19 Burst results for "Patrick Brown"

"patrick brown" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

11:37 min | 8 months ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Percent off with free shipping and man's scape dot com and use code verge so that's the curve even on with the Burger which I've had very good at at tried Pork slaughter that's sort of the next big one. What is the difference developing the pork product? What did he have to change? What did you learn? What's the what's the key difference? People SHOULD UNDERSTAND OKAY. So so people often setting loving too critical thing for our existing. You know ground beef product team and I guess if you had to rank the things that we learned in our innovations that would still be on the top list but obviously that alone isn't me. It doesn't tell the problem. There's every every me from every animal contains human and in every case it's an important part of the flavor chemistry but they all taste different. And and the Texans are also different even from ground product ground ground beef and mafia and so forth. So what are the differences? Well okay concentration of lower pork. There are other differences in the flavor. Chemistry the chemistry is insane. Fundamentally it's all the same chemistry in different meads but the proportions of different molecules that participate in that. Chemistry vary from species to species particularly the in the fats. So that's a that's a difference. Then the texture is different. The people described part of Newton lead from animal in a million years. So I'm not the expert fossil. Be People who who who who are experts on you know the century experience but basically has sort of springer texture and more fatty outfielder and so forth. So they're a bunch of things that we needed to do differently for park or those. Just levers you pull and sort of production to get there is there. Is there a big chain needs to make? How does that actually work? What's the sort of mechanics of saying we're going to go after pork? No well it really depends on the on the product and I would say the chances are substantial enough that we can't just swap it in but on the other hand one of the things that we did early on because of the we knew to achieve our mission we need to have a production process. That was simple enough. Didn't require any highly customized equipment. You know basically be good. Plunge in food production equipment that was already produced enough scale and then like I say ingredients that were scale and so forth so the production process. uses equipment that sufficiently already widely available that for example most of our ground beef product production is is is being done by co-manufacture again. It's using equipment. That's mostly the same equipment that they use to produce ground beef from a cow so they're not the biggest producers of Conrad Ground Beef for the fast food market and our process was deliberately designed to be adaptable to existing scaled food production equipment so that that would be an obstacle to our few tar ability to scale. So when you decide we're going to go into the pork market. What were what were the steps before launch. What did he have to do well? We haven't watched that product commercially yet. That's that's something pending for later in the year. We did kind of a sneak preview at a CIS just to kind of show the world that this is coming. Get your orders in now. But what are the steps in launching it raw? Before we launch a product we first of all developing prototyping lab scale. Then we do test runs pilot scale then. We have to make sure that anytime. We make a change in ingredients or process or something like that. We have to make sure it doesn't affect shelf life so that's a long lifetime because obviously was shelf life to be many months which means it takes many months to make sure that you have many months shelf lives and then we have to make sure that the scaling principles that worked for ground beef worked for down part in terms of the physical forces in. There's when you go when you scale manufacturing of stuff there are complicated scaling rules that engineers know about and so forth. But you can't take it for granted so we do. Then we scale up to production scale. Make sure that that works. We do a lot of consumer testing to make sure that the product from the sensory perspective for consumers is delivering tar standards and so forth. So one thing. I want to ask you about that with the pork in particular. I feel like this wasn't as controversial on the B side but I've heard a lot of pork producers. Say Well you shouldn't be able to call the sport right in like now. The dairy industry is saying we shouldn't call nut milks milk. I know you're kind of passionate about this but the idea from the traditional agricultural suppliers that we shouldn't call plant based replacements for meet. Various kinds of meat is more prevalent than it. I think it used to be. How are you feeling about that? Well okay the reason. They feel threatened and weren't complaining before it is that for a mediator until impossible foods basically came along the products that were based products around. The market were sufficiently inferior from the perspective of meteors. That they were not meaningful threat. In fact I would just say that there was no such thing. Nothing that deserved to be called plant based meat was on the market. There were plant based products that were Veggie burgers and stuff like that but they were not legitimate pint base meet in the sense that A blinded consumer would recognize them as meat and and not only recognize them as meat but recognize him as a very delicious version of the mead. Once that happened the incumbent industry realized that there was an existential threat on their doorstep which we are and and we're coming through so that's why I think that there's been this huge uptick in Angst and sort of lobbying information from the industry. But here's the thing about naming. When digital cameras came along right it was common sense to still call them cameras. They didn't call him something new. It was just a better version of the perform. The same function only did a better job of it. As the previous technology we have done a lot of consumer research that basically tells us something incredibly important for this whole story which is that meat lovers. Viner's loving author meet. They're not going to be persuaded to eliminate it from their diet or even by large reduce consumption. There are going to keep eating it. They like it because it's delicious. They like it because a good source of protein in iron accessible affordable familiar blah blah blah blah blah. They don't like the way it's made and that's true across the board. It's virtually unanimous vote. Mediators is not part of the value proposition that your meat comes from the carcass of a dead animal. Okay with all the backstory to how it was produced with all the same sanitation problems in the mid system with all the public health issues and welfare issues. The environmental catastrophe meat lovers do not love that. Okay they they love their meat in spite of the way it's made not because of the way it's made well that means is that meat to meet consumer is defined by the sensory pleasures the nutritional value the cooking. Behavior that familiarity affordability. And the way it's made is something that they try to think about as little as possible. Okay so what that means. Is that for us to call our product. Mead who's actually just reflecting consumer perceptions I e if there's a food that tastes like meat that delivers the nutritional value of meat that has the versatility and and performance of meat than to a consumer. It's easily slots in his knee just like a digital camera slots in to the place previously occupied by film camera so we have no qualms about calling it meet because it is neat. It's just meet made a better way and frankly you know if it comes down to it. We're not worried about the whole naming issue. We could call. It can want as long as consumers you could find. It will be fine but it's much better For the consumers as long as we're us for us to put it in your salad alongside meat because the consumers that have the most to gain from it are people who are currently shopping for animal basement and like I said our research has shown US something. I it's incredibly important to understand. Which is that almost all meat lovers around the country and globally would prefer that there may be made without using animals and directly from plants. They would prefer that as long as it delivered the deliciousness. The protein iron the things that they value if you if you deliver that meat lovers would prefer to be made from plants and Corey of. That is that we would be doing ourselves a disservice. If we didn't boldly advertise that this product is made from plants. We want consumers. It's an are absolutely in our interest to make it perfectly clear to consumers that this product does not come from the corpse of a cow right. So you're not causing any confusion there. We don't want to cause confusion because it would cost us because we know that meat lovers would prefer that there may be made directly from plant as long as it delivers deliciousness. So this kind of this is a big of a question but go with me on it right now. You're in the business of Substitutes you're substituting for ground beef. You're a better product. Do you think it's better for the environment? You think it tastes just as good doing it with pork. You could make a novel meet right. Is that something you've thought about making something completely different than any other meat? That's currently on the market. Of course is that something right now you just want to take over substitutes and then make something new. It's something that's been on our mind. And obviously in the course of learning about the Flavor Chemistry and textures beat and so forth. We know quite a lot about the the difference between pork and beef and other meats from animals ser so to speak where you set the knobs with respect the flavored chemistry we can navigate that whole space we can create things that would be unmistakably. Leave Music Flavor and texture. But unlike anything that you've had before in that category because after all the choices of meat that are available in the world today are basically a historical artifact of the species that people were able to domesticate. You know ten thousand years ago. And they weren't chosen because they were the most delicious animals on Earth. They were chosen because they were capable of being domesticated. And that's what you get so yes. There's a lot of possibility for creating. Let's say flavors that would deliver a as meat butter on like anything on the market? Why haven't we done that because it gets back to our mission a sale to US has value from mission standpoint? Only if it comes at the expense of the sale of an animal drive product. Okay and the best way for us to kind of right now with our current state of you know a lot of people don't even know about us. Barely learning buys the simplest thing to do to make the maximize the chance that are sale cost of sale to the animal drive. Meat Industry is to very deliberately occupy the same niche. So that if you're.

US Meat Industry Pork Viner Mead
"patrick brown" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:22 min | 8 months ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Audio format. You do can't do anything. Sony can't go to the bathroom without doing it. Proprietary Three D audio format. That's all they know how to do when they when they spin up. The new can ban board for making a new thing. It auto populates three audio format built into the development template at Sony Right. I'm very excited to listen to the one like Santana Song that they ever released in this format. It will sound amazing. I'm sure that's great. All right we got to wrap this up. Thank you everybody for listening. I'm confident that maybe listeners have heard my child screaming and running around in the background. Because that's what happening. Thank you for putting up with a little difference in audio. Quality is where we're going through this at this time. I appreciate it appreciate sticking with us. I hope that we're able to provide some entertainment. You can tweet at us. I'm at reckless. Dinner is back on Paul's future. Paul were available when we're not going anywhere it's like hit us up. Let us know what you want to talk about. Who you want us to have on the The interview shows speaking show on Tuesday. The CEO of impossible foods Patrick Brown. There's actually conversation he's a he's a really interesting did and we're gonNA keep going keep going. We're GONNA power through this so yeah. Let's talk to US tweeted next week. Rock and Roll Paul Bronco Report if there was a spreadable cook bowl eligible plant face butter. That was better for your body and the planet. What would you make with it but our cookies butter pie? That's the thing by the way whatever it is country crock plant butter makes it happen and bakes delicious country Crock. Plant butter is so tasty. Even butter lovers love it. You can use it as a one to one substitute for dairy butter in all of your favorite recipes and enjoy it knowing it has twenty five percent less saturated fat than regular old.

Sony Paul Patrick Brown CEO
What to Expect from CES 2020

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 11 months ago

What to Expect from CES 2020

"The consumer electronic show doesn't seem to be the venue you'd expect but impossible foods is promising it will reveal big menu related news at the show next week impossible foods and it's full meat products will be highlighted there the CEO Patrick brown has ruled out an IPO in the near term rival beyond meets has seen its shares soar at least two hundred percent since

CEO Patrick Brown
"patrick brown" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

10:58 min | 1 year ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"United States that <hes> if if it's a picture that would upset was having breakfast while they read in the newspaper you win publish it but I think that that image and some of the images that you made of children that who who died represent images that not only need to be taken but should also be seen but I know that you've that you yourself at times had felt reluctance about shooting the images and putting putting your mom there. Can you talk to me a little bit about that yeah some I think let's let's break this down. The picture that you're mentioning is is not a bad picture. It's a picture of bad things. Let's it's just clarify that it's not the photographer as done that. It's not the newspaper that it's done that. They haven't set out to do this. This is a consequences of actions that are well beyond the photographer or the the media and I do really believe that people should know about this. This is important. If this was an accident in somebody's house or safety on the road. We have a right to know as a public. We have a ride. I tonight and these deaths are they could have been avoided that that's the thing these these are not listen all natural disasters but there were a disaster in Iraq these avoidable deaths and if it annoys you if it upsets you while having breakfast right to you congressman take action. Don't shoot the Messenger and I always find that interesting where it's always the photographers fault for showing you something that is evil all the stand up you have you we have something that is one of the most precious things and is becoming more and more precious as time goes on and that we have a democracy ossie. We have the capacity to vote. We have a voice and if you don't like what is happening vote differently don't shoot the Messenger. It's always easy to shoot the missing you. That's that's the easy shot to sit down and think about why this has happened to the history behind these incidents. That's when it becomes. It's not a sound bite. It's you need to one needs to know the the the history the street and need to know the knowledge of that subject matter and I think that the time that we live in the moment democracy is something that is really. It's IT'S ON A. I don't think the scales are really balanced on one one of the things that are really appreciated during your presentation was was the whole idea that of why you do what you do and it wasn't really to save the world or anything like that but to really see your workers as a catalyst for people to take some action themselves whether it's to educate themselves more about it or to write their congressman or to protest or to donate money to a cause it in support of the issue and I think that that's was <music> a great way of describing the reason why you and many other photographers do this kind of work because I think people too often think oh there's nothing there's nothing that I can do and I think your work challenges that mindset that there's nothing that they can do because they're not powerful politicians or whatever the case may case may be. Did you come to that. Ah Understanding of of how you wanted your work to be seen and how you wanted it to impact people was that did that exists from the very beginning or did that come just as you you had a variety of different experiences where you were seeing what was happening in the world and witnessing with your camera and feeling like I need to have a way of understanding what and why I'm doing it. It's a multitude of things and I think it comes back to my my youth. My I come from a Maga factor in the in the eighty s in the ninety s or the eighty s you know I think let's let's Dolly back even further <hes> I I hate bullies. I really that's one thing it's my I do not like a bully. I like some of the to stand for something and I am I. I may agree with him. I may disagree with them but one thing highly dislike is a bullying and bullies coming all different forms you know just like everything else and I think that's where the seed was planted for me when I was a young boy and they used to be a bully oh now street who bullied kids and an a thing that injustice that happened when I was a young boy playing street football street cricket and he was always a nasty piece of these gyco Gary I think that's where the seed was planted for me. Five sport you know and Oh come through to where I am today with. I'm in a very lucky position. I'm able to go to into situations such as this and be able to document and show the world hopefully to show the world but I'm also have the. I have the ability ready to you know I have a democracy. I have running water have electricity. I'm in a very very treasured position in life from for a lot of people and I would my mom once said to me once. This is no dress rehearsal. This is going to live on all channels twenty four hours a day and that sort of resonated with me when I was a young man and I think you and I I want to do my best and this is what i WanNa do this. This is how why I see the world and I enjoy what I do. Even though it sounds sounds a little bit morbid enjoy meeting people photography's an incredible vehicle. It's a visa or the passport passports multiple worlds and realities that I can go in and out but at the heart of that the restore grounding essence that there is there is things that are happening in the planet that people I need to know about and my job is on my I see my role in this is to show people. I don't tell I don't think I tell people what they should look at ice blade out in front of them and let them make the decision and let them stop the sation. Let that the big Oh we talk about this as an entity hopefully I'm. I'm a very small gear and <hes> you know in a much bigger gearbox will that we live in. Hopefully I'll add something to that. I don't know if I will tell them. That's my take on your initial forays in the photography involved some street photography dance photography but it was newspaper article that you saw a doctor you're working in Malawi that served as a big catalyst and it'll pivotal moment in your careers as a photographer and you know where you ended up traveling to Africa selling your car or selling your surfboard to photograph this doctors work in in in this country to tell me about where you were at that point of your life and why you made such a huge leap in terms of where you were to traveling halfway around the world to make photographs well yeah it was it was a very pivotal nine hundred my career. I come to personally realize that you an image which can actually make a difference to what degree that we can always be can debate that backwards and forwards but when I came back from Malawi I realized that an image images can change people's lives. Let's dial L. Back even further than that I was working in a multi-storey Compaq and I was at a toll booth the person that you people will give money to give their ticket to and I would take the change and no press the button to lose the boom gate leave and that was I was making ends meet and putting myself through night school and and <hes> throughout school we've the money from this <hes> working in a multi-storey cop and he was an awful job but Sunday mornings. This is dead time. He doesn't really start going anyway so it used to just walk around the cow pie with my camera why would be studying photography books and things for me to take a big leap across as you described it to go to Malawi Film Carsoup for the moment when black and white T._v. and take twenty six rolls of black and white and twenty eight rolls of color. I think wasn't such a big leap for me because my I've traveled all my life I grew up a little bit in the Middle East Five Oh man <hes> of growing up in <hes> South Africa playschool trae hit and a little bit in Canada and they'd been to Nicole place and my family finally settled in the Australian when I was thirteen. I lived at a suitcase until I was. I didn't have a wardrobe. My first wardrobe ever had was when I was sixteen so for me. It's it's not it wasn't such a big leap psychologically and now looking back Jack it may be once and not a psychological leap but it was definitely a late and I'm going to tell you take another phrase but my mom the night I was getting my camera gear. At in you know getting my piles of bits and pieces aces on the floor in the house and I said to my mom said you know the worst thing you can do is not go is not leave and never really understood that at that time and I just shook it off but she was right. The worst thing that could have done is no actually actually leave and it stayed regretted not going even if it didn't work out even if I never got to see this doctor I never never met him all those sorts of things and she said but what's worse that's going to happen you. I don't have a bumpy landing. You might fall into your ankles. You know in a metaphorical way. You're GONNA come home. It's not going to the end of the world and I think that mentality is always stay with me. It's the worst thing that can happen. Is You. Stay put keep moving. Keep saying that what will keep meeting. People keep evolving as an individual through the end of this.

congressman Malawi United States Malawi Film Carsoup cricket Compaq Iraq Africa Middle East Gary Jack Nicole place South Africa Canada twenty four hours
"patrick brown" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

15:21 min | 1 year ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"And welcome back to the candidate frame <music> all right. Hey we finally got this worked out and just keep my fingers crossed but it's good to talk to you again. Yeah it is. It's very nice to have a chat and catch up and see how you guy so you've been. You've been traveling a lot since I saw you yeah. I went back to New York after sewing you so you in D._C.. I did a couple of tokes there then came back to Thailand and then I don't think four days and there was straight into Bangladesh Russian and here I am I'm still hearing alone is typical for your for for life to be even out all the time. It has been a number of years yeah. It's you know get get a week. I think the longest I've suspension Abedin is fifteen days in one bed in the last eighteen months in the same bed must be demanding considering the kind of work that you've been doing recently. That's demanding in and of itself but living out of suitcase just compounds how humanity curious of try and get as much sleep as I can try and have too many hangovers and and just just try to keep focused you know try and keep it keep it simple and duncairn complicated with life in that sense yeah. What is your in Bangladesh right now doing some work that's tied with the work in your most recent book no place on Earth about the Linga yes crisis? Why don't we start there? Since you're you're there right now and if you could start with just a I guess a basic primer of the circumstances that you've been photographing for the last two years come back. This is the two T._A.. Michael It will August <hes> Twenty August the twenty fifth will technically the the two year on here to to revisit to reconnect with people. I met two years ago. See whether lives are saved by lives changed for the better and luckily I can report that it has just to see where this Ark. This trajectory of people's lives are going after such tragedy is going into the into the recent couldn't live and one. I'm seeing is yes. Things have gotten better there now. They have got some peace. They're able for the first time to have some freedom of speech. They're able to get together in groups and talk and discuss discussion. This is the ring oracles and work out things in their own pace which they were never able to do in bank in they were never able to to get together in groups but I'm also seeing frustration now that eh they're having concerns about education that these nine hundred thousand people who basically we've out work. We've had a future and so this disenchanted disconnected wanted. Minority is slowly coming to the surface so they've gone from one insecurity to another insecurity which is it's <hes>. I think this long-term projection of where the Ranga will be it is still an untold story nonsense. After seeing your presentation giving the book I made it a point to read up more on it because he'd been sort of in my in my cursory sphere so I kind of knew little about it but you wanted to find out more after seeing your your presentation and you can correct me if I'm wrong but my understanding of it is that the Ringa have existed and in Myanmar for for for generations generations and they hit initially <hes> immigrated from another country which was it that was the the Bangladesh oh it wasn't Bangladesh in those days it was it at a different name but yet if this has been going on for a century ensure yeah the the contemporary crisis regarding Bangladesh and the radio and the and the Ranga started in basically early seventies any progressively has got more and more intense and over the years and they've been pushed out Burma and then they come back in to Bangladesh and then come back to Buna and each time they've gone back they've had more and more of that civil liberties cheese eroded so every time they were pushed out they the the knees take something often and then they would go back and and it's come down to the point where they're now <hes> stateless they made them belong to anybody and that's this is a situation where amount even though they have been there for generations and generations the Vermes don't want to consider them as Burmese part of which is is because of the religion that they practice. Is that right yeah. That's that's it's true. It's <hes> Ben he's done even use the Wood Ringa in any conversation regarding the the ring they call them and galleys so even even the distinctive trying to you know show them as a minority. The standalone minority is not happening within the dialogue within Burma so that causes all sorts of headaches because they don't see themselves the ring don't I don't see themselves as Bangladesh's. They definitely they don't want to stay here. They don't want to live in <hes> in Bangladesh. They they see boom Os their homeland they want to they want to be taught Burmese. They don't want to be told Bengali so you you can not see this clash this head on clash with them with them and with the Burmese the religion does have a lot to do you were seeing that this has been going on at least in its current manifestation during during the seventies but what what was the catalyst for the you know for for the violence and the massacring the basically the genocide of these people over the last two years it was a build up. I mean something like this doesn't in this <hes> this systematic approach to to ethnic cleansing doesn't just happen overnight it. It's very full tout will executed plan so it slowly can building up. I'm probably not the best person to give you the title breakdown of the time line with it but you've gone from a nation that didn't have freedom of speech and it was a very closed society. Citing this is talking about <hes> on me Emma then democracy arrived and suddenly people had freedom of speech now. There's a situation in in Burma which was called. It's got a nickname. I'm the saffron revolution monks took to the streets of Rangoon protested about the price of cooking oil which cooking all jumped up by a huge amount and people couldn't afford to actually cook oil cooking all is a very interest politics Burmese food and the government realized this animosity and anger that was in society was directed towards the military and which is the government at the time still as to some degree and the from that moment homeless they turn that on animosity and anger around and focused on minority that nobody was really worried about. We've in internally we've guiding so this minority then suddenly go all the energy and that was the Muslims that's really complicated. The Muslims were brute generally speaking with brought to Burma by the British and the second Komo Wall and prior to that to use them they did all trading the British military tool the trading with the Muslims and by doing so to de stabilize the middle class the power structure within Burma <hes> so if you were able to destabilize the middle class I stopped the money you would then have power over the nation so this dates were right back to when the British colonial powers came to very very complex cocktail things that spread over you know hundreds of years fast forward to the Internet hate speech anger and it's there's a lot of evidence points towards facebook doc that have a lot to do this hate speech any started to ferment and start to grow and repair of a few years we saw a lot of animosity towards the ringer and slowly Orleans slowly and slowly they were depending they they had to demolish the fences around the houses farming tools were confiscated and then the the militia the gangs the Buddhist gangs and started to attack people and that was I think it was eighteen months prior to August two thousand seventeen. They was <hes> an attack on a Muslim section of a village <hes> that <hes> incited more hatred and then move forward and over eighteen months to two always two thousand seventeen and then they shoot attack took place which was a military totally systematic organized as the Burmese military call it cleansing operation but I just want to say this is this type of behavior has been going on for a long time in the we've been minorities righties. What makes this different? I'm talking the West. The West in the western situation kind is similar to what's happening on the eastern borders in the Novum borders with China and Thailand with all the minorities but what's different in this particular cases the pure scale of it and the organ the systematic approach to this particular one and that's where we are today. I think the numbers are over. Seven hundred or eight hundred thousand Hindu have had to if of flee Burma and now in Bangladesh of the countries is it yeah that's true the numbers a slightly changed. We are now getting figures of one point one one point two million add flavor that fled from over two thousand seventeen when you realize that this was a story that you wanted to tell unlike other conflicts you weren't you know the press wasn't allowed to come into Burma in to photograph this so you were largely in other photographers photographing these sort of the the outcome outside of that country's borders tell us about the challenges you faced in terms of negotiating negoti all all of that because it was really just a lot of insanity and unpredictability going on that was one of the most difficult parts of this this work was we were the journalistic community and they we you would photographing goal documenting the consequences of actions so we never got to actually photograph the action and I in most civil unrest there is usually one one two photographers wanted to cameron or journalists are able to get into these war zones and you know give us some insights. I'm independent perspective on what was happening but we're kind state was totally locked down so all the information we got was was the evidence Bhagat was oversee the physical injuries scarring the people had and the testimonies and that's why in the book I the US Children's drawings what took place because we didn't have any we didn't have any visuals of why these people fleeing what are they fleeing from. It wasn't until late two that mobile footage mobile phone footage. She came out to mobile phone images came out so the children's drawings to me <hes> really important because they yes they are children's drawings and you take that with a pinch of salt in the sense of the view of what's actually <unk> happening but these are still people and they stole these locked into people's memories so it was the it was the the collective memory of what had happened there and this is done by eight year olds to up to to fourteen year olds at the joint in the book and when you look at those images the veil they're scary they all. It looks like the worst horror new looks like something Stephen King couldn't even think of and you being <hes> I personally witnessed to people who lost their lives trying to to escape men women children. It must have been credibly devastating to to to be seeing that in the scale that you were seeing in yet still having to use your camera to create evidence of of what was happening well. That's my job. That's my job yeah it. It's what I set out to do and I set out to document was taking place. I wanted the world I think I needed the world to some degree to know about this. This is not what I do for live in isn't a want I I need to clarify that. This is a need I need to do this to make me you know who I am very important for me to be doing this type of work <hes> yes there is the selfish and there is no personal ambitions but the the underlying elemental is I think it's the need for the will to see these things and lie my vehicle to be best. Portray will tell the stories for visual mechanism photography and the visual literacy that I'm able to bring to something like this is my skill all set in the past week here in the United States. <hes> there was some controversy about an image that was published of a man and his child who drowned while they were trying to cross the the Rio Grande River and some people thought that it's something that shouldn't be published and the New York Times actually had it on their front page front page cover and I was reading an essay by I someone today who was saying that sometimes the morality of an issue supersedes the taste that may have been so commonly accepted they have to test for a test for the longest time the breakfast test here in the United.

Bangladesh Myanmar Thailand New York D._C Rangoon Abedin New York Times Wood Ringa Michael Rio Grande River Stephen King facebook Emma US United States. Komo Wall Bhagat
How ugly will Canadas 2019 election get?

The Big Story

09:16 min | 2 years ago

How ugly will Canadas 2019 election get?

"End. Up next so schedule Indians are going to make a larger rebate than on Tehran's. Are I get that it has to do with how fuel intensive the local economy is, but that's we real hard to explain to the people who are getting less of a rebate. There's a traitor in all of us direct invest with Scotia. I trade become a new client, and you could get up to fifteen hundred dollars cash or three hundred free trades when you open and fund a new account conditions apply. See Scotia trade dot com for details. The carbon tax is a really interesting issue to me because you would think it would split down the lines of well, we have to do something about climate change. But I'm more interested in if it splits down party lines like is this something that we're seeing conservatives lineup against because I know some conservatives have run on platforms for carbon taxes, we went through an interesting moment is a country where the conservative leader of the largest province Patrick Brown. When he was leading the on -tario conservatives was going to accept the arguments for carbon taxation was going to cooperate with federal efforts on the matter and then use the revenues to pay for the rest of his platform. And and and every conservative Ontario, said sure like fine. Whatever will, you know. It's a little weird. We're not used to being pro carbon-tax. But he he's leader at off we go. And then when he was elected from the party for very much, different reasons, he was replaced by a leadership campaign where every single candidate rejected his vision of the carbon plan and a lot of people who were. Willing to run. So, you know, rod Phillips, the the environment ministry around -tario is an old acquaintance of mine. He was perfectly happy to run as a candidate for Patrick Brown. He was essentially recruited by Patrick Brown is a candidate to run on a platform that included carbon taxes now, he's the environment minister of Ontario. He's taking the feds to court, and he is he canceling cap and trade carbon tax every effective measure to reduce emissions. How you and something like that? There's a lot in politics that resembles sports more than it resembles philosophy. And if you're if you're wearing the blue jersey, then you're going to do with the blue jersey says an an and if that changes than than I found people be remarkably agile, he's a conservative because this is this is what being a conservative means this year. Yeah. Does that cost you later on because that's something that's gonna come back. Come back on them so blatant. Yeah. I have to say that it. Sure, not guaranteed the cost you. I mean every federal liberal in the country was against free trade in. In nineteen eighty eight. And then all for it by nineteen Ninety-three, right? When an McClellan was the Justice minister of Canada, she stood up in the house of Commons and promised the Canadian people that extending same-sex benefits as part of the public sector employees working conditions would not lead to gay marriage in Canada. She said, look, we're not this. Nobody's talking about gay marriage. And then four years later they were talking about gay marriage. And and McClellan was fine with it. You know, politics often doesn't involve a sort of a stately and orderly evolution towards a higher level of of of Justice in awareness. It often just involves swallowing yourself whole and hoping that nobody notices that's a good way to put it as we get into the actual campaign, which starts in January. How important is it going to be for the liberal party to kind of articulate the message that that you said is working for them on the carbon tax, but you kind of have to explain it. And I wonder if as the campaign starts and kind of slogans get shorter and punchier. And simpler, if we have any idea if they're going to be able to do that I for one very curious to see how this works out. Look in some ways, the the liberal planets simplicity itself, if you burn fuel you will pay a tax that is assessed based on scientists best guess about about how much carbon you're putting into the air. And it's the same as a gasoline tax that we pay now it's the same as all sorts of consumption taxes taxes for smoking, and so on and then the the extra little bit of it is the revenues that are raised in a province from that tax ninety percent of them. Go back to people to individuals through the income tax system. And because that includes revenues that are raised from business, but don't go back to business the revenues that are raised from business. Also, go to individuals most people are going to get more in rebates than they paid out in carbon taxes up mostly at the at the at the gas pump and on their fuel bills. And I think that's a pretty basically easy thing for people to understand. But there's a there's a lot of weird kind of quirks to it. I if you live in one province your rebate is bigger than if you. Live in another. So Cisco Indians are going to make a larger rebate than on Tehran's. Are I get that? It has to do with how fuel intensive the local economy is, but that's we real hard to explain to the people who are getting less of a rebate. It's not even obvious to someone who lives in gap. No on the, you know, ten miles from parliament hill on the Quebec side why they're not getting any rebate at all. But somebody lives on the interior side is and you can say, well, it's kind of obvious it's because Quebec is cooperating with the carbon tax Ontario's fighting against it. So that the feds have to set up their own, gene. But look already I'm I'm a couple blocks down the road. So that was gonna stop complex explanations of complexity that are not easy to use as a rebuttal to simple things. Like, why are they taxing every time? We get in our car. You know? Yeah. Why does Joe get a better rebate than Jane? This is not going to be an easy argument to win. It seems to me. I would we talk to you back in in August or early September about Hamish Marshall, you told us kind of the thought carbon tax was going to be. V hill that this election would be fought on you still think that. Yeah. Certainly one of the big ones both sides can imagine a situation where it's not in their interest to talk about this all the time. I'm struck by how few public comments, Catherine McKenna. The environment minister has made Ian detailed defense of this plan and of the philosophy behind it. She tweets a lot of feel good stuff on Twitter, but she's not easy to get an interview with and often in the interview, she doesn't say a lot. So the the liberals plainly think that they win they're likely to win on this. If they don't tire people out by always talking ear off about it. And similarly, I can imagine the conservative saying, you know, we can get these guys on general taxes taxation on general cost of living on affordability on not getting along. With our American cousins, there's a million issues that they can go after the the the the liberals on that may be cleaner lines of attack. But I just think it's in these people the the liberals believe themselves to be the party of climate virtue. And the conservatives be. Believe themselves to be the only people who understand the real nature of Canada as a resource producing center. And I don't think they'll be able to. I don't think I don't think MIR tactics will be enough to keep them from resisting going at each other hammer and Tong on this. I just think they can't resist a fight on this issue. I've heard that the election campaign itself is going to be nasty, but honestly going at each other hammering tongs over the merits of a carbon tax seems like a pretty civil disagreement. Do you have a sense as we head into twenty nineteen? How nasty the campaign will be. I think they're always pretty nasty. I mean, I it's interesting, George W George H W Bush, the elder of the two Bush presidents just passed away. And I read all of the eulogies that said he was such a gentleman in such a fine fellow right? I remember the the nineteen eighty eight presidential election, the one that he ended up winning when he succeeded from Ronald Reagan, and he ran against Michael Dukakis who was an academic who is a very ineffective fellow. And that campaign got so nasty about prison. Furloughs for convicted, rapists. And and and now long forgotten issues since then that Newsweek magazine had a cover illustration drawn by Garry Trudeau who was the the guy who did Doonesbury showing Bush Dukakis, mud fighting mud wrestling, you know, and with Bush's cartoon hands curled around dukakis's throat campaigns are always way nastier than we think failed. The it's it's become a bit of a cliche on parliament hill before every campaign. Everyone says well, this one's going to be very orderly. And you know, we can predict how this is going to happen. And then somebody in power starts to lose or somebody. Who's got a shot at power starts to see it slip away from them. And this is their entire career. The stakes are so high that look I've never seen a boring campaign because I don't think I don't think the people in it can afford to have the boring, and they're so convinced that the other side is wrong for the country that the that each side feels permitted to say just anything about the other side. And so there's no self restraint. And I'm not sure this next campaign is going to be worse than any of those. But you know, we always kid ourselves that they're going to be really straightforward and. They always turn out to be just the damnedest thing you ever. So that's one reason why I stay in this game. Thanks, paul. You. Welcome. Paul senior writer for Maclean's based on parliament hill. That was the big story brought to you by Scotia. I trade you can visit Scotia I trade dot com to start direct investing today, and you can visit the big story podcast dot CA. If you want more big stories, you can also contact us. They are suggest a story idea or just tell us what we're doing wrong. He can also do that on social media, but not in public, please. The at big story podcast on Twitter on Facebook on Instagram. And we are everywhere you get your podcasts, apple Google, Stitcher. Spotify wherever please rate, please review. Hello friend. I'm jordan. He throwing thanks for listening. We'll talk tomorrow.

Parliament Hill Patrick Brown Ontario Scotia Canada Tehran Twitter Michael Dukakis George W George H W Bush Blue Jersey Mcclellan Quebec Rod Phillips Hamish Marshall Spotify
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It has been a bumpy. He year for the former leader of the Progressive Conservatives Patrick Brown in January. He looked set to sail into the premier seat here in Ontario. See TV news story described allegations of sexual misconduct by Mr Brown against two women. Mr Brown denies those allegations, but was made to step down as leader. And then on Monday, Patrick Brown was elected mayor of Brampton Ontario, the period in between had been a roller coaster as Mr Brown failed to get his old job back and then sought a new home and on politics a metro morning hosts, Matt Galloway summarize the ride in an interview with Mr Brown this morning. Here's the last night months for you. You went from being the Progressive Conservative leader to the former leader to a Progressive Conservative candidate to a former candidate to the pil- chair candidate that. He'll chair candidacy was cancelled. And now, you're the mayor of Brampton, how'd you describe the last nine months in your political career? It's almost like it could be a movie. Obviously I'd say a lot of opposition from party over the last year. And you know, I you know in the face of adversity when you get knocked down you get back up. And that's exactly what I did. And I have to say to support the how decent. How generous that people Branson have been has just been incredible. You know, as I went door to door. I went to vent to vent people really gave me the courage and energy to keep on going. You also arrived still under the cloud of sexual misconduct allegations against you. You're suing see TV for defamation for reporting those you've denied this. Do you think that the two women who made those accusations are lying? So I wouldn't was false allegations on anyone. Worst on my worst enemy, and so those I'm I'm sure there was a political angle to this. How people were convinced or cajoled to make up false stories. But I think it became very clear in the weeks afterwards while the socks completely fell apart that that that they were fictitious stories have the allegations by the women been withdrawn so eight. And I don't wanna go into pass. But but all the people that made the false allegations disappeared in some cases sent sent out of the country. And so, but having said that I I don't want to get into those details they was all this league political attack job in ATV's going to have to defend that and that is before the courts. And so I have to be careful not to get geeky eight get too much into those details, but there's a reason there's eight million dollar defamation lawsuit for what was very sloppy journalism. The fact sports tell the parts so quickly shows that they could've easily been fact checked having said that I want to stress my focus now is not is not going backwards. My focus is entirely on getting Brampton back on track. And I'm gonna work dandy out to make sure it is. That was part of an interview with them Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown on CBC Toronto's metro morning earlier today and again on Monday, Mr Brown was elected mayor of. Brampton Ontario, which is about an hour north west of Toronto..

Patrick Brown Brampton Brampton Ontario Ontario pil Branson Matt Galloway Toronto eight million dollar nine months
"patrick brown" Discussed on Stick to Football

Stick to Football

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on Stick to Football

"I'm a i'm a chip in dip person like i doubt give me some french dealt with some ruffles chips salsa chips akeso i think that's the way to do it just try to go like for variety not let's do steaks and eighty dollars bourbon just get a much cores light jannati light and a bunch of like trash food like soft pretzels and stuff and and that that way and the easy new york new jersey way that we always do is just order a bunch of pies every time you get a couple of pizza pies whether it's the fantasy draft whether it's a super bowl that doesn't have unlimited amounts aaa pizza kind of makes everyone content and i don't wanna say sobers everyone up but makes them you know somewhat respectable so all right good question for mike this next one from patrick brown do you see the patriots moving up in the draft and if so who would they trade up for my simple answer is no they just can't i don't see them moving up in this draft for one of the top four quarterbacks the i'm with you i'm the same i know everyone's like oh they a trade trade up this roster is not as good as they make it look they need to retool they've been aggressive and free agency but they still have to address the front seven on defense they could still add another corner they do need a qb tube but they have two picks around one two picks around to so they can be strategic about getting that done and and adding last year the 2017 seventeen draft they picked four players they can add that many starters this year with those four picks they have in the first two rounds so i say you just sit tight and try to better that roster.

mike patrick brown patriots new york eighty dollars
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast hello i'm jeff turner and i'm the host of on drugs each episode i dive deep into the history science and culture of drugs will cover everything from caffeine to ioi sca with fascinating detours along the way it's a brand new season of on drugs subscribe on apple podcast or your favorite podcast app hello i'm carol off good evening i'm geoff douglas and this is as it happens the podcast addition akg that two tonight alleged crime and punishment united states special counsel robert muller lays his first charges that indict russian people and russian groups for what our gas calls an attempt to steal democracy paying more than lip service in defiance of criticism that the compensation would be overcompensation the of stockton california plans to experiment with providing his poorest citizens guaranteed basic income going going oh wait no he's back patrick brown the embattled former leader of the interior progressive conservative party announces his intention to become the un embattled future leader of the pc party by joining the leadership race win the chirp sir down to protect themselves from predators male crickets in hawaii no longer make any noise but apparently no one's told them because they're still trying to belt out love songs rock of rages it was burned in the rules save its burned can be removed the canadian curling skip rachel homeless decision to remove and opponents stones threats a flame were at the olympics and beyond and we knew he had ice and his vein spot until the winter games begin we didn't know that mr t of mr t fame had pebbled ice in his veins and tonight hill tell us about his new passion for curling bull as it happens the friday edition or radio that wants him to share the specifics of his new love and some sweeping generalizations.

jeff turner caffeine geoff douglas robert muller patrick brown olympics special counsel stockton california mr t
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It has been less than forty eight hours since patrick brown resigned and the ontario progressive conservatives have a new face at the helm for now today vic fidelity a northern ontario mp p was named as interim leader but listening to his press conference this afternoon you'd think he was there for good i am the party leader i was elected party leader by our caucus today we made a unanimous decision and caucus that decision was turned over correctly to the executive and we will hear from them shortly want to be the party leader in the election book i've always said i've said in the last you know since the start at all two days ago i have always said look how i felt about the fact that we need to be decisive and we have one opponent here it's not ourselves the opponent is kathleen wynne and the damage that she's done to anterior we need to spend time addressing those needs getting our platform continue to get our platform out where we can bring real relief to families that's what we should be spending art that's my personal belief i was on terry o p c party interim leader vic fidelity speaking earlier today earlier today the party was split over whether to let the caucus pick a candidate like mr fidelity to run in the june provincial election or to old a leadership contest allowing its two hundred thousand members to vote just before we went to air they went with option to the plan is to have a new progressive conservative leader by the end of march rod phillips is an ontario p c m pp candidate for ajax and the former head of the ontario lottery and gaming corporation we reached him in toronto rod phillips we have just learnt that your party will lead its members vote on a new leader before the provincial election in.

executive vic fidelity rod phillips patrick brown ontario kathleen wynne ontario lottery and gaming cor forty eight hours two days
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Bye bye bye bye thank you met in city is the director of physical intelligence at the max planck institute for intelligence systems intelligent systems rather in stood cart germany that is where we reach him and if you'd like to see some video of the robot inaction visit our website cbc dots he eight a age in the king james version of the bible jesus says quote it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of god unquote now i can't address that with any real authority but i can say this it is apparently easier on the eye for a needle to go into a camel when a rich man in a kingdom enters it into a beauty pageant and now i will try to make sense of what i just said in the kingdom of saudi arabia there is an annual camel beauty contest it started in 1999 as a way to celebrate an animal of great importance to a better when people it has since expanded enormously the contests that is every year more people go to see more camels try to win more money in total this year the equivalent of forty million canadian bucks is up for grabs now there are specific rules to ensure noone cheats but when it comes to getting a championship trophy end a huge jackpot there's many a slip 'twixt the lip and the cup so far this year a dozen camels have been disqualified from competition in some cases because a veterinarian artificially pretty up some of the competitors with boat talks apparently the judges want camels to have big lips small.

director max planck institute saudi arabia germany
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It looks like a proper game show but it was definitely not fun and games when the bulletin of atomic scientists ruled the giant novelty clock on stage at a press conference earlier today the panel of scientists and scholars announced that they were pushing the doomsday clock forward thirty seconds last time the clock inched this close to the apocalyptic midnight was during the cold war and here's what rachel bronson president of the bulletin of atomic scientists said about the decision to increase the level of a nuclear threat this year the bulletin approached its discussion knowing that the doomsday clock with edging ever closer to midnight with this in mind the board weighed events of 2017 and its relationship to 2016 and the path seventy years in this year's clocked discussions nuclear issues took centre stage yet again to call the world's nuclear situation dyer is to understate the danger and it's immediacy we considered the ossified state of arms control negotiations and nonproliferation agreements as well as new testing undertaken by north korea nuclear exercises built into russia's military plans and an enhanced commitment to nuclear weapons in pakistan india and china we considered at length the lack of predictability and how the united states is thinking about the future and future use of its own nuclear weapons and unpredictability that it is embodied in statements and tweets by the president of the united states it is was with reference to what i said earlier and other key factors that are spelled out in our clock statement that we've come to a grim assessment.

cold war president dyer north korea russia nuclear weapons india china united states rachel bronson pakistan thirty seconds seventy years
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"A little more objectively but are not terribly hot domestic is this is how a person like aung sang suu chee is behaving a woman who was awarded the nobel peace prize and what does all this mean for the ranga people is there any hope well i think there's got to be a concerted international effort stronger than has taken place and by the way i commend canada for its efforts you read on voice their i've talked to your embassy there i think more countries meet the get involved and here's i think the trump administration has taken the right position they sought the release of the journalists uh secretary tillerson spin out there and push for investigations what else it's really this is why i accepted this position on sun suit cheek can be the biggest agent of change to make things better they're not the fixed the entire problems or so massive when when she refuses to listen to new ideas and criticism there's not much hope in the long or short run meantime the ah the leadership in me in maher says the country is ready for a gradual repatriation of these many thousands of ringo moslems from bangladesh do you think mian mars really ready to to receive them back mere mars not ready i mean bangladesh's already delayed sending these refugees because they're no measures of safe transit they're no measures of protection there is no guarantees of citizenship the homes of these individuals have been destroyed they don't want to leave because they fear their lives they want to stake in bangladesh the steps for this transition have not taken place and it's a combination of better management uh better leadership but also the fear of the military that the military's go to continue committing some of these atrocities so no it's not ready and and what bothered me about me amara was they said well this has bangladesh was fault they have a presidential election.

aung canada maher bangladesh mian mars presidential election suu chee secretary
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Talking to us no problem thank you so after having minute pressured okay thought by byebye jason buha days owns an enormous funchal pop collection with his wife in revere massachusetts and we've reached miserable hayes in revere he wants considered the defacto leader of myanmar uncensored g a friend now the former governor of new mexico bill richardson says he is probably on her enemy list yesterday mr richardson resigned from an advisory board on the brahim the refugee crisis in myanmar the board was called the advisory commission board on rock state and he has publicly rebuking both the panel and ms sued g herself governor richardson has just returned from yanmar reached him in santa fe governor richardson why have you steps down from this advisory board two reasons one i think it's to whitewash uh operation that does not want good sensible advice about what to do about the row handgun rokach roof kind and secondly because i think on who she has lost trust in me and i've lost trust in her so for those two reasons mainly that i felt this board was not going to give the advice that was needed to improve the situation human rights situation now what were you things that the board would accomplish when you agreed to participate well i've known on susser she for thirty years i've always supported her and she told me this board was go to make recommendations of basically to give credibility to reforms that she was going to make on the whole refugee human rights issue and then i find the that the board is basically validating.

massachusetts hayes revere bill richardson advisory board yanmar jason buha funchal myanmar new mexico g santa fe human rights thirty years
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"She said oh these are cute and you know surprised start with a few and then it kind of spiralled from their cute seems like the appropriate worried i mean these things have oversized heads and kind of almost baby like characteristics d do you think they're cute is that what the attraction is for you i don't think they're cute arrived for me the attraction is just but there's so many different life who prove the bronco has that we can find anything that matches you know my my personality um the great talking points so we have friends over reference committed oh book it you know the ones you just go look at all the new ones i you know it if putting my personality out there in in on display now you and your wife actually ended up signing a contract regarding hassan code tops give us the story behind that are it so we got married in july of twenty six team and on a honeymoon uh probably like most couples we talked about by accused of moving forward and what we're going to do and a future we had talked about you know possibilities of getting a dog and art collection it already been over a thousand at that point so we said we pretty much needed to slow down on it by we she met die um and so i said okay well what do you make a contract and say that already spent a certain amount of body each week on pops and she kind of joked about it and left it offered to think ever to well i don't sleep much so one night was sitting there she sleeping and i'm sitting at typing away of my phone and decided to make eight pop trapped you know using pop instead of a contract where it where i allowed myself thirty dollars per week to spend on pops and the amount of money i'd get per month depended on how many friday's cell within up so the the issue with that was that i allowed myself so many exceptions um san diego comecon uh is one of the biggest comecon conventions in the united states and that happens every july.

united states hassan thirty dollars
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"You know there there have been shorter props to victory in politics but not many uh and it could be appealing for for a few candidates you know some of the bigger name candidates who maybe wouldn't want to commit ten years to trying to become a leader at a premera this is one of the shortest path to possible victory that we've ever seen in french politics fivemonth this is not a long time so i'm optimistic uh if side uh i'm side but i'm but i'm optimistic miss know that thanks very much for talking to us thank you for having me okay by a gmo bad as a former ontorio progressive conservative party campaigner and staffer xi is currently a senior consultant with crest view strategy we reached her in toronto and to patrick brown is not the only politician facing sexual misconduct allegations this afternoon can't hair resigned as the federal minister of sport and persons with disabilities after being accused of harassing women when he was a member of the alberta legislature prime minister justin trudeau said mr hair would be placed on a leave of absence pending an investigation into the allegations and yesterday in nova scotia progressive conservative leader there jamie bailey resigned after news broke that his party was investigating him for quote allegations of inappropriate behaviour matt russian ski drives semis and british columbia and last week he was driving his tractor trailer on the transcanada highway by the community of spence is bridge everything was fine and then he noticed some falling rocks and then things got worse fast we reached matt russian ski in langley british columbia mr rashid ski do you feel lucky to be alive right now you're definitely how are you doing physically though pretty sore you know it took a bit of a toll on the body with her with the impact but her all in all you know there's nothing broken couple of bruises couple of small car sunday mostly just just muscle heart where did you get the bruising i took took it to the left shin uh the dashboard hit me in the leg and then uh i i've got a little i had a little bit of bruising along kind of the left side on the smaller my back but if it clearing up pretty good but i think that was just from the seat.

senior consultant justin trudeau mr hair jamie bailey columbia spence ski toronto patrick brown alberta prime minister langley fivemonth ten years
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Of of the conservative caucus not have known about them i think it's um may responsible not altogether fair to imply that the allegations themselves were secret so we're the rumors i'm almost certainly um by there there were no media outlets that came forward with these allegations until last night because i think there was a lot of work that went into proving uh and making a case for their veracity uh it was a really strong report and i believe but they were all quite shocks is that good enough though for a party if there's rumors around about their leader to wait for the media to expose something to party's not be more proactive perhaps in in finding out whether those things are potentially true yeah i think it's incumbent upon political parties look there's no doubt that other circumstances in which politics occur on the hill at queens park i worked at queens park i've been there at the young woman in fact and there's no doubt that the circumstances there lend themselves to inappropriate behaviour would you mind the nature of people coming into at abundant of power very suddenly and those power imbalances being very stark there's a culture um in political social life where there's quite a bit of drinking often on all sorts of circumstances that create a situation where we see and it's coming out um and i think it's a good thing i think sunlight is probably the best disinfectant are we going to see more of this come to daylight from the ontario legislature do you think i do i do i think it took them will feel emboldened us they should uh and it will further um undermined and push out those of users who fit hiding in the system your party uh is five months from an election that they need a leader what kind of conversations do you think are going on right now with and caucus uh the caucasus electing an interim leader tomorrow morning but but it's clear our caucuses do not elect our leaders so there's been some some discussion of having a caucus elect an interim leader who had been us through an election and we wouldn't have a formal leaders a protest until after an election i think that would be a mistake there are all sorts of caucus numbers that i would entrust with that job like who is that was what was going to ask you next time you who do you think.

media outlets queens park caucasus ontario five months
"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Categorically untruth every one of them it's never okay it's never okay for anyone to feel they've been a victim of sexual harassment or feel threatened did any way let me make this clear and in then noone appreciates up more than i do i booked two younger sisters who are my best friends i've grown up in a in a family that has taught me good values is not my values is not how i raised is not who i am three hours after that news conference was held patrick barra patrick brown announced his resignation as leader of the ontario pc party and with about five months until the provincial election it leaves the tories in damagecontrol mode here's how the party's deputy leaders and mps sylvia jones and steve clarke responded today clearly it was a shock none of us knew about what the allegations were until last night we need an opportunity to have those conversations internally but absolutely it was a shock so we have to move forward we have to it we've got to get our caucus together we've got to have that discussion we've got to meet with the with the party officials we've got a consult the members and we've got to move forward the ontario progressive conservative party caucus will meet tomorrow morning where they are expected to announce an interim leader jamal vat is a former ontario pc party campaigner and staffer she is now a senior consultant with crest view strategy we reached smell that in toronto ginny mo that we heard earlier from the deputy leaders of the ontario progressive conservative party and and how they characterized what's been happening at what do you make of the what's change for the party i'm fad for my party um i'm glad he resigned out of it the right thing to do and i'm glad that the senior leadership people around him pushed him to do so and resigned immediately when they heard what the allegations of a very very serious allegation but i'm had that our party is is with eta leader.

harassment ontario pc party steve clarke jamal vat senior consultant patrick barra patrick brown sylvia jones ontario toronto five months three hours
"patrick brown" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"patrick brown" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Um you know as studies come out and progress over years and decades that kind of central estimate can change and i believe that our estimate will stand the test of time but we will see that's not for me to say at this point i think there is a responsibility to columbus wants to reduce the uncertainty the things that matter most colleague of mine recently said the you know you don't get to decide whether you're work is wall is for the community disorders worthwhile a hug this is paul of a way to so let's use everything we've go and the data to gut which is increasing by the minute to get a handle on these things are combining models and observations and failure week together in a way that surprising doesn't happen very often fact was peter kox you can meet his paper and and using these article over it makes you to come forward slash make sure you also had from patrick brown his papers available at the same address time now for this week's news chat and before to you and callaway joins us in the studio hyon hello there now first up china has been trying of some time to build a i research what's the status of things as they are right now in china while the news were reporting this week is my my colleague david sarnoff ski who's based in based in shanghai has reported that a mountainous district in western beijing is likely to be the seat of a new kind of ai artificial intelligence ob business park the chinese government is interested in investing about two point one billion in creating this industrial park in hopes of luring ai startups in in in companies to plant themselves there and hope seems to be some extend operative word because at the moment china's seems to be finding it somewhat difficult to to attract the research as they won i think that's that's the theme in in the story is that it's an open question you know if you build it will they come i think is what was what the story is is asking and you know there isn't some sources quoted including people.

columbus peter kox china shanghai beijing chinese government forward slash patrick brown callaway david sarnoff artificial intelligence