6 Burst results for "Patricia Wilkerson"

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

20:32 min | 7 months ago

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are, and with regards to Manning his where belts are well known. He's incarcerated in Phoenix Arizona. We'll have more after this break. Facebook's safety teams protect billions of people each month. They lead the industry and stopping bad actors online. That's because they've invested more than $13 billion in the last 5 years. 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Unfortunately, it's easy to be unsafe online, but now it's easy to help protect yourself. Norton 360 with life lock gives you powerful device security, a VPN to keep your Wi-Fi activity private. An identity theft protection to help monitor your info and alert you to potential identity threats, all in one. No one can prevent all identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses, but you can opt in to cyber safety. Save 25% or more off your first year of Norton 360 with LifeLock, at Norton dot com slash LA times. That's 25% off at Norton dot com slash LA times. Gabriel you mentioned a lieutenant humi. He was one of the first people there on the scene at the site of oday's assassination. What are you telling you about that day? One of the challenges with reporting a cold case that is 36 years old is that people that have the institutional knowledge and firsthand experience of the case and the investigation are disappearing. They're passing away, and that's true of a lot of people from the Orange County side of things. You had Charlie stumpf, who was the commander or lead of the bomb squad for the Orange County sheriff's department. He had his team comb this scene of The Office on 17th street in Santa Ana, and they reconstructed the bomb like a big jigsaw puzzle. He passed away. The lead investigator on the case where Santa Anna PD was concerned was feral buckles. And he was the one that had firsthand knowledge up until his retirement in 1996. What was unique about humani is that he was the area commander of that part of the city. And deputy chief dispatched him to take control of the scene. So he was there within 20 minutes. And he witnessed the FBI's arrival within the hour. These guys come out and they come walking over to us and there's a couple of FBI agents and a couple of LAPD joint terrorist task force members. And they came up and they told us that they'd been tracking a couple of guys from New York up in LA and they lost to man LAX and they were probably responsible for the bombing and Ted time. I think you gave us the names of green and Manning. And really he has a firsthand experience of that scene. It was a big case in Santa. And I'm very high profile. And of course, it's a crime of international implications, but he went up into the office. He remembers seeing the destruction and devastation. He remembers the scene very vividly and what he did. And so that's, you know, for historical posterity, it's necessary to get someone like humani on the record. And that's the other challenge in this case is that because it's an open case of cold case and there's still at least on the surface and active investigation, people with knowledge are hesitant or do not have the clearance to speak openly about it. So humani is very valuable in that regard. And he definitely offers new details into that day and the investigation that followed. Lieutenant moon has been retired for nearly 20 years now, but the old days case is always wait on him. The reason we have laws is to punish people who prevent them from doing that again, or is it kind of a warning to others, look, we have lost about this. So when people avoid prosecution, it's annoying. I can't. I'm not going to sleep over it. I'm not going to cry about it. It happens sometimes, but she's we had at 1.57 warrants for guys that were and fled to Mexico. So we knew they were down in Mexico, a lot of when we knew their addresses, but this is big government and they don't care about the little people. It's significant. But matter in the big picture. From your experience, firsthand knowledge of the conversations that happened on the scene and in 1994, you know who did it, you know how they did it. And, you know, you knew where they were. Yeah. Or they came from where they went. All that was no. Everything is no. It was a very solid case. You know, easy to process. You shared with me that when he would walk from the Orange County superior court in saint Anna to the Orange County district attorney's office in the rhythm of his workdays, he would pass by the outer statue. And that kind of served as a reminder to him of this unsolved murder mystery, if you will. And he's always felt that it was. Higher up government institutions that got in the way of a very easily prosecuted case. So it always kind of had a thorn in the side element to it. And it wasn't just a statue. What is interesting is when that statue was first dedicated in 1994 on what would have been Alex 50th birthday, Mooney worked at. So you had Mooney, he said it was a light security day, but it was acrimonious because her Reuben who was as bellicose leader of the JBL was across the street in Santana and crossed the street from the statute dedication and was basically berating the family in the people in attendance of the dedication. And the FBI was there too as well just to keep tabs on everything. So, you know, the case had a way of coming up. So it definitely weighed on him on that day in 1994. In April, when he worked security for the statute dedication, and then in 1996, he goes with Ferrell buckles to the FBI field office in LA, where he got a front row seat in how the investigation was stymied in his recollection by the State Department. And so he has those memories in mind and he's open to speaking about his experience with the case and what he has seen. And as he mentioned to me, he expressed his remorse for the family because they have not been delivered justice for 36 years. Alex how they had three daughters at the time of his death his murder. And they were very young, and he never got to see them grow and get married and lived their lives. And that gnaws at a lawman who likes to feel dissatisfaction of justice being delivered and a case being closed, and surprisingly, it was really unprompted that he deemed out a man of peace. It was definitely the mere opposite of her Reuben. He was not Delacroix. He was not boisterous. He was very soft spoken and very eloquent in his media appearances, but he was a man of peace in that regard. If he found things that were disagreeable about his politics and stances on Palestine and Israel, it was very hard to hate Alex all day, unless, of course, you were embroiled in the JD L extremist mindset. So, you know, he expressed very forthrightly that he believed him to be a man of peace above all, no matter what disagreements there may be politically and it's just another case of justice denied and justice delayed. Audi's case is something that local politicians have never forgotten though. Former Congress member Sanchez press the House of Representatives repeatedly to investigate his assassination and then recently, Congress member Luca ra has continued that work. Absolutely. I spoke to congressman Correa about his resolution, House resolution. And what it seeks to do is basically enter Alexander's memory as a matter of congressional record. And recognize him as a victim of domestic terrorism. And as the congressman mentioned, it also acts to carry on with Sanchez's work before she left the office. And it also seeks to renew attention into the investigation. So it would be very interesting to see how the case develops and going forward, how all of this is going to coalesce because you have the ADC pressing the attorney general Merrick Garland to name suspects to provide details about the case while at the same time in Congress, you know, Rashida Talib has also cosponsored that House resolution. And so there's motion on this case after 36 years, where it all leads to, remains to be seen, but it's easy to be cynical because there has been concerted efforts to renew interest and not let the case grow cold in memory in action, but what really changes at the end of the day is getting closer, but we'll have to wait and see. What's important is that the three folks I mean, many people have passed on who've been involved in the case, but the three people who have been of interest internally in the investigations are still alive, so justice remains a possibility. Finally, what is it about the Audi case that has stayed with activists decades after his killing? It's always been important to the Arab American community, but when I wrote about his case 30 years later, the younger generation of Arab American activists in Orange County and elsewhere throughout the United States almost forgot about them, they had to relearn about him. He was just getting started. He was 41. It's hard to find audio clips of his appearances in the media or video clips because he was really just getting started. He joined the organization only for a few years. And before that was basically also a poet and a lecturer at orange coast college and graduated with a master's degree in political science from Cal state Fullerton. So he was a family man who just started a family and an activist who was really starting to shine and come into his own before his life was taken. So the new generation has had to kind of relearn his legacy over in the West Bank and he's never been forgotten. He's a hero in jifna Palestine, a martyr. And he's basically seen in that role, but also as a native son. Someone that if you traveled to that area, you're going to hear stories about how he was as a person. So his memory is spread between Southern California and the West Bank. Over here, and there's a bit of a renaissance, if you will, because the new generation of Arab American activists are basically taking the baton from their predecessors. And it will be up to them to continue to press for justice in the case. So really what we're seeing is a generational, like I said, passing of the baton. And we're going to see that level of advocacy continue. And in my work, I always try to not just have a focus on the case and the investigation and the persons of interest, if you will in the suspects, but it's always important, not just to ask who killed Alex all day, but it's always important to remember who was Alexander. Gabrielle, thank you so much for this interview..

FBI Robert Manning Manning oday United States government Department of Justice Israel saint Anna Alex O' LA times Patricia wilkerson ADC rabbi honey Phoenix American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey Helena ode Alex Saudis
"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"A ghost in Santana. It's there, but the people who remember are mostly gone. Absolutely. And that statue plays that role in a sense because cast like a ghostly apparition over the city. And then two, it also just remains there for people to inquire and ask questions. But yeah, you know it's this case from 1985, it's 36 years old now. And surprisingly, it doesn't go away. New generations will learn about him, even above and beyond the Arab American community. I think the Latino community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are,.

Robert Manning FBI oday U.S. government Alex O' Manning Department of Justice Patricia wilkerson rabbi honey Santana American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey Helena ode U.S. saint Anna Alexander Alex Saudis Phoenix
"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"The times. There's always nice to be on. I have to admit I did not even know about the ode case until I became a reporter, even though I know that statue. So if you're walking through Santana, you see this big, you know, very serious statue of a man and you think, oh, you must be either some Roman or maybe a Mexican 'cause Santana is such a Mexican city. And then you go and you see the name Alex ode. Who is he? So it's almost like his case is a ghost in Santana. It's there, but the people who remember are mostly gone. Absolutely. And that statue plays that role in a sense because cast like a ghostly apparition over the city. And then two, it also just remains there for people to inquire and ask questions. But yeah, you know it's this case from 1985, it's 36 years old now. And surprisingly, it doesn't go away. New generations will learn about him, even above and beyond the Arab American community. I think the Latino community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are,.

Robert Manning Santana FBI oday U.S. government Alex ode Alex O' Manning DOJ Patricia wilkerson rabbi honey American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey The times Helena ode U.S. saint Anna Alexander
"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:46 min | 7 months ago

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Palestinians who live in Israel proper. On the West Bank and in exile. That was Alex O'Day from an interview on Pacifica radio on August 22nd, 1985. Odes assassination drew condemnation from Jewish civil rights groups and galvanized Arab American ones. A statue of him now stands in front of the Santa Ana public library within walking distance of where he lost his life. Gabriel San Roman writes for times OC, which is part of the Los Angeles Times. He has followed the investigation into a day's assassination for over a decade. Gabrielle, welcome to the times. There's always nice to be on. I have to admit I did not even know about the ode case until I became a reporter, even though I know that statue. So if you're walking through Santana, you see this big, you know, very serious statue of a man and you think, oh, you must be either some Roman or maybe a Mexican 'cause Santana is such a Mexican city. And then you go and you see the name Alex ode. Who is he? So it's almost like his case is a ghost in Santana. It's there, but the people who remember are mostly gone. Absolutely. And that statue plays that role in a sense because cast like a ghostly apparition over the city. And then two, it also just remains there for people to inquire and ask questions. But yeah, you know it's this case from 1985, it's 36 years old now. And surprisingly, it doesn't go away. New generations will learn about him, even above and beyond the Arab American community. I think the Latino community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are,.

Robert Manning Santana FBI oday U.S. government Santa Ana public library Gabriel San Roman Alex ode Alex O' Manning Department of Justice Pacifica radio Israel Alex Patricia wilkerson Los Angeles Times West Bank rabbi honey
"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Operated. Judea Patricia Wilkerson of tulahoma passed away Wednesday January the thirtieth at life care center. At the age of seventy years. No services are scheduled Dave's Calverton funeral home in charge of arrangements. Peggy Lynn Harris, formerly of Manchester passed away January twenty nine th at Malvern Arkansas at the age of sixty eight years funeral services are scheduled for Saturday at one pm with burial to follow Atlantans cemetery. The family will receive friends beginning at eleven AM. Dave's Colbert's and funeral home in charge of arrangements. Kent Roger gamble. Eight. Eighty of Belvedere passed away January thirtieth at his residence funeral services are scheduled for two pm Sunday at hickory grove Baptist church and hunt land in term it will follow at Mount Carmel cemetery in hot land visitation with a family will be at the church on Saturday from five until eight PM arrangements with Winterberg funeral home. Christopher burns, formerly of tullahoma passed away. January thirty first if the open arms care center in Ottawa at the age of forty three years funeral services are scheduled for Saturday at one pm at Lynchburg funeral home. The family will receive friends from eleven AM until the service time arrangements with Lynchburg funeral home. The local obituary report on thunder radio brought to you by central funeral home. Mornings at six fifty five midday twelve twenty and each evening at five o'clock. The latest can also be found online at WM SR radio dot com. Com. Thunder radio is your hometown station were so hometown. We're talking to local folks doing local things in your community. Tune in today at twelve thirty four hour lunch and learn captain, Billy Butler sergeant nettles and sergeant rain will be here from the coffee county sheriff's department to give us updates. You. Don't wanna miss this episode of lunch and learn and if you have an idea for and learn segment, Email them to w m s are at thunder thirteen twenty dot com. Let's think about customization presented by Liberty Mutual insurance. Liberty Mutual customizes your auto insurance. So you only pay for what you need more things in life, customizable. Why do I.

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"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"patricia wilkerson" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"And operated. Dutia Patricia Wilkerson of tullahoma passed away Wednesday January the thirtieth at life care center. At the age of seventy years. No services are scheduled Dave's Calverton funeral home in chart of arrangements. Carol f lovely of Manchester pass away Sunday January twenty seventh at her residence. The age of seventy five years, no services are scheduled. Dave's converts in funeral home in chart of arrangements. Peggy Lynn, Harris, formerly of Manchester passed away January. Twenty nine th at Malvern Arkansas at the age of sixty eight years funeral services are scheduled for Saturday at one pm with burial to follow Atlantans cemetery. The family will receive friends beginning at eleven AM, Dave's Culbertson funeral home in charge of arrangements. Kent Roger gamble. Eight. Eighty of Belvedere passed away January thirtieth at his residence funeral services are scheduled for two pm Sunday at hickory grove Baptist church and hunt land in term it will follow at Mount Carmel cemetery in heartland visitation with the family will be at the church on Saturday from five until eight PM arrangements with Lynchburg funeral home. The local obituary report on thunder radio brought to you by central funeral home. Mornings at six fifty five midday at twelve twenty and each evening at five o'clock. The latest can also be found online at WM SR radio dot com. Thunder radio is your hometown station were so hometown. We're talking to local doing local things in your community. Tune in today at twelve thirty four hour lunch and learn your coffee county mayor Gary Cordell, we'll be here. You don't wanna miss this episode of lunch and learn and if you have an idea for Lynton learned segment, Email them to w m s are at thunder thirteen twenty dot com. Your dream home is in Manchester, Tennessee, it's a charming English Tudor cottage nestled on a wooded lot with its very own creek. Hi, I'm Emily with middle Tennessee properties. Call us at middle. Tennessee properties at seven to eight ninety six eleven we would love to show you this property. It's located in the highly sought after country club subdivision. That's the neighborhood right next to old stone fort state park, a charming English Tudor cottage a picturesque setting. This house is completely updated. This charming English Tudor cottage and two additional wooded. Lots can be purchased separately a charming English Tudor cottage with all the character you want and all the updates that you need see this listing at middle. Tennessee property search dot com. MLS number two hundred to four zero. Seven. Shaven prices, and.

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