on for about five minutes. I love Jimi Hendrix. But even that. The will save insider. Thank you. This is really good, Hoppy, really understand it. Thanks mirka. If you've heard anything about state and western Myanmar. It's probably that is the home of the ethnic row hinder or it used to be me and Mars military has waged a brutal campaign to purge Rohani Muslims from their homeland the UN has called it ethnic cleansing. There's also a rebel uprising in the same area. So why are and mar officials now telling the world that kind is an investor's dream worlds. Patrick win takes a look do you have millions of dollars. Are you looking to invest somewhere unique? Well, the political leader of Myanmar Aung San Suu Chee she says, look, no further than recline state brimming with opportunities and warm and friendly people are eager to be part of the development adventure. It's an area about the size of Switzerland. Only. It's by the sea, pretty humid with lots of jungle and the power is always going out that fancy cheese says, don't worry. It's still a good place to Bill. Resorts or factories. She said this in a speech to investors from China and South Korea and Japan all over and she focused on reclined pristine beaches and its ancient temples built more than five centuries ago by the locals Buddhist who call themselves, the Arakan people this religious complex of astounding beauty is a gem that has yet to be revealed to the world yet anyone who Google's recline. We'll see. She's glossing over huge problems problems. She alludes to only briefly by blaming outsiders. The international community's attention has been focused narrowly on negative aspects related to problems in also kind Roth. Okay, stop north Rakhine. That is the home of the Rohingya one of the most persecuted groups in the world and negative aspects refers to soldiers brutally driving them from their villages into Bangladesh. The country next door back to the speech rather than on the panel. Rama's picture that shows immense potential of this.

Saudi Arabia Jimi Hendrix Myanmar Aung San Suu Chee US Myanmar Iran Steven Snyder Israel UN Middle East Switzerland Roth Bangladesh Rama Stephen Rakhine Rohingya Patrick Google Arakan