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"pathology department" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

10:16 min | 2 months ago

"pathology department" Discussed on The Science Show

"This is science show coming from a garden by Paddock on the south coast of New South Wales but let sleep now to the other side of the country to Perth and edith. Cowan University. To a speech pathology department to meet associate professor Aaron Geeky who works on a face you there and also looks after patients. The Charles Garden the hospital. She's another brain scientist. Faiza in Greek is Norwood's meaning loss of words. And you get lots of words because she had stroke can be. Strike can be brain injury trauma brain tumor anything that gives you brandon injury predominantly to the left hemisphere in mice people and why is language affected because it is kept in the left hemisphere in ninety eight percent of the population? It's in the left hemisphere the brains and extraordinary complex organ it communicates with the rest of the brain but the left hemisphere controls that I've heard of some people who are affected after stroke with one language but the other language can kind of Linga and be stronger. Is that just an urban myth nine? That's the truth. If you lay down one language as a child you have that as your main language and adults all people over the age of about twelve when your brain is developed can learn another language on top of the original language. But if you're a multi-lingual person or even a bilingual person you can lay down two languages at once and there has a really big effect on what happens when you get a brain injury and what happens to your language as you recover. So the first language in people who are monolingual will remain and be the strongest and the languages. After the injury that they have learned will be more affected but if someone's bilingual multi-lingual those languages will be affected equally. Atelli what speaking personally now that. I'm slightly older. I'm amazed by the fact that having grown up in Australia just for a few years when as school I get phrases in German appearing from nowhere and I I suddenly she'll say them people think I'm bonkers. You know th th th. This German was widened to my brain. Somehow is that common thing. It is a common thing. It's Code Code Switching and win your brain can't find the word in one language it will search for it or the phrase in the language that's easier to get at some points that boost support for for you. Did you have any exposure to that recently or just pops up out of completely no way of five months of swearing German? Just pops out swearing's really a very different phenomenon very highly emotive language but also highly praised common and so it will pat in any language and it has that same emotion with it so like down with the Augusta the e citing so. I'm actually the background. What about your work? How do you look after people? And how do you study the phaser? My work predominantly looks at people who are recovering from stroke in the very early phase of the recovery so a recent study we just finished looked at over two hundred people in the first two weeks where we started an intensive speech and language project after stroke and we gave some of those people very intensive work in the first four weeks of their recovery and others wasted. Do just the standard amount of therapy and what we hypothesized in that. What we thought would happen is that based on our premise of neuro recovery. In that the science that come before US said that if we do more better and what we fan in language in early recovery is that actually it's important to do some therapy and some reintegration but too much made no difference and our intensive program was exactly the same a point to point difference to the standard k. So we're talking hours of therapy. When people are just recovering we did twenty two hours versus nine point five hours and our communication people being able to talk in sentences and in the everyday life was identical. So you should go gently exactly. And it also means that we've been able to identify that that economic spend very valuable resources in that very early period doesn't need to be so intensive so we're able to make sure that people who have had a stroke in recovering. Those resources can be spread a little more than having to use the same resources intensively for only a few people and watch the basis of getting the language back. Is it just hidden down there still in you? Go to recover it uncovered or do you have to learn again? It's relearning and of course everybody's recovery is really different but with a phaser. What we believe happened is that people haven't lost their ability. They just I would access the woods store. And they let a store essentially and they use strategies and Hinson pointers to help them re access those pathways Ahmad about. If you're just getting older and you think the memory is fading a bit. Is it that you've got too much? You've got accumulated decades and decades and decades of words and you having the salt them all the time and you got far more than the teenager or is it something. That is naturally fading. Because she's getting older again. You'll say of course everyone's different but still. There is an age effect on communication and would choice because like you say the vastness of vocabulary in older person versus a younger person in general. But it's about what happens and what's happened to the brain pathways more than the woods store itself so if you look after your brain pathways and use them regularly and they are used in tasks that a functional then your ability to recall words will be greater so brain exercises are essential and making sure that you using your words in an environment that you would normally use them. In for example conversation crosswords whole range of exercises is much better than not using them so we really encourage people to talk more and to be accurate but also to use it so one of principles we go buys use it or lose it reading books as well anything that accesses or uses words so yes reading. We do talk about listening to music. There's a relationship with music and words not necessarily in there. Hasn't been anything shown around watching television and words although we tend to probably when we're watching TV have other things happening at the same time so out results around. Tv watching not as conclusive as reading books for example own listening to music or task specific practice having a compensation now reading on screens where one tends to flick. That seems to me not to be the kind of thing you're talking about because the retention and concentration is not the same. That's exactly right. What brains need to be able to process the information? Lay it down so that you understand it and then be able to have that cycle be able to have your tune for example in a conversation and have speech output or writing output and it means that information comes in is processed and then is retained in the exchange that we call communication any advice in general also people who not necessarily had strokes and therefore getting some direct therapy but people who are worried about the way. The Language Command is fading. A bit what. You've already said that you'd pack some fraction practice. But what they do so one of the things we do in clinical practice is make sure that people are talking about things that are relevant to them so task silence. It's cold making sure that things are accurate because Brian Pathways need to make sure they making the correct choices and making sure that it's a communication strategy that's done regularly so I come across many people who don't talk to anyone in their day and are not accessing language store and then as they speak or communicate right they really struggle. There's a set of neuro principles that we go by and rehabilitation in. Its Task Salient slack. I mentioned practice but practices. You mean to play a bit like playing any kind of sport. But it's a brain sport and making sure that you do that on a regular basis MoD. If you've got you don't have this be listening carefully. The detritus that occurs like everyone saying like like like an Evans. In you know you know you know all that stuff. What does that signify pummels? Those fabs in pathology we call it empty speech and it's cold that because it conveys no meaning it sometimes used as a carry a phrase a habit free example. People use that a lot if they get stuck on a word or can't find the one they looking for in particular but it's really an ineffective strategy. It doesn't help the brain. Find the woods that the Pistons looking for so we discourage it yes oppose is often more effective than alarm or so scientists love Soda. They beginning sentence my cut them all out. Aaron Kotecki is an associate professor at Edith. Cowan University speech Pathology Department..

associate professor Cowan University speech Pathol Cowan University Aaron Geeky Norwood scientist New South Wales Charles Garden the hospital Australia Perth US Brian Pathways Aaron Kotecki Pistons Hinson
"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:31 min | 4 months ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

"So if you have a cancer like this woman and you're not getting what you want or they want to cut out part of your body that you want a part of your body you don't want your kidney in the pocket you don't want your kidney in the pocket of the pathology department you don't want your lymph nodes in the back of the path ology department going to be short of breath you don't want to get chemotherapy immunotherapy that seldom works very well might work for a few months and this woman who doesn't work at all this is the story of radio surgery with doctor Lieberman this is true stories every patient we talk about his true story usurpations is see I saw this woman just two days ago and I take your store and I come here and relate what is happened to her so that you can understand and your loved ones because understand and even she she is so motivated to be here to get better because she knows what it's like to lose the kidneys she knows what it's like to be short of breath and not get better and she knows what it's like to be sent home to die this is the work we do every day and it's a very good idea to have a paper and pencil to take notes and we'll give you some useful information so please get a paper and pencil you can always call our office at two one two choices call our office even now two one two choices that's our phone number two one two choices two one two stands for New York City in choices.

cancer doctor Lieberman New York City
"pathology department" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:01 min | 6 months ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"This is the work we do so if you have a cancer like this woman and you're not getting what you want or they want to cut out part of your body that you want a part of your body you don't want your kid in the pocket you know when your kidney in the market in the pathology department you don't want your lymph nodes in the bark of thought department you don't to be short of breath you don't want to get chemotherapy immunotherapy that seldom works very well my work for a few months and this woman it didn't work at all this is the story of radio surgery with doctor Lieberman this is true stories every patient we talk about is true story usurpation side see I saw this woman just two days ago take your store and I come here and relate what is happened to her so that you can understand and your loved ones to understand and even she she is so motivated to be here to get better because she knows what it's like to lose the kidneys she knows what it's like to be short of breath and not get better and she knows what it's like to be sent home to die this is the word we do every day and it's a very good idea to have a paper and pencil to take notes and we'll give you some useful information so please get a paper and pen so you can always call our office at two one two choices call our office even now at two one two choices that's our phone number two one two choices two one two stands for New York City in choices because you truly have choices with cancer care she didn't have to lose a kidney shouldn't have to go on the useless immuno therapy or doctors encouraged her and pushed her down all you have to lose your kidney you don't have to but our doctors never told her about all the options and we do things very differently here when you come here we talk about all the options so you learn a lot and I can tell you that I see many many patients and ninety percent of patients learn things about themselves that they never knew before that's why sometimes it goes at all just let me tell you my story in a minute it never works that way because I already know that most patients don't know the whole story they can't know the whole story there doctors number of taking the time to explain the whole story and the meaning in what blood tests means and cancer markers on the extent of the cancer this woman her doctors never told her that the cancer was up against the Airways blocking the Airways she had no idea and that's why it's so important another reason why it's so important to come here to get a fresh second in in this we do every day man I'm such a leader when we accept most insurances Medicare Medicaid were super conveniently located in the heart of New York City were close to fourteen different subway lines bosses although buses that come into New York City go to Port Authority just next to.

cancer
"pathology department" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:42 min | 6 months ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Throw in a bucket in the pathology department you know what happens when it gets thrown in the pocket it's not helping you at all and of course he thought if you removed his kidney that he would live well then the cancer just kept on growing back in the groove back in the logs in the immuno therapy and chemotherapy and yet who does of treatment and the cancer cap on growing and progressing well the chemo doctor didn't tell him Hey kimonos and work very well for kidney cancer the chemo doctor didn't tell him Dr liederman treats kidney cancer spreads the long he treats cancers that spread to long he treats lung cancers of the long noninvasively lots of people want that because they don't want their long thrown in a pocket and they know that either long to breeze we treat patients with lung cancers we also treat patients whose cancers travel to logs was two separate tumors in the logs one cancers and started the long which retreat and cancers of travel to the lungs metastasis which retreat and the fact that there are real liederman presented data showing a ninety seven percent success rate treating kidney cancers traveling to long's presented are dated after our reel liederman M. D. magna **** laude present other day that one of the largest cancer meetings in the world so we know the chemo doctors in the certain should have known about it but they did and they kept my giving chemo with the chemo didn't work the catcher kept growing in the long spy lateral right or left logs and he came here for a valuation and we talked about all the options that we talked about surgery run afraid the surgeon seemed like they're afraid of radio surgeon Dr leader months and the cable doctors seem to act they're afraid of doctor leader minute radio surgery but we're not we're not afraid of them we talk about chemo and surgery because we know I mean think about non invasive invisible beams of radio surgery to attack the cancer of the lung verses opening up the longer moving part of your long or think about years of chemotherapy stage four cancer that's really had kidney cancer stage for the cube Kimmel doctors are planned the groom lifelong chemo well he finally heard through a radio listener like you and you can save lives I know that and he came here and I saw him I saw him last year and he had catches in the right lung and left long and we talked about all the options remember yeah that surgery on the kidney it failed the cancer came back he had chemo and other means of therapy it failed the cancer kept growing and he came here last year and we offer treatment and we treated him many came.

kidney cancer chemo Dr liederman M. D. Kimmel
"pathology department" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

08:29 min | 7 months ago

"pathology department" Discussed on Today in Focus

"So I was born in Tehran. Flew over here Single Parent Council estate. They struggle to make ends meet went. Comprehensive School went to the local university Brunel University so just knocked on the Lady's door earlier. WHO's talking to me about housing shoes how she struggled chuckled with council housing and moving in around exact same stories? My mom so I tell her you know. My mom was made homeless. Won Awards investi living hostile for a little while when people ask me who who I am is one of them now. It's the same story is millions of families across the UK. And it's high time that we were represented by one of US rather than Boris Johnson. WHO believes they have an inherent right? Heritz privilege to be Syria has been conservative for a really long time. This is an area that voted leave in the referendum. And is it not true that the Conservatives brexit message is going to resonate with voters here much more than latest brexit messages Boris. We'll get some on boats. I can I can. I can come today that he someone will vote for him but his thing about breaks down we. It doesn't surprise me here in Oxford. Doesn't come up as much as you'd expects. I think people are overestimating the Tories brexit message. Even if we're shunned gets a majority. And even if he gets his deal through parliament element. There's still two years of negotiations to go. It's not the end. He's talking about this oven ready ready Brexit brexit on his analogies of so dead. So I think they're taking the public fool in public. Our law smarter than they give him credit for tuned in you have your opponents and one of the things that they in house been levied against you are some tweets. He did a few years ago. which grant Semitic do you regret them? I am now yes I mean. Look every single public platform interview of. I have tried to apologize without reservation. I've also tried to to be. Yeah positive influence on the discussion and talk about the context in which they came and what steps I think the country and the government an MP need to take in order to route and Semitism out out at an early age within our colleges with an schools. The reality is look I say. I don't believe that it's beyond symmetrical Resi but as long as there's Jewish wishes saying more needs to be done John One east to be done as a Muslim who has faced more racism in this election. The more people can dream of when you came. I had just been on the phone to the Metropolitan Police about security. Because I can no longer be confident that I'm safe in this campaign that has that become a bigger and bigger issue. Fevers the campaign. That's going on over the weekend. We had what we thought would be the potential incident I know that one of the voices within the community. Say you need to do more. There's no doubt way to be doing more. Have you had a chance to debate the prime minister. And and will you get to. Its own pretty much. Every city has the privilege of having to see all the candidates lined up an answer. The questions the local community. It's it's a basic part of our democracy which there hustings. I've just gotten an email joy so it's the Eilly I've been waiting to hear back from the Conservative Association. Whether or not they would be able to bright a representation at the hustings things I have just learned abortions would not be available and in his absence. They are not minded to send a substitute. I'm disappointed by this but I feel that Dawson is not going to go ahead an issue that residents would probably you want to question both candidates about here is health and the NHS. This has become particularly important for Boris Johnson. Who has been personally blamed for the failures of the local Killington Hospital? Parts of which so dangerous patients have moved out tests eighties and is lifted next bridge for decades success right. She used to work at Hilton Hospital and when we met her she was home with our son. Steve himself retired. Thirty career is an ambulance technician because of stress. Yes I have worked helling Don Hospital years ago wait there for twelve years and the pathology department and I've never known to be like this. You know we never had patients waiting for hours on end trolleys in the past situation things said there was nothing like that and within the last year. There's been a dramatic increase in the way in time at some healing in hospital. Now we've had I any closer hammersmith without the I N E close central mid and it's not rocket science is is it that effect we've gone from when I joined a case of all great to see you know. Welcome come in to where the bloody hell of you being you know and you saw like confronting confronted agro. Why was it you took early? Retirement from working. An ambulance technician burnout. Basically emotional and physical to job. Just become far more. Stressful gave several neurosurgical consultancies. Let's he's canceled. Do you worry about the support. You have your own healthcare here Cossio hours given the appointment at my local. GP's by the nurse there. And what was this to check out. This was check out. For Parkinson's the appointment Bennett came through was cancelled. They give me another one another appointment and that was cancelled and then on the third appointment. Some Defoe Camille up from the neurology department the day before and said I'm afraid we'll have to cancel your appointment juice shortage staff staff tomorrow. They said ask your JP to refer you to another hospital which may get into buses so my understanding just from the discussion ahead on the phone with the department was that in normal circumstances would be three doctors covering the new Euroleague Department at the moment. There's no this is for something very serious you know. How long has this been going on for the thought? You my Parkinson's it's about seven months now going on seven months. Would you talk about how you're going to at this election going to vote for. I'm GONNA Mellow local. Labor definitely won't vote conservative. Why not uh-huh Boris? Johnson celery. No No. We've we've experienced in common around here. It was Masan road actually canvassing. This is going back about six eight months ago and it just don't know people were asking him and he was coming out with blatant shouldn't say but lies but he is very popular around here. Can You understand why people vote for him in this area and not anymore. I don't I think people have seen through him now. Because era of Conservatives got friends and they say they wouldn't both him they wouldn't vote conservative because of him. I've come up to a different part. Constituency a bit further North bitty. Thea and it was here last week. That the Prime Minister's Partner Carry Simmons was out delivering leaflets for him. And I'm just interested to find out if what tests says is true free with a traditional conservative voters are going to decide not support. Boris Johnson. This time well thank you very very good fairly good job. And there's quite a few issues on their in experts at the places. The hospital did hospitals falling down and his son and the thing about that. Well he keeps going to wait. What was I have a new? But we as the Dow but we never got. It shouldn't be doing a bit more about well. Yeah he's close. How much other things? I chose to Heathrow Airport so these vote this time this guy..

Boris Johnson Tehran Brexit brexit UK US parliament Comprehensive School Oxford Conservative Association helling Don Hospital Killington Hospital university Brunel University Heathrow Airport Hilton Hospital Syria Semitism Metropolitan Police
"pathology department" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:44 min | 11 months ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Don't need to have your kidney removed you don't have to have your kidney throw in a bucket in the pathology department you know what happens when a good start in the pocket it's not helping you at all and of course he thought if he removed his kidney that he would live well then the cancer just kept on growing back in the groove back in the logs in the ad immuno therapy and chemotherapy and yet who does of treatment and the cancer cap on growing and progressing well the chemo doctor didn't tell him Hey kimonos and work very well for kidney cancer the Kimmel doctor didn't tell him Dr liederman treats kidney cancer spreads the long he treats cancers that spread to long he treats lung cancers of the long noninvasively lots of people want that because they don't want their long thrown in a pocket and they know that either long to breeze we treat patients with lung cancers we also treat patients whose cancers travel to logs was two separate tumors in the logs one cancers and started the long which retreat and cancers of travel to the lungs metastasis which retreat and the fact that there are real liederman presented data showing a ninety seven percent success rate treating kidney cancers traveling to long's presented are dated but there are real leader with M. D. magna **** laude presented our day that one of the largest cancer meetings in the world so we know the chemo doctors in the certain should have known about it they did and they kept my giving chemo with the chemo didn't work the catcher kept growing in the long spy lateral right or left logs and he came here for a valuation and we talked about all the options that we talked about surgery run afraid the surgeon seemed like they're afraid of radio surgeon Dr leader months and the cable doctors seem that they're afraid of doctor leader Matt and Rachel surgery but we're not we're not afraid of them we talk about chemo and surgery because we know I mean think about non invasive invisible beams of radio surgery to attack the cancer of the lung versus opening up the longer moving part of your long or think about years of chemotherapy stage four cancer that's really had kidney cancer stage for the cube Kimmel doctors are planned the groom lifelong chemo well he finally heard through a radio listener like you and you can save lives I know that and he came here and I saw him I saw him last year and he had catches in the right lung and left long and we talked about all the options remember yeah that served in the kidney it failed the cancer came back he had chemo and other means of therapy it failed can't you kept growing and he came here last year and we offer treatment and.

kidney cancer chemo Matt Dr liederman M. D. Rachel surgery Kimmel ninety seven percent
"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Park and was going to live. Life, he walked out and he was happy celebrating. She hasn't been seen for weeks and weeks and weeks, in fact, she's missed court for the first time in twenty five years now, when part of the lung is removed and she had part of her lung removed for cancer. Yeah. There's surgery on the long lungs, like a big balloon they open up the long cut out part of the long. The long deflate need chest tubes, which are painful hospital, stay to the possibility of infection, and bleeding, and then the recovery, and, in fact, you never really recover because you never have that lung back that part of the long is now in the pathology department and some super pooper hospital. You never have your lung back. Think about that recovery recover. You get better way. You get better. Maybe. But you don't ever get back to where you were. Before, of course, we wish you all the best. And we wish supreme court Justice Ruth better Ginsburg, a speedy recovery, and a good recovery, and get back to her health, of course. But many people come to us with cancer one nod, your jewels in the long or the liver, the pancreas and the kidney or the bladder, the prostate, and they choose noninvasive treatment, because they don't want to have radical surgery that don't want to be opened up with tubes and IV's and then the convalescence and they don't want part of their body going. I can tell you, I see so many men and women with cancer in the lung like the supreme court Justice, who are never told that they can have non invasive treatment at the, the hospitals. Now, of course, we hope that she's told and we hope that she chose surgery. We hope that she was informed. But in my experience for ninety nine point nine nine nine percent. Scent of the patients who are seen by the surgeons at the big hospitals. They're never told.

Justice Ruth cancer supreme court Ginsburg bleeding nine nine nine percent twenty five years
"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And DVD. Hey, Dr Liederman were back. We are back just to emphasize this prostate tissue. Here's another patient, a see patients, I put my notes together and just didn't order this man said next in order. He's seventy two years old. He was he's America's five children born in Jamaica, he had radical surgery two and a half years ago. One of the biggest super-duper hospitals in New York. Hid radical surgery for prostate cancer. He never came to see me, then he went right to the surgeon to surgeon did the biopsy the surgeon fancy dancy served to the surgery since that day three years ago two and a half three years ago. He's been leaking urine every day. He's not had erection in three years said that they have surgery, and he came into me why. Because his cancer is coming back the PSA's rising after surgery the PSA should be zero. And while the PSA is going up in this man's word about it. And we got the records, and well, what are the records show well at that hospital fancy dancy hospital. Yeah. The Gleason seven cancer and the surgeon cut through the cancer. He left a positive margins in the patient. Now, if you have a cancer and the surgeon cuts through the cancer, the pathologist looks at the specimen, so. After surgery what's happened or during surgery. The material is taken the tissue the part of your body or your loved one's body is sent to the pathology department the pathologists that analyzes the material at issues a report. And then this man, the report showed that the cancer was left behind that the doctor cut right through the cancer. Also, the pathology report showed that it was Perry. Neuro invasion. Well, this was a Gleason seven cancer surgeon assured him he'd have good results. Well, you don't have to reassure patient when you know that ninety percent of men will be leaking urine and ninety seven percent will lose their actions. This man lost his erections. He is leaking urine. And the cancer came back. We know that because the PSA is rising, and why is a cancer back. Well because the doctor cut through. The cancer doctor left cancer behind Cathal report says it to the left anterior margin cancers left behind and this man has pain. He's lost weight. He's gone from one hundred fifty five two hundred forty five pounds. I examined him. And he came.

prostate cancer dancy dancy hospital Dr Liederman Gleason Jamaica New York America Cathal Perry three years one hundred fifty five two hun ninety seven percent seventy two years ninety percent
"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on 710 WOR

"America exactly for a case like yours because you're. Eighty five and you're a little bit fragile and not everyone wants their lungs to be removed when the lung is removed. Remember the God gave us the lung to breathe. So if that long is put in the pathology department, and our garbage can you can't breathe with it anymore. You've lost that ability to breathe and most people who have cancers of their lungs wanna breathe and many people with cancers along I can tell you, and I'll be talking later in the show about person who had terrible breathing COPD lung cancer, and she came to me because she understood if she had the long removed. She would become a respiratory cripple. She's already short of breath would become a respiratory Kripo. So there's many reasons whether supreme court Justice or anyone in the world with cancer and the long whether it started in the long that's a primary lung cancer or spread to the long a matassa. That the invasive radio surgery might be exactly what you're looking for no cutting, no bleeding, no hospital. Stay no removal of the lung. And now you can understand why am I in America was stereo tactic body radio surgery. When all the hospitals, even the bigger super-duper ones and all the doctors and all the facilities that standard. She was. Okay. One doctor stood up and say, hey, there's a need for better treatment. There's a need for non invasive treatment. There's a need one day. Maybe the supreme court Justice will come with cancer lung, and that they cut out that part of the long she might never be the same again. And that's true for you. And for me and your loved ones, and that's why so many people come here. Whether it's for lung cancer or breast cancer or lymph node cancer or liver or pancreas or kidney or bladder or prostate or colorectal or gynecologic sites. Sarcoma melanoma and more. This is the work that we do every day. And we have lots of information to send to you can call office even now at two and two choices to one to two four six forty two thirty seven, and we send that information all over the world, even to Washington DC. So just call up her office, even now at two and two choices. That's two and two two four six forty two thirty seven cholera office. Get a booklet a DVD will send it to you. If you want an appointment to be seen about cancer suspected cancer..

cancer supreme court America cholera COPD Sarcoma melanoma Washington one day
"pathology department" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Here. It is. A surgeon a medical surgeon did not do anything wrong after wrongly removing a woman's healthy kidney. Instead of an adrenaline gland. Amazing. The surgeon insists he should not be penalized for removing the woman's healthy kidney. Instead of her adrenal gland. Dr Scott Baker. Is being sued by his patient Dina Knapp who claims his medical air left with left her with stage three kidney disease, depression, and chronic fatigue a month after MS nap filed her lawsuit. Dr Baker has responded agreeing that he committed the mix up described but denying that in doing so he breached no standard of care. The air has been spotted the same day in the scanned by pathology department at a hospital in a doctor Baker called nap to tell her that he did not get everything and she eventually decided to have a second surgery. At mayo clinic in Rochester, Minnesota to remove the gland and the mass. The adrenal glands instead atop the kidneys and producing hormones to regulate sugar fat and protein in the body as well as keeping the blood pressure under control, they do this by producing a number hormones, including adrenaline cortisol now Astro so here, you have a doctor. Outrageously insists what I didn't do anything. I just took the wrong tissue out of your body. Instead of removing a unhealthy tissue. He removes something completely different. And he says, hey, what's wrong? I, you know, it's okay. Yeah. I made a mistake, but I shouldn't be penalized for it. This is what goes on in the thinking process in some sick way. And it's outrageous. And it's why it qualified is the health outrage of the week. All right. Let's get right back to your telephone calls and questions, and let's say Hello. Oh, back to Tim back to Tim. Yeah. Tim is having pain. He's in Fresno. And he's having pain all over his body joint. Pain is been to his doctor and they're doing a lot of stuff. He's not sleeping. Well, and Tim if you're there still I want you to know something first and foremost, you need to get away from the medical care that you're under because it's not working and try something completely different starting with drinking more water. If you way, let's say you should drink about half, your body weight announces, and I know this sounds too simple to be true..

Tim Dr Scott Baker Dr Baker Baker Dina Knapp mayo clinic cortisol Minnesota Rochester Astro Fresno
"pathology department" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Just look like a mass between your breast bone in your heart, and in general, they need to be removed to really make a clear diagnosis, especially if they're true thi- moma's because I staging not to get too technical. But the stage you have to look at the entire mass. And and whether it's a capsulated not in capsule and so forth. So they have to be removed to accurately diagnose and stage them, and if certainly if a if a malignant fi MoMA were to be left in place. It would not be a good thing. That is correct. Yeah. So Loretta what was it like to have robotic surgery? I've had several surgeries in my day. But I'm seventy one, but I felt I didn't feel any excess pain feel comfortable to hospital was good at just felt good about it. I mean, especially knowing that my recovery time was going to be a quicker than it would have been if they'd had to go through the chest. I feel good. I'm I'm moving around. Good. I feel good. I listen to my doctors when they tell me what I shouldn't shouldn't do in. I think that's important. So what what where we are the scars on your chest. And how do you have just a handful of little puncture sites? What is where did where did doctrine conspiring make the incisions on my left side? They went on my left side. And then he explained to me that it would be several small stitches there were going to be there. And that's what they did. I had one drain to. There was a funding my breasts that they be removed, and then I had my stitches removed about a week and a half after my surgery, which is so was so happy for you that everything went well. And what did the what did the final pathology show? I know that whenever something is removed from the human body. We usually send it to the pathology department did everything turned out. Okay. On the pathology fine. Everything is great. It ended up being a benign, fixes O'Brien benign. That's that's wonderful. You know, Loretta mentioned the Loretta. Thank you so much for for sharing your story with us. And and I was intrigued that you mentioned that you had a drain there. And and I think as many of our listeners know the chest cavity has negative pressure. Right. So that we can expand our lungs, Paul. Maybe you can comment on when you operate on the chest. Did you always have to leave a tube in there to get the air out what what can people expect? When if they were to have a robotic procedure on their chest. I think the first thing obviously is what organ are we going to be operating on? And I think, you know, we actually, you know, doctors foreign I discussed this about you know, what is the list of what we should do all the time with these surgeries. And I think for the standardly if you're going to come in to have any type of lung surgery, which is probably the most common thing you do. Right. But the surgery on the lung, correct, I think you should expect to at least have some drain coming out your chest at least overnight. You know, the lung is a very soft and very delicate Oregon, and sometimes it takes a little bit longer for it to heal up. And you know, to really we use it more to protect you from having little leaks where the air comes out of your long. But you know, in cases, like, you know, Loretta is. I mean, we we leave in some people leave it in for a few hours overnight. But typically, no more than overnight, you know, obviously, depending on the extent of your disease. I mean, if we're doing a simple, you know, pull it out, you know, you know, lymph node or ectopic parathyroid, even sometimes you don't even need to leave a drain in the chest at all until you're left with just all these little incisions, and you're done. Mario. I'll give you the last word is it is it safe to say that for long Najah goals, and for for many lung cancers, the robotic technology has been revolutionary, I believe so absolutely. I think it's allowed us me personally to do things. That I couldn't do with kind of the chopstick approaches was alluded to before. And I think it's even made some things we used to do open much easier with the magnification lighting. So it is definitely a allowed us to help a lot more people than I could before fantastic. Well, thank you all so much for joining us in a segment, we'll.

Loretta Oregon Mario O'Brien Paul
"pathology department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm sitting with a GP who's doing a physical. It's an hour and a half an hour and forty five minutes now, I'm worrying about his patients. Right. I've had other physicians. Tell me, you know, I have to see eight or ten patients an hour just to make my nut just to pay to open up the door. And then you realize oh my God. This is what we're doing healthcare. I've got an hour and forty five minutes. He's asking questions I've got a page of questions he'll pick up and call us. Specialist. They'll come in to the conversation. It's mind bogglingly smart. Right. So many doctors it's the system. That's the problem not not the physicians themselves, so the important thing. And I've been listening to John knows where the who's the outgoing CEO and president who interviewed for the film, but we've been out on the road talking about the film, and he says, it's really important understand. There's two parallel systems. One is the system of care. And and that's the faith in the hope part of it is sort of the sense of kindness. The other part is the super Lee will engineered system, and they bring in engineers to make it more efficient, and these they've been trading and building on and experimenting with these efficiencies for more than one hundred years. So they know how to get things done from the pathology department next to the operating theatre from the patient's records, traveling with the patient from understanding the centrality the patient from all of this stuff. It's so well engineered in top of that these places are beautiful architectural things. There's lots of. Art there. So when you go in you realize that the conditions of care are not just scientific outcomes. You're listening to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart have been speaking with Ken burns about his new documentary the mayoclinic, faith, hope and science. We'd love to hear from you. If you have a question have you ever been to the mayo clinic, do, you know, someone who has we'd love to hear your story? You can call us at two one two four three three WNYC. We'll be back with more from Ken burns after the break. WNYC is supported by Kenneth Lonergan Waverly gallery, actor comedian writer director, Elaine may returns to Broadway alongside Lucas hedges. Jon Allen, and Michael Sarah performances begin September twenty fifth tickets at telecharge dot com. The John S and James L. Knight foundation, helping public radio advance journalistic excellence in the digital age. Knightfoundation believes, informed and engaged communities are essential for healthy democracy. More at knightfoundation dot org. Neon and movie pass presenting the new film monsters and men when a police shooting of an innocent black. Man is caught on tape. A Brooklyn neighborhood rises up to take a stand opens this Friday and select theaters. It's a real personal decision about what you do with your estate. My name is Elizabeth Helene. And I am the listeners legacy circle member. So by having WNYC in.

WNYC Ken burns John S Elizabeth Helene Alison Stewart mayo clinic Brooklyn Kenneth Lonergan Waverly Knightfoundation James L. Knight foundation Lucas hedges Jon Allen CEO Elaine president Michael Sarah writer director forty five minutes one hundred years
"pathology department" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"pathology department" Discussed on Kickass News

"Kogyo. They literally built the mayo. In a cornfield in the middle of nowhere. Exactly. And it's still a, you know, it's not. It's a city right now, but it's not that big city and it's still in the middle of cornfields and it's, you know, there's an interesting statistic that they were performing more operations per year. I think it was in nineteen o five. When Rochester then had a population of seven thousand then Johns Hopkins did in Baltimore, which had a population of half a million and the reputation just spread like wildfire because ordinary people could just walk in there and come by train from Alberta, Canada, and have this thing fixed and sent back home. Yes, and it seemed so perfectly mid western, that all of this originated with a handshake between the doctor WW mayo and none, and that deal has held for over one hundred fifty years. Even today there's still no written contract between the nuns in the clinic. That's correct. It's an amazing story of the nuns. He think, well, that's cute and anachronistic nineteenth century. The nuns are still there. They have been values council to make sure that those nuns and they're Franciscan values are part of the equation. As they negotiate the day to day, you know figuring out how you keep at this in the right way, and both the mayo family and the nuns have left their Mark on the clinic. What did they each bring to the table? They've got this great story and, and there's these two parallel sort of world's at that coexist perfectly within male. One is one that's about service Cape ING, true to these values that the patient is for some of the Franciscan values. The values at the mayo is brought to the table and how you do that over time. The other is that they've got a well oiled system to make sure that happened. They actually hire and continue to hire engineers that helped them make sure that these efficiencies will not only stay true to the values, but also be literally that efficiencies. And so they're able to do these things much quicker. Much better. And I want to ask you about that because a side from these various advanced surgeries, they were performing. They innovated in streamline the entire hospital experience. For instance, they started putting the labs next to the operating room. What did that do pathology next to the operating table in nineteen thousand five. One of the mayo brothers challenged pathologist to figure out a way to get a biopsy quicker than usual. He did and they put the pathology department right next to the operating table. Why is this important? Well, say you're a woman in your undergoing a abreast operation for breast cancer and they pull out the mass and they send it to pathology, and they know before they so her backup, whether the margins are clear, meaning they've gotten it all more often than not because the pathology takes a long time and other places you've sown the patient backup. They've gone home and a week later, the doctor said, the margins aren't clear, come in for a second, maybe third operation, but Mayo's. Got this system a well oiled system that still puts you the patient. I, that's able to cut down four fold on those secondary and tertiary operations. I mean, that in of itself ought to be worth the price of admission certainly. And it's hard to overemphasize the importance of these seemingly simple ideas, like having a team of doctors treat a patient or all those doctors having access to.

WW mayo Cape ING Johns Hopkins Canada Rochester Alberta Baltimore one hundred fifty years
"pathology department" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

10:38 min | 2 years ago

"pathology department" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"In one eight seven seven doc Dali. One eight seven seven d. c. d. a. l. i. r. right so couple of losses we, need to talk about this is kind of interesting All right let's start with this one and I'll woman resume Because the surgeon Removed a kidney I. Wasn't supposed to this is, in Sioux, Falls South Dakota I'm not sure what she was doing up in South Dakota but she's not one Dina nap and she was supposed to have an adrenal gland and. A, mass on the gland removed during the. Surgery in October fifth two, thousand sixteen Lawsuit instead the doctor, Dr Scott Baker Removed are healthy right kidney Baker was informed later that day by, the pathology department at Vernon McKinnon hospital that removed the kidney and failed to remove the adrenal gland But on October seventh later He told me that, he hadn't heard from pathology So He was told what. Happened Possibly when Patient two days later still doesn't know what's going on So the patient Or the doctor called. The. Patient October eleventh so now that's six days after the surgery and told her the part of the adrenal gland was still. Inside her body And that he did not get everything the loss of says he advised, her that she would have to undergo a second. Surgery I know some of you guys getting mad at this is all alleged this has been reported by USA today but Knapp went on to have a second, surgery But. She went to mayo clinic and Rochester Minnesota and then. The gland in the mass was successively removed Mark having the executive director of the surgical South Dakota or Baker is a. Partner in which is also named as? Defendants said, he, had not seen the complaint. Nor could come that why? Does the article bring them up I thought okay this, is gonna be interesting what is the codefendant say so the complaint was found. In federal court says NASA runny searcher resulted, in. An incurable and progressive kidney disease and a remaining kidney Patient. Says she suffers from pain fatigue depression? And mental, distress, further the lawsuit says since. You Rony surgery DNA has? Been unable to perform many functions and has required replacement, services to clean them in her home the past the future cost of yet Is to be determined okay When you guys hear. This You get grumpy I don't. Blame you for getting grumpy I could hear you guys are Doctors yeah this is a cluster This is a cluster, I would like? To. Know what what happened I mean this this. Is a cluster beyond words and I understand this is alleged okay he's not guilty until proven. Innocent that I really. Would like to know what the heck happened How do you go into. Surgery and not know what you're removing did somebody on the paperwork say it was the kid Did pathology say the, mass extended into the kidney Did the pathologist say this was renal cell carcinoma They're not adrenal cancer So he. Took out the kidney So a. Lot of things went wrong here One thing that really stands. Out is the patient was told right away Patient was told oh we didn't get everything out So, let's talk about Dr cover-ups That's tricky in medical school. We're told we're not to. Lie And medical. School where talks old up to If you, make a mistake you own up to it but don't apologize for something you did it And you know I've, told you guys cases where I've I've was never been sued thank God and never heard a patient but I can't. Tell you, how many, times I started taking blame, for something that I really, wasn't even involved in I wasn't you know Yeah, we had a patient call up saying Dr wax gave medication that I'm having a side effect to so the nurse. Goes doctor, wax the Patient you yesterday is having a. Side effect to the medicine prescribed right Medicine right away come in let me take a look just let me know what is the medicine and what does the side effect because I may have the. And the nurse asked the patient and it was Glucophage a diabetic medication and the side effect was my neck hurts I'm like neck hurts I mean I'm ready. To go oh I'm sorry stopped the medicine One, wasn't eckerd's yes she's. Got, a rash. On her neck That sounded like? Shingles bringer in. Tell, her not to stop the diabetes medication And she had shingles And the diabetes medication had nothing. To do, with, that. It's, just oh, yeah well you know she started a new medication that. Didn't bring, on shingles I mean, maybe somebody, could say oh yeah new. Medication could be stressful, the stress who knows, but I'm, ready to you know because the patient said they. Got a side effect, I'm, ready to. Say oh I'm sorry Stop them and, I the women need, a blood, sugar was really high and our blood sugar probably. Spite because she was, starting, and affection Shingles is an infection So and she was a diabetic and she ended up. Staying on the medication she ended up doing very well on the Which is, also does but foreman so you know in medical school I, teach the students you make a mistake you say you're sorry but don't. Say you're sorry if you. Didn't make the mistake. You want to address it because you don't want to perpetuate a mess if. That patient did it come back to me And said Yep, Dr wax gave me, this medicine it's a side effect whatever you know she even, said she's sorry and it was you know who's going to stop and. Start examining the shingles you. See what I mean I mean you need to kind. Of clear the slate okay You know what's going on but. You Mess up, on surgery You have to own up where you have to, tell them what happened Do doctors, lied patients, I'd like to say no but it probably. Happens everybody lives you. Know many times my car has been worked on you change oil yet Oil wasn't changed I mean, I, you know I I can't tell you how many times we get light to But when we're talking. About it being your body I tell you all to, have an, advocate have a patient advocate there, have somebody that could you know, if you, are you know let's say you're on a ventilator make sure you have family members you know round the clock that could be there during visit appropriate. Visiting hours, to be there and you'll talk to the. Nurse and, find, out what, they're, doing you know you're allowed to have an advocate in there But, you can't have an advocate in the OR And I, can understand that that's? Really annoyed if somebody got what? Are you doing. What are you doing to work let me work let me. Do my, thing so you can't have somebody there so what what you have to. Do, that to all your advocating, before the surgery now this is this person's fault But, one way to prevent this is okay explain to me what my situation. Is, and give me my results All right let me see, the result so I have an adrenal. Mass. Show me where that is and show me what you're gonna cut And please make mine you know early morning so. You're wide awake after you if, you had your coffee. Don't do, my surgery at the end. Of the. Day where you could mess. Up and then the other thing too which is really interesting I mean I've had tons of surgeries When I'm waiting for. My surgery you're wide awake, and the nurse comes in reconfirms the surgery being dubbed the anesthesiologist comes into reconfirm. The surgery and the surgeon comes, in you have three. People coming, in to reconfirm the surgery So what I'm dying to. Know is in this particular case is that what, happened where they. Confirmed okay we're taking out the adrenal above the kidney and the dodgers just goes in and, he's so used to remove, kidneys said he just removed to kidney I don't know Now there's another lawsuit going on there's a black doctor African American doctor. Being told Tallahassee Says black doctor is suing tells. C. memorial healthcare because he was discriminated against by being kept off an on call list and because it was kept. Off, and on call list was. Being forced to take a larger load of indigent patients And having his medical staff privileges with helped Now I'm not sure what's going on why they would take them off. Call why they would takeaways medical staff privileges but he filed this in federal courts said he was discriminated against because he was black This media attention back in a couple of your a couple years ago And people protested the hospital now Dr Webster's gastroenterologist His complaint says that the seven hundred seventy two bed hospital deprived him of his rights by discriminating against them on the basis of race by. Denying, them equal protection And as it was all the policies opposed on him he earned less than his white counterparts practicing the same field of medicine So we're going to, a little bit into this if an employer prevents you from doing something If you make less. Money to somebody else one eight seven seven Doc Would it.

South Dakota Dr wax kidney Baker kidney Patient diabetes kidney disease adrenal cancer Dr Scott Baker USA dodgers Vernon McKinnon hospital NASA Sioux mayo clinic Dina Knapp Rochester Minnesota Partner
"pathology department" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"pathology department" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Mental health problems to try and help somebody overcome enormous still got the highest death rate of any mental illness uneven with a low of great support. Some people very much struggle to shake often when when I meet people in the clinic who are suffering besa verily with una wrecks on ask them about came about. They often struggle to pinpoint the moment at which the relationship with food diversity changed in. It's almost like a kind of enchantment as fallen over them. That's often the terms that they use to describe it as well. Some some malignant changes has befallen them about how they can appreciate interact with food Unwin. They manage to shake off, and that's one of the most wonderful things in in medicine. This when somebody throws on regular often on the. Body flutter. She is on his not again in the undergo this most wonderful transformation in Rivera sister body fills out again, that is also described by patients as quite a mysterious process. Almost lately count. Really understand what happened. There disgraceful for the fact that they managed to shake off. It seems to me quite a plausible culturally this idea of some kind of enchantment falling on just because it often comes on unbidden, then departs again just as on accountably in the chapter in the book on gigantism use polish chapter to look into the the madness of nature. And I wanted to talk about why. I wanted very much with that chapter didn't want it just to be another straight exploration of a of a hormonal transformation. So our bodies change all the time in response to hormones and the bodybuilder chapters. You mentioned it is example of that higher taking extremist. Hormones can make your body change shape. I guess gigantism is another example of that. When you're growth hormone goes out of control in your body just grows and grows and grows. People can reach seven, eight feet toll that is unsustainable. Ultimately, in reunion bodies, human frame isn't really designing decrypt able to maintain that kind of size. And so people with gigantism start to suffer progams pressure. Our heart struggled to pump blood to such a big frame in Seoul on I very much wanted without chapter, not just to be the straight exploration of the hormones. Also look other ways in which. Each ideas of enormity of grandeur of elevation of stature are also unsustainable in a perfect example of that is the is the madness of of Nietzsche because he describes in his own right things beautifully. How started to lose touch with reality. He began to believe himself to be of immense philosophical stature. He believed himself. Other members of mankind were almost dwarves in comparison with his enormous mental capacities. And that too is unsustainable, that too proved his don't fall, and there's a lovely lane from Montana where Montaigne says that no matter what size you are, you're much human being, you know, we don't measure the star chart of human beings by the l. are by the foot and the same should be said, if I, we assess human beings. In terms of their mental capacities. You know, you're not more human just because you're more intellectually elevated. But as a trap that leaches certainly seem to fall into the end of his life, just one mole then and you off these chapters with chapter on death. And within that chapter you you attend an autopsy. Tell us what happened? Well, I as a GP or can GP don't often have caused speak to forensic pathologists, but some once a forensic pathologist preparing a report on when my own patients who died and I had to speak to her about off medical history of this particular patient. And I said to her, you know, I envy you guys sometimes because a lot of my medical work is about trying to imagine what's going on beneath the skin. Imagine the unfolding pathology. Imagine the anatomy. Annette, you actually see once and for all what's going on under the skin. When you do. Cops as everyday and she said, all that's a myth issue didn't come and join us. So I went along to in on some autopsies in the forensic pathology department in the marketing and. It was a real. It was absolutely a revelation to me. Quickly, the body is divided into parts. Amusingly professional. These individuals are just the debt of knowledge they can start to predict about ho- somebody lived another died..

gigantism Nietzsche Seoul growth hormone Rivera Annette Montana Montaigne eight feet one mole
"pathology department" Discussed on PD Stories

PD Stories

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"pathology department" Discussed on PD Stories

"So he agrees in the store the store detective agrees but as she's completing the act he says i'm sorry sweetie i've changed my mind you're getting arrested so she kept it in her mouth so we get the headquarters the jail give me a styrofoam cup she spits into the cup we put her in the holding pen we shoot up to the stanford hospital go the pathology department and we asked them could you please analyze this in here and tell us if there's any semen in this cup ten minutes later come out all yeah went back to kaldor arrested him sexual assault let me tell you some some of my favorite people were prostitutes because they were really disoriented earth they knew everything happening in the street good info great info rainfall and i knew her that store detective had been shocked when you guys came back in the rest of his boss almost we almost had a locked the boss up because when we went in there is came and started giving us a hard time i should look you really don't want to have two people arrested today for interfering won't you let us do our job if your man is innocent that'll come out later on but that's not for us to decide we have credible evidence very crowded wow yeah now when did you join the burglary squad on i think it was tober sixth of nineteen eighty four my partner at the time phil he was on the sergeants list and he said to me you know what i think it would behoove me to go into detective bureau lagoon on my resume to become a sergeant i felt kinda bad like it was my wife coming on telling me she was leaving me for another man and i said really fill he goes yeah he goes i you know we have a great partnership but i i have this opportunity and i said all right you know what i think i'm gonna put my name in to the detective bureau they needed one more guy and i was the guy in the bureau it was a whole new world to me because these are like really seasoned guys i had three is on the job i mean i was a as they called us roar as rookies but i got lucky again i was teamed up with a investigator vinnie hat mun vinnie had him in had about eighteen years on the job he was a guy i knew because she was assigned for awhile up in the chiefs sweet he was like a physical himself a secretary allies on yet right it was a very funny man very witty a shoop shoop cop a great interrogator i sit to v wave you've been he goes sh if you do too much around here they expect too much eagles you have a lot of energy hanging around i'll make you start on worry about a kid and i was the kind of guy that when i saw someone like that i made up my point to hang around with them because i wanted to know everything they knew you have to gleam everything people know because some things aren't in textbooks since everything changes every day you have to be able to bob and we've a lot and that's what these guys knew how to do they know how to bob and we've now you were burglaries robberies homicides the whole spectrum while what happened was we will call the burglary robbery squad but by the time i got in there we didn't do robberies we just did burglaries we ought mentored the major crime section so if you had to shootings come in at the same time three shootings coming at the same time they would grab us right away so i now downtime we would do burglaries and then if we got caught with a shooting or a homicide we worked on them but what was good about it because our felonies happened way more than they felonies we knew a lot of people in the street every day we we investigate a felony so we had a lot of street connections and we knew a lot of the bad guys who knew a lot of bad guys and you know at business one hand washes the other so we were able to gleam a lot information on cases and you also in the stanford area have a lot of.

eighteen years ten minutes one hand
"pathology department" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"pathology department" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Accurate cast ted to quantify exactly how much of the kenema as in me yes so certainly highquality sausages and unknown inconvenient thing about less traces of human because i guess as the amazing thing about dna in our kind of leaving a trace of ice else touching led the sampo chomping at the south end yet can guest it's gotta show aspca said anything it could adding yes yes because we have sequencing datecertain we can actually see the variation in the different bits of sequins yet we did find some inquiring interesting at him wintrust he was his with these sausages made from one pay no that might firm probably would imagine too afraid so so that's really cool because when we look to the sequence states at what we could see was actually probably three or four different pigs in that just from the genetic variation that sets really cool so much as it was sort of what you guys do remain suspicious thirty feel about the results of relieved to be honest yes immobile replaced while now than that cited the only thing left today and save some for me thanks very much to stephaine and to add fun out from cambridge university's pathology department the secret thing a sausage for us on very relieved we didn't end up with something of a sweeney taught moment there now with us now is david bentley he's the chief scientist of the global company alumina thereby steering cambridge here and they've also developed a system that we used to read out sausage dna and there the official partner of the nhs one hundred thousand genome projects this is an ambitious study it was on voting 2012 bother them prime minister david cameron and his aim is to read the genetic sequences of thousands of national health service patients.

aspca cambridge university scientist partner nhs prime minister david cameron ted david bentley official