32 Burst results for "Pathak"

"pathak" Discussed on Makom Israel Teachers Lounge

Makom Israel Teachers Lounge

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"pathak" Discussed on Makom Israel Teachers Lounge

"Accurate truth is is the professional keystone of what you do. And so you're you're really indispensable for citizens who who want to understand what's going on. It is difficult one of one of my superiors at work told me once that A writing doesn't have to be perfect to have to be very good Because if you want to write something perfect than than it will take you six months to write something pathak's right that's what happens when you write a book. It takes forever to get right which is also a form of journalism. It's also important that long long-term journalists but that's very different What i do is breaking news thing. So i need to get the information out in a in a format that people can actually understand and read and it has to be as as accurate as possible as to the mission that i know right now and an often. I mean i won't get things wrong but often there's a clarifications that come out afterwards from sheriff's officials and then after all atom so in a lot of my A lot a lot of the stories related to gun crime out and get the identification of the victim Much much later an hour or two hours later once. The family is notified etc. So then go in and out a line that says Late to the victim was identified as So what we're reading you on the breaking news newsbeat we should. We should see everything as ongoing as part in other words. We should see your reporting is ongoing. Yeah if you click on on a on an article of shooting that just happened. It's unlikely you'll see victims name. Sometimes the age won't be completely clear Some times you know. Medical substance will say they will forty two. The police say they will forty four or something so usually just write something like in their forties to try and keep it. Keep it accurate. Because i don't want to say they were forty two if they were actually forty four..

pathak
"pathak" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"pathak" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"To go where it's the coolest so the barns are able to provide that so they're pretty happy and you're not feeling like they're cooped up and want to get out now and they get. The pens are big enough. They walk around. They get plenty of exercise walking to the pilot hike to the parlor in the cows. Don't like to we try to keep them in their pens for as long as they can because they don't really like to socialize and different groups like to stay with the same group they're usually with. They make friends going to school. You may go to recess but then you come back to the same class little anyway. So what would you say that. By the way we have the robot coming to visit us. This is my favorite employees and this robot just pushes that feed. That's laying for the coast. Chew on right. make sure it's as close to them as possible. So she'll go through. I call her. She clergy but she goes through several times a day her boundary points or these little magnetic strips on the ground. So she most of the time does not run away goodness otherwise she would have run us over and they're heavy that requires full traffic everytime when she goes off pathak. Sing this song. Take a drunk girl home. It's bad but yeah no. She goes through several times a day even in the middle of the night. So we don't have to have a person taking that three hours out of their day to push up cal feed. They have regular feed on a schedule every single day. So even though the cows can kind of reach some feed their at that big of a deal to make sure they have as much as they feel like eating all the time they have. This robot which. I'm sure is in an inexpensive piece of equipment running all the time to make sure those cows have what they want to eat..

pathak
"pathak" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"pathak" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

"It's an interactive session on a video. Coal which includes may sharing some tips but also the lovely humans on the coal sharing by wins the challenges they learnings and tips. It's always incredibly inspiring and empowering and sets up all up for very inspiring and productive. Wake i get so much feedback from participants who are asking me to continue these lives after the course so this is something i haven't heard before so this is what i'm gonna do for the month of guest this anyone who's going through challenging times and during this time a recording there lockdowns where i am in the world and i know a lot of people are suffering these pathak for you to get some momentum. H monday is also anyone who stuck. I want to ask some questions or want some inspiration to move forward the week. It's for anyone who wants to be around like minded inspiring people that is so important to get momentum on your dream life. It's for anyone who done my course but fallen off a beat. I want to get back on track. This happens to all of us but you do not have had to do my costs to be part of these for anyone who wants to be. Part of a veritable club suffered a month of august. We are going to read a book and we're going to share what we're learning and implemented from. That book is for anyone who feel unmotivated. I want to be inspired to start taking action and wants to thought h being inspired to make the most of the week ahead and it's also for anyone who wants to be supported inspired and have some fun. I decided that. I'm gonna make august my best month this year regardless of the challenges around me so i'm going to be there to inspire you to consider the same and this is how we work. Every monday nights starts on the ninth. Bogus twenty. twenty one will jump video coal together. You don't have to be on camera. You can be completely silent if you want. Just get the inspiration. I will share some tips and answer any questions you have. You can also share your wins challenges learnings and be supported by myself and the rest of the group which is often the highlight of the spent where everyone puts their thoughts and inspiration and challenges and winds together. And if you choose to will already the same book over that full-week and share one highlight that we can implement in our own life so we'll combine the concept of a book club as well it will be recorded so if you make it you'll be able to watch it when it suits you and you will receive a fiefdom monday night with incredible inspiring surprise guest as a bonus on a monday. That is the last monday of august so that we five mondays in total. And i'm so excited for you to meet this. Incredible human who is very inspiring. He will be a surprise guest. I will add illegally. Show notes if you want to be part of this or just go to your dream since handled com. Thanks for tuning in today. I hope you are inspired. And i will see next week.

pathak
Mark Walker Says Trump Made Mistake Backing NC GOP Senate Rival

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:15 min | 10 months ago

Mark Walker Says Trump Made Mistake Backing NC GOP Senate Rival

"Me about representative. Mike walker lashing out at club for growth suggesting that trump was misled into endorsing ted bud in the north carolina. Senate race. Well you know this is part of their two parts of this but the one of the parts of this is it's part of genre of trump's never wrong he's only misled and of course in north carolina in the senate race there Rich and birds retiring until you have mark walker ted bud and former governor governor pathak rory trump endorsed early and really without warning. He everybody thought he was gonna take time. Once his daughter-in-law laura trump decided not to run quickly doors representative head but mark walker. Who had been. Tomorrow i'll go asking for trump's support as they all go there and ask for trump support was upset and when i spoke to him on friday. He blamed mark meadows former. North carolina congressman. Turn from white house chief of staff and said he wanted to pay back over a congressional endorsement in the congressional seats in that meadows had vacated now the other part of this is the club the club for growth i consider sort of greybeard of rabble-rousing dc advocacy groups And they have been endorsing and republican primaries. They tend to to endorse republican primaries. Where there's no way. The republican nominee can lose the general election in the texas race. They endorsed susan. Wright the widow of the deceased congress men. And it's jake l. d. Who won and so you know every once in a while. One of trump's endorsement falter and extra comfort growth also has a pretty good record. But you know walker. Accuse them of venus outside. Dc group bundling and dumping a bunch of money into local politics. And i think he's trying to use what happened in texas. And i can't blame him. 'cause you're always looking for something to say that. Look this outsider group meddled in a local ray. They're meddling in our local ace. You shouldn't voters didn't listen to them there and you guys shouldn't listen here

Ted Bud Donald Trump Mark Walker Pathak Rory Trump Laura Trump Mike Walker North Carolina Mark Meadows Senate Jake L White House Texas Wright Susan Congress Walker
Create Killer Content that Gets Bums on Seats, with Ben Lifton

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

08:14 min | 1 year ago

Create Killer Content that Gets Bums on Seats, with Ben Lifton

"Me just start off this conversation because content kind of sounds obvious to a lot of us an yet content. Yeah craft content. What what we talk about. Because some people have no idea when we say christ great content. Greg i we are united way creating tapped your platform for you communicate to your community with. That's basically will comes in. Its continues anything that you create as a professional as a film This as as stein's wherever you are you're creating content to communicate to your community and your fun on social media or google mail on emails for example side. It could be images videos. Podcasts britain articles. your santeria. The actual design of the interior not crabbie's contact like it needs content in. It's not just an empty talks so everything is contact when when you start to realize the opportunities round creating amazing content for your brown's the a just an obstacle endless linnet basically you do see. Sometimes people will. I've heard he said. I dunno what content to create content in everything. We do wherever you know. We took in your bums on seats getting into e. You've got to really identify what it. What is your message. I guess before you go out that we content then exactly and then is making sure that when you off when you do your take. For example wind duty professionals suspecion always asks. Are you communicating to consumers to a client or you communications heritage easy prize. Mary very very very different. And that defines which direction you go in. I guess we've where you can guy. We content pretty much. I think that that is very slight roots. And any any topic. Eric schmidt come to everyone can create content but the the difficult thing is creating engaging content that fox conversation stocks an immersion the Get stop following for example on your social media to ditch that current stars and movie to begin with you. i'm not takes time and be creativity to content create and it was. It takes a lot of of dedication to 'cause it's not nice success in your to create engaging like binge while the context. I'm gonna like this conversation lot today. This row vice straight or they send you know from from a personal point of view that were heckled live and we kind of always been narrow on social but it has been learning process for me. And i know what i'm getting riot times and sometimes eats i think when i talked to experts like yourself bent on this subject. The one thing that probably you would say it is planning content rather than just winging it is not acceptable because there are days where missing. I haven't got a plan. But i think that kind of works. He sent on my phone. I'm ready to go with them. What's your take on that. That's where you're just explaining that all of the fact that your sometimes gang an idea when you find the having debt and that's because you become confident as a content creates because you can see. I do not asking what that would have been appointed some somewhere Walk on our way back to my to we. Brilliant as the keys so pathak plan prevents historical phones. I not enough. Why that's going to quote in. What am i Contented planned posts fix the six page. I love that. It's so good. Isn't that nineteen i really. I really do agree with it. Because i'm a big believer. I've always been a big believer in quality over quantity announced monday night will wayside saharan easy prizes. Like i said harry shovel contact with a completely different game when you uranium content on your account a piece of content out on on instagram Outtakes will convince without How as a e mail in my knees western current client base dugout. He's content out. Use your town and you start to walk out okay. What makes different communities. What means different positive community pick. I'm creating content for example. May i know the higher level creativity really while Migrate my rails ions It's a it's a little bit more like a monument pledged events stuff. I do my Grid rails Occurring yards rtd based ash whereas some my stories behind saints which genuinely believe. Anyway that's interesting so again you approach in is interesting here because y- y seeing that story says grit and grit tends to be the polish side. An against the stories is a bit more rule risk. It's kinda now it's there. It's exactly right yeah. I think that there is why tend suggest haraguchi price just to get into the rhythm of being big. That confidence is to break down a little bit to think i can't. Instagram is a multi multi multi platforms multiple english Multiple stories with john muslim rule behind the scenes. As i say shove him personality all hyphen sire iranian stories tall enough. I'm not stories Avenue grid at ways thought is an i. I like to see people think of as you pull failure. United saying you a model in you're going costing costing your costing for shades and you. You're you're not so. Instagram grid is and to give the analogy of you should is wayne greatest hits ooh knifings Real love. it is already a love you put in that nightmare anyway. I found her a very hot lady. Right she's got she skinny. Hey look we often see. Minks ask rails as on new video platform fence around and just like rails tiktok his. The video only on youtube is longer for com temperatures. Your your suggestion the Long contact united education based skills based like breaking things down pace content similar to itt bay side when you thought to break down just to summarize it it stories. The song will personality grid His satirical finding brielle's as transmissions speedier video. vcr tiktok video video. Youtube long contents are actually adding real violent with with education usually and then emails while unit. That's that's more of us. Breeding community these peak where he would have signed up to rating. They might already in existing client in our notch about your funnels. Isn't it a

Stein Harry Shovel Eric Schmidt Greg Britain Pathak Brown Haraguchi Google FOX Mary John Muslim Instagram Saints Tiktok Long Contact United Education Wayne Youtube United Brielle
Detoxification Support During a Fast with Dr. Michael Murray

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Detoxification Support During a Fast with Dr. Michael Murray

"Dr. Michael murray thank you for joining us here at the fasten transformation summit. Thanks david i love the name of your summit. Transformation is always a great thing of fasting. can be powerful vehicle to to make that happen. Yeah absolutely and so. How did you get get going. I mean obviously you've got this passion for research. How do you get started. In natural health. World had become the voice of natural medicine. There's an inner story in kind of the outer story. I tell everyone. I'll do a little bit. Mix of both of my father who developed a condition called els palsy. it Condition where you lose the Information to the muscles of the face a space with literally paralyzed you went so nature catholic doctrine at literally abroad his face back to light and I had a knee operation a couple years prior and it just wasn't really responding to physical therapy and he suggested i see this nature path. I did and it was just a miracle in my life. And i need to watch learn more. And the more i learned about the diet herbs natural approaches to health and human it just resonated with something deep inside the end this became my initial. I feel really blessed. And i gained so much personally from the path that i was led to and hopefully i made a difference in the world on my own death. Yeah absolutely certainly have. I need you and i really want to acknowledge you for just paving the course for younger people like me to come up and have all these references and be able to really share this message more and more people throughout the world. And you've seen. I mean literally over the last twenty years huge growth in a natural natural wellness. And other work you've done is helped high near that. So thank you for that thank you. This is such an important topic. I just wanted to stress at all the viewers out there. I really believe that the greatest threat to human health today is not some super bayerischer. You've been eating too much sugar junk food. The biggest threat to human health is the ever increasing environmental toxin load and we are at the top of the food chain and so we have the ability to increase as we age. The concentration of these toxins in our body are Accumulators these toxic compounds. It's really really important. These days to do everything we can to avoid. And then a support our body's ability to get rid of these toxic compounds. So i really welcome the opportunity to talk about this really important subject. Yeah you're so right about that. We need detoxification strategies. And that's your topic today. And so what kind of results. In what strategies do you like to use for detoxification and fasting. Will i think the the detoxification is really kind of complex series of events in our body in require an unbroken chain of these events to effectively. You get rid of toxic compounds. One of the great Basic tenants of nature pathak medicine is to remove obstacles to cure and obviously these toxins can be an obstacle but so too can Our inability to get rid of these toxins. There's a lot of things that go into getting rid of these toxic substances. We have to support our body properly a day in and day out but i think especially during a fast. Yeah absolutely what sort of toxins are the big ones that were trying to eliminate from our body. Well you know thousands of years ago when when they were doing fasting for healing they're mainly concerned with water. Soluble metabolic talks talks that our body naturally produces a water. Fasting was really great way to cut a flesh. All these compounds out these days toxins. That were most concerned about fat. Soluble toxic pesticides. herbicides flame. retardant solvents heavy metals and these compounds are stickier harder for to get rid of and we have to use different types of strategies along with a making sure that we're well hydrated to get rid of these talks and so. I think that there's a lot that we can do to assist the body. Get rid would the call persistent organic pollutants. Those are the compounds that the that i mentioned part of those that i mentioned pesticides. Herbicides flame retardant. These are the compounds that i think when people think of talks these days. That's really what they're thinking of. And for good reason these these are really a harmful compounds to

Michael Murray ELS David Pathak
Reparations: How Could It Work?

Science Vs

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Reparations: How Could It Work?

"On today's show reparations. Okay. Well, My name is Ebony picket I am a wife and a mother of seven. And four bonus children. So that's total of eleven. You'll hear some of those kids in the background. And Ebony is one of the few black folks in the country is actually been given reparations. It was because decades ago family was the victim of a horrible massacre. It happened in a small town by a lot of black people lived called Rosewood in Florida. And it all started on. New. Year's Eve in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two. So. It was a happy time. It was a time when they were celebrating and they were cooking and they have fireworks little sparklers. Enjoying another. A group of white people in a nearby town had become convinced that a black man attacked a white woman. And over the next few days, hundreds of them poured into Rosewood in a frenzy. Nobody really was expecting it from what we know. They just started shooting up the house from outside and that's what they did for seven whole days and they didn't stop until everything in the town was burned down. Every house was burned down to the crown. Some of our family members were lynched. One of my cousins Sam Carter, his ear was cut off they will keep it in the jar the white mob killed him, and then kept this man's Lia in a jar. Souvenirs, but it was very brutal. The local police just let all of this happen and many Rosewood residents ran and hid in nearby forests and swamps. There was there was no one coming to help for rescue and? That was in the data winter so they were in the cold swap. For seven days. Hundreds of people were forced to leave the harms and at least six black residents were killed. None of the black families went back they had to stop their lives ova. And Today Basically nothing is left of this town. No one was ever charged for the murders or the destruction of homes and businesses. Ebony said it was so traumatic that for years the families were afraid to even talk about what had happened. But in the nineteen eighties, the younger generation decided to speak out. Ebony family took the story to the media to politicians to whoever would listen and they hired a law firm who took their case to the state legislature asking the Florida government to acknowledge what happened and to pay restitution for by the survivors and their descendants. In other words. They asked for reparations. And they got it. Producer rose ramlet talk to ebony about this. Yeah. I read about it being passed as a bipartisan effort, which now seems like a miracle. Yeah. Right. That doesn't really have much anymore in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four when this bill was passed they would just nine survivors still alive and the state gave each of them up to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. What did it mean for the survivors the direct survivors when the bill was passed full of emotion. A lot of there were crying some of them were still afraid really even then. Even then. And for descendants like Ebony, they set up a scholarship fund it paid for her college. Education. I was able to actually get a bachelor of science degree in Occupational Therapy Kinda. gave me. You know kind of like a new life a new hope I was a books to actually go into a major that I could actually excel in and into well then. So yeah so it was great. It's great for me. While this reparations plan wasn't Pathak and some of Ebony relatives couldn't benefit from the program. This story shows us that use possible for the US to recognize when it's done. Something wrong. And pay up. So what would happen if this played out on a much larger scale? Because we're not just talking about one horrible attack in one small town. The idea here is that reparations would make amends for something much bigger. Slavery. More than two hundred years of enslaving people and using their free Labor to build the US economy. And while this idea might feel like a political nonstarter. It's starting to get some real attention. Almost a third of Americans polled lost yet said that they were in favour of reparations and a bill to study. This has more than one hundred and fifty signatures in Congress right now. So for us we're wondering. How on Earth to academics calculate how much reparations would bait? Like how do you put a number on that kind of suffering? And how would the US actually pay for it?

Ebony United States Florida Rosewood Sam Carter Congress Pathak Producer Rose Ramlet
"pathak" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"pathak" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"New service DOT ORG. A difficult time ahead of. But if we are to be prepared for. It. I said our fear of. Ice Standing here without fear because I remember. I remember that I am here because of the path that lies before me let me the Pathak lies behind me. I remember that one hundred years we talk these machines. and. A center award I remember..

Pathak
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 1 year ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago, but we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous. Huxley's Utopia and not finding it. Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades and we're increasingly lonely. whereas in a utopia, everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen, forty-three, the psychologist Abraham Maslov developed a theory of Yoga. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in a utopia we decide for ourselves what we need and how we're going to get it in Huxley's Utopia. Citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds pretty good right then. Why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society, to work, we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism, even family. See for yourself if a utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch, brave new world now streaming only on peacock. This is advertising content. Hey. This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:57 min | 2 years ago

Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

"Welcome to amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Devon and Cornwall. I'd like to welcome to the show. Ryan Duffield from Devon who has come to talk to us about the city of Plymouth in southern England and also the surrounding area, including Devon and Cornwall. Ryan welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me Howie. Good well, you know and it's funny because we just talked about the English coast, but we've moved a little further to the West and talk. Talk about a different region of the coast than we did on the show recently when we talked about Suffolk and the the downs. Why should someone go to Plymouth Plymouth? Actually it's a fantastic city. It's a city that goes amazing maritime history and tradition that dates right back to the medieval times, but actress quite often overloaded when people think of cities in England. They think oh of Lunden Bama again. Manchester Liverpool perhaps. I think Plymouth is just as much. Interest is end if those cities, but it's just north of us so much, and I think particular twenty American. Listeners interested is also the city where the pilgrim father set sail on the mayflower. Sixteen twenty associated with the traditional thanksgiving. S Pre interesting point. Is also surrounded by beautiful coastline. It's right on the border of the county's of Devon and Cornwall these are two of the most popular tourist destinations in the UK down in the South West of England, said Scott lost offer. Willing we're looking for dividend cornwall if we go down to the English map and you go far bottom left. That's where we are, and if you go further bottom further left from there, you end up in the ocean. So we're. Right on the south coast of Devon Oklahoma so are literally facing out to the Atlantic okay well and facing out towards the south. Yes, excellent well, what? Are. You GonNa. Recommend Fourth Festival is obviously starting in the city centre, so the city is actually pretty much based around the coast and its large harbours, so I would say starting day Sutton Haba, which is the main harbor in the city and that so where the city spreads out from I'm from around the. You've all sorts of things to say side. You've got things like the mayflower steps. Steps, which is where there's the pilgrim fathers actually set sail from and this museum dedicated to that you've also got what's the Barbican? which is this old coupled street state specs, medieval periods, which is full of these is correct, slim pubs and bars, restaurants shops things like that, and it's one of the few passes cities. The city was actually bombed June. Sacramento War by the Nazis and the. The city was destroyed, and this is one of the well preserved areas of that city out, also recommend site just basically following the coastline of the city's known as Britain's Ocean City for good reason, because it will revolve around that and overlooking the area. What looks like is huge, fool trust, but what actually is actively operating? Royal Marines and Royal Navy base. That's right in the heart of. Of the city and they still have people that you can save people, training and things, and they actually do tours of that interestingly and I'm not sure how many military basis you can know many Abitur tour during the middle of the day. You can't do that well and it seems like one of the reasons they do that, too. Is You mentioned? This is not a new military base. Quite historical, so this is where the ships sailed out to fight the Spanish Armada for absolutely, and the city is very synonymous with Francis Drake. Who is the man who led the defeating of the Spanish the? He was from Plymouth. Things like the main shopping center in the city named optimus could drake circus, and you'll find lots of other places around the city named after him. You also have along. Along the Bob sell them this coupled medieval street. You have the Plymouth Gin distillery, which is actually the oldest gin distillery in the country, and of course you can go in then you can have tools that you can find out how the GIN is made. You can find out the botanic WHO's they use? Jin's at the end of that. So if you're GIN, Fan Pathak place to go we'll. Get into more detail on all these things. So in terms of the BARBICAN. For instance you mentioned the Plymouth Gin distillery. There are different pubs and things. Do you have a favorite pub? Is there someplace that we ought to check out? There is a place I feel bad commending it, but there's a web spins now Weber spins is a national chain across the country. If you live in the UK, you know about web of Spain's. They've actually got really nice bar that down on the Babacan. Babacan, which is right by the Plymouth Gin Distiller Selfish Nickel Jin from that, but they've got huge selection of our genes of a drinks there, but all the buildings there because they're all medieval style buildings that is then become ingrained within the actual itself garnered sovereignty. Highly recommend that this is places down the thyroid record. Think of any off the top of my head. Okay mix over a new kind of places and very traditional old pubs as well which great.

Plymouth Plymouth Gin Cornwall Plymouth Plymouth Plymouth Gin Distiller Devon England Ryan Duffield Ocean City Chris Christensen Devon Oklahoma Howie Royal Navy Babacan Francis Drake Sutton Haba Manchester
"pathak" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Langland a virologist with southwest college of natural Pathak medicine has been focusing on botanical treatments for corona virus Dr Lang won it in the simplest terms explique splaine it for us what you found so far yeah thank you very much for inviting me this morning so you know what we're doing really is going back into traditional Chinese medicine and you know we know this virus in as well previous outbreaks of sars have a current M. originated out of China and so we're really looking at what the tentacles what herbs China has used to control previous related outbreaks and spring those two in lab turned violent but you know science behind them to see how effective they are and we're screening of how thirty five forty different botanicals and our results initially are very very promising weeds test about ten so far and about half of those are definitely showing efficacy toward killing the virus and lettering by Armand so we're going to continue to screen these botanicals and our hope is to really move as far as quickly as possible our hope is to really put site behind attack on medicine to continue now that folklore state and be able to define exactly how these botanicals work and then be able to create formulations that use these different botanicals and hit the virus to different spots during replication cycle and then is with the center clinical studies done around how we talking treatment or vaccine or both this is only be for treatments or trying to find the tentacles that will kill the virus directly and be able to treat patients that are infected you know even even if we move forward toward a vaccine development as you know coronavirus tends to have the highest mortality in those people that are more elderly or immune compromised and presumably a vaccine may not be effective in all sorts and then that sort of the population so even if we do develop a vaccine three months we're going to we're still in need of writing treatments available for those people that the vaccine doesn't work and so that you are helping them if you're down the road we can use as a treatment for those patients as well as other patients Dr Jeffrey Lang land of the southwest college of natural Pathak medicine joining us in Arizona is morning news it got about thirty seconds Dr Lang Lang we continue to hear the little rumors of maybe a vaccine will be available by the end of the year it might be internet St-Pierre's.

Dr Lang China Armand Arizona Dr Lang Lang internet St-Pierre southwest college of natural P Dr Jeffrey Lang
Lo Bosworth: From Reality Star to CEO of Love Wellness

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:43 min | 2 years ago

Lo Bosworth: From Reality Star to CEO of Love Wellness

"Today. Lobos worth joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Love Wellness. A Body Care Company. That's changing the conversation about self care for women. You may know her name from her time on reality TV shows including the hills and Laguna beach which we all watch. I certainly did but in the past decade low has also made a name for herself as an entrepreneur and a businesswoman. So we are very excited to have you with us. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Thanks for having me you guys. We're going to start how he start all interviews with just give me a resume for us so for the past four years. I've been the founder and CEO of Love Wellness and two point. We make clean personal care products for women And we also create a lot of really empowering education for women About their bodies so that they know how to take care of their bodies better before that I was really heavily involved in the content creation space and I created a ton of wellness and food content. Just before that. I was actually a student at the French Culinary Institute right injury and we're going to talk about God. It was so good it had always been my dream to go to culinary school. I love cooking. I do love cooking and so a lot of content at the time was sort of centered on wellness nutrition and food before that I was a partner in a different tech startup that failed spectacularly. It was called revelry is irony really this yes so this was like twenty twelve which is when we started. Yeah yeah since you the scam. I remember twenty twelve and we had this idea that we wanted to put cute party supplies all too hard partying a box like a curated experience and it turns out that it's really hard to put thirty different products from different manufacturers into a box and ship it at a cost effective price. The boxes were enormous. I wanted to pivot. But my co-founder didn't anyway didn't workout. Before that I wrote a book that's when I was living in L. A. Still and then before that I was on the hills before that I was at Ucla. And before that I was on Laguna beach before that I was in high school. So that's it so when something that is not on your wikipedia linked in bio that. Maybe we didn't see on TV either that we should know about you. We actually just updated my wikipedia like two weeks ago because Rizzi are publicists was like have you ever updated your wikipedia like no. That sounds like a horrible thing to do for yourself. Right to go on your wikipedia read through it and then be like this is the crazy. I don't WanNa pull up. The old version was pretty cringe worthy. It like went into episode detail on my. How is this relevant off? Wow so when you google then so what do you think is something that is deeply misunderstood about you? I think for me and I have just started to talk to people about this with love wellness. I haven't really done too many interviews or spoken about this company at great length yet and I think for me sort of coming to terms with the transition between being somebody who was on television. And when you're on reality. Tv definitely put into a certain box right. And then if you are an influence or you're put into a certain box and so how do I sort of bridge the gap between living in that space and being taken seriously as an entrepreneur and the founder of business? That's doing really really well. So how do I reconcile that? And how do people that know me from a distance? Reconcile that so. I think that that's something that we sort of talk about often. And I think part of why I'm out doing interviews because I've been working so hard on this for the past four years and we we really feel like we're making a difference and so why wouldn't I want to share that story but it's definitely something that I feel like. I have to still overcome. You know what I mean. Yeah I think that makes sense. So let's get into that a little bit more because we want to talk about your journey from when people started to get to know you to obviously what you are doing today. I love wellness so to start out. I mean as you said you were a high school student and then everything else happened you everything change which is when I think back if someone had filmed my high school experience I would die. Yeah what was it like shoo? Be Not even a young adult like a k. The kid child Yes how old are you when you started well so it was my junior year when MTV I came to Laguna and they were interested in doing something and at that point we were a little unclear on what that was and then I believe if memory serves correct it was like the summer before senior year or senior year that they recorded that first season of Laguna beach and the show premiered my very first week that I was a college student and it was traumatic. It was right within Perez Hilton. Was starting to hop off and all of those blogs if you recall And all of a sudden we were on this show that had instant overnight success and social media didn't exist back then you know. They live because God but facebook was in its first European facebook. And so you know you're a kid you're on this show. You don't have any way to communicate with people in the way that you do now and so people got to know us as we were portrayed on television and yes we were children right and so we tried to do our best to not look stupid so obviously as a kid you look stupid. They were also trying to make you again. That was the of course point of reality. Tv is to make its nonsensically latest story. Yeah I know so as kids you know you have to get parental permission to be able to film. How did you convince your parents let you do this? My mom was not about it but my dad was like this is cool. What do you think like you were going to get out of it? My Dad is a really smart guy and I think from a career Opportunity Perspective. He sought from the very beginning. He was like you could really do something with this. And for years after the fact when people would come up to me in public. I would pretend that I wasn't me because I was so embarrassed. And he was like Lauren. You just have to own this. Why are you so reluctant to just own what you have done and try to use it to your advantage and your dad was saying. I think you could really do something with this. Who What did you think you were going to be when you grow up? Like what was what did he think this could be a platform to do. I wanted to be a doctor actually. I wanted to be a dermatologist or plastic surgeon and I love biology. I think medicine is so fascinating but I'm not great at math and so when I was at school I actually was like sort of on the pre med track but couldn't get through those terrifically difficult math classes. Which is disappointing. But I think it lends itself to my interest in in wellness and health and in general. So it's definitely still a passion of mine. All of that information is really sticky and my brain. It's the stuff that I think about all day long and I really care about. But it's when you get cast on television show and it changes your life sort of derails any plans that you had before looking back at the attention that all of you guys got and now looking at how many people are young in either college or their careers and are blasting themselves all over social media and sometimes that can be a good brand building decisions and sometimes you go into a job interview and I definitely look up of course their profile. And it's not Weiss. What advice do you have for people who are thinking about how to present themselves? I would just say to exercise caution more than anything else. I'm somebody that doesn't go onto instagram. It like wrestling with me to get me to post something on instagram. I don't WanNa do it? It's like when you have five dollars in your bank account. You don't WanNa look in your bank account so I have a very different relationship with social media than I think. A lot of people do of course when you post something and you get likes. It feels good like that experience. I don't think is different for anybody. But for me I think just because of the experience of being on a reality show and feeling so judged for doing something like that and feel like I always had so much more to offer. I'm always a little bit hesitant to put anything out into the universe from an emotional experience that something that you know. I'm still working through. Are you looking back that you agreed to do the show? Yeah it's really not in my personality do stuff like this. I never wanted to be somebody who was like unknown person. You know what I mean. It just sort of happened when Laguna Beach I started. We didn't even know what the show is going to be. We thought it was like you remember that. Show true life we do. We kinda thought it was gonNA be like that. Just a documentary style. Look at kids that lived in this part of the country and then we go away and it didn't go away did not never been away. And so it's just been me trying to figure out how to be satisfied with my life knowing that it'll never go away so obviously we're gonNA reach became. The hills became such a part of the Zeitgeist for this age group. And you're right hasn't gone away and we heard it is weird and the fact that you're like weird. It's really weird. Like I feel like I know you hear you had to develop your career and and essentially your public persona. Yeah after the show. Yeah walk us through your mental state. At this moment you're early. Twenty s at this point yes Early twenties so I guess it would have been like thousand ten right Thousand Eleven. Yes so blogs were just becoming a thing and they were like. It was still really early days on me. Song didn't exist yet. There is that one girl on Youtube. Who do the lady Gaga makeup videos? Michelle fan is like the only person who is influencing the time and so. I know that that age is all of us. Whatever I think for me. I've always loved writing. I've always loved expressing myself creatively and so I started to write. I had my own website for a period of time and just started to create content and actually had some kids that I went to Ucla with like writing articles. Moore's writing articles about stuff and from there. I wrote a book but truly I had no clue what I was doing at that point. I I suppose I didn't realize that what I was doing was actually laying the foundation for my future in terms of content creation. But at that point nobody could monetize their content. And so if you were doing it you're just doing it because you enjoyed it and I want to drill down on kind of what your motivations are at this point. Because was it this thing that I signed up for in highschool took on a life of its own and I now need to make money to a degree. It was about making money but remember at the time. Nobody who's blogging was earning any money. I couldn't see the clear Pathak. I think for me I wanted to have my own voice okay. I think that's what it was about right. I wanted to have some kind of platform where I could express myself and try to get outside of you know the space that I had been in for the past few years and I think that originally that was sort of the

Laguna Beach Love Wellness Founder And Ceo Ucla Facebook Laguna Body Care Company French Culinary Institute Lobos Google Perez Hilton Founder Rizzi Co-Founder Partner Moore
Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

Squawk Pod

01:36 min | 2 years ago

Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

"Today Andrews interview with Uber Ceo. Dr COSMO shocking. Investors have been watching Uber closely for signs of profitability when Uber went public on the New York Stock Exchange in May of Twenty nineteen. Andrew asked Dara about it and Dara. Well here's what he said so for us. The Path to profitability isn't theoretical there are cohort of countries that are profitable. We do reinvest profits aggressively recipe. New Business Lines like eats that have great promise but we're pretty comfortable when we look at the portfolio of businesses. That we have that we have a very strong Pathak off a a few months later in an interview with CNBC November Dr Projected profitability by twenty. Twenty one we are actually targeting twenty twenty one for adjusted even profitability full year and this week around eight months after the company's First Trading Day Uber reported its fourth quarter financial results. And and as you'll hear there was also some good news for investors about that profitability goal. Here's Andrew Uber reported quarterly results. Last night the ridesharing giant announcing announcing on its call with investors. It is moving up. Its target for profitability by a year. Join US right now. For an exclusive interview is Uber CEO. Derek Ezra Shack Good morning to you. Good morning thank thank you for for coming in. Let's walk through if you could for investors so they understand how you think you get there and when I say get there. I'm talking about profitability. Well as we made through our way in two thousand nine hundred and we became more and more confident of the strength of business and the ability of our teams to execute.

Andrew Uber Uber Ceo Dara Dr Cosmo United States Derek Ezra Shack CEO New York Pathak Cnbc
Cloud Log Analysis with Jack Naglieri

Software Engineering Daily

08:10 min | 2 years ago

Cloud Log Analysis with Jack Naglieri

"So you're building tools around not just log management or log log analysis but also compliance dance. So if I want to be compliant for sock to or PCI. There are a number of things that I need to do to achieve Steve that compliance and a lot of this has to do with configuration. Kicks plane the connection between compliance compliance and having the right resource configuration essentially for a resource to be compliant. It follows a lot of these checklists that the compliance standards outlined so for example there would be a standard for encryption. Is a really common one right and make sure that your data is encrypted at rest. So we can do with our product is we can scan of bucket. We can enumerate all the attributes on it and then we can compare it against policy in a policy defines desired secure state in a way. And then you know we just develop a set of policies to cover all these different checks across all these different standards. And that's how we build the case for gang compliance certification in those things are not built natively into aws like eight. You can't you can't say hey hey. Aws I want sock to compliance across all my infrastructure. No you have to do some work to get there. So it'll be us does have the tool called configured that will help you with this but it's the same type of premises with Panther right except with Panther. You get more customization flexibility and it's more central than configure panther. You can actually scan like any number of accounts and it goes into one view you which is really helpful and then as a byproduct to that you also get asset inventory too so you can kind of like go through all of your buckets all of your accounts you can say like okay like who are. We failing any checks for CIS across any of our accounts or do we have any buckets named XYZ. You know it's it's really helpful for that but out of the box. Yeah I mean this is game better at this like they introduced a feature on us. Three that we'll just block all public access and I'm not sure that public access block aligns to compliance check per se. But yeah they give some tooling. But it's still really on the engineer to do it. That cloud asset indexing that you just described so there's a problem that I've seen in a couple of companies called cloud sprawl basically where they have all these resources that they don't even know where they are where they exist that you know people throughout organization of spun up databases and spun up servers in like these things are just not centralized in one place. There's no place you can go to see what what are all my assets that users across my organization of spun up on AWS. Can you describe that problem. Why is there a problem of indexing? All of a company's cloud resources like shouldn't there be a place I go on. Aws where like click. And like. Here's everything I have. Yeah I mean there should be. But there's it's not and I think it's because the counselor all very segmented and away and aws is super powerful. You can do a ton within the confines of a single account and I think that's just an area. They would need to invest in at some point and they probably well. I can't see it going on forever like this where you have. Have you know this explosion of accounts happening in you need tooling around it. Just it hasn't really happened yet. From native themselves and that just ended up being a byproduct of panther like we didn't really design the compliance to say. Oh we're going to build Nassim Tori just kind of happened as a side effect but it's a really good inside effect. Because now I can say like I can write a policy that says I only expect our users have existed in one of these accounts in. Because you have that context all the accounts accounts I think it provides a you a better security control as well. You don't have to deploy your rules in a single account you can look at the look at all of them influence it okay. So that MRS basically the on boarding process is well. I guess in order to actually know whether you're compliant or not you you would have to wire the panther compliance tool to all of your aws accounts therefore panthers going to have a view into all those aws W. counter. Know where all your resources are view. Panthers it's a single platform so we combine the compliance and log analysis into one and we actually use the same data for both in a way we have like I was saying before the beauty of land as you can create all these really fun complex pipelines. And that's exactly exactly what we did. So for example giving clutch data which is all the API calls that are happening in your account. We can use effort log analysis. We can also use that to say did some resource change and we have a separate pipeline. That gets the data essentially forks into that says okay. This log file shows that user created. Let's kick off a scan on that user and get more information and then let's compare the output of that into our policies which map to compliance standards and then that can tell us if this user has too many permissions for example because a another common compliance check is that you don't just have an admin attached to a user directly you'd have it within a group or you wouldn't have it at all. I mean having an administrator in aws like an administrator users actually kind of seen as anti pattern and you should useless privilege engine. That's a more common security best practice right. So that's really like the beauty with integrating and then when you integrate you get the context across both to so if that happens that says like Jack did this thing now I can actually see what permissions Jack actually have. What can you really do and combine them into one platform almost something else? That was kind of new and you see sometimes sims but we really want to invest into that integration. Let's switch I conversation to focusing on the business aspect of this the good market. Are you trying to sell entirely to cloud native startups. You do you feel like you can also sell to enterprises that have a mix of on prem infrastructure and are getting started with the a cloud or a year or two into their cloud product journey. The I think it's summer unrealistic. If I was to say only Claude native companies. Because I I think any company of a significant scale will have both will have on prem systems and we'll have cloud based systems and they might be multi cloud. That's a common thing to you. Know some people started dabbling. GP because they like Big Table or they can get benefit out of using different clouds for different purposes. So it's like Big Table G K or ten yeah pretty much and then with aws. I mean we try to focus on people have large amounts of aws infrastructure but but the beauty with logging tools is that they all natively support sending data bs anyway so someone in a hybrid environment or someone in a purely yes. Environment Environment really wouldn't make a difference to me this is long as they have some. Aws Infrastructure where they can run this application where they can run panther itself. That's really all that matters. They they can even have on. Prem systems to like laptops is a good example right like laptops really. Don't have anything to do with cloud and we can configure laptops to aggregate data into the cloud some way and then we can you know. Use the context outside of aws so for example like Pathak firewalls or Cisco firewalls. You know those who don't live in the cloud and Each of those companies were can away to bridge into the cloud. But Yeah I think the the scenario of having on Prem appliances and data is so common that we have to support it

AWS Panthers Aws Infrastructure Prem Systems Prem Steve Nassim Tori Engineer Administrator Jack Pathak Claude
"pathak" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Than everybody that you've seen before Hannah says using this idea from math. It's called optimal stopping theory. Can dramatically increase your odds of finding the perfect partner to say you dated like twenty people in your life. Well if you just picked one of those twenty people at random to marry there's a five percent chance you'd have found your perfect partner which is like not very good on three but if you dated this same twenty people and you flat out rejected the first third you then can up your chances of finding the pethick person to almost forty eight percent. Wow going one in twenty two more than third. You've just massively changed. Chances are finding them but this is all all a matter of probability. And there's there's a chance you could reject your soulmate in that thirty seven percent window. Yeah I mean they risks in Rhode Right. So you'll Pathak Pathak person could come along in your rejection phase and you could get rid of them and then spend the rest of your life regretting the fact that you didn't just marry them This only maximizes. Your chances of finding the Pathak pacify doesn't guarantee it math. Yeah Damn it. It ruins everything. I think brilliant. Okay so you've made it through your rejection face found on that perfect person within your thirty seven percent window. How do you know if it's GonNa last and that's something that it turns out you can write a really beautifully facing booster stations to look beautifully? Simple if you're a mathematician so the equation is w at t plus one equals liberal W plast are wwe plas I h M brackets HD Mathematicians came up with this equation for love by.

Pathak Pathak partner Hannah Rhode
"pathak" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

Phil's Philosophies

14:46 min | 2 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on Phil's Philosophies

"To an episode of fills philosophies a podcast with me your host Philip Warfield. I'm a twenty three year old. Recent college graduates still trying to figure out what I want to do for the rest of my life so while I try and figure out my path I invite you the learning experience with me as conversation though as with my good friend. Ali Pack in her story about faith trials and in the end abundant blessings blessings coming through Shirley. No foul on. Thank you for having me. Were shore so I know where you're from so go ahead and do this. It's going to be really really hard. Are you ready. I'm ready. I'm here yourself. Yes what is your favorite thing about the lone star State of Texas in only thirty seconds. Oh Man has to be. The Food of the people are very friendly down there and The music and just the big events that we we have like the Houston Rodeo and Are like famous water parks and things like that. Yeah I love home for sure. So they say that everything is the bigger in Texas. Do you agree. Yes actually especially the food. Thanksgiving large amounts of food portions. That sure. That's something I miss about. Texas says I remember you know going to the Texas State Fair Dallas and the Fried Orioles. Gosh I know yeah like Friars Hell I think they do. I was like Oh my soda but okay yeah. That's wow. I've never heard of that actually. So That's interesting. Yeah Yeah definitely a lot of fried food. uh-huh yes so you mentioned Houston Rodeo earlier that mean you have a little bit closer to Houston. Yes I live I live in. Houston I live in the city and It's very a busy and traffic is definitely not something. I enjoy but I lived there all my life. So mid home no matter what for sure I I lived in Houston. Oh Man I'm gonNa Sound really old almost twenty years ago now. It's as well. That is wild. I've never thought about that before but yeah even back. The traffic was trash. You would have rain and then suddenly everyone would forget how to drive. Yeah I was a little boy back then but trying to get anywhere was really really really annoying was awful. Yes so tell me then you live with like a big family down there in Texas Well coming from. I'm an Indian family. I have a lot of family members but Back home a definitely. A lot of my family members are scattered around the country and some most the living in India and some in London too so but back at home it's just My Mom and dad and my sister my older sister and We have some of my dad's family that live there as well some cousins and you know aunts and uncles and as well as my mom's side So yeah like I see them when I can but but mainly like immediate is just you know both my parents and my grandmother and My sister tonight so when I think of India I happen to think of Bollywood I think is beautiful dresses and the things that were out there. You have that at home. Oh yes I have. I have many in an I love and I love it. I love wearing it when I wear it. I feel like I'm in a Bollywood movies. It feels amazing and then participating debating Asia night here at southern like oh it makes me feel like I'm in a movie so Asian night. Can you describe that for everybody who doesn't really know what that is at southern. Yes the Asian night is just. It's it's a Ni- dedicated to all Asian culture and we have food and and we have a performances says setup just For other people to see what this country looks like in in what they have and a miss definitely one of the biggest biggest nights here at southern. And there's so many people that come and especially for the food you know having just a little flavor from from each country and and just a taste taste of of what it would be like going there. Yeah it's it's one of my favorite nights of the year for sure so I mean I hear this all the time. A lot of people people are always like India Malaysia Brown people typically. You always hear that. How's that make you feel? Sometimes I'M I. I don't know it wasn't until like as it was starting to get older that I realized that I started to see that India's pretty much left out from a lot of like when like Asian Asian culture because we are South Asian. But we're you know we're still in Asia so by a lot of people don't realize that because it's not talked about or it's not known so when I've I had an experience where will they ask like I think he was in some class asked Something about Asian culture and I started talking and there was someone next next to me that was like well. You're not Asian on Mike will. India is in Asia under like away and it was just like a it clicked in their mind like. Oh that's true but like it's not talked about Simmons Awkward because we think of Asians and I have to say this is by stereotype. We think of people with what is said to be you know the smaller or sized is that are a little bit sideways stereotypically all of those things and the bowing and all of those things but India of course is part of the Asian continent Senate So yeah that's that's actually. A huge thing is for sure so with a big Indian family told me what your childhood was like Definitely always had people over like there was never a time where it was quiet before I was born my mom when my mom and my dad had Got Married and it was basically a full house so they had my My grandparents from my dad's parents and then they had my dad's first cousin and it was just a full house. Everybody lived together. That's how it was. Yeah but We always had people over. We always had parties just enjoying The Time mm-hmm that we had as a family and then you know kids came along and we had we have so many cousins. So it's always been. It's been a packed house but I love it because we're so family oriented so being around them and like feeling the love and care from them like it's it's definitely an experience. I I wish that a lot of other people could feel definitely you grew up around love around care what was culture like at home. Home Culture. it was. It was very strict so my my dad came from India after college. So he's very set in his ways you you know and and and nothing could change that. My mom came at age of thirteen so she was very much like would go either way and just I I think more understanding of American culture and kind of adapted to it more than my father but It was definitely strict and Yeah he he just had a lot of rules that we have to follow and they're still to this day like their Events celebrated in India. That still wants us to celebrate here and just this past week we have this holiday called Russia button and rugs again Russia Vanden. I'm going to try and say that right bundle in Russia abundant. Yes okay. And it's called brother sister a day dedicated to brother and sister relationship and in India. Our cousins are also called are brothers or sisters like it's the same word. Yeah so they don't like I mean we'll say like I mean this. Is My cousin brother my cousin sister. That's that's what we say so when my dad will talk to people like Oh yeah they have brothers and stuff like we don't really have you know you know brothers my brother. Yeah so but But so we just celebrated that and we have so much family. Come over at my dad's and we have like these. It's a just a symbolism so we have these bracelets that we Tehran our like our cousins or brothers wrists and like it's just showing our love to them and they think they wear. I might be wrong. They may I think they wait for a whole month. Or as long as they want and And then return the brothers give their sisters a gift. So either it's the money or like a bracelet or earrings or something but It's a sweet moment and I know. My Dad was just sharing with me that he wished that here in America because they had something like that because they have mother's Day and father's Day banana brother Sister Day. So wow that's actually true. We have mother's Day father's Day Grandparents Day Best Friends Days Act Act national girlfriend boyfriend exactly. Wow Is there a brother and sister day and that makes me wonder that's interesting. Yeah so describe so those rules as you're talking about earlier you said that your father was rather strict. So what kinds of rules that you have to adhere to Definitely like a hundred percent vegetarian diet diet even though like I'm still vegetarian but Like no meat was allowed in the house and you might even chicken not even chicken and even though he would eat chicken but He wasn't in the house interesting. Yeah exactly I know Beef was untouchable. Absolutely add because of You Know Hindu sacred yet. Sacred and Let's see what else We I mean family was. I mean this is a good thing. They'll family was before anything so Definitely had to minimize my time with my friends. You know certain days to be with my family Had to attend everything. My Dad said that we had to attend and even if we didn't know the people we still have to go. Oh address Weddings birthdays even. If it was someone of like my dad's friend that we didn't even know from his side. I mean I mean we would. We would still have to go Weddings especially it was like. There's there's no requirement like you have to. You have some musk. I have to happen so But more of Oh and also worship in the House my my dad has his own worship but he calls it it's called Pooja who yeah pooja and That's when he does his own This whole system of like he goes outside and he he faces the Sun. Because I you know they they also worship the sun and And he praised and when he comes back inside and and he does incense-burning and He has the small room where he has like pictures of little small statues of of of some gods and he has a little book that he reads in. It's kind of repetitive. Type of thing so we my sister and I did take part in things like that when we were younger My mom of course she. My mom raised born raises. An adventist. it was hard for her to see that but she kind of did it just just to please him and But at the same time she was also taking us to charge and and things like that sell buffer is when we would sit in and be with our dad during that time or even my grandmother. it was like we'd enjoy it because we get to dress up a little. Stodgy sins of so. We didn't really see. See it as as anything more than that so but definitely like religion was a huge thing in my home because my dad. What is Despite him being Hindu he's very committed in honestly. It's kind of admirable to see how committed he is because it it pushes me for my faith. You know to to spend more time with God. You don't things like that so But yeah that's pretty much kind of how the house ran and whatever they said would go and Mainly whatever my dad says because If my dad's Congra- with my mom then it's like whatever she says doesn't matter it's about what he says so so is that something also pretty imperative in Indian culture in that whatever your mother said. It didn't really matter as much. Her father was the ruler up the household. Yeah and that's something. I saw a log growing up. It was Definitely it always had to be like whatever he says goes so. If let's say my mom were to have made dinner. But he didn't like it she had to make something else even though she even though she already made even though Oh she probably slaved away all afternoon exactly yeah she would have to do anything to police. Mu You can't even argue with him you know and and on top of that. My Dad bad Is An alcoholic so you know him coming from alongs as of work and then he's he's sitting on the couch and drinking and you know my mom trying to do what he he says and him getting upset or triggered like the smallest things you know and Yeah or it's like whatever she's she would say about something he's like. Oh you don't know anything like I know what I'm talking about. And and this and that I saw the the treatment of of how it was it was it was him before or anything. Wow Yeah so that also makes me think did your mom have an education deter what kind of education at your father have. Yeah my mom She went went to college and graduated with associates in nursing and She's a nurse. You worked in the hospital for fifteen years on the floor. Yeah and Now she works as a case manager at home For United Healthcare. So and my dad He got a bachelor's degree in microbiology and He's a microbiologist. He works in the hospital as well in the lab so both You know came from a good a good background in and was able to Get a good job and to be supportive of my sister and I am in that was a Alternate blessing you know But but yeah both of them educated and you know that's interesting considering that both of them were educated yet. Your mother still felt like she kind of had to well subject herself to beings number two in the house even though she was cooking all the meals even though she's a mother so so she raised both of you exactly he would still come home and be like well..

India Texas Asian culture Houston Rodeo Asia Houston Asian Asian culture Philip Warfield Ali Pack India Malaysia Brown Russia United Healthcare Tehran London alongs Russia Vanden Simmons
"pathak" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on WTVN

"Today with a very different speech than you normally hear from President Trump, and I've already heard from a number of people say, one of his finest speeches. It wasn't a speech about him, President Trump hit pretty much every note. Right. This was an event that required him to tell the American story. Not Donald Trump story. A rare moment of national unity was the best effort on a long time. President Trump rose to the occasion, strongest speech of his presidency acidy, the perfect speech, this was not Donald Trump speaking today he was eloquent. It was a good speech. He really was a cheaper and much more dare. I say it was angry mental enemy. He knew one hanging. And of course, this was not Donald Trump speaking. See that Christiane for absolutely. Pefect. Pathak speed. John berman. It's at it wasn't a speech about him. He really rose again. Stuck to the script above blah, blah again, striking. How if is these people will never understand that Trump makes everything about him in his speeches. Let me show, you somebody who did that all the time. What are you, somebody number three December tenth two thousand nine Oslo this Barack Obama receiving the Nobel peace prize for having done nothing. He don't even an office two months when he got the Nobel peace prize. They gave him a Nobel peace prize. I'm not come. Because they said he wanted peace what they really know was that Obama was going to downsize the United States. Obama was going to rain in the power of the United States. Why give somebody the peace prize haven't done Diddley squat yet? So here is Obama, December ten two thousand nine accepting his Nobel peace prize. I received this honor and yet because.

President Trump Donald Trump President Trump rose Barack Obama John berman United States Diddley Christiane Oslo two months
"pathak" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"I'm Richard Cantu, Iran. The issue is secretary estate. Mike Pompeo's huddling with European allies. Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif described sanctions against his and economic wars. A says that if the US escalates, there will be dangerous consequences. I asked him what that means. He said, I wanna keep President Trump guessing, although Iran will only act in self defense. So he wasn't saber rattling in a military sort of way. But he does say this is an economic war. And we don't see any difference between a military war. An an economic war. ABC's Martha Raddatz President Trump is headed for Great Britain, a three day state, visit the president will receive a lavish welcome at Buckingham Palace joined the Queen for a private lunch and attend a formal state banquet in his honor the focus of the president's visit here is on the ceremonies. But his visit comes at a moment of political crisis over Unser. Certainty about the United Kingdom's planned exit from the that you and a contest to pick the next prime minister ABC's, Jordan Philps in London. Mr. Trump says he might meet with Boris Johnson, who the president suggested, he'd support to replace Theresa May as prime minister investigators in Virginia Beach Virginia have yet to determine motive in Friday's mesh shooting. We've learned the shoe design from his job from Friday morning via Email. Police say no major problems or disciplinary issues at work. They have yet to find anything glaring that might have set him off, still about forty FBI. Investigators remain working that sprawling building looking for clue ABC's with Johnson in Virginia Beach at a Sunday night. Vigil participants lighted twelve candles one for each of the victims jury selection, Monday in Peoria, Illinois, for Brent christianson charged in the two thousand seventeen disappearance and suspected murder of Chinese scholar, union Zhang's body was never found. You're listening to ABC news. Pathak man here..

president Iran Javad Zarif Boris Johnson ABC Mr. Trump prime minister Mike Pompeo Richard Cantu Virginia Beach Virginia Beach Virginia Jordan Philps Martha Raddatz secretary Buckingham Palace US Brent christianson Pathak
"pathak" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Pathak man here. Wanting to talk to you about an ever increasing and deadly epidemic in our state. It's an epidemic which affects every one of us and our families. The epidemic is distracted driving. The danger is. Real each year. Distracted driving seriously injures, or kills tens of thousands of people. I'd Pathak man, man, reminding your phones down is up say alive. Don't text dry. This message brought to you by this station of the drive smart. Arizona coalition. Your child has cancer for words. No parent wants to hear unfortunately, it's still a reality for too many families, because of you Arezzo Cancer Foundation for children is able to fund the very best pediatric cancer research, and directly support families right here in the valley because of you, there's airs una Cancer Foundation for children. Visit as Cancer Foundation dot org to see how you or your business can make a difference in the life of child with cancer. That's as z Cancer Foundation dot org, looking for a lawyer. It's easy. Just go to as e bar dot org. That's the state bar of Arizona's website are find a lawyer tool will help you get an attorney in your area and give you important for mation about their background, plus find plenty of great information and. Topics like employee rights are divorced, or just how to hire an attorney. Remember, it's all at easy bar dot org. The state bar of Arizona serving the public enhancing, the legal profession, sponsored by the state bar Zona aired Inc. With Arizona Broadcasters Association and the state, her smile, I it was one of those things that makes you feel like you're the best man that walks face of the earth to wake up and find my fiance dead from an overdose of prescribe pain, medication makes you realize that this is something that can happen to anybody. And it has been a horrific tragic event that I've had to live day in and day out in the same bed that occurred. Learn more.

z Cancer Foundation dot org Arezzo Cancer Foundation una Cancer Foundation epidemic Cancer Foundation Arizona Pathak attorney Arizona Broadcasters Associati Arizona coalition Zona
"pathak" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Hot Pathak cost quite shooting at a city complex and beach Virginia leaves at least twelve people that thirty say didn't end until police kill the gunman. It's the end of the work week and suddenly shots hurt inside, a public works building at the Virginia Beach municipal building time employing, a public utilities and chief Jim survey. Ira says the gunman with a forty five caliber handgun. We fire upon all the victims. He says victims were found on three floors of the building and credits officers with taking on the gunman along gun battle between those four officers and that suspect Megan Bandon, one of the workers huddled in an office for safety called nine one one gunshots. Hearing the cops get out, one man told his wife, it sounded like a nail gun until he saw bodies governor. Ralph Northam our hearts ache over the senseless violence. I'm Jacky Quin jour-jour should order Friday. Keep Missouri's only abortion clinic operating over the objections of state health officials. Lila rose of live, action till Salem radio. The clinic has an extremely poor health record facility. That's had over seventy medical emergencies at it, it is on that. Operate with state. Investigators. It has moldable house and safety violations, according to the state health department so not only ending the lives of children. The will also putting women at risk controls, Markle's Stelter claimed the order was necessary to prevent irreparable injury. To Planned Parenthood mice president pets, as President Trump is committed to stopping the flow of legal immigration at the us, Mexico border and presidents absolutely determined to use the, the authorities that he has as president to call on the congress and to call on Mexico to do more to address this humanitarian crisis at our son is Trump said, a June ten deadline for Mexico to do more to slow immigration through its territory, more of these stories at townhall dot com. It's the dirty little secret of military service for women. Thirty percent of female veterans recently interviewed.

President Trump president Virginia Beach Mexico Ralph Northam Jacky Quin Pathak Megan Bandon Virginia Lila rose Jim survey Ira Missouri congress us Salem Markle Stelter
"pathak" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After the knees in my Pathak city on the BBC World Service was shining light on places that are doing things. Right. And with building a city that works what happens in the oven. While is he important to all of us and around the world investment in the night time economy is rising say this week in London to valuate, it's twenty four policy and asked could it what why you join me fi Glover with Erico and Greg Clark for my city after the knees. BBC news with David Allston nor career says it's test-fired new tactical guided weapon, which it says will increase the combat power of the army. It's the first weapons test since February's summit between the North Korean leader, Kim German and President Trump broke up without agreement. Congressional Democrats in the US accusing the attorney general of trying to spin the findings of the long-awaited Muller reports head of its publication later today. William bar is holding a news conference shortly before the redacted report is released to congress. Facebook says it's unintentionally uploaded the Email contact to one point five million new uses since may twenty sixteen without their knowledge. Oh consent. It said the data wasn't shed with anybody and is being deleted the ends of Indians voting. The latest phase of the country's mammoth general elections despite security concerns in some states. And election official was ambushed and shot dead by Maoist militants in Orissa. As she traveled to supervise polling officials in Pakistan, say gunmen have shot dead at least fourteen people to hijacking a bus in Baluchistan reports than fifteen men, stop the vehicle on the coastal highway, and after checking the passengers identity cards for some to disembark and kill them, the German comic Volkswagen has backtracked on comments made by its chief executive saying he was unaware of China's treatment of week Muslims and Xinchang by the firm factory fee w said it was away at taken steps which have been credited by members of the week community and German politicians, and the Jewish poces the festival is to be celebrated Poland's Warsaw ghetto for the first time in seventy six years. That's the latest BBC news. Hello, I'm feed lover. And you're listening to my perfect city on the BBC World Service..

BBC World Service BBC William bar fi Glover Facebook David Allston Kim German US congress President Trump Pakistan Orissa Volkswagen Baluchistan Warsaw Greg Clark attorney Erico London
Four Republican senators say they'd vote 'no' on Herman Cain

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Four Republican senators say they'd vote 'no' on Herman Cain

"We begin today with a math problem. A political math problem in some degree. Yes. I will grant you this. But one with an economic kicker Republicans control fifty three seats in the United States Senate as the politically inclined among you will know nominees to certain federal offices require fifty one votes to be confirmed. So if say four Republican senators decide they are not going to vote for giving nominee that person's Pathak confirmation becomes difficult. And that is where retired pizza mogul, and friend of President Trump Herman Cain finds himself today mister Cain. Also, a two thousand twelve presidential hopeful in a holder of unorthodox economic views has been floated by the president as a possible nominee to the Federal Reserve Board of governors today. As I alluded to a fourth GOP Senator came out and said, he would be a no on mister Cain. The official end from the White House, by the way in the person of National Economic Council director. Larry cudlow just this morning is that the White House still supports Mr. canes nomination. Not in the news so much the past couple of days as mister Cain has been getting all the heat or the controversies both political and personal and economic surrounding the president's other potential nominee, Stephen Moore, who you also might have heard of

President Trump Herman Cain Mister Cain President Trump National Economic Council White House Federal Reserve Board Of Gover United States Senate Pathak GOP Larry Cudlow Mr. Canes Stephen Moore Senator Director Official
"pathak" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Pathak caused California governor Gavin Newsom his halting the execution of more than seven hundred condemned inmates on the nation's largest death row for at least as long as he's governor. There's some says he can act unilaterally because he's not community Eddie sentences. In two thousand sixteen voters passed Bill to speed up executions of the state California has an executed anyone since two thousand six Wyoming Republican Liz Cheney is questioning whether Nancy Pelosi's opposition to impeach president. Trump carries any weight with her party. She's trying to send messages to them by saying, look, this is not a path that she wants to go down. But she's not in charge. It appears to us at least two Democrats, including Texas. Congressman green say they will force a vote by introducing articles of impeachment. The chairman of the house intelligence committee says the Justice department should release the Muller report when it's completed the public interest in getting a full accounting of what has been able to produce over the last two two years is overwhelming. Adam Schiff says that if the Justice department attempts to in his words berry report, he'll do whatever is necessary, including calling Muller to testify before congress. The head of Wells Fargo is under fire on Capitol Hill for the banks response to a series of scandals. California's Maxine Waters taking a but CEO Timothy slows Wells Fargo simply too big to manage. No, we're not Republican Patrick McHenry, noting the reports of problems continue despite the Bank paying four billion dollars in fines. Are we gonna see more headlines coming up, and we're going to have another hearing about this? I can't control the media while there's no evidence. The Bank continues to open phony accounts as it did in the past. The New York Times reported this week that employees remain under intense pressure to meet sales goals and at some continue to break ins hurdle. Rules, Capitol Hill. Correspondent Wally Hindes. This is townhall dot com. Joe Piscopo here. Asking are you tired of dealing with dummies? Well, experienced the smart later by a car at route twenty two Toyota, we'd no hidden fees. No back and forth. No pressure. And no.

Patrick McHenry California Pathak Nancy Pelosi Wells Fargo Gavin Newsom Trump Adam Schiff Liz Cheney Muller Joe Piscopo Justice department Toyota Bill Maxine Waters Congressman green Wally Hindes Wyoming president
"pathak" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A common approach to understanding basic aspects of human nature like the desire to help. Other people is the study people and whom that desire is missing and psychopaths exactly such a group. So they are characterized by a lot of things. But some of the most consistent findings about them is that they're very bad at recognizing fearful facial expressions. So basically if they see somebody in a vulnerable situation, they doesn't compute. Yeah. And there's a region of the brain under the cortex call the magdala that we've known for a long time is really important for recognizing other people's fear as people who have lesions in this area show, very specific selected deficits in recognizing other people's fear. And what is the middle look like in psychopath. So and people who are psychopathic it tends to be too small sometimes maybe twenty percent smaller than that of healthy people. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. And we know from brain imaging studies that most people show a strong increase in activation, and they make a lot when they look at somebody who's afraid whereas people who are psychopathic dont. Okay. So that was your baseline, and then was your theory that you came up with. Well, over the years people have been coming to the conclusion that it's not like there's two kinds of people in the world psychopaths and everybody else. Yeah. Psychopathy like a lot of psychological disorders exist on a continuum where you can people the very far end to our maximally psychopathic, and then people who were just a little psychopathic. And then the bulk of people in the middle who were not particularly psychopath. That continuum suggests that might be only half the equation might be that the continuum keeps going in the other direction. So that you have highly psychopathic people on one end average people in the middle. And then maybe on the other hand, you have people who are head Pathak who are unusually sensitive to other people's distress and unusually carrying and so that suggested to me that maybe if you studied at people who are extraordinarily altruistic brains would look psychopathic.

Pathak twenty percent
"pathak" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"I'm going to shift it hell, we had alcoholism and funny, but we I'm not gonna I can choose to drink alcohol. I choose not deposits on the this is this is tremendously to me empowering inspiring. Change in perspective hugely. And like you said you do have the option to flip the switch to switch the track to redirect the train, and you can be that transition point for yourself and for the people around you and for the people who come after you. Greg this. This has been such a a wonderful conversation for me. I I hope it was somewhat stimulating or fun for you to be part of and perhaps we could just close on the on. The billboard question is does anything come to mind as a question word a lion? Quote, anything that you would put on a billboard. As a message to convey to millions or billions of people light light just that would L I G H T. That's liked is every moment in our lives in whatever capacity in Deir is always this choice in this moment to step towards light to step towards darkness. And I don't mean grandiose, you know, as I said before massive good massive. It's not that. But each moment, we have the choice. Do I step towards delight? Do I step towards some doc version of? This moment. Do I do? I get irritated with my kids. Do I be patient? Do I do? I listen to the voice of consciences moment or do. I just go off to ego would want to go off to and my experiences with this. And I'm just just beginning my journey, of course. But is if I if I pursue what is light. It will bring more likely and that light grows brighter, brighter. And maybe carries on forever till the perfect date. But that's that's the idea wherever anybody's they can do that. Right. What amateurs is they've made before and all of of made mistakes. Right. All of us have chosen in those moments went down dot choice. I mean, the the dockside like, you know, look, some style was thing where you go over to the dockside mo-. But just in this moment, I chose the impatient. Pathak shows the negative pas, I chose self interested public chose the. Or I could just choose the life in in my experiences wherever anybody is on this Junie between light deduct. Let's say wherever they are on that continuum, the people that most full of light on the people who've done all the best things in their lives, necessarily, it's which direction that headed. It's which decision they just make. And and so that's why it's so powder. This is not getting old bird about whatever the pasta. It's been in this moment, am I leaning into the light? Oh, eating out of it. And that to me is like seriously. It's lik the whole of life written in one single rule. And and so that's that's that would be I think that would be my notes for that. At least today liked. I like it. Thank you so much..

Greg Junie Pathak
"pathak" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"I'm going to shift it hell, we had alcoholism and funny, but we I'm not gonna I can choose to drink alcohol. I choose not deposits on the this is this is tremendously to me empowering inspiring. Change in perspective hugely. And like you said you do have the option to flip the switch to switch the track to redirect the train, and you can be that transition point for yourself and for the people around you and for the people who come after you. Greg this. This has been such a a wonderful conversation for me. I I hope it was somewhat stimulating or fun for you to be part of and perhaps we could just close on the on. The billboard question is does anything come to mind as a question word a lion? Quote, anything that you would put on a billboard. As a message to convey to millions or billions of people light light just that would L I G H T. That's liked is every moment in our lives in whatever capacity in Deir is always this choice in this moment to step towards light to step towards darkness. And I don't mean grandiose, you know, as I said before massive good massive. It's not that. But each moment, we have the choice. Do I step towards delight? Do I step towards some doc version of? This moment. Do I do? I get irritated with my kids. Do I be patient? Do I do? I listen to the voice of consciences moment or do. I just go off to ego would want to go off to and my experiences with this. And I'm just just beginning my journey, of course. But is if I if I pursue what is light. It will bring more likely and that light grows brighter, brighter. And maybe carries on forever till the perfect date. But that's that's the idea wherever anybody's they can do that. Right. What amateurs is they've made before and all of of made mistakes. Right. All of us have chosen in those moments went down dot choice. I mean, the the dockside like, you know, look, some style was thing where you go over to the dockside mo-. But just in this moment, I chose the impatient. Pathak shows the negative pas, I chose self interested public chose the. Or I could just choose the life in in my experiences wherever anybody is on this Junie between light deduct. Let's say wherever they are on that continuum, the people that most full of light on the people who've done all the best things in their lives, necessarily, it's which direction that headed. It's which decision they just make. And and so that's why it's so powder. This is not getting old bird about whatever the pasta. It's been in this moment, am I leaning into the light? Oh, eating out of it. And that to me is like seriously. It's lik the whole of life written in one single rule. And and so that's that's that would be I think that would be my notes for that. At least today liked. I like it. Thank you so much..

Greg Junie Pathak
"pathak" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"pathak" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"Personally, I spent a lot of time with war frame and Pathak saw this year. We're fame released probably one of their large updates yet with new open world, and so on and so forth. Keep doing what you do. I really would like to the to ongoing games that I saw people talking about after our discussion were siege. Which we gave credit which I wish I had time for, but like ongoing games that require such a time investment that I'm already using for a couple of games and then with the other videos and play for my job, which is unique circumstance do not have time to devote one ongoing game. And also, I would say in both those cases like I played some path of exile and war frame in two thousand eighteen and didn't stick either of them. So they were not my best games of the year. Like, the war frame update sounded really promising and appealing, but to reinstall it again too. Yeah. But I just I then I launched it and was right back in that situation of just like, I don't know where I'm supposed to go or what I'm supposed to do. And also every time I launched were frame. I like the movements slightly less like it just has has. No, wait to it is free lady. Flippy just it doesn't feel good. Mutant ninja. Yeah. Yeah. And that should feel great. But instead it feels like weird net code floaty in some ways. And it just never the movement. Never feels right? And every time I launch it that that crystallizes just that much more because I only come back to it every six months or so at this point probably going what's up with war frame? I've heard a lot of stuff about war frame. Let's look at war frame. And then I get back in and go like well launch this mission. And I play man. This doesn't feel good. Last year is going to be the year that I got back into four honor. Because you know, they keep. Expansions of stuff. They've got new single player stuff. Like, this is exactly what I've been asking for this like, oh, they have a cool single player campaign, or whatever I'm going to hop bag in just never happens because it is such an investment. But we were both talking about like fighting games that we wanted to get into jump headfirst into. I would. Would love to. But man, it is such time commitment, but God if I envy people that do have the time to I up these games, and I felt were frame, and I felt like twenty eighteen was a year where I played all the games I wanted to play as much as I wanted to play them. I keep looking at other stuff longingly aggressive, generally speaking like I played like me personally, if I was not trying to get a job done. I would not have played as much medal your survive. Right. You could head that time back, but. But generally like when it comes to the games, I didn't finish games. I chose to finish. Like, I feel like I spent my time where I wanted to spend my time this year. Yeah. And don't really have any regrets about that. Check back in on a lot of those some of those games here and there and stuck to what I do. And then that's how I got it around an awful lot. But there wasn't anything that like really really sunk my teeth into like I'm used to doing with like street fighter type game and expected you to have really stuck with monster hunter, even more than you did a c. Yeah. But I gotta taste of the version and running that ad per second as well. As low times really forced me to like hold off. Like, it's like, I'm gonna spend all my time on the version once that released come to find out that they're going to be on a staggered like in DC, really schedule all these events are like all the school events are happening on the PS four right now XBox, but they're not coming to for a while. And that just deflates me. It's got it. It..

Pathak six months
 Violence plagued West Virginia prison before Bulger killing

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

04:06 min | 3 years ago

Violence plagued West Virginia prison before Bulger killing

"Was in a wheelchair when he was attacked at Hazelton prison in West Virginia that he was beaten beyond recognition with a padlock stuffed inside a sock. The times citing a law enforcement source not directly related to the case reports Bulger's is appear to have been dislodged from his head that it's not clear whether his attackers gouged out his eyes or if they were knocked out because he. Was beaten so severely. Frankly. Why do you went out the way that he lived? I mean that is what he did to his victims. He was vicious. He strangled. He was convicted of strangling a woman, and then he would go upstairs and take a nap while his friends buried her body. The attorney for an inmate at Hazelton photos. Freddie, Jesus tell CNN tonight he believes his client as a suspect in Bolger's grisly murder. Lander standing is that he is in solitary confinement. He's in the segregation unit at Hazelton because he's under investigation for him being involved in this Jesus is a mafia hitman from west Springfield, Massachusetts. And was convicted for murdering a boss in the notorious Genevieve's crime family as well as an associate this Jia, certainly did not like informers he's doing to lay sentences because some very close decided to become an informer and going back and I've visiting Mr. Jesus from the better part of two decades. Now, he'd had a particular distasted and Bolger was a well known informant. Investigators said that for years before a corrupt FBI agent tipped him off depending. Charges against him. Bolger gave the F B I information on rival mobsters. He was leading south. Boston's violent winter hill gang at the time. Why do you someone who is truly a gangster an associate Pathak murderer? That's what he was. He's someone that sold out his colleagues to law enforcement to get advantages for himself Bolger's exploits as a murderous gangster and an FBI informant with picked it in the popular hit movies. The departed man as lack mass were Johnny Depp, played Bolger, John, Geno. What I did eight rand Jimmy. It's alliance alliance between the FBI between you and me. Ultimately, a jury found Whitey Bolger culpable of eleven killings between nineteen seventy three and nineteen ninety-five tonight. The attorney who represented the family of a woman who was strangled by Bolger says he doesn't believe they're taking pleasure in Bulger's murder. There is such loathing Bolger. And for what he did. Did with his murders. His drugs is corruption that obviously he's not a person that engenders many feelings of sympathy from anyone, but there are many serious questions tonight regarding the circumstances at Hazelton prison, which according to his lawyer inmate, Freddie, jeez said was very violent place. Why was Whitey Bolger? A high profile inmate a notorious informant placed in the general population of that prison when he arrived just the day before his murder CNN tried multiple times to get answers to that. From the Federal Bureau of prisons a spokesperson for the bureau told us, they could not comment because the matter is under investigation wolf and Brian. There's disturbing new information about patterns of violence and chaos at the prison that federal prison in West Virginia. That's right wolf, the New York Times did a big investigation recently reported that the Hazelton prison was routinely, understaffed overwhelmed. The times report says they've been short on guards since two thousand sixteen and that there were two hundred seventy five violent episodes there. Just last year, including fights among inmates and attacks on staff, the bureau, prisons has not commented when we have inquired about all of that. Brian Todd reporting for us. Thank you coming up. There's breaking news an Email exchange from the peak of the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign shows longtime Trump ally, Roger stone wasn't touched with the highest level of the Trump campaign about the WikiLeaks release of democratic emails stolen by Russia. Is there a collusion case for the special counsel, Robert Muller? Are you interested in learning how enterprise scale companies drive organic traffic to increase their online visibility than download the voices of search podcast from the heart of Silicon Valley here? Search

Whitey Bolger Hazelton Prison Bulger Murder FBI Bolger Mr. Jesus West Virginia CNN Federal Bureau Of Prisons Brian Todd Hazelton Freddie Attorney New York Times Johnny Depp Genevieve Boston Robert Muller
Pittsburgh Steelers won't trade Le'Veon Bell or rescind RB's franchise tag

Chicago's GameDay

00:28 sec | 4 years ago

Pittsburgh Steelers won't trade Le'Veon Bell or rescind RB's franchise tag

"You want? So they aren't free because you end up paying a lot. Or there are those other sites where you post your job in the same environment is someone selling a human sized hamster wheel or qualified candidates. Can't find you because your job post gets buried really quickly way. Deep down at the bottom of the site. Posting your job on monster means you don't have to post on those sites because we don't do any of those things we deliver candidates and qualified once monsters job postings start at just forty nine dollars. No hidden fees. No irrelevant

Matt Hasselbeck Bell Steelers Adam Schefter Browns NFL Randy Gregory James Connor Devante Parker Espn Greg Olsen Wnba Pathak Pittsburgh Panthers Bells Place Chicago Josh Gordon Brown Five Years
Autumn Calabrese discusses how gut health can affect mental health

Anxiety Diaries

32:39 min | 4 years ago

Autumn Calabrese discusses how gut health can affect mental health

"A mental health podcast. So I wanna talk about mental health as well as physical health. How do you find the physical health. End mental health intertwine. What do you think is the connection there? Oh my gosh. They're bound up around each other. And so often I see that we want to separate them and there just is no separating them. I mean, I could go on forever about this topic. That's been super important to me lately because the biggest thing is our gut health. And I think that term it's sort of new in the media, gut health in what what it means to not everybody really understands are like, what does that have to do with my eating? And obviously there's your micro bio, that's the bacteria that is living in your gut that determines the health of your gut, and that is fed by what you eat there. Certain things that obviously eat, there's food sensitivities that play a major role in it, and most people don't realize that the majority of our serotonin is made in our in our gut in her stomach, not in our brain. So depression, a lot of people are assuming, okay, I'm depressed. It's coming from my brain and that's not from what we're learning the front. Always the case could be that your gut my Oma. So off that you're not producing it in the right levels of serotonin. I mean upwards of seven. Eighty percent of your serotonin made in your gut. So if that's not working right, you're happy hormone isn't getting produced properly. So that leads to how you're feeling. I experienced it first hand us about two two and a half years ago. I started having some serious issues. I was losing weight rather quickly and didn't know why I hadn't changed anything about my eating or anything about fitness. I fell into a depression. It wasn't super severe, but it was definitely there and I couldn't figure out why because everything was great in my life. And I was like, why do I feel down and blue when I should feel on top of the world? And it was kind of like a switch overnight. Like it just kind of came out of nowhere, and I kept trying to claw my way out of it and more and more symptoms would come. But the the anxiety in the in the mild depression, just sort of were there and like the weight gain with sort of go up and down. And then all of a sudden I lost my muscle definition wasn't coming through the way it used to anymore. Despite how hard I was working out, felt like there was an elephants sitting on my chest constantly, and it was two years of searching for. Answers. It was two years of seeing some of the top specialists in Los Angeles and them telling me that it was in my head and that maybe I just needed to talk to therapists that there was nothing physically wrong with me. And I kept saying, I know my body, this isn't right. I know my body. This isn't right. And that's one of the benefits of being in tune with your body and really knowing it. You can identify like there's something going on here, and I was literally at the end of my rope in about to give up and just assume that this is where I was going to be all of a sudden like, maybe this is just what happens when you hit thirty six and thirty seven years old. It just doesn't work the way it's supposed to any more. And then I go back in a day. I refuse to believe that I hate like I've always said age is just a number, and that's not the case. If you take care of yourself and I'm taking care of myself and I looked up a natural Pathak doctor, and I finally went and saw the unnatural path. And I sat with her for two hours and I told her all of my symptoms and the long and short is we discovered I had severe food sensitivities, and of course it was the foods that I was eating every single day multiple times a day, severe food sensitivities, eggs. Peanuts to flax seeds to all men's, which are all healthy foods unless you have a sensitivity do and the amount of inflammation that was in my body. And in my gut, I had leaky gut because of it, which meant many particles of my food where leaking into my bloodstream, which was causing problems. And on top of it, I was basically what was considered malnourished my vitamins and mineral levels had plummeted. I wasn't absorbing any of my foods. So while I was eating healthy food, I wasn't absorbing the nutrients of the healthy food. So I had no b vitamins, which is why was exhausted all the time. Adrenals were completely tapped. Come to find out. My zinc levels have plummeted in your zinc is responsible for your testosterone, which is why muscle definition wasn't there. But all this stuff that was wrong with my gut was the problem. So it wasn't a chemical imbalance in my brain that was causing the anxiety in the depression. It was the inflammation in my stomach ended eliminated those foods. And again, it wasn't an overnight fix. Although I did start feeling better about three days after is eliminated the foods, but then it was a very long road about another year of. Of feeling my gut of, okay, those inflammatory foods are out. But now I've got to get my vitamin levels back off and glued Amine to heal the gut lining and adrenal support and all of that. But the crazy thing was is that is soon as that all got under control, anxiety lifted the depression lifted the happiness returned, and I'm not saying that that's the end all be all for everybody, but everyone's different. And there are obviously many a times where there are chemical imbalances in things like that, but the food support your body. And if we really stop and think about what food is for, you know, it's not a reward. It's not for pleasure. It's fuel and its information for your cells to everything that we put in our mouths tells our body how to behave. It tells ourselves if they should repair themselves or if they should die off, it tells are inefficient replenish your if we end up with acne, tells us it helps set our Circe Ian rhythms. I mean, everything you put in your body tells yourselves what to do. So if you're putting in things that don't support that, then those cell. Aren't going to function at the optimum level, and then it's just a matter of, okay, we'll, what are you going to get? What is your symptoms going to be? Then how do you deal with it? And then ideally it, yes, find your target and then go after it. There are the top foods that the people always say, okay, you can try the elimination diet in that is, you know it's sugar and corn wheat, and dairy and gluten. And so white. In those usually like a top six say, that's a great place to start. The problem is is if you miss one thing, it still doesn't get better than for me, I would have never, probably eliminated eggs. There might favor food in the world. I probably would have never eliminated Ullmann's. I mean, why would I think that would be a trigger but they were off the charts. So if you do an elimination diet and you still don't find your answers. The next thing to do is to get that blood test, and there is a little bit of confusion sometimes of like, what am I doing prick test or my doing a blood test and it's the blood test. Mine was the Elisa food panel test. It's not the one to determine if you're going to have antifa lactic. Doc, that's the prick test. It's the one that's going to look at the inflammation levels in your body and say, this causes inflammation. This does not. Regardless of what caused you to have that anxiety and depression, you still had those feelings, right? You still had that feeling of on, well, that feeling of that sitting on your chest, did you also work with a therapist at any point to kind of work through those feelings? I did actually, there wasn't Kerik has that I was working with for about six or seven months, and she was wonderful, and it was great to go in there and talk to her and by no means trying to sound like true or anything like that. But I'm very aware of what my feelings are. I'm very aware of what my emotional triggers are in very aware of the things in my past that don't sit well with me and that I'm working through. So for me, it was like a little bit of a hard. I mean, like I said, I went in and I would do my therapy sessions and guess it was great to top, but I was like a for me. I didn't feel like even when I was in those nations, it wasn't that I didn't feel like it was helping. I, I knew it wasn't the root cause or issue, and it wasn't the cure and it wasn't going to make it better. Does it feel good to. Go talk your problems out. Absolutely. And for some people, that's exactly what they need, but I just intuitively knew that mine was happening on a cellular level inside my body. This therapist can help you deal with those problems in those feelings when you get them, but they can't necessarily help get to the root cause if it's something

Depression Instagram Los Angeles Autumn Brussels Facebook Zayed CEO Sean T Brooke Burke Bobby Calibers Meyer Apple Head Of Product Development
Icahn, with sizable stake in Cigna, to oppose Express Scripts acquisition

Bloomberg Markets

05:18 min | 4 years ago

Icahn, with sizable stake in Cigna, to oppose Express Scripts acquisition

"Purpose Movers and, shakers the cost named Greg Bloomberg market movers and shakers with Carol. Massar and Jason Kelly on Bloomberg radio I'm Pimm FOX along with Bob, everywhere in for Carol Massar and Jason Kelly taking a look at the s. and p. five hundred one hundred and fifty three issues advance three hundred and forty seven decline and five remain unchanged Bob every. Let's, start, with your movers and shakers well. Tim I gotta go with the underwear we've got the Hanes brands that is no longer going to, be selling its exclusive line of champion active wear at target stores and that stock is. Down of it's what happened. To it it's down by twenty percent I think it was like nineteen percent and it's it's a ridiculous amount that showing how I. Think that investors are kind of fickle when. It comes to the, big box stores on the one, hand they punish the the shopping malls, but on the other They give it a lot of a lot of. Weight when it comes to retailers selling their wares there let me just, tell you about the shares of trip advisor down today by about a half a percent moving a little bit lower in after hours trading after reporting second quarter earnings of forty one cents a share estimates. Were, for, forty cents but revenue missed analysts. Estimates four hundred and thirty three million for the quarter estimates were for four thirty five we'll bring, you an update on trip advisor and it's guidance right now shares down eleven percent after. Revenue MRs Wall Street estimates. Sets trip advisor and yes trip adviser is of course based in Needham home to Bloomberg one zero six one Boston newburyport at thirteen. Thirty in metro west and the south short. We love our listeners, all over the glass Red Sox, nation yes it is I'm going to give you a positive today feeling good it is. Miller Coors the ticker is t. a. p. Molson course did. I, say Miller The old one I now it's Molson thank. You okay Molson, Coors Brewing company is having, a joint venture with hydro Pathak Kerry Corp in Canada to develop a non alcoholic cannabis infused beverage so. You're combining I guess it's not alcoholic but there's only it's. Only a matter of time till they get wise and start putting alcohol in it you're getting two of. My favorite things their business and pleasure I'm, not even gonna talk about that shares of Express Scripts down about six and a quarter percent. Today this comes after disclosure that the activist investor Carl Icahn has built a pretty sizable, stake in Cigna and that plans to oppose the fifty four, billion dollar takeover of Express Scripts is according to people familiar with the matter now the. Exact, size of Carl Icahn stay couldn't immediately be, learned but. It's below that five. Percent threshold that would have required him to. Disclose his holdings nevertheless The shares of Express Scripts responding to that news down more than six and a quarter. Percent Sticking with the underwear of motif yes they have here under armor is down today under armor is I'm not quite sure why been searching the Bloomberg terminal for, why under or maybe it's just one of those, things where if you have Hanes brands down you have the leak over to all the other Underwear Underwear Elastic on out of the. Underwear I want listeners to know that I made Pimm FOX laugh on it is not an easy thing to. Do, well let me tell you about MGM that's not a laughing matter for shareholders m. g. m. resort the stock down more than nine. Percent in today's, trading this of course has to do with the revenue going to accelerate beyond the trough of tough rather a tough second. Quarter I beg your pardon. Bob I'm just trying to do two things at once and at the. Tesla second quarter adjusted loss of three. Dollars six cents estimate was for a two dollar and ninety cent. Loss so worse-than-expected for for, tesla and they've, been you, know they've been criticized for burning cash and not making any profit You know most people would love to see a an electric car company. Succeed boys tesla having a. Hard time yeah they're burden through a lot of money let me just. Tell you what happened with the Vicks. Today we'll get the tesla in just a second the vix moved. Higher today it was up, three percent adding, zero point, four zero to the vix settling at thirteen point twenty three Dave My name is. Dave You're doing.

Tesla Carl Icahn Express Scripts Advisor Bob I Pimm Fox Bloomberg Molson Miller Coors Carol Massar Greg Bloomberg Purpose Movers Jason Kelly Tim I Vicks MGM Cigna Hydro Pathak Kerry Corp Coors Brewing
Dentists keep dying of this lung disease. The CDC can’t figure out why.

This Morning with Gordon Deal

02:14 min | 4 years ago

Dentists keep dying of this lung disease. The CDC can’t figure out why.

"A strange pattern of cases of a lung disease the centers for disease control and prevention reported that an analysis of patients at a virginia care centre found a high incidence of what's called ip for ideo pathak pulmonary fibrosis pulmonary fibrosis is a condition which lung tissue become scarred making it difficult to get oxygen into the blood depriving crucial oregon's like the brain and heart out of nearly nine hundred patients studied over roughly two decades the cdc found eight dentists and one dental technician all men had the disease seven of the patients had already died it's eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning jennifer kushinka is back with more of america's first news forty five people have died after a helicopter crashed in new york city eat dear ever and flipped upside down in the water last night only the pilot survived this witness saw what happened the helicopter came like london slowly and the next thing you know it just flipped i'm we heard somebody crying for help and helicopter was a private charter for a photo shoot president trump's plan to combat school shootings will include a call on stage to increase the minimum age for purchasing assault weapons and an effort to harden school so there are less vulnerable to attacks by dow spokesman rochon told abc the president will not advocate universal background checks but will reiterate his support for a bill that would promote better information sharing some will be legislative some will be administrative and some will be recommendations for states as well as a task force two studied this issue in more depth president trump's advisors say his surprise decision to agree to meet north korean leader kim younghoon was less impulsive than it appeared cia director mike pompeo and treasury secretary steven mnuchin say the administration had laid the groundwork for talks with kim by imposing tougher economic sanctions in previous administrations on the north korean government mnuchin appeared on nbc the pro those very clear that he wants to do everything possible to protect america and its allies that the existing situation of testing nuclear weapons and missiles is completely unacceptable pump pale accused previous presidential administrations of whistling past the graveyard has the.

Virginia NBC Steven Mnuchin Director CIA DOW London New York City Oregon Mike Pompeo Kim Younghoon President Trump Assault Donald Trump America Jennifer Kushinka Technician