35 Burst results for "Patagonia"

"patagonia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

04:11 min | Last month

"patagonia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

"Mission of patagonia is one. That i absolutely love. It says that we're in business to save our home planet. And what that means is that deep into the psychology of the organization. Every single person from customer service to accounting is working for the environment. They're totally lon behind the vision and that is really unique. In the business world i think model is the director of environmental action for europe and that has two parts. One is leading on environmental campaigning. Because we take one percent of ourselves and put it into supporting activists and charities on the ground grass roots organizations to make a real difference for nature and then the other bit of what i do is working on the business itself and how it uses its power both to work on its own footprint the footprint of its suppliers and how it influences other businesses to drive change for good. So that's basically what i do and i guess you asked a little bit about how i got here and i i think you know since i was very young i've always cared about nature and particularly the ocean. I worked on the ocean for little. While then i went into business and i was a marketing director for many years but at one point i it began to hurt a little bit too much to see what was happening to the natural world and also imagining. The future of my friends children an unsafe future. A future full of extreme weather food shortages mass migration. And i couldn't bear it anymore so i went into the third sector and worked for a number of conservation charities and legal charities fighting for the environment and then i got an opportunity to come to work for goania which jumped on. And it's because well. I guess at a personal level prince together business and my passion for the environment but i think more importantly it's about being part of this extraordinarily powerful machine full of equally passionate people with some really unique. It has this contribution to ngos that it makes. It's a massive one billion pound business. It has connections to grassroots and probably even more importantly it's a great storytelling telling organization so we have the ability through our communications to change how people think. And that's a big part of the fight of what's going to drive success because is around changing how people think and how people act so. That's why i joined patagonia. And i'm really really excited to be here. Excellent answer and i think we'll dig into some of the messaging and campaigns that you do have ongoing and coming up as well but i just wanna dig into something you said there about the machine of the brand and the company you know. Patagonia is for many people consumers and business owners a bit of a guiding light. Almost fifty years been on this same mission of really being responsible for our planet responsible for the environment. But you come from you know as you pointed out an ngo background you worked on the sea shepherd so you come with a bit of an activist. Background is well. Tell me why that is important for the brand in its messaging and in its campaigns. You have to think about how change happens and some of it happens inside the system by changing laws by changing our business acts and some of it happens because people outside the system push it to change and so it's really important to realize that you actually need both being an activist. Organisation is critical from a number of levels. One is that those activists are pushing for change. Like i just said and the other thing is that connecting into activism gives your organization. I guess two things one is it gives you authenticity..

two parts one billion pound one percent One both third sector one point fifty years two things patagonia single person one Patagonia europe goania many of patagonia
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

02:39 min | 6 months ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

"I don't call it a separation <Speech_Female> but maybe <Speech_Female> This duality <Speech_Female> that exists within the <Speech_Female> company. As i'm speaking <Speech_Female> to you that i've come to <Speech_Female> understand about patagonia <Speech_Female> that there's <Speech_Female> the part of patagonia <Speech_Female> that wants to <Speech_Female> sell you a cool <Speech_Female> hat or a <Speech_Female> more cosy pullover <Speech_Female> that you'll have for years <Speech_Female> but there's also the part <Speech_Female> of patagonia that wants to <Speech_Female> be an activist <Speech_Female> company. Do you <Speech_Female> think that your competition <Speech_Female> within those <Speech_Female> two sort of separate <Speech_Female> entities <Speech_Female> of patagonia <Speech_Female> are the same companies <Speech_Male> or different <SpeakerChange> companies. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> i don't think there's too. Many companies <Speech_Male> out there <Speech_Male> that are comfortable <Speech_Male> engaging in <Speech_Male> activism. To <Speech_Male> be honest with you. I think <Speech_Male> that one of the sort <Speech_Male> of silver linings of <Speech_Male> the last four years in the <Speech_Male> us is that <Speech_Male> you're finally <Speech_Male> finally seeing <Speech_Male> the ceo. <Speech_Male> Some large <Speech_Male> publicly traded <Speech_Male> companies offer <Speech_Male> opinions on things <Speech_Male> and provide some level <Speech_Male> a leadership on topics <Speech_Male> whether they be immigration <Speech_Male> related <Speech_Male> climate or otherwise. <Speech_Male> And i think that's <Speech_Male> encouraging but i think <Speech_Male> it's also been out of <Speech_Male> desperate necessity <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> i don't know <Speech_Male> what will expect as <Speech_Male> we look ahead for the <Speech_Male> next four and beyond years <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But i think in <Speech_Male> short there's not too many <Speech_Male> companies that are really <Speech_Male> comfortable <Speech_Male> with engaging directly <Speech_Male> and activism <Speech_Male> enos. I said <Speech_Male> before. <Speech_Male> I don't think it's something <Speech_Male> that we <Speech_Male> we weren't founded <Speech_Male> with that idea <Speech_Male> in mind we've done <Speech_Male> at necessity and <Speech_Male> i think what's critical <Speech_Male> for us. <Speech_Male> Is you know flippant <Speech_Male> as it may sound is <Speech_Male> is it <Speech_Male> the right time for <Speech_Male> us to call people <Speech_Male> out and win. <Speech_Male> Is it more effective <Speech_Male> to call people. And i <Speech_Male> think ultimately <Speech_Male> what we want to <Speech_Male> build and <Speech_Male> what we want to <Speech_Male> be in service <Speech_Male> of is a community <Speech_Male> of people <Speech_Male> who are really committed <Speech_Male> to being good <Speech_Male> stewards of this planet. <Speech_Male> That ultimately is what <Speech_Male> we want to be a part of. <Speech_Male> I think what's really <Speech_Male> a challenge. <Speech_Male> I look at this and <Speech_Male> as the outcome of <Speech_Male> the most recent. Us presidential <Speech_Male> elections. <Speech_Male> You had <Speech_Male> almost <Speech_Male> half of americans <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> lineup behind <Speech_Male> somebody. Who <Speech_Male> was you know in <Speech_Male> every way <Speech_Male> a climate denier <Speech_Male> and that's a real concern. <Speech_Male> And so i <Speech_Male> i would like <Speech_Male> to figure out how <Speech_Male> we be <Speech_Male> come to <Speech_Male> construct a part <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> of the dialogue <Speech_Male> and helping people <Speech_Male> understand <SpeakerChange> what so <Silence> important to protect <Speech_Female> all right <Speech_Female> and it will be exciting <Speech_Female> to watch. How all of <Speech_Female> that unfolds <Speech_Female> Thank you ryan so <Speech_Female> much for coming on business. <Speech_Female> Casual for <Speech_Female> this honestly. <Speech_Female> Refreshingly <Speech_Female> transparent <Speech_Female> honest conversation. <Speech_Female> I love hearing <Speech_Female> your perspective <Speech_Female> on where patagonia <Speech_Female> has been where it's going <Speech_Female> but also where it falls <Speech_Female> short where any company <Speech_Female> fall short. We all <Speech_Female> can understand <Speech_Female> how that happens. Both <Speech_Female> with the companies we <Speech_Female> give our money to <Speech_Female> and our own personal lives. <Speech_Female> So thank you so much <Speech_Female> for the <Speech_Female> incredible analysis <Speech_Female> and insight. And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for your time. I really appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it my pleasure. <Silence> <Advertisement> Thanks <SpeakerChange> so much <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> we <Speech_Female> talk a lot of <Speech_Female> business talk around <Speech_Female> here but what <Speech_Female> really matters <Speech_Female>

patagonia Us
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

"Making money matters most making money patagonia's not to go amid never has been i think that what under the last five six seven years patagonia history so first of all a little bit context for me. I've worked in the outdoor industry for my entire career. And so i've been looking at patagonia from not too far distance for a lot of my professional life and i've been working for the company for the past six years and it was only in the last five six years at patagonia really started to grow significantly and reach a much broader set of customers and really scale its impact by increasing visibility and that was under rosas leadership and i think she had the insight that if we had more visibility will have more impact. I think it was a good insight. I think she also had the capability to really scale. The business i think at some point though you've kinda got all the visibility that you need and whether were one billion. Two billion three billion or five billion. I don't think it really matters. I think we have gotten past the point of the end. This cute little story from southern california That doesn't apply to other companies in the apparel sector. Or beyond. And so i wanted at all about how big we are in revenue. How much money we make. We are profitable will continue to be profitable because there is no mission without margin that discipline is a requirement for us. But you know how big we are is not. it's not. What motivates motivates me figures. What motivates to. Any people pouted on you. Yes i think there is. No mission without margin is a really neat way of wrapping it up and putting a bow on it because at the end of the day. If you really want to accomplish widespread change you have to meet a lot of people where they so. How important is scale you know. Let's say if you if you consider patagonia's role as sort of role model within the apparel industry s a company that is for the most part things right in terms of taking environmental responsibility really really seriously can a smaller company..

patagonia rosas southern california
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

05:09 min | 6 months ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

"We've been talking a lot. Here about patagonia's. I would say number one relationship with customers as it pertains to being responsible for the environment for the world around us and doing your best to be the best that you can be But also there is a financial perspective. Here that i think is worth considering. So how do you think that these efforts to be conscious about the environment in about the the people who you're employing You know even the materials you're using your earlier example of only using organic cotton. How does that impact the way that you make money. Does it make you less money to make these priorities. You know. I think sometimes when we are sort of birthing new technologies or new ways of doing things that can be expensive. There's a limited market and go back to this story about organic cotton. At the time we made that transition you know of on again. The founder and owner of the company laid out a challenge to the organization. He's once he fully understood the impacts of conventionally grown cotton he said you have eighteen months to convert everything and i think it was roughly forty percent of the business at that time was was cotton product and it was all conventionally ground and the people in product across the organization. Said it can't be done you're gonna put us out of business. Said we've got eighteen months and you know we almost almost put the company out of business but it was important enough to von to to bet on the You know that decision in to ensure that the standard was met on a relatively short time. Line and i think that there have been times in our history where we have had to really push the tempo on something and in doing so it creates a bunch of complexity internally or there's not a fully developed market or whatever the issue may be an it certainly can drive you. Know can can Impact our margins. But i think ultimately what we're trying to do is change the systems and so it goes back to you..

patagonia
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

05:04 min | 6 months ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

"Which is this mission to save our home planet right right. It's interesting to think about the responsibility as existing at the intersection between the corporation. The company that's selling things that people wear and also the consumer whose responsibility it is to be educated and to try and reduce their own impact on the world around them. Is there a way to kind of pinpoint like what comes first the chicken or the egg. What comes first the the ecoconscious corporation or the ecoconscious consumer or it doesn't even matter. Yeah i don't know that it matters amid funny we we've had a lot of conversations internally in the last couple years about T shirts and hats that. Have our logo on them because those are products that people often see in in it becomes a little bit of a fashion led movement. For whatever reasons. I'll never understand it. And i'm not going to spend a lot of time trying. You know people see that logo and other people want logo on all of sudden. You've got this growing piece of your business that you never really set out to drive and so one of the conversations we have internally a lot is really what you just spoke to which is key. Is there a way that we can use this logo businesses kind of a gateway drug to bigger ideas. And i think that the answer is yes but the one thing i know for sure is just selling more product with our logo on it does not make it a gateway drug that does not put people on a pathway to thinking differently about their purchasing decisions and so i think what we have an obligation to do is try to pique their interest but also surround them with additional context. And that's something that we think about all the time on our on our e commerce site on our other digital sites we've got quite a few We were in the food business and We also have a site called. Patagonia action works which is a site to connect our grandees about fourteen hundred around the world with our community and our retail stores and any of the wholesale accounts we do business with. What's really important to us is just creating context and all of those environments who people get a sense of of what we stand for. Yeah it seems that this is really at its core about practicing what you preach in terms of your promises to do. Better be better sell better. Are there any companies or brands. You look to as a good role model in actually practicing what they preach. I think that there's a number of small brands and businesses and again. I'm here in europe right now and have been here for six years so there's certainly some over here that i've had a lot of interaction with There are some of course in the us and other parts of the world as well. I find it's generally the smaller ones. I think that what you see an speaking about apparel here. But more broadly as well is this constant and you can call it. Greenwashing it certainly but into that area but it's a broad spectrum of companies talking about their values in the steps that they're taking it almost without exception. It's you know if you could do sort of balance sheet. It's you know mac..

Patagonia europe us
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

"To save your home planet is certainly a the embiid kind of michigan. I know in the press. Release that announced your promotion. Ceo you said ambitions. Don't get much bigger than that. Which i think is really really accurate. Does it ever feel like it's. It's too much that the ambition is too large and almost impossible to actually accomplish. My answer is an individual is. I don't know figure out. I really don't You look at the overall health of the planet and not only is it moving in the wrong direction seems to be moving in that direction exponentially faster than scientists and other experts thought possible. So there's a huge part of me that really wonders. I look at the way that we've managed covid in the last eight months as as a people. And i'm not i'm not terribly optimistic of a modest But i am the ceo patagonian. This is our commitment and our mission statement. And i believe very strongly that we have a responsibility to do everything we can to try to live up to that mission and that's internally within the four walls of patagonia but that's also all the other ways that i talked about so we're deeply committed to it certainly. I don't think. I know. I don't believe anybody in patagonia paralyzed by the enormity of it but sobered Absolutely when you think about your core customer for patagonia is it. The kind of customer who is super ecoconscious is doing all they can to reduce there waste and reduce their carbon footprint or is it just the general populace and you hope that in buying something from patagonia are reducing their impact a little bit but probably not thinking about it every day. Yeah no i mean. There's there's probably a big difference here. Between what i hope. And what we're focused on the reality or at least i accept that there is some difference but i always think about patagonia's is really simple. We exist to serve people that come to the branch sport and product people that come to the brand through mission and values and we are at our absolute best when they're one in the same and if somebody comes through sporting product and doesn't know what we stand for and how we make product. I would love the opportunity to help them. Better understand better patterns of of.

patagonia michigan
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

02:43 min | 6 months ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Casual

"Ken and apparel company. Become truly sustainable. I think is possible I don't think any of us are there yet. But i do think it's possible. I think it's going to require that. We look at the footprint of the businesses. We run the people who are involved in making the product that we make i think ultimately really committing to circular business processes not making product. That people don't need moving away from it. I think this cuts to the heart fast fashion trying to trigger people to buy as as entertainment things that they don't need which i think is fundamentally evil and then making product of low quality and failing to take responsibility for those products everything i just described as anything but sustainable but i think each of those issues there are better ways today and i'm convinced that they will be even better ways in the future so let's get into the specifics of what those ways are. I'm curious to hear what patagonia approach to limiting this this negative feedback loop that we have within the fast fashion industry. It's how is patagonia to to slow things down if you will were. I think it's difficult to talk about patagonia today without taking a quick look at least At our history you know why we were founded and and kind of different chapters in the book as it were so we're founded forty seven years ago by a gentleman named yvonne art. He's the same person who owns the company today. his first foray into business was hand forging climbing equipment. He was a self taught blacksmith and he would Bang out climbing piton often on the beach in malibu between session surfing and then he started importing clothing actually rugby shirts from the uk and that was his step into apparel for climbers. And so you fast forward forty seven years but the origins go back to an outdoor clothing company. And that's still very much what we are today. And if if you know as a company that was founded to allow people to explore wild places we have always had this outsized interest in protecting those while places so those that kind of goes back to the beginning patagonia. I would say i always think of. The company's history has chapters in a book and early on it was really about minimizing our footprint and then we moved into trying to scale solutions to Just better ways to make product in seeing other companies and apparel and beyond adopt those practices then in the mid eighties. We committed to what we call taxing ourselves. What we called earth tax was at the time it was one percent of revenue ten percent of profits with long since just codified it as one percent of revenue in giving that to small grassroots organizations working on environmental topics and then in the last handful of years given the overall degradation of the planet. We've waited more directly into activism ourselves. So i think your question was a lot around prentiss a business but we do a lot of work within the footprint of the business when we do a lot of external work think within the business.

patagonia yvonne art Ken malibu rugby uk
More companies pledge to give workers time to vote

Bloomberg Best

04:11 min | 8 months ago

More companies pledge to give workers time to vote

"Are involved in this next organization. You know their names were talking about all birds. Amazon Lulu Lemon lift Major League baseball uber target. The list is kind of endless and they've got a common interest. It's about strengthening our democracy. And encouraging participation. Now there's 545 of these companies in total. They basically just want to encourage civic participation. Okay, get out involved. So we're going to talk to the executive director of the Civic Alliance. He's Stephen Levine. He's on the phone with us from Los Angeles is also the co founder of Meteorites, Social Impact investors. Steven. It's great to have you. I imagine you guys have been quite busy over the last few months. We definitely have Kaylie and thank you for having me on this evening. I appreciate it. A CZ you mentioned the Civic Alliance is a nonpartisan business coalition that is strengthening our democracy by supporting face healthy and accessible elections. And by really inspiring every American to participate in our democracy. And I'm really proud of the work that we've seen so many extraordinary cos. Lead this here many for the first time encouraging both their employees and their consumers. Tio specifically active and get out and vote. Can you give us some specifics on what you've done? What kind of what kind of efforts Absolutely. So we've helped many companies, many major employers think about what policies they could have to make sure that all of their employees not only feel supported but also encouraged to vote. We're very proud to share that companies like best buy and Tax office are actually closing their retail locations. Either early or opening them late on election day to make sure that all of their employees have time off to vote. Other companies are closing completely for the day like Fiat, Chrysler on Patagonia, which are literally shutting down all of their operations on election day to make sure that their employees have the time they need to vote. We're also helping companies think about how they can message and provide all of their employees and consumers with the latest information about the different ways that Americans can vote in this election cycle. 20 is definitely a unique election cycle because you can say that again. The challenges represents so so we're really we're really excited that that many companies are are helping to fill in the gaps and educate Americans about about how they can vote early this year. Interesting fact. 99% of Americans can cast their ballot before Election Day in 2020, and we're thrilled that more than 75 million Americans already have. It's pretty just 30 million more than 60 students. It's no forgive me. I'm interrupting you. It's staggering, though. When you kind of get your head around those numbers. It's also staggering that you know, we talked about a story last week. About a Silicon Valley tech CEO that emailed all 10 million of his customers urging a vote for Joe Biden specifically like it used to be go back a few years. It was a no no for CEO or an executive to get out there and talk politically. What's different. We have about a minute and they will come back and continue. Okay, Great. Well, what I would say. First of all, I want to reiterate that specific alliances a nonpartisan all right, No, I understand Organization, but I think it's pretty exciting is that I think companies have started to realize that that civic engagement, nonpartisan civic engagement actually isn't partisan or political. It's patriotic and its civic And I think what we've seen is that because employees are really pushing companies take stands on important social issues. Companies are in turn, turning back to their employees and their consumers and saying, You know what? We will take a stand and we're taking a stand to encourage you to vote and really helped shape our country's future in our communities future and so I think. Encouraging voting and civic engagement eyes really the both politically safest and a really powerful move that many, many companies they're coming? Yeah, I would say employees. Consumers also, you know,

Civic Alliance Stephen Levine CEO Major League Kaylie Amazon Los Angeles Executive Director Joe Biden Steven Co Founder Fiat Executive Chrysler
Amazon Workers Demand Time Off To Vote

Here & Now

06:14 min | 8 months ago

Amazon Workers Demand Time Off To Vote

"Not able to vote early may have to take time off of work to make it to the polls on Election Day if they're allowed to warehouse workers for Amazon are threatening to walk off the job later this week unless the company gives all of its employees paid time off to vote. There is no federal requirement on companies to provide time off for voting. But the Amazon workers are part of a broader push this year for employers to make it easier for Americans to cast their ballots. Let's bring in Victoria Scheunemann, assistant professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh. Welcome. Thank you so much. So far, Amazon has not said they'll give warehouse workers paid time off to vote. But other companies have including WalMart, which, of course, is the country's biggest employer. Are we seeing more companies adopt this policy this year and what's driving it? Yes, absolutely. The number of companies that have taken on voluntarily to provide their workers with either time off for voting or paid time off for voting has increased substantially in 2018. There were about 400 companies that came together under the time to vote initiative. That was founded by Levi Strauss and Patagonia and people the goal of time to vote in 2018 as they were going to try to get 1000 companies by 2020. As of today, I saw 1667 companies have signed on to this initiative. Lisa and Macy's trip Advisor, Bank of America. You see companies across the diversity of different types of industries as well. This is interesting because there's no federal requirement. For time off to vote. How many states mandate companies offer time off to vote? And what kind of state laws really governed Time off on election day? Yeah, I mean, I think a big reason. A lot of these companies are taking the initiative privately. It's because there are very few Public protections, right? We have no federal law that guarantees people time off to vote on Election day. There are some states. I believe there's 11 states right now that have created Election Day as a civic holiday. There's about 30 states that have some sort of law. Sometimes they'll require companies to give you just a couple hours. Sometimes they require paid time off. But as of now, there's 20 states in the country where no citizen is guaranteed time off, even unpaid time off on election day. Do we know if having time off for voting actually effects voter turnout. I mean, I think the intuitive answer is obviously it would. It's hard to measure the effect of any election policy because so many things change at once. But if you ask people who don't vote why they didn't vote. The most common answer we get is that they couldn't find the time. You know, America is one of the only countries in the world that has its Federal and national elections on a week day on a Tuesday and that might have been convenient in America in 18 45 when they created the policy, But for a lot of workers and a lot of parents, it's not a convenient day anymore. That's really interesting. How does America compare with other democracies around the world? When it comes to this? You mentioned, of course, many places allow people to vote on the weekend. By far the most common day for elections in democracies across the world is on the weekend, almost always on a Sunday, sometimes on a Saturday, the United States It's interesting because we selected Tuesday as our election day. Because it was the most convenient day for Americans in 18 45, and at that time eligible voters where Christian farmers who traveled by horseback so voting on a Tuesday was convenient because they could observe the Sabbath on Sunday. Leave home on Monday and travel to the Poles naked vote and then they could be back home in time for Market Day, which was commonly held on Wednesdays Tuesday, was actually picked because it was the most convenient in the 18 hundreds. But of course, America has changed since then. Yeah, we're a long way from the 18 Hundreds. You know, this time around about 60 million people have already voted earlier mailed in absentee ballots in the selection. That's according to the U. S elections Project of the University of Florida. Does the growing trend toward early voting and mail in voting make time off to vote unless necessary, In your view, since many states allow people to vote over a period of weeks instead of just on election Day? I would say all of those policies make it easier for people to vote in different ways. Access to early voting and excuse free vote by mail are not universal. That's one thing that the Amazon workers have emphasized, is that some of them are protected by state laws. But a lot of them are not. Some of them live in states that have no access to alternative methods of voting and have no state protection for time off the types of people who are most affected, right when we make voting more costly, or we make it more difficult to vote. Populations who are most affected are the people with the fewest resource is those tend to be low income families. They tend to be single parents, people working minimum wage jobs or working multiple jobs. Those populations are most affected, so any policy we implement that would make it easier for people to vote. Is going to affect disadvantaged in underrepresented populations. More so than the rest of the population is just one thing to know is that if we were to make Election Day, a national holiday, not everybody gets the day off on a national holiday. If you think of the businesses that are open on the fourth of July or Thanksgiving. Those businesses tend to be operated by hourly bridge workers and often minimum wage workers making Election Day holiday would make it more convenient for more people, But the people who are left out are those who are already more disadvantaged in society. How do you think this pandemic will impact future elections in the way that we vote, and perhaps this issue of being able to take time off to vote? It's a big question. I think one thing that the pandemic has done is it's pushed a lot of states forward in time in creating alternative methods of voting, right, making voting more accessible to people. Although some of those reforms have been temporary and short term, I do think that one states experience an election with easier voting and see how simple it khun B. And once voters experience that. I think these policies are more likely to continue, so I think, if anything, it's pushed us forward faster by preaching and even more immediate need to easier access to voting. That's

Amazon America United States Levi Strauss Victoria Scheunemann Assistant Professor Of Politic Walmart University Of Pittsburgh Macy Khun B. Bank Of America Lisa University Of Florida Advisor
Ross Franquemont  U-2 Pilot Talks Through The Prep For A Mission.

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

06:50 min | 8 months ago

Ross Franquemont U-2 Pilot Talks Through The Prep For A Mission.

"Tell us a little bit about the the the typical mission. I mean, we've many seen youtube footage of of the takeoffs and landings of the Dragon Lady and the airplane is called that specifically because it is a little odd to fly. But as a pilot as you got used to it tell us a little bit about the the whole process from suiting up to getting it back in the charts at the end of the day. So. Definitely, obviously, one of the most unique aircraft that is out there in her for us emission it actually started pretty much today prior. Because you're you're going to be sitting in space, can be strapped into action see. For you know nine, ten, twelve hours at a time, you're not gonNA be able to get up or anything like that. So you have to get yourself physiologically ready to go on a trip like that. In the jet. So you're you're eating right everyone gets to know the body really well. So you You basically have to show up you obviously well rested. And Well Fed and You typically you about two hours prior to take. You do all the other normal pilots stuff. You know you have to check not yet check weather and all that kind of stuff because. You might be miles above the typical weather out there while you're on the mission but you're gonNA have to take off to land eventually in you have to go through all that stuff. So you gotta do the normal pilots stuff. You're actually you're you're meeting up with your chase car pilot who who's going to be joined the chase garnished another youtube pilot and his job is. Probably. The biggest part of his job is he has to be ready if I come in and say eight know my my stomach's not gonNA. Take this mission today. For whatever reason he's got his step in in actually fly the mission or me So but we're basically is basically like a slight lead wingman relationship with with the chase car islet So, he's supporting you. All along the the coal preparation for the flight. The. Around in our so prior to takeoff, you're actually you're going to separate the chase car islet called the mobile is going to. Head out to their craft. He's going to take all your stuff. In and he knows exactly how you want the aircraft's set up because you've told written it out for him and and when you go. TDY With these guys for months on end, you get to know each other pretty well, know how people like stuff. So is going to take everything out. He's GonNa do the full walk around aircraft. He's going to get everything ready inside the aircraft and on a full mission. Yeah. There might be a five or six different contractors worth of sensors on that equipment they're. All out there you know this thing look like they're preparing young space shuttle for launch because there's hoses everywhere. There's wires going everywhere on the aircraft everyone's uploading stuff to their own sensors and checking them for me. It's as a pilot. I'M GONNA head back and I'm GonNa Start Process Getting into spacey and that starts around an hour prior to take off and. The for most of my time in the U.. U2, it was actually the rule was you had to be on oxygen in our product takeoff they we've made some modifications cockpit that's actually changed or the modified cockpits. You don't have to be on oxygen or an hour anymore, but let's still try to get as much a close to in our breathing pure auction, and that's just to try to get rid of the nitrogen at your system But that process basically starts to you're GONNA have to Off The plate suit, you put on some kind of long underwear underneath If you're flying over really cold area, you know they always say dressed egress. So The you'll the space. It doesn't provide a whole lot of thermal protection. So if you're flying the Arctic or something like that, you're probably get you're gonNA put on some like. Patagonia thermal underwear or something like that. the You'll go out and there's actually a team of space. You Spacey Technicians they're gonNA actually help you get into the space. And The gas? Is Awful Sport and physiological training. Squadron, they they do all the maintenance on the space. They're the ones that put you in and they also do all the the preparing the seek it, and actually the ones that strap you into the seats they're very integral process. Make sure the mission actually happens. The way it's supposed to, but team of technicians are GonNa get you into the space. there's a supervisor watching the whole way in because it's obviously one mistake could be life threatening in a in the event of an emergency They, get you in the state they. Have to put the suit on the helmet gloves lacan. And as soon as she locked helmet on, employs it down you start they start understood oxygen and that's Kinda starts here what they call your two-time. So you get you get locked in they have to put a harness on you. That's going to actually attach injection seat. and they run through. A series of tests leak test to make sure that students can air They can inflate it because at the main job is there you know it's primarily to make sure you don't do hypotheses in also makes you don't lose pressure. Around your body and that's full pressure suit essentially, it's going to. It's just a little little cabinet around you to make sure that. You don't get into a lethal zone, the air pressure on you. For most of my time, flying with the cockpits were setup where You're up seventy thousand feet. Pressurized about twenty nine thousand feet, and so when you're sitting in the space suit that actually It's not inflated because you WANNA be able to move around and stuff like that, and your body's actually sitting at twenty nine thousand feet. And it's designed if the cabin were to say suddenly rapidly rise cousin a leak or an injection or something like that. The suit X. Lock in pressure at thirty, five, thousand feet around your body. So it'll keep you alive We all do it in the in the Austin Chamber ride the Chamber up to seventy five thousand feet or so and it. The let the suit actually keep you alive in the you know real in the in the chambers she get to see what is like not a real comfortable experience.

Youtube U2 Supervisor
Driving the Carretera Austral, Chile

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:54 min | 10 months ago

Driving the Carretera Austral, Chile

"I'd like to welcome back to the show Steph dyson who has a travel journalist, a guidebook author most recently the Moon Guide to Chile and a travel blogger at worldly adventurer dot com. Steph. Welcome back to the show. Thanks having me Chris I'm excited to be back again. Well Of Truth. I should say when I say welcome back to the show, Steph has been on the show before you have heard her talking about northern Chile, a number of episodes ago I wanNA say five years ago. Yeah I think that's correct just before you started working on a guidebook. Kissed before Ya. So this is kind of rounding out that experience because the moon guy to Chile just published. And that was a quite a long amount of time working on this guidebook but also Steph was the show a week ago and something went terribly wrong and it did not record. So I appreciate your patience but I also appreciate your expertise on Chile. When. We talk about she leave this time we're talking about and I'm going to try and pronounce it the cut. US thrall the southern. Highway. Good. That was good pronunciation. I I. See you've been working on it. We'll have to do some things right this time. What is the? astral and where would we find that in Chile? The CATTA that Australia Archie means the southern highway to give you a bit of a clue and it's in Chilean Patagonia. Now, how to guy near is the sort of slightly nebulous region because nobody's really sure if it's somewhere on his own or if it belongs to other countries a what it is, but effectively, it's a region in the very far south of South America are in between Argentina and Chile. and. The kind of thorough style is the kind of rules western section. So it's the kind of Chilean bit where she gets really narrow sort of not part of the country, and it's just before you hit very southern Patagonia West toughtested by name and the destinations that you've discussed previously only put podcast bright further north than the last show we did on Patagonia, there is a lot of Patagonia. If we look at the map there. There's a lot of Chile in terms of height, not necessarily in terms of with. Yeah it's a long country and I have children most of it and it. Pile. Will End just this road is seven, hundred, seventy miles or twelve, hundred and forty kilometers. So when we talk about One week itinerary, you're going to start us not at the top and go all the way to the bottom where you're gonNA start, US. Yeah so I always recommend people planning Patagonia is starting inbound Maceda says about halfway down the cutter that'll style just outside this sort of biggest town in the area it's Koi Heike and it's an apple that where you can fly into directly in Santiago. So it makes it a really great destination to start your trip. and Are we gonNA do anything around the airport flying are where we going to start our actual trip? I would recommend picking up a call. Then you don't need a four wheel drive to cut that Australia just needs sort of reason, the high clearance because most of it is now paves. The big for the locals I'll tell you that hasn't that hasn't been paved before but yet you're gonNA jump in your car and you can head south for a couple of hours to via settled gusty steel, which really tiny little town outside of a national park. You talk about outside of national. Park. The one thing as we talk about this pretty much this whole way there are national parks everywhere I think. I'd made the analogy that if you started at the top of this highway in you're a squirrel, you could probably get to the southern tip of South America in jump from tree to tree within a national park. I'm not sure the tree is correct but the national parks is almost accurate. This just a whole lot of national parks here in southern Chile. Yeah, it's actually what the government did. Last year would start it up the root of their parks re to the parks. On, it's about two, thousand, four, hundred kilometers I believe I'm connecting pretty much port Lamont which is the very northern tip Patagonia all the way down to Cape Horn, which has its own national pockets the bit at the very bottom of South America's islands that people go. Because the sale is used around the whole and and it was a big deal because white windy down that. Square yes. Yes. There's now they sort of route to the pox. It's kind of this ingenious could you can't actually drive between all of them, but the capital style does opportunity to actually connect quite a number of them.

Chile Steph Dyson Patagonia United States South America Australia Steph Cape Horn Government Port Lamont Santiago Chris Argentina Maceda Apple Chile.
Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

WSJ Tech News Briefing

26:19 min | 10 months ago

Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

"Last week John spoke with Facebook Coo Sheryl Sandberg Zoom Call, and we've got their conversation for you as an extended show today. John Obviously people know Sandberg as Facebook, Coo. But what else should they know about her? She's very well known in the tech industry, but also in in circles of leadership in advocacy for women in leadership minorities, leadership But yeah, the most visible role she plays as the number two to mark facebook in that has been enrolled. That's been developing over more than a decade and prior to that, she was a in early employee at Google and played role in the Clinton administration as well. Of course, there's been a lot going on facebook and we've reported on it along the way, but they're kind of always as. So. Why talk to San Merck now it's been particularly busy summer and there was a lot to talk about on the call. You know you've had this advertising boycott. You've had a lot more questions about their willingness to police hate speech and and make sure that civil rights are being protected on the platform You've also had this run up to the election and a lot of focus on small business and what they can do during a pandemic both to stop the spread of misinformation and help small business stay afloat. Cheryl's also well known for her foundation Leinen, and at the time that we talked, it was a black women's payday and Kamala Harris had just been tapped as the vice presidential candidate for Joe Biden. Leinen had just done this study that pointed out some things that are fairly obvious. But maybe we didn't realize how cute the problems really are, and that was related to advancement opportunities for minority women in Business both leadership management opportunities just their ability to move forward in their careers. Here's what she told us the data's incredible right now, men are doing a lot to men are doing an average of fifty hours a week of childcare and housework. That's something. We've never ever seen before women doing an average of seventy one. And Black Women and women of color doing even more that GOP is twenty one hours and single mothers, many of whom are of color but single mothers of all backgrounds are doing twice as many hours per week caring for elderly or sick relatives as well and doing a great majority of childcare and we know that all of these numbers hit women who were core hit poor families harder than wealthier families across the board. But even amongst the elite, what you almost always see is the average woman even if she's working full-time is doing a lot more in the home than the average man and that is a big part of what happens to us in the workforce. Until we get to a quality in the home, we're never getting to a quality in the workplace and that has become even more urgent with coronavirus. These are all important issues to the Wall Street Journal, we cover these things all the time we've been covering them aggressively and comprehensively, but we could only manage to get so much in today's episode. So with the issue at hand is clearly. The election and facebook's huge role to play. They're given what happened in two, thousand, sixteen and expectations in the twenty twenty and that's the part of the conversation we wanted to share with listeners today. Thanks John. A couple of things. We should note here this was a video call. So it's got that feel to it and it was recorded last week we've got that conversation after the break. Robotics, artificial intelligence augmented reality. The future is here listen to tomorrow today with the Wall Street Journal's future of everything the podcast that takes you to the frontlines of science and tech and shows you what's coming next. Look ahead. What do you hear? The future of everything from the Wall Street Journal Subscribe Wherever you get your podcasts. I want to set the context of you know of the problems and our criticisms aimed at your company, not just Sheryl Sandberg the executive, but the user of facebook is well I I. I have to assume that you're not just running a company that you're using the product. The company faces a Lotta Chris the you know. The the frustration about incentivizing the you know spreading misinformation allegedly incentivizing that extremely provocative in hateful speech that that gets through and get seen sometimes gets pushed up in our news feeds. The suspicion facebook is still a place for unwholesome characters and actors can manipulate the system in use misinformation to get results that they're looking for etc.. Nah Not. Not so much yet about the solutions that you guys have put in place in the learnings but how do you feel today about facebook is a place against the backdrop of those criticisms so we do face a lot of those criticisms and anytime you have a platform as large as ours you know three billion plus people on it many many of them daily. We have huge responsibility. And I think that is a responsibility that we really had to grow into. When I look at this election, we are a different company than we were in twenty sixteen and we are going into this election in a very different place in touches on all of the issues that you you're talking about. So let's go back to answer your question to twenty sixteen if you think about the election in two, thousand sixteen. We obviously had systems in place to defend against attacks from other states. But what those normally or thought of what we thought of them I think everyone of them was. People with hacking steal your data, remember the DNC emails remember Sony. That was basically what state actors did, and we've had very good systems in place in great defenses there what we completely missed in two thousand sixteen was not going in and stealing your stuff. But was going in and writing stuff. Fake host trying to get audiences to believe things in ways that you were representing. That's what happened with Russian interference and we completely missed it. So did the FBI. So did every government of the world? That is just not true when you think about the election in twenty eighteen and you think about being election today. We now understand this threat and are deeply engaged in working on it, but we're also not on our own homeland security has a department on miss the FBI has a task force on this in two thousand sixteen we call these groups coordinated inauthentic behaviour. So coordinated authentic like we saw the Russian fake posts in twenty sixteen, we took down networks we'd never heard of it twenty seventeen we took down one. In. The last year we took down over fifty. We now do these. So often at people used to write stories, we've Allah publicly. No one even does does that mean we're going to catch every single thing I will never claim that we will always have every single thing the services big. But does that mean we're in a very different place going into this election Absolutely. And one retake really seriously. We're also trying to get even more proactive on the good like on facebook there's things they're stopping the bad stopping the hate stopping interference with there's also promoting the good at, and that's something that I care a lot about mark as a lot of Bob. So we want yesterday. So it's perfectly timely to talk to you about it, our new voter information center and what that Information Center is a one stop shop where you can go to get accurate information on this election. That's never been more important registering to vote who's eligible that stuff's always hard. But in this election with corona virus and holes potentially closed getting accurate information is even more important. So We'd put this out. It's modeled on our coronavirus center where we put out very definitive information really helped people get the right answers. Now anytime people post about voting on facebook working a link to this center. We're also trying to be as ambitious as we can. I'm a woman I'm I'm owning the word ambitious, but it's ambition by my company. To Register people. So in the last two elections, we registered two million people to vote. which is very large, but we've put out pretty audacious goal that we're GONNA try to help register four million people for this election cycle, which I think would make it the largest effort of its kind by were invasion and were really. We're really proud of that really excited about it. So we I sit here John Taking, you take the criticism when we deserve it very seriously. We take our responsibility very seriously atop to show work every day trying to stop anything bad we gotTA learn quickly bad will always try to get ahead but also trying to use our platform in our services for the good. What do you do as the user? Something on facebook doesn't along there. Do you just pull the red phone out and make a phone call or are you pensive about that and thinking about emits broader context at it needs the nuance as market said it's very hard. To directly police the content and and just hit the button? Yes. So look it is hard to directly police the content. We know that it's very hard to pull heat down. It's very hard to find it and identified. That's why we've invested so much think our standards are the highest not the lowest I think our enforcements the best, but that doesn't make it perfect. You know as a user I actually don't remember seeing something that violated our policies and most people have not most people hear about it or it gets pulled into press and they see it now. I've certainly seen things I. Disagree with I have some family members whose political views I do not share. You know I have some ice stuff about fuck I disagree with. But in terms of my actual experience of seeing real hate yes I would pull I. Don't have a bat phone, but I would definitely take a screen shot in forwarded. Personally, referred infant I haven't had that experience or know how many people actually do see content that violates the rules is there a way to kind of measure that? Millions of people report content millions of not not all of it is actually violated with our standards but millions of people go through that process. In fact, we released our latest community standards enforcement report, and it gets to exactly what you're asking what that shows. Is All the different kinds of content we take down how much? How much violence? Were Nagasaki and it shows what percentage of it. We took down and found ourselves or someone reported to us. And that's where the progress on hate I think really becomes clear when we first did this report years ago, twenty, four percent of the hate we took down, we found ourselves which meant that seventy, six percent of the time someone had reported it to us. That's not a good experience. Our latest report we put out this week were at ninety, five, ninety, five percent of the hate that we take down we are finding before it's reported. That means five percent of what we take down is still being reported to us, which is still alive on facebook. So we have our work cut out for us, but clearly a significant improvement over twenty four percent just a few years ago and it to really the investments we've made in systems in AI in. Huge teams to monitor that's gotten us. There are your standards tough. Enough I mean that's something that we know is a sticky situation because everybody wants what they find to be offensive police in. As you said, sometimes it borders on my own bias is what I don't WanNa see. But when you look at the standards, where are you guys at particularly because they have in freshly criticized and there's rolling dialogue about whether whether you're going to get tougher? Where are we met? Her students are very tough but they're not as tough as some people would want them to be or they're not as comprehensive as some people would want them to be you know one person's opinion. One person's free expression could be another person's he. We work really hard on these definitions and were very public about the our entire standards are publicly out there including most to the material that the people who use inside their references that were very public about them. You know for the most part, we've always been a very protected society and the criticism has always been on both sides I'll give you an example that was very hot for a while was breastfeeding. We don't do pornography, we don't do breasts. In some parts of the world, a new woman who's naked from the top would be on the front page of every newspaper, and there are people that really believe in breastfeeding. It felt that we were suppressing their free speech because our computer systems were picking up any time. You saw a nipple of any kind even if it was a breastfeeding picture so we've worked more nuance there, but I think over the course of time, people have found us to be very strict on the standards. There are people out there that think are hit standards aren't strong enough. We are continually evaluating them continually making improvements. But I think a lot of people think our standards are too hard and so we try to be as transparent as possible. We try to evolve to meet ongoing things that are things. We'd never heard of no one ever heard of years ago. That are brand new movements that are hateful and there are things that some people find offensive that we do leave up because we think three expression in having that too is critically important in a lot of situations sodden. You're thinking on your role as an information broker during corona virus. How did that? I emerge and how did you deal with that at facebook given? All of the things that the most elite elite medical personnel don't know in yet. Here you are with the responsibility of not disseminating misinformation that may cost people's lives or fan pandemic. So our policy on misinformation is we don't take down we send it to third party fact checkers if it's marked as false or partially false, we dramatically decrease the distribution we market this has been marked false or partially falls and we linked to more information that often can tell the whole side of the story. Even, before Corona virus, we had an exception to that, which is information that was going to cause imminent harm and that policy really came out of other parts of the world. Misinformation was leading to death or imminent harm. The Corona virus we took the stand to things we said we're not going to have information that will lead to imminent harm. And we're going to rely on health experts. We are not decided there was no decision made by your marker anyone on our team. This is true about coronavirus and this is not because we're not experts but we partnered from the beginning with local health authorities the CDC the. H. Show the you know the health ministers in different countries to make sure that we were taking down misinformation. No matter who posted it up would also give very accurate information out and I think sometimes in these discussions, we forget that there are two sides. Of course, we need to take down at least marcus false things that are harmful, but we also have to use our services. To, get out the information people need. So governments like the UK, government local governments when they needed to get messages to their citizens, they've turned on us and we've been I think a very effective way of getting messages out. Interested. In in several high profile advertisers including some that I shot from it said, we're gonNA take a break and it wasn't just facebook it with social media have companies come back and what what are those conversations and like I know. The effect on the bottom line may not be what well understood you do rely. So heavily on smaller and middle sized companies for revenue but but it was a huge moment, a big headline where where are you guys at conversations are they back? So advertisers are starting to come back not but a good number are coming back have come back in process. Look those conversations were really hard John because normally. If someone is boycotting you or is protesting you want you to do a whatever a is in. You don't want to do it. That's not the case at all here the boycotters and the advertisers didn't want hate on facebook and we don't want this book Sosa. I think we had completely aligned goals and we have challenges in enforcing that. So again, we just released our enforcement report. We were at eighty nine percent of finding hate we take down ourselves. Now we're up to ninety five. That's an improvement and we know we have we have further to go. We also do have some notice agreement with people on what hate is we tend to take a broader swath of allowing some information that we think it's free expression to stay on so that people can have dialogue but in terms of hate, I think the real issue is that there's a fundamental misunderstanding of our service out there that we need to do a better job correcting we don't want. Hey. We don't benefit from hey, we don't profit from hey users don't want to see it. Consumers don't WANNA. See it. Advertisers don't want to be next to it. So the the narrative of facebook is leaving pay because they WANNA profit for. That's just just you talked about voters earlier and the initiatives that you're putting your proactively being part of a solution is what I hear you saying. But Marquez said very recently with this electric this unprecedented situation and I'm I'm guessing given your. Your half glass full mentality it's an opportunity but what's at stake here for facebook I? Mean we're all GonNa Blaine facebook if things go wrong and a certain candidate decides to use the platform and you're not taking down information with speed or at all is it a noble no-win situation here or what's at stake for this platforms ability to prove its productive place in this discussion? So we all know that there's a lot at stake for the selection full stop. There's more concern in confusion about how to register to vote what is valid I think there's more concern around misinformation around any kind of coordinated attacks. I think we're going into this election in a totally different place than twenty sixteen and interestingly, I think our track record in twenty eighteen was actually fairly good when people talk about things facebook missed in an election getting upset at us for things that are almost always talking about twenty sixteen you almost never hear about twenty eighteen and there have been hundreds of elections around the world and to look our job is to get people accurate information to be proactive. We are being much more proactive around. Pushing out information in this election and we have or have been before, and that is modeled on what we did with Toronto virus. We are taking that approach doing everything to get rid of the bad. We are doing everything to get in front of people the accurate information as well. And then we want to make sure that people can use the prop. One thing that's worth really thinking about is how many small people small people running for smaller offices. Are Using our platform provisionally when we're in social distancing and can't campaign. That's right. So how do you advertise to? No one's ever heard of me. I'm running for State Senate or I'm running for school board and I want to do it cheaply and efficiently we allow that to happen and we're proud of that role replied. There are you prepared I mean thinking about four more years of questions regarding how quickly you should be policing the president and his tweets given the thus far has a track record that trump is definitely more aggressive with platform Vice President Biden ever has been he trump wins. You're already in a in a in a situation where you guys are have been accused of dragging your feet on or taking a less aggressive stance against him. How do you think about that in a world where we might see four more years of that? It's our. It's our job to have clear and consistent rules. That, we apply in a fair way globally and I know we are very focused that we should be very focused on this election. There are important elections all over the world with people on different sides, and so we have experienced not just in the US cycle, but obviously the hundreds of elections that have happened since since last US cycle and we do we. Get accused from conservatives of being anti-conservative. They look it. Awesome. A see liberal silicon, Valley company I mean, I've been very affiliated Democrat. I remain unaffiliated Democrat other people look at us and they say we're not going far enough and our answer is going to be very clear about what our rules are and working apply them as even handed away as possible we also. Recognize that there should be limits to our power to decide what stays up in. Probably one of the most important things that's going to happen in the upcoming twelve months is the rollout of our content for which we've announced but has not yet come together to play. So for the first time, there's GonNa be a possibility that if you either have something taken down. And you think that's unfair or you take it down or you WanNa leave up in either direction, you can appeal it to the content board in your case much like the court right they'll have more than they can but they'll try to hear the big months. Someone else will decide and that board is independent does not report to mark does not report to me. Were also working with governments around the world. We think government has a very big role to play. Wouldn't it be good if governments to find hate rather than private companies would you be good if governments defined what is a political ad? Not Private companies were working hard to make sure that there are checks and balances and that the government's role is really important not just here around the world. You're not just the Democrat I mean you're you're a friend of the president presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket at an I I don't know the. Friendship, but definitely, it's been noted that the two of you have relationship you've been support I'm wondering if you're kind of jaw drops a little bit about the delicate role that you need to play his business leader given facebook's place in society if you're running Ben and Jerry's, which is much smaller if you're running. Patagonia. If you were running for Motor Company, you probably feel a little bit more free an mistaken to be supportive and to give the porch that you want to feel it all that your your ability to help is checked by your role I mean, my day job is facebook and my nights on Facebook, and then you know I work on my foundation as well, and so it is not my job to be very active in the political process and I've chosen a career that keeps me in business. So I don't wake up in the morning. You know what should I be doing politics 'cause I wake up in the morning with a very big job for facebook I. think that's consistent with business leaders. You know as a woman and as a woman who's long fought for the role of women to have more to celebrate ambition to celebrate what we're reaching for the highest office I'm thrilled to see a woman about to be nominated a woman of color about to be nominated and I spoke out anatomy horse I would do. Of course, I would do that and my foundation has done that as well. Do need to think twice about how supportive I mean it it's not a heavy lifting to be supportive publicly. Meaning you don't have to put in a lot of hours, but like running a news organization, I mean it kind of is a proxy for what facebook has become what we think of as a neutral platform even well, I've said, we're GONNA work with anyone who wins for us. So when I'm asked when you work with trump, if he wins the election, will you work with Biden if he sorry president trump if he wins the election we work with Vice, President Biden. Of course, we don't get to pick. Citizens elect their governments and we work with them, and we work with all over the world and we have to be willing and able to do that. Would you work for President Biden if there was a president Biden, you know I have a long decided I had my time. I worked at the Treasury Department under President Clinton and it was an amazing opportunity. What about the open seat in California right now not interested at all I mean. I really love my job and I really have so much respect for mark and my colleagues. Every day is not easy I don't expect anyone feel sorry for me or any of us we have great opportunities big role to play. We have serious responsibility to get this election right? We have serious responsibility to get hate and you know misogyny off the platform. against, wake up every business, I feel lucky to have this opportunity and I feel lucky to work for someone who is strong and has such conditions as mark. Are you having a guest one final question is the enormity of that task of getting it right. Your back and forth about what that looks like all day. But getting it right as a business challenge. Also, when I say this, I wonder if you are amazed at the trajectory of the importance of this as a public trust, almost as a is an institution and we aren't just considering a business but has a responsibility to society. Is there one? That outweighs the other giving you have shareholders, others, or is there is there a way to balance those two things at the same time? These things that people think are in conflict sometimes, but I really don't think they are we need people to trust our service we need people to trust that we're GONNA make content decisions not for profit on either side. But for the right for the right reasons and to doing the things that need our responsibility to protect elections takedown hit, they don't trade off against the business. They're important to drive the business. Now, there is a resource tradeoff rehiring engineer. We can put them on an ad program to build rags ads we can put them on safety we can put them on security. Of course, we have resource trade-offs, research trips of my time reserves tradeoffs mark if you look at how do our jobs and you compare it to for years ago, Mark Myself All of our senior leaders Chris Cox who just came back. Incredible. Chief Product Officer Mike Shrimp for our incredible. CTO We all spend a lot more of our time on the protection of the community. Then we did five years ago but I think that is super important and for a while we were playing catch up and I think all of these things work together. There's not a trade offs. We have to absolutely meet our responsibility and build our business and without meeting our responsibility, we're not going to build Turkishness. Kyi No your plane to grab people from. What you go Thank you for your time. It's always nice talking to and. Until next up. On.

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High desert flower farming in Arizona with Aishah Lurry of Patagonia Flower Farm

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

05:20 min | 11 months ago

High desert flower farming in Arizona with Aishah Lurry of Patagonia Flower Farm

"Was thinking about you all week thinking, how is she farming when it's over a one hundred degrees so give us sort of a snapshot of your farm and like how do you cope with those conditions? Well, let me tell you first of all, we're in what's called the high desert where about four thousand feet above sea level. So we're in the mountain. Okay. So near probably always consistently ten degrees cooler than Tucson in almost fifteen degrees cooler than Phoenix. So settle a little secret about where you are is because of allegation exactly now it's hot outside it's a little hot, but you know it works in it's funny because one of the benefits about living here it does snow. We get snow in the winter, but it's usually gone by noon our ground never freezes. So the soil is always workable all and very rarely have like a hard frost. So if you think of like I, go up in Boston, it would start to get colder and colder nine pm pm and that's when the coldest would happen. But here the coldest time it seems like is early in the morning three or five. In the sun rises in warm things up in usually. So is just a click fraud so that can damage some plants but for the most part, we have no problem. So I don't know and I I just I guess, I have the desire to grow flowers GonNa make it happen or the variances is what's crazy is that it can be like ninety five degrees during the day and then in the thirties at night. It's crazy I mean I was thinking when you talked about snowing in the morning at least you're getting precipitation where other parts of Arizona are not getting precipitation. So even though it snow, it becomes the moisture the roots need that's in. It's wonderful when the snow slowly melts in and gets into the soil, you really can't beat that. while. So give us snapshot of Patagonia Flower Farm, and of course I pick a Patagonia as the clothing, but it's actually the name of a town and I believe a mountain somewhere, right? Yes. In it's actually pronounced Pentagon Yep. Okay Not like the brand to girl. No. So it's very hilly. We got a lot of grasslands here Yes. So it's really really beautiful. A lot of people think of Arizona and they think of Oh. It's everything's GonNa be dry. We've got quite a bit of green going on Yeah. It's really a beautiful town the Pentagon, yet self only has about a thousand people that that live here Old Mining town in it's quite a lot of retire. You can imagine a lot of artists, letter retirees, a lot of women. So it's an interesting sweets out. Wow. That's I wanNA visit. That sounds really wonderful. Yeah and is there much agriculture they're like. Are. You a lone ranger to use the Weser your lot. Of course. Now, a lot of people are gardening. You know it's funny because there is A. Organization here in town that I work very very closely with called Borderland Restoration. So they have a big greenhouse here where they sell native plants in the harvest seeds germinate the season, create more plans to restore the over you know. Overworked will say off. Areas of. Of. Southern Arizona. So so yeah. So. There are few. Let me think. So, before I moved here like years before there was a A Dalia grower here believe it or not, and I know that they must have had a lot of shade because we need the shape of the Dahlia's but But yeah. So a little bit here and there but I think borderlands nursery is the biggest like grower right now and it is mostly native Oh. That's so interesting. So your what's the size and scale of of your farm and give us a snapshot of what all the pieces to the puzzle there. Okay. So. I am what is called a micro farm about or thousand square feet, and I'm growing things very tightly together and I. You know I took 'em a Florette alumni I took her class in twenty seventeen. So I follow a lot of her protocols and the only differences I do a no till I keep the landscape fabric down and Yes. So so that's if I do the landscape fabric I've got who those short tunnels I don't have a greenhouse yet, but one day. And yes, I have an area where I'm doing mostly perennials and then I have my annual and at borderlands has been so gracious of allowing me to use a quite about fifteen hundred square feet where I've been growing sunflowers in in the ground or undercover know in the ground vendor landscape fabric on their property warring. Yeah. But I love it that like you've been entrepreneurial enough to figure out how to. Access land that wasn't being utilized, but you knew would be perfect for some flowers. Eight. Wow.

Pentagon Arizona Patagonia Flower Farm Tucson Borderland Restoration Boston
Between Renting and Buying, Unagi Offers Personal Scooters With a Subscription

Talking Tech

07:24 min | 11 months ago

Between Renting and Buying, Unagi Offers Personal Scooters With a Subscription

"These scooters. There are many of them out there. But how many of them can you subscribe to? David Hyman has a company called. And he is offering read full not reynolds but subscription. To instead of paying a thousand dollars for a new scooter David wants to tell you all about subscription. Hi David. How's it going tests you same here or tell everybody what you got. Sure. So We started Nadi about two and a half years ago. Because we felt that there was a market in this game from my own personal experience of people want to own scooters have one in their possession. It's up, rent them on the street and I got frustrated with ridesharing scooters both. From kind of a at Adnan experience, where wrote a lime scooter to a whole foods and I came out with my groceries and? was. Gone because somebody took it wrote away back and I had just bought inexpensive pint of ice cream and I ended up walking home with melted ice cream. And I thought why don't I just own one of these things like Not, not to mention the urban blight, right that the separate conversation I know you're down in. Southern California people can't hit three steps in tripping over one, right so. I just like the ownership model all. and. So we launched to ninety two years ago. Our hunch was correct. We we were selling hundreds a month, and since covid has hit, we are now showing thousands of. With folks s by coming on board to carry our scooter and new Europe Europe photographer being H Photo Outta Rama. Now Sell our scooter. Are Scooters it's the best electric. Scooter. Poured. Electric Scooter you can own this. Don't just take my word for it There's over a hundred reviews online that states the best electric scooter you could have, but it's a thousand dollars and not everyone can afford that. So we've been asking yourself, how have we reach abroad her audience? And so What is this? When is this going? Live this life when you want it to go live? So. So Logging all access is our new subscription service. It is thirty nine dollars a month. No commitment. There's a one time fifty dollars setup fee. And that's it. We bring it to Your Place Felice ambled. It's dropped off by an inaugural represented if You don't have to assemble it. Don't have to deal with the box and whenever you're done with it, we come and pick it up. But. We think that. Indian. That's New York because of the tour. Angeles in New York, city is where we're launching. Correct. If anything ever goes wrong with the scooter we at your door and under twenty four and we just hot swap another one. So you know skewed downtime. And Insurance is included. So, if anything goes wrong with the scooter, if it's stolen or any form of damage. There's an eighty, five dollar deductible. Now you said you started the company based on melted ice cream. So what happens when you ride your scooter to whole foods and walkout in walk into the store to get the Ice Cream? What do you do with your scooter that you are now subscribing to? So you can either lock it like a bicycle regular you locked works. Scooter so light I throw it in my shopping cart. That's what I did. I mean, it is. It's twenty six pounds. It's the kind of thing that you can bring it any cafe or restaurant. You know we we sell thousands a month, the normal use case with our scooters that. You take it. Everywhere you go and we really designed for portability. Normal. Users under not. Ride to. Our or a subway can take it on the subway and then pop out and take it with them. It takes up no footprint on the subway. It's got one plate folding mechanism only weighs twenty six pounds and it's you know how to arrange and it's electric. So it moves along. Nineteen miles an hour. I mean, you know it's gone incredible amount of torque because it's dual motor see can go fairly steep hills with it. And where do you make them? We make them in Shenzhen. Okay. Everything else okay. Correct. But we are in American company eight I'm proud to say, I, think out of every electric scooter company than. Scooters were the only American based electric, Scooter Company. And our customer services you incredible. So we treated like Patagonia were the only electric company that has a phone number. You can call people pick up the phone and talk to you. Now is the reason that sales went up the delete because of the maybe a lot of people don't want to take the bus and be around people and things like that. Yeah, I mean there's been this kind of seismic shift towards quota. Personal transportation people not wanting to get on public transportation, not get on ride shares, not getting share googlers, shared lifts, and so there's a real need right now you know there's especially you know New York skiers are becoming legal on Sunday. There there's you know we went volt markets to start because we couldn't choose between the two. La Is. The scooter epicenter of the planet. But L. New York's got a real need right now. So we decided to launch in. Baltimore. So. Anybody listening. We're now in the middle, the MO, the middle of summer. So when do you expect to start hitting Chicago in Boston and San Francisco and some of the other major markets? I. I'm not going to throw any any M. Any dates but those cities are are the first ones on our list. Okay. But certainly, they wanted to spend a thousand dollars you could buy you could buy one Tamar. Absolutely and you can't finance it on our website is well. But put thirty nine dollars a month into perspective. That's that's a dollar forty a day. New York subway ride today's three dollars and fifty cents for one Ri-. A rideshare scooter from lime were bird is about five bucks. So. Five dollars a ride. For. Daily commuter there's been two hundred dollars a month for grossly inferior product that half the time the batteries are dead or they're broken when you go to them not to mention the issues but share right now so. And it's yours and it's your germs and not somebody else's your germs and keep the streets clean et keeps your neighborhood looking good and it's no different for your city than owning a bicycle and you get a little bit of

New York Scooter Company David Hyman Europe Adnan Reynolds California Covid Angeles Shenzhen RI LA Baltimore Chicago Boston San Francisco
Columbia Sportswear's Gert Boyle Faced Down Sexism and Ageism

Business Wars Daily

04:29 min | 11 months ago

Columbia Sportswear's Gert Boyle Faced Down Sexism and Ageism

"Boyle. Grew. Columbia sportswear into a downfield powerhouse is the third Nar five-part series on the origin stories of iconic companies. We originally aired this episode about boils legacy after she died last. November, let's listen back. She was one tough mother and proud of it. Gert Boyle, the ninety five year old Chairman of Columbia Sportswear died earlier this month since then accolades poured in for boil, she was a formidable funny icon of the outdoor apparel world notorious for her resilience and her toughness qualities that empowered her to guide Columbia from near bankruptcy in the early seventies to what the New York. Times. Now calls the largest outerwear brand in the United States, a three billion dollar business. Gert Boyle was born gertrude lamb from in Germany in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, four, when she was thirteen, the family fled Nazi Germany moving to Portland Oregon there her father lamb from bought the Rosenfeld hat company worried about antisemitism. He changed the name to the Columbia hat company. Columbia evolved from hats to outdoor year including a fishing vest that Gert than a homemaker raising three kids designed. Gertz husband Neil Boyle eventually became CEO of the family business. But in nineteen seventy, the forty seven year, old leader suffered a fatal heart attack. Suddenly Gert found herself at the helm of an eight. Hundred Thousand Dollar Company. She had no idea how Neil had run it nor how she and her son twenty, one year old, Timothy would manage. As CEO of Columbia Gert frequently encountered sexism, but she always had an acerbic comeback as the new. York Times reported Gert recalled that a businessman upon learning. She was the president exclaimed, but you're a woman her answer. You know I noticed that when I got up this morning. Still, the combination of rampant sexism in her inexperience almost killed the company by Nineteen seventy-one. Gert. Agreed to entertain an offer to purchase it. But when the buyer a man offered, only fourteen hundred dollars she custom out and slammed the door in his face wrote Doug Schnitt span who profiled her for outside magazine. Gert said for fourteen hundred dollars. I would just as soon run this business into the ground myself that encounter galvanized Gruden Tim with a combination of unconventional strategies including being the first to use the waterproof fabric. GORTEX. They saved Colombia and set it on its growth path while all of their outdoor industry rivals including the north face in Patagonia. Marketed their wares to elite climbers and adventurers girding in Tim, we're happy to sell their products. Products at department stores at lower prices that strategy shocked the young industry and it worked so too did the Marketing Campaign Gert? Boyle is best known for the one that featured her as just what she was. One tough mother that campaign which ran from nineteen, eighty, four to two, thousand, five depicted gert down to earth mob oil. Now, take no nonsense mother who didn't suffer fools gladly, and who would allow nothing less than perfection A. A string of TV ads showed Gert using her son Tim as a product Tester to prove that they're outerwear was both warm and waterproof. In the first. She had tim dressed in Columbia's famous three layer system. Walk through a car wash. Her favorite one was one in which she drove a Zamboni on a hockey rink. Right over her long suffering son dressed in Columbia gear. Of course, he was lying the ice breathing through a straw. Straw apprentice out of the same era for the boundary peak parker quoted the Middle Aged Gert, saying I've got hot flashes to keep me warm. You'll need something that zips mob boils tough. Mother ads are credited with transforming a little known business into a household name inside the company. Her wit was also on display. She summed up her guidance for other leaders. This way early to bed early to rise work like hell and advertise. She might have added and work like hell. Until the day you die, she made it to the office on her ninety fifth birthday in March and was still having business discussions shortly before her death on November third according to outsides Schmidt's Pon. Gert Boyle will be remembered for many things among them, her belief which she shared often with younger women that a woman could do anything and also her conviction that older workers are assets in the workplace. Indeed, in her nineties, she wrote perhaps my presence in the office offers a message that managers liked to put older workers out to pasture. Out. To lunch.

Gert Boyle Columbia Columbia Gert Thousand Dollar Company Chairman Of Columbia Sportswea TIM CEO Boyle. United States Germany Neil York Times Doug Schnitt Portland Oregon Gertrude Lamb Gertz Hockey
Could Science Build a Better Grain?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 11 months ago

Could Science Build a Better Grain?

"The ever increasing need to feed Earth's growing population and not always cautious ways that we grow our food are some of the factors that have put our plants environment in peril. Farming accounts for nearly a quarter of human emissions that are warming the atmosphere, and as much as half of that comes from plowing the soil to grow crops, such as wheat, corn and soybeans, which releases carbon, dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, the latter byproduct of fertilizer use, but researchers have been working on ways to reduce the harmful environmental effects of agriculture. One potentially promising innovation is a grain the goes by the trademarked name, her Kneza like familiar grains it can be made into flour for use inbred breakfast, cereal, and other foods, and also as an ingredient in products, ranging from beard ice cream. But unlike many other grains, Kerns is a perennial plant meaning that once it's planted. It'll keep coming back up year after year. It doesn't have to be replanted from scratch year, so it cuts down on labor. In addition, Kerns a has a deep root system it reaches over ten feet or three meters into the soil, and may help to sequester or capture atmospheric carbon that root system could also make more resistant to the impact of drought related to climate change in some areas. Currency was picked by the Land Institute a Salina Kansas based organization founded in Nineteen, seventy, six, the founder West Jackson recognized that a big problem of modern agriculture was that it was wearing the soil by focusing upon monoculture, growing a single crop in a certain area as that practice intensified on modern farms. It's destructive. Downsides became more and more evident in the form of erosion and worn out soil that required increasing amounts of fertilizer, creating increasingly polluted groundwater Jackson saw the development perennial grains to replace annual ones as a vital part of the solution to those problems. The Land Institute's website explains given that grains makeup over seventy percent of our global caloric consumption and over seventy percent of our. Our global croplands, transitioning from an extractive annual model to a perennial model is the best chance we have create truly regenerative food future, but developing new food crops is difficult and time intensive challenge back in Nineteen ninety-three scientists at the Rodale Institute and Other Research Organization identified a plant called intermediate wheat grass species related to wheat as a promising candidate that might be developed into a perennial grain. They worked with researchers from the United States. Department of Agriculture to breed the plant and improve its fertility and seed size in two thousand and three, the Land Institute began working with intermediate wheat grass as well after years of breeding the plant. They developed Kerns the trade name for their variety. In some ways, the process of developing a new crop hasn't changed much since prehistoric times. It involves breeding generation after generation of a plant taking the best from each new batch, and reading them together an effort to promote whatever desirable characteristics your seeking, however plant breeders these days have some tools that the ancients lacked the land institute employed a process called molecular breeding, in which they use genetic analysis to determine the traits of the plant should have even before it grows to full. Full size in order spot plants, but the most potential for breeding. We spoke with Rachel thrower the institute's Chief Strategy Officer. She explained it's taken us ten thousand years, and an intensified two hundred years of modern reading to get the crops. We have today. It's taken twenty to get Kerns to where it is, it might take another twenty to get it to competing at scale with the annuals. But in the effort to turn Kerns a into a commercially viable crop. There's a lot of work ahead. Stroller says that researchers are now working to increase the size number of seeds produced by each plant, and to increase the height of the plants. One drawback of currency is the unlike conventional wheat. It doesn't yet lend itself to free threshing, in which the edible grain is easily loosened from the plant. It instead requires another step called D. hulling to remove the skin of the seed before it can be turned. Turned into flour, that's because the stems remain green, after the plant matures conventional wheat withers, and is thus more easily separated in addition to breeding currency to make suitable for free threshing in the future, scientists are working to make the yield produced by real working farms match what they've been able to achieve on their research plots to that end. They're gathering data from the farmers to help figure out how to time the harvest. What settings would optimal for combines and other factors that might make the fields more productive. Researchers are also working with Baker's chefs, brewers and distillers to develop products that utilize curtains to help create a future market for it. One product already on the market is long route. Pale Ale who's maker Patagonia provision sites Kerns environmental positives in its marketing and last year general mills. CASCADIA and farms brand produced a limited edition. Honey toasted Kerns, a serial, which it sold to raise funds for the researchers. We also spoke via email was Steve, Coleman and assistant professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and Ohio State University, and the CO author of two thousand eighteen bioscience article on Kerns cultivation methods. He said up and working with Kerns F for ten years, and it's been a fun adventure. I think one of the things that I've really come to appreciate. Is that successfully? Domesticating developing a new crop requires more work than anyone can really appreciate.

Kerns F Land Institute Nitrous Oxide United States Rodale Institute Department Of Agriculture Stroller Salina Kansas Rachel West Jackson Chief Strategy Officer Cascadia Founder Baker Assistant Professor Steve Ohio State University Other Research Organization
Facebook Tightens Controls on Speech as Ad Boycott Grows

In The House with Ken and Jared

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Facebook Tightens Controls on Speech as Ad Boycott Grows

"On our Facebook is speaking out with new initiatives targeting hate speech and voter suppression in a social media ad boycott companies like Unilever Patagonia Verizon and others have pulled their ads from Facebook over concerns about how the plan for mishandling hate speech online everyone who girls staying healthy and good now Facebook founder mark Zuckerberg addressing is workers saying changes are being implemented beginning today Facebook will ban a wider category of hateful content in ads were able to identify almost ninety percent of the hate speech that we remove a before anyone even has to

Facebook Unilever Patagonia Verizon Mark Zuckerberg Founder
Birthday party leaves 18 in Texas family with coronavirus

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Birthday party leaves 18 in Texas family with coronavirus

"Hi hi a Mike Mike legal Rossi defeat Rossi for president a are reporting reporting Donald Verizon a birthday Trump and party his joins brother leaves an ad eighteen over boycott a tell members of Facebook all of a Texas book over family hateful about content with to the hit corona the market virus Verizon is joining eighteen a judge a boycott people in New York have of tested City advertising is positive turned aside on for the Facebook corona a claim virus in by a campaign after Donald a surprise trump's to pressure brother birthday the company party seeking to do in to Texas more halt publication last to keep month racist of a book Ron by and the violent Barbosa president's information niece who is married Mary off to its a platform doctor trump is says the judge he the hash refused didn't tag rule stop on to the attend direct hate for the merits may profit thirtieth of the campaign case party saying for only his is daughter supposed his in court law to last lacks because jurisdiction through of cold July did nineteen over other the safety matter advertisers concerns the book being who have published are pledged both by his to Simon boycott nephew and Schuster Facebook who had the is virus Instagram titled but didn't and other too know much company what and hosted services never enough the gathering include how of twenty my outdoor family five gear people created companies among Patagonia the world's the L. most the are north dangerous both face his father man and R. III who's which in in his itself eighties in a statement should and be didn't a tip Facebook off attend as executive to what the the party president Carolyn Iverson might Barbosa want to block says said it his father the the company motion is currently remains filed hanging by committed the president's on to purging by brother a thread Roberts hateful content has in the family I see from members you its services signed while a on settlement life support hi Mike that would Rossi bar for both up them his from mother writing who stopped about family by the matters party just meanwhile to drop the spokesman something off for Simon also and Schuster tested says positive the publisher and is delighted was hospitalized with the ruling and looks hi forward Mike to releasing Rossi up the book next month I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

R. Iii Oscar Wells Gabriel Roberts Barbosa Texas Mike Mike Publisher Schuster Simon Carolyn Iverson Executive Rossi Schuster Facebook Hash Donald Trump Mary RON New York Facebook Donald Verizon
NYC judge rejects Trump family effort to halt tell-all book

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

NYC judge rejects Trump family effort to halt tell-all book

"Hi a Mike legal Rossi defeat for president are reporting Donald Verizon Trump and his joins the brother bride an ad is over splash boycott a tell mountain of Facebook all book it's at over both hateful Disneyland about content to hit in the California market Verizon and the is Magic joining Kingdom a judge a boycott in New in York Florida of City advertising is turned the ride aside on is Facebook tied to a claim the theme in by of a campaign the Donald movie song trump's to pressure brother of the south the company seeking to nineteen do to more halt forty publication six to keep movie racist of that a book features by and the violent racist president's stereotypes information niece Mary off and its tropes platform trump extolling is the judge the the old hash didn't tag south rule stop on the is direct mighty hate for merits profit satisfactorily of the campaign case saying according only is supposed his to uncle court Remus to last lacks jurisdiction through disease July now changing over other the the theme matter advertisers to one the based book being on who the have princess published pledged by and to Simon boycott the frog and Schuster Facebook the two is thousand Instagram titled nine and movie other too much company that features and services never a black enough female include how lead my outdoor family this gear comes created companies in the midst Patagonia the of world's the worldwide most the north acknowledgment dangerous face man and of R. racial III disparities which in itself in a statement should Disney be a tip Facebook though off says as executive to the what change the president Carolyn in splash Iverson might mountain want to block said has it been the in the the company motion works remains filed since by committed the last president's to year purging brother I'm Roberts hateful Oscar content wells has Gabriel family from members its services signed a settlement hi Mike that would Rossi bar up them from writing about family matters meanwhile the spokesman for Simon and Schuster says the publisher is delighted with the ruling and looks forward to releasing the book next month I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Carolyn Oscar Wells Gabriel Roberts California Rossi Publisher Schuster Simon Mike Iverson President Trump Executive Disney Schuster Facebook Remus Mary Florida Verizon Facebook Donald Verizon Trump
NYC judge rejects Trump family effort to halt tell-all book

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

NYC judge rejects Trump family effort to halt tell-all book

"Hi a Mike legal Rossi defeat for president are reporting Donald Verizon Trump and his joins brother an ad over boycott a tell of Facebook all book over hateful about content to hit the market Verizon is joining a judge a boycott in New York of City advertising is turned aside on Facebook a claim in by a campaign Donald trump's to pressure brother the company seeking to do to more halt publication to keep racist of a book by and the violent president's information niece Mary off its platform trump is the judge the hash didn't tag rule stop on the direct hate for merits profit of the campaign case saying only is supposed his court to last lacks jurisdiction through July over other the matter advertisers the book being who have published pledged by to Simon boycott and Schuster Facebook is Instagram titled and other too much company and services never enough include how my outdoor family gear created companies Patagonia the world's most the north dangerous face man and R. III which in itself in a statement should be a tip Facebook off as executive to what the president Carolyn Iverson might want to block said it the the company motion remains filed by committed the president's to purging brother Roberts hateful content has family from members its services signed a settlement hi Mike that would Rossi bar up them from writing about family matters meanwhile the spokesman for Simon and Schuster says the publisher is delighted with the ruling and looks forward to releasing the book next month I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Executive Oscar Wells Gabriel Mary Rossi Publisher Schuster Simon Mike Roberts Carolyn Iverson President Trump R. Iii Schuster Facebook Hash Donald Trump New York Verizon Facebook Donald Verizon Trump
Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting Verizon joins the bride an ad is splash boycott mountain of Facebook it's at over both hateful Disneyland content in California Verizon and the is Magic joining Kingdom a boycott in Florida of advertising the ride on is Facebook tied to the theme in of a campaign the movie song to pressure of the south the company to nineteen do more forty six to keep movie racist that features and violent racist stereotypes information off and its tropes platform extolling is the the old hash tag south stop is mighty hate for profit satisfactorily campaign according is supposed to uncle Remus to last through disease July now changing other the theme advertisers to one based on who the have princess pledged and to boycott the frog Facebook the two thousand Instagram nine and movie other company that features services a black female include lead outdoor this gear comes companies in the midst Patagonia of the worldwide the north acknowledgment face and of R. racial III disparities in a statement Disney Facebook though says executive the change Carolyn in splash Iverson mountain said has been the in the company works remains since committed last to year purging I'm hateful Oscar content wells Gabriel from its services hi Mike Rossi up

Mike Rossi Verizon Facebook Florida Carolyn Iverson Mountain Gabriel California Disney Executive Oscar
Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

"Hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi are a reporting reporting Verizon president trump joins the bride and an former ad is splash boycott vice president mountain of Facebook Biden it's at over sounds both hateful Disneyland different content themes in California on the corona Verizon virus and the is Magic joining Kingdom a boycott president in Florida Donald of advertising Trump was the in ride Wisconsin on is Facebook tied Thursday to the theme in of a campaign the singing movie song the to pressure praises of the south the company of his administration's to nineteen do more forty response six to keep movie to racist that covert features and nineteen violent racist stereotypes information we have cases off and because its tropes platform we extolling test is the the old hash deaths tag south stop are is down mighty hate for profit satisfactorily campaign we have one of the lowest according is supposed to uncle mortality Remus to last rates through disease July now changing we've done an other the incredible theme advertisers to one historic based on who the job have princess pledged presumptive and to boycott the frog democratic Facebook presidential the two thousand Instagram nominee nine and Joe movie other Biden company that features was services in Pennsylvania a black female include lead blasting outdoor this the gear president comes companies in the midst for being Patagonia of the in worldwide denial the north acknowledgment face a number and of of cases R. racial III disparities in is a statement increasing Disney Facebook in though twenty says executive the change nine Carolyn in states splash Iverson mountain said has been the in the company we're works going to remains be since dealing committed with last for to this year purging for a long I'm hateful Oscar content wells time Gabriel from its services trump hi Mike can't Rossi wish it away up polls in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin show Biden ahead of trump but trump trailed in both states and nearly every poll in twenty sixteen before winning both and the presidency on election day Mike Rossio Washington

Iverson Mountain Mike Rossio Washington Gabriel Oscar Executive Disney JOE Florida Vice President Verizon Wisconsin Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Carolyn Patagonia Pennsylvania Remus Facebook Donald Trump President Trump
Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting Verizon joins an ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content Verizon is joining a boycott of advertising on Facebook in a campaign to pressure the company to do more to keep racist and violent information off its platform is the hash tag stop hate for profit campaign is supposed to last through July other advertisers who have pledged to boycott Facebook Instagram and other company services include outdoor gear companies Patagonia the north face and R. III in a statement Facebook executive Carolyn Iverson said the company remains committed to purging hateful content from its services hi Mike Rossi up

Mike Rossi Verizon Facebook R. Iii Carolyn Iverson Patagonia The North Face Executive
Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Verizon joins ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting Verizon joins an ad boycott of Facebook over hateful content Verizon is joining a boycott of advertising on Facebook in a campaign to pressure the company to do more to keep racist and violent information off its platform is the hash tag stop hate for profit campaign is supposed to last through July other advertisers who have pledged to boycott Facebook Instagram and other company services include outdoor gear companies Patagonia the north face and R. III in a statement Facebook executive Carolyn Iverson said the company remains committed to purging hateful content from its services hi Mike Rossi up

Mike Rossi Verizon Facebook R. Iii Carolyn Iverson Patagonia The North Face Executive
Leap, But Bring Your Own Net

The Budget Minded Traveler

07:22 min | 1 year ago

Leap, But Bring Your Own Net

"Hey guys welcome back. How are you how is it going? I hope you're hanging in there. It has been such a strange season. This whole twenty twenty thing. I can't believe it's already. May I just hope that you guys are doing well and staying positive? I know it's been hard. We are in very weird times right now so I just wanted to get back on here and just share with you guys a little bit about what I've been up to lately if you've been listening for any amount of time Or following me on social media for any amount of time you know that I love to lead group trips and specifically I lead trips every year to Patagonia and We've gone to Jordan we've got. We'RE GOING TO CROATIA THIS YEAR. As long as we are allowed to that trip is still on and the other thing that I have been doing with my group trips for the last couple of years is leading retreats. And I know you've heard me talk about Mary. Treat a little bit lately in recent episodes. This retreat is called. Bring your own net and it's about discovering the tools that you need to show up for yourself whenever you take a leap because guess what that net doesn't just appear got into that a little bit in the last episode in one of the blog posts that I wrote but I wanted to talk a little bit more about that retreat today and that is because it is actually happening. It's open right now for registration. It is may fourteenth to seventeenth so the doors are going to be open through May Twelfth. And you can find everything you need to know at traveling. Jackie DOT COM slash retreat. This is my first ever online version of the retreat that I've been leading for two years. I'm super excited about it. This has been a dream of mine ever since I started leading it in person to put it online. Actually this week I was supposed to be in Italy getting ready to lead it in person with some of you which really hurts my heart to think about but here we are and this is the next best thing so. I am so fortunate. Actually we are all very fortunate right now to live in an environment where we can create such events using digital media just like this podcast that you're listening to right now which have the power to really bring us together no matter where we physically maybe which a lot of us is still at home but today. I I wanNA tell you a little bit more about why. I'm doing this why I'm putting this retreat online. And what what it's really about and where it came from because that's something I've never really gotten into on this podcast Although it starts with my story and that is something I have gotten into on this show but just in case. You have not heard that because you have to go back kind of far too. Tino catch my story I'm GonNa just tell you a little bit about that today and just a little bit more about who I am and where I've come from and I some of You. You've actually been following this show for You know what we just. We just had our six year anniversary of this show which is crazy we. Are you know six years later? We're still going and I personally as your host. I've been through a lot in those six years and That's what we're GonNa Kinda talk about today and we're also going to hear in a little bit from two of the girls who have been on this retreat with me so going to try our best to give you an idea of what is going on with the. Bring Your own net retreat. So in case you don't know my background. This is something that I I usually share. I mean a lot when I'm interviewed on other people's podcasts. But as far as my own podcast. I don't really share my story anymore. So I'm going to kind of recap a little bit I started traveling internationally. When I was eighteen I went to Costa Rica study abroad for a year and that totally changed my life and I kept traveling after that I fell in love with travel and everything different new and I could not possibly go back to normal as I as I knew it to exist before and so I that was what really kicked off my Mike Vagabond years. I suppose Where I truly pursued travel as a lifestyle and after that year in Costa Rica. I studied abroad for a year in Italy I followed my passion to learn languages. I went and study abroad in Brazil as well. I backpacked through Central America. I ended up back in Europe. Living there. Travelling there was back and forth between Latin America and Europe. A lot during those years of basically my my university years and just after that and in two thousand twelve I got married and although I was still able to travel here and there You know my life was really different and I was kind of doing the adult things had a home and a dog and a partner and you know we were kind of doing the thing and then in two thousand thirteen is when I started blogging with the budget traveler and then the next year I started the podcast in two thousand fourteen and a lot of you guys have been here since then which is super cool You know I was in a different place. Then if you've heard all of this then you've really been with me through it all But in two thousand fifteen the year that I got a divorce and that year I decided to take my backpack and myself onto the road and I put some of my things in storage and I said goodbye to the life that I knew and that I had been building And I'm not going to get into the personal details of why all that happened. The important thing to know is that I needed to change. That was the bottom line. I needed to change my life and so this was the path that I took. I decided to hit the road by myself. And that turned out to be an incredible voyage of personal discovery for me that turned out to be me totally tearing all of myself down to the foundation and rebuilding even parts of my foundation. I needed to know what I was standing on. I needed to know what I was doing in this world and I didn't and I didn't have confidence in myself. I didn't think I was ever going to be okay with travelling alone. I never thought I was going to be content being on my own. There were so much that I was afraid of but what I knew was that I had to make a change and so this is what I did. I made the change. I took the leap I left and I pursued life on my own and it totally changed everything for me

Italy Costa Rica Europe Mary Central America Jordan Partner Mike Vagabond Brazil Latin America
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"Is delivered night twenty sixteen and at the parking lot in Ventura California rose macario steps out of her car and into the warm mid morning sun the Patagonia. Ceo rubs her bloodshot eyes. She barely slept last night. And that's because her nightmare just came true. Donald J trump has won the election. Trump ranks high Makarios black book. He stands for everything. Patagonia opposes oil drilling coal mining. Climate Change denial but her horror at the election. Results has now solidified into resolve just before heading in. She emailed the entire company and urge them to find ways to help. Patagonia's fans Organiz against the trump administration's environmental agenda as she walks across the line von Cunard emerges from the same tin shed where his billion dollar business empire began. The sheds long outlived its usefulness to the company but you could still use it when the urge to do some blacksmith things strikes. He had straight for macario with a determined. Look on his face. Rose I read your email and I agree with every word. We must push even harder now. We must be ready to fight for what we believe in Makarios smiles. That's exactly what she wanted to hear. And it's just as well because it won't be long before Patagonia and traube cross swords. It's April twenty seventeen and Makarios Patagonia's office watching president trump deliver live address from the White House. Today I'm signing a new executive order to end another agreed abusive federal power and to give that power back to the states and to the people where it belongs in December of last year alone the federal government asserted power over one point three five million acres of land in Utah known as bears ears. I've heard a lot about ears and I hear it's beautiful. Macario tenses at the mention of bears ears. Patagonia funds the activists who helped turn this part of southern Utah into a national monument. Now trump wants to put these federally protected Red Rock Canyons. Back in the hands of Utah politicians and that sparking fears that the land will soon be opened up to developers and mining. It's a direct strike against a cause close to Patagonia's heart. Marco knows the fight to stop trump. Going ahead with this plan is on. She needs to call in some powerful allies. Macario grabs her phone and calls. Vice President are are. Are you seeing trump's announcement on bears ears? Yeah we need to do something. The whole outdoor industry needs to together. We can make a difference. I'll get our social media team to spread the word and encourage people to lobby against the change. Fantastic will do the same on our end. We should call around the rest of the industry to build a coalition by the day's end Patagonia. The North face and other outdoor companies are ready for battle. They may be business rivals but in this fight their allies united to protect the kind of outdoor spaces that are their lifeblood but their words fall on deaf ears. It's December twenty seventeen and in Ventura employees are crammed into Patagonia's conference room on TV. President trump is in full flow speaking live from the Utah State capital in Salt Lake City. I will sign two presidential proclamations. These actions will modify the National Monument says it nations of both bears ears and grand staircase Escalante the teen reels. As trump announces that the federal government will hand eighty five percent of bears ears back to the State of Utah Months of campaigning by Patagonia. The North face and their customers have failed to save the National Monument but Makarios ready for this. She turns to her team. Looks like we're going to war. You all know what to do. A minute later. Patagonia's website gets a new homepage. Five stark white words on a black background. The president stole your land by then Makarios on the phone to the Washington. Dc Law Firm. Patagonia put on standby filed a lawsuit as the Lawyers Spring Action Patagonia's publicists spread the word. That Patagonia is now suing. The Federal Government for scaling-down bears years by late morning Patagonia founder. Yvon Cunard is on CNN. We're losing this planet and we have an evil government and not just the federal government but Wacko POLITICIANS OUT OF UTAH places. I mean it's the north face also acts. It blasts the move as the largest elimination of protected areas in US history and donates. One hundred thousand dollars towards an Education Center in bears ears but the trump administration isn't backing down Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke hits back on Fox News so Patagonia made in China. These these companies are out there. Shameless lies they should focus on how to bring manufacturing back to this country rather than line the public about about losing federal land but while Patagonia spars with the White House in waits for its day in court. The North face launches a new marketing campaign. That seems like a clear dig at trump's promise to build a wall along the US Mexico border since nineteen sixty six viewed walls not as obstacles opportunities. We were searching for a personal kind of freedom in this pursuit found a community this community shyness that the only way forward is together. We believe in a world is united by difference bound by empathy and strengthened by understanding. Walser meant for climbing yet. Despite its present day political undertones. It's a campaign that could have come from north face or Patagonia at any point during the last fifty years for awhile. Most companies run scared from politics. Patagonia and the north face have long been nailing their colors to the mast. It's not without risks by making a stand. They inevitably alienate some customers even as they win the loyalty of others but there are sound business reasons to do it. In two thousand eighteen. A major survey by Public Relations Firm Edelman found fifty seven percent of Americans say their beliefs. Now drive their decisions about which brands to spend their money on and that number is growing not just in the US but worldwide so now more than ever what values accompany stands for matters to the bottom line and that's good for Patagonia the north face. Because they've done more than just make money they've sought to change the world to since one thousand nine hundred eighty five. Patagonia's made cash and in kind donations worth eighty nine million dollars to hundreds of grassroots environmental groups. The North Faces Explore Fund spends half a million dollars a year supporting projects that help people access the outdoors and the conservation. Alliance Co founded by the two brands in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine has given more than twenty million dollars to North American conservation groups. The origins of the North Face Patagonia politics were there from the moment. They started as a hobby. Jobs of two dirtbag pals since then. The two companies have reached heights. Neither founder could have imagined on the way they've survived near fatal falls defied convention and inspired millions to head outdoors today. They boast combined annual revenues of more than four billion dollars Patagonia. The North base of both come a long long way but even now so many years and billions later these two companies are still kindred spirits to competitive dirtbag brothers looking for the next peak.

Patagonia trump North Face Patagonia Makarios Patagonia The North face Utah Donald J trump federal government president US Macario National Monument Makarios Ventura White House founder Ceo north face Vice President
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"It's spring two thousand ten and in British Columbia Patagonia seventy two year old. Founder Yvonne Shimmered is fly fishing for steelhead. Trout stands in the river water rushing around the size of his grave waiters and throws his line a second later these fishing companion. Patagonia CEO. Casey Sheehan does the same. After a moment of quiet she figures he should give she in the news. I've been thinking we're approaching common threads from the wrong direction. She stiffens he knows she is about to hurl a curve ball his way common thread. Just Patagonia's groundbreaking recycling program. Customers can drop off worn out garments Patagonia stores or mail them to the company and after five years. It's become so popular at the company's flooded with old clothes. She doesn't think it needs fixing but Patagonia is charts business and what he says goes. She hadn't steels himself and turns to his boss. Okay Yvonne what do you have in mind? We're putting too much emphasis on recycling. We should get people to reduce the by less. That's the best way to stop products going to landfill. I want us to tell people to think twice before buying new sorry. Let me make sure I understand you here. You want to tell people to buy fewer clothes from us. She Dr Blix's fishing line in nods as what I said but listen Yvonne you know I believe in Patagonia is higher purpose right but telling people not to buy well. It's suicidal. She yards eyes. Stay fixed on the river. It said that if you WANNA be a Samurai. You can't be afraid of dying as soon as you flinch. Your head gets cut off. I'm like a Samurai. I am not afraid to lose this business. Just then. There's a tug on Cunard fishing line. I got one as she nar real. Zana's catch she and looks at him lost for words she knows that. Patagonia's hit pay dirt every time. It's gambled on putting the environment I but this this is something else. This is telling customers not to buy your products. And now she and in his team was find a way to do that without destroying Patagonia in the.

Patagonia British Columbia Patagonia Yvonne Shimmered Casey Sheehan Zana Founder CEO Dr Blix
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"It's early two thousand five Japan Patagonia's environmental chief. Jill domain is being shown around a sprawling industrial works in the city of Matsuyama. The complex is owned by chemical giant. Teijin and they created a new process. That's got domain. Very excited a male John Executive in a white short sleeve shirt leads her into a large building inside. A river of old garments is tumbling down a chute and into a large dumpster. Here is where we sort the waste polyester garments things like zippers and buttons must be removed before we can process the material. The executive leads domain up a flight of metal steps in a long gangway until finally. They're looking down on a huge Pale. Green machine that resembles a shipping container. This is the heart of our EKO circle solution here. The garments are shredded and melted to break down the polyester so it can be spun into new polyester yard. It's as good as virgin. Polyester domain stares at the machine off for a moment then turns to the executive. How does the energy used in your process? Comparative Producing Polyester from scratch the television EXEC BEAMS WITH PRIDE ECHO. Circle uses a quarter of the energy and releases forty percent last. Co Two than virgin polyester made from petroleum domain smiles. She's just found the recycling system. Patagonia has been looking for in September. Two thousand five Patagonia puts its discovery in Japan to use it. Launches a recycling program called common threads that encourages its customers to reuse repair? And if all else fails recycle their old Patagonia gear company urges Patagonia wearers to drop off their worn out polyester garments at its stores or mail them in the company then sends the Garments Onto Tae John's plant in Japan to be turned back into Polyester Yard Patagonia's army of Devo Taes immediately rises to the challenge by spring. Two thousand seven they've donated so many garments that half the polyester used to make the company's best selling Kathleen underwears recycled not that the switch does Patagonia's bottom line any good tae-joon's recycled polyester costs twenty percent more than virgin polyester. But that's a hit Patagonia founder. Yvon Cunard is willing to take. He figures that other companies will eventually follow Patagonia's lead driving down the cost of recycled polyester. But there are business upsides to the common threads program further underlines Patagonia's status as a responsible company and wins it even more loyal customers by two thousand nine Patagonia is growing steadily. Annual sales have surpassed three hundred million dollars a year but that leaves him far behind the north face since the takeover the north face has gone from bloodied and broken to an outdoor superpower. It's now selling more than one point. Two billion dollars of gear a year and it's replaced Leeann Wrangler as VF's biggest brand. It's also a brand seems to have no boundaries. It's winning over. Ultra COOL NEW YORK. Eighteen through its collaborations with underground street. Wear brand supreme. It's Newt Z. Puffer jackets and vests are worn by young and old rural an urban dwellers alike even politicians like Mitt Romney and Barack Obama sport its logo in short. Everyone's wearing north face and now it's reached the very top of the fashion business. The North face is turning. Its attention to another challenge catching up with Patagonia on environmental responsibility on the next episode Patagonia rails against Black Friday the north face heads for the farms and the two rivals unite for a showdown with the president from one day. This is business wars. We sure hope you enjoyed this episode. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple podcasts. Spotify Google podcast iheartradio stitcher or wherever. You're listening right now. You'll find a link on the episode notes simply tap or Swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors and you can support our show by supporting them if you like what you've heard. Here's another way you can support us. Get a five star rating. Tell your friends how to subscribe. I'd here's yet another way that you can help us out. Answer a short survey over at one dot com slash survey and tell us what business war stories. You'd like to hear next. We should say something about the conversations in this episode. We can't know exactly what was said at the time but the dialogue is based on our best research. Now if you'd like to learn more about Patagonia and the North face we would recommend let my people go surfing by avant garde and conquering the north face by HAP KLOPP. I'm your host David Brown Tristan. Donovan wrote this story. Karen low is our senior producer and editor edited and produced by. Emily Frost. Sound design by. Kyle Randall. Our executive producers are Ginny Lowered Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by or non.

Patagonia Japan Patagonia The North face John Executive Matsuyama Teijin Japan Yvon Cunard Donovan David Brown Mitt Romney EKO Ginny Lowered Beckmann Circle Leeann Wrangler Spotify VF Emily Frost
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"On the last episode Patagonia was hit by the recession while bankruptcy loomed over the north face after it over expanded now. They're both licking their wounds in setting out on divergent paths. Patagonia stopped chasing growth and put planet before profit. The North face is now on the Nasdaq and pushing to become a billion dollar brand but it's lower price tech wear line. In new summit shops are failing to deliver the sky. High growth companies told investors to expect. And now the north face is about to resort to subterfuge to cover its mistakes in order to maintain its assent this is episode five rescue mission. Its December nineteen ninety. Seven and in an inconspicuous office in Connecticut. The North faces thirty nine year old finance chief. Christopher Crawford is out to salvage bad quarter. He sitting down with a rep from a barter company. Bader companies are corporate swap shops places where businesses can offload. Merck's didn't sell in exchange for other services or goods. Crawford's hoping this company will make his Christmas by relieving the North Face of the excess inventory. Clogging up its warehouses. The unsold surplus spans the company's entire range from Mango Colored Mountain Light Jackets and Black. Willie hats to Merlo Hugh Tundra pile vests and hot shot day packs these unwanted items are more than a storage cost. They're also money locked up in fabric money. The North face can't reclaim until the garment is sold. The REP taps and figures into the spreadsheet on his PC interns to Crawford. Okay Mr Crawford will accept the inventory at the full wholesale price Crawford fields relief flooding his body with this deal. The North face will get paid. It's full profit margin on its unsold gear. But there's a catch and that catch is that this will not be a cash deal the coordinator glances at his spreadsheet again. So that's seven point. Eight million dollars in trade credits. The North based can redeem those credits for goods and services offered by other companies in our network. We've got advertising agencies. We've got printers Crawford cuts in. Actually I I've got a condition. I need a veto on who you sell. The inventory to the north face is a premium brand. We can't discount stores flooded with our product. That's not a problem. Get the contract draft over to you later this week Crawford leaves in an upbeat mood. He's just offloaded. The North faces unsold gear and more importantly made a sale that will show up the company's soggy fourth quarter sales or so. He thinks a few days later at the north basis headquarters in San Leandro California. The barter company faxes over the contract. There's just one thing Crawford needs to check Crawford. Picks up his desk phone calls the north faces onto. Hey It's Christopher I'm about to sign off on a barter deal. They're buying our excess inventory for the full wholesale price and they're paying in trade credits. How do I list Prophet in our accounts in short you? Don't you can't count. Trade credits is dollars earned. Doing so violates generally accepted Accounting Principles Gab. Crawford's eyes widen the north face. Needs this deal on the books. If the millions from the barter trade aren't in the figures investors might run scared in the company. Stock Price could tumble after getting his shock and check. Crawford calls the bar companies representative to reopen negotiations. He knows all cash isn't going to fly so we offers the next best option need alter our agreement. I need the DEAL TO BE HALF CASH. Half trade credits. Oh well Mr Crawford. We're not going to pay cash when the North Bay skin veto who we sell the items to your tying our hands and making this deal too. Risky. Let's face it if you could sell the inventory through your normal channels. You wouldn't have come to us. Proffered purses his lips. Okay Okay how about this? The North face will guarantee that you will recover at least sixty percent of the price when you resell the product and if you will make up the difference by buying back the merchandise oh well that changes everything given that guarantee we'd be willing to bake it apart cash part credit deal over the next month. The North base ads the barter transaction to books it counts all the cash as Prophet. Even though under the terms of Crawford's guarantee to the barter company the North face could find itself buying back the year. Then the north face makes another sneaky. Move IT SPLITS. The trade credits across two quarters. Split into the amounts involved fall below the threshold that would force the auditor to strike the sale from the accounts and despite knowing the barter transactions are being counted in the figures the auditor deems the amount immaterial and signed it off the move delivers a five million dollar boost. The company's nineteen ninety-seven Results and another two point. Four million in nineteen ninety eight but the ruse won't go unnoticed.

Christopher Crawford The North face Stock Price Patagonia North Bay REP Mango Colored Mountain Light Connecticut Merlo Hugh Tundra Bader auditor Willie coordinator San Leandro California representative
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

09:37 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"Than backpacking and hiking. Wieland presses the attack home right now. The outdoor industry is leading. Skiers like us. Now everyone's selling fashion but serious gears want quality technical gear to we could call it extreme gear you know make it plain that are closer designed for the most extreme conditions. Klopp leans back into his chair. I get what you're saying and I've still got some reservations but you've convinced me. It's worth the risk. Let's try it. Advanced skiers instantly see the appeal of extreme years insulated gortex outer shells with your two ways. Zippers for Ventilation. And articulated hoods within months extreme gear establishes the north face as America's leading maker of technical skiwear but breaking into the downhill. Ski Market is only one way that the north face is trying to drum up growth. It's also looking overseas and it's got Europe in incites in April nineteen eighty three. The North face makes its first advance across the Atlantic by buying out a Scottish outdoor. Wear factory and that gets the attention of Patagonia. It's April nineteen eighty-three and HAP. Klopp is giving Patagonia savant. A tour of the north faces new offices in Berkeley California over here. Our marketing teams. We divide them into categories. These are backpacking guys just behind them. That's the new skiwear team clout notices yard looking up at the Sky Lights. Oh yeah I figured that. Since we're outdoors company. We should bring the outside in tall windows for Natural Light Skylights. Let in fresh air. This is the kind of thing you wanted to see a yeah. We're looking for ideas of how to develop our campus. In Ventura. The North Face Patagonia might be rivals but there are more like competitive siblings than enemies. They both respect each other's products and share a belief that success comes from growing the size of the industry rather than fighting tooth and nail over the existing and at twice the size of Patagonia. The North face is the big brother sharing tips with its smaller sibling. And that's why she narves thinking of an alliance. So how are things going with the factory and Scott? It's exciting but you know we've got excess capacity there at the moment. Maybe we can help you get into Europe interesting interesting. Well it would definitely be quicker than building it up ourselves. How anywhere and don't know. Maybe we manufacture your apparel under license in Scotland. Where do you think maybe you send US stuff straight from Hong Kong and we distributed? Well Hell let me think it over the casual talk about North Face Patagonia alliance. That doesn't go any further instead. Patagonia recruits European partners to distribute its chinese-made close across the continent but she nods about to spot and opportunities elsewhere. That will stretch Patagonia to the limit. It's early Nineteen eighty-four and Yvonne Cunard is roaming the exhibition floor of the national sporting goods convention in Chicago. He spots a small crowd gathering around the standard fabric giant milliken and wonders over at the stand a milk employees ease holding up a polyester. American Football Jersey covered in grass stains. Ladies and gentlemen. This Jersey here is made from our latest innovation and polyester now. I'm sure you know that usually getting out. Grass stains like this as a challenge. Standard Polyester repel soap and water in it melts in commercial dryers. She moves in for a better view. Patagonia polypropylene underwear might be a top seller. But he's always disliked how it can't be tumble dried. The man for milliken walks over to a bucket of soapy water and START SCRUBBING THE JERSEY. So we all know that washing is the big problem with polyester close right. Polyester doesn't absorb water and that makes cleaning hard until now people have tried solving that by applying various oils. But no more at millikin. We've devised a new process where we actually the surface of the polyester fiber what that does is make the surface of this Polyester Jersey attract water making washing easier. Our process creates polyester with a higher melting temperature. So you can put this here Jersey in your home dryer like. I'm done washing the demonstrator pulls the Jersey out of the bucket. The grass stains are gone and she yards. Got a brilliant new idea. It's a week later and in the meeting room at Patagonia has been tour headquarters. Shoe Nar is telling his executive team about what he saw in Chicago. I WANNA do a complete shift and fast I want Milkins new Kathleen polypropylene fabric in all our base layers for the fall of one thousand nine hundred five. The team looks worried. She already ordered them to switch from using pile flees to sin. Chila a new fabric made from recycled plastic bottles. Now he's also asking them to re engineer. The company supply chain and manufacturing for base layers and less than eighteen months at the same time Patagonia. Ceo Chris McDevitt pipes up Yvonne. We're already going flat out. Getting in Chile fleeces ready for fall. Nineteen eighty-five fleeces in base layers are two of our most popular lines and switching. Both of them to new untested fabrics could do a lot of damage. If something goes wrong but she nods not about to be swayed. No we do both at the same time. If We delay a competitor will beat us to it. We have to be first to market. Innovation is what we're about. This is not debate. The PATAGONIA team gulps. They got less than eighteen months to switch their supply chains and manufacturers over to to unfamiliar fabrics. It's going to be a race against time. And there's zero room for error. Patagonia is gambling with two of its top three bestselling lines. Only the company's popular baggy shorts will be left untouched and if Patagonia fails it's going to be left with a gaping wound in its finances. One that could lead the company bleeding out. Hey what do companies like ring hint and Tacomas all have in common? They all use our sponsor net sweet to accelerate their growth. That's what and they do that. Because successful companies know that in order to grow faster. You have to have the right tools. It doesn't matter if you're looking to take your company from two million to ten million or from ten million to hundreds of millions in revenue nets we by Oracle gives you the tools to turbocharger growth with net sweet. You get a full picture of your business finance inventory. Hr customers and more. It's everything you need to grow all in one place right from your phone or computer. Net sweet is the world's number one cloud business system trusted by more than nineteen thousand companies. It'll give you the visibility and control. You need to make the right decisions and grow with confidence. Net sweet business grows here schedule your free product to a right now and receive your free guide six ways to run a more profitable business. It's at net sweet dot com slash wars. That's net sweet dot com slash wars one more time net. Sweet DOT com slash. Wars hiring is challenging. It's always been probably always will be multiple job sites. Stacks of resumes a confusing review process. Sound familiar well. There's one place you can go. Were hiring is simple fast and smart a place where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. That place is ziprecruiter dot com slash. Bw Ziprecruiter send your job to over one hundred of the Web's leading job sites but they don't stop there. With their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience. And invite them to apply to your job. You can even add screening questions to your job listing so you can filter candidates and focus on the best ones. In fact. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day and right now to try ziprecruiter for free listeners of business worse can ziprecruiter dot com slash B. W THAT'S ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash be W ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM SLASH VW to try Ziprecruiter for Free Ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire.

Patagonia the north face North Face Patagonia The North Face Patagonia Klopp Europe Chicago Ziprecruiter Yvonne Cunard Wieland HAP Ski Market Berkeley California Sky Lights US American Football Jersey Atlantic America
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"It's early nineteen seventy-five and Patagonia's just received the first delivery of rugby shirts from Hong Kong. But the excited team gathers in the warehouse for the boxing of the company's first mass produced product. It's a big moment to make these tops. They've had to learn the close trade from scratch everything. From buying fabric to outsourcing production to Asia. She slices open a box with the utility night and hands out shirts to the team. But as the team inspected the jerseys the room goes silent. Tom Frost stairs with dismay at the shirt in his hands. They're awful. They're so thin. Another employee puts his shirt on the sleeves. Only go two thirds of the way down his arms slowly the enormity of the problem sinks in the shirts are unsellable and Patagonia sunk all its cash into making them. It's ordered three thousand shirts a week from Hong Kong and bought months of cotton up front and ships loaded with even more of these sub-standard shirts are already crossing the Pacific moments ago. Patagonia was ready to celebrate. Its biggest product yet. Now it's hurtling towards ruin business. Wars is supported by extra hop. Cybercrime is on the rise in complicated tech like the cloud and Internet of things makes it hard for modern businesses to see and stop attacks. Well it's time to be the Hunter. Not The hunted an extra hop helps you detect threats in the cloud up to ninety five percent faster and automate your response so you can stop bad actors right in their tracks with extra hop you get complete visibility on every asset in real time and it scale which means you can stop ransomware and more sophisticated threats up sixty percent faster and expose attackers hiding in seemingly legitimate traffic in real time. Extra hop helps you secure hybrid enterprise wherever it is today and wherever it goes tomorrow allowing you to see everything in your environment from the cloud to the data center all the way to the customer take it from the Home Depot which uses extra hop to manage and secure twenty three hundred remote sites quote. No data set is more complete inaccurate than what extra hop delivers. Check it out for yourself. There's a full product demo customer success stories in a whole lot more at extra hop dot com slash. Bw That's E. X. T. R. A. H. O. P. dot com slash. Bw need a break from family. I think we all do especially right now. If you're looking for a bit of escapism try getting lost in the RICHLAND's family drama and trust me. They have plenty. The story starts with Eleanor and Michael. Richland having just lost their parents in a plane crash as they reckon with this tragedy. Something about their father's legacy just isn't adding up the siblings come face to face with two choices. Protect family empire or risk. Losing everything to find the truth with it's crazy twists and turns the RICHLAND's family secrets unravel in wondering dazzling scripted. Drama blood ties. You can subscribe to blood ties on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you're listening now to binge ad free subscribe to wonder.

Patagonia Hong Kong RICHLAND Tom Frost Asia rugby Spotify Apple Home Depot T. R. A. H. O. Eleanor Michael
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"It's July nineteen sixty eight and in Ventura California Doug Tompkins and avant garde are loading the final batch of supplies into a grubby cream colored Ford van. It's been a busy couple of weeks. Since they dreamt up their plan to go to Patagonia. She persuaded his business partner. Tom Frost who runs she? Narda equipment in his absence. They've also recruited to Powell's to join them on their six month trip and Chris and their gang. The Fun hearts after packing the Van Food Skis close reels of film tents and sleeping bags they strapped their surfboards to the Roof Tompkins checks the handwritten list of supplies and equipment. That's everything we're ready to roll. Just then Tompkins Wife. Susie reaches into her bag and pulls out a bed sheet. One more thing this Tomkins unfurled bedsheet and grins painted in big white letters on the sheet or the words Viva Las Fun hogs after. Tompkins kisses his wife and baby daughter. Goodbye the fun hogs pile into the van. Start the engine and head South Week later. They're surfing in Mexico and Guatemala. They get questioned at gunpoint by soldiers who think they're CIA agents. Costa Rica and erupting volcano forces them to flee at high speed as ash rains down in terms their surfboards. Black in Peru. They ski sand dunes the size of hills before heading to Chile to carve the powder on a snow covered volcano. Then it's on to Patagonia where civilization vanishes in the rear view mirror and the road fades into rocks and he'd soon the gnarly eleven thousand foot summit about Fitzroy looms into view storm. Clouds Shroud the mountain. An angry bone chilling men's ripped through the valley below. They carve out a cold wet and cramped ice cave the base of the mountain to shelter from the wind and rain. They spend weeks in the cave waiting for a break in the weather. Endless days spent in damp sleeping bags recounting stories and playing cards then late one evening. Tompkins steps out of a cave. The skies are finally clear. He turns to his fellow fund. Hogs this is guys the moment we've been waiting for time to get ready the fun hogs no the clear skies won't last so they start the ascent to thirty in the morning under the cover of darkness. They Hammered Steel Piton into the Rock in a whole themselves higher and higher. They squeezed their way up between gaps in the rock face there's spike crampons bite into the mountainside as they ascend they climb for hours. They're sweat drenched cotton and wool clothes sticking to their backs and the only time they stop is to figure out the best route to the summit when they finally crawl onto the peak almost eighteen hours. Later it's eight. Pm and the sun is about to set they look out triumphantly over hundreds of miles of uninhabited arid scrubland but then he narrows his eyes. Another storm is already rolling in. Don't think we can hang around for long. Look over there agreed. Let's get the final shot down fast. The team whips out their film camera and shoot footage of themselves unfurling the red Viva Spun Hogs Banner. Then after just twenty minutes at the top. They start their descent. After hours of rappelling down the mountain they make camp for the night. They resume their descent at dawn. The gang battles fierce icy storm winds fraying their repel. Ropes will hold finally at eleven. Am The fun hogs make it back to their ice cave and collapse into their sleeping bags a week later. The Fun hogs are heading home. It's night and she nods at the wheel driving the van over the rough dirt. Roads of Patagonia Tompkins sits in the passenger seat staring mournfully out the window. It's changed she nar glances at Tompkins. What's Changed Patagonia? See those lights in the distance. There were no lights at all when I first came here civilizations closing in same all over though I mean remember those tropical forest we passed in Peru the ones that had been burned to the ground to clear land for Farming Tompkins nods. Yeah I do we're screwing up the world man. The silence springs coming. The two men go quiet lost in thoughts about the destruction of the natural world. It's December nineteen sixty eight and after six months away. The Fun Hogs Ban Finally Rolls Into Ventura California. She climbs out unloads gear and waves goodbye to the gang. He stands in stairs. Is the band disappears around the corner. He might be home but he feels different. The trip to Patagonia has opened his eyes to how the natural world he loves is being degraded from now on he vows. He will live his life in the least environmentally harmful way possible and that applies to his climbing hardware business shoe art equipment to but it won't be long before his new value news could his business in jeopardy on the next episode backpacking. Mania seizes America. The North based piggybacks on Winter Sports and Shoe Nar challenges the north face with his own outdoor where Business Patagonia from wondering. This is business wars. I hope you enjoyed this episode. I bought you to subscribe on Apple. Podcasts spotify Google podcast Stitcher iheartradio or wherever? You're listening right now. There's a link on the episode notes. Just tapper swipe over the cover art and you'll also see some offers from our sponsors. We hopeless support our show by supporting them pay. If you like what you've been listening to it would be great if you could give us a five star rating and don't forget to tell your friends how to subscribe. There's another way you can support us. And that's by answering short survey at wondering dot com slash survey and tell us what business were stories. You'd like to hear we should say something about the conversations in this episode. We can't know exactly what was said at the time but this dialogue is based on our best research. Now if you'd like to learn more about Patagonia and the North Base. We recommend the film mountain of storms. As well as let my people go surfing by Avant Garde and conquering North Base by HAP KLOPP. I'm your host David Brown tristen. Donovan wrote this story. Karen low is our senior producer. Editor edited and produced by. Emily Frost. Sound designed by Kyle Randall. Our executive producers are Jenny Lower Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by or non Lopez for wondering. I'm Lindsey Graham. The host of wondrous show American scandal. We bring to life. Some of the biggest controversies and US. History presidential lies environmental disasters corporate fraud in our newest series. We look at the conflict in Waco Texas. When a small religious group went head to head with the federal government. It was a conflict that led to a long and bloody standoff to listen to this and other great series subscribe now to American scandal from wondering..

Tompkins Patagonia Tompkins Doug Tompkins Peru North Base California Tom Frost Ford van Business Patagonia partner Ventura rappelling Powell Chile Lindsey Graham CIA US Chris Emily Frost Susie
"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"patagonia" Discussed on Business Wars

"In our new series we follow the trail blazed by two of the biggest names in outdoor apparel the North face and Patagonia today. These giants have outdoor attire boasts combined revenues of nearly four billion dollars a year and their clothes are as common on city. Streets is mountain slopes but their story is about way. More than dollars earned. It's also the story of two companies with shared roots and their battle to stay true to the values that were founded on but when these two companies took their first steps in the nineteen sixties. Mountaineering was a niche hobby. No one imagined mountain where would become a fashion staple. The outdoor industry was run by people who just wanted to make enough scratch to fund their next expedition. This is episode one dirtbags. It's nine hundred sixty four and Doug Tompkins. Fumbles for change in a telephone booth in downtown San Francisco. He pops a dive into the slot dials. The operator and asks to be connected with von Cunard's home in Burbank California connecting you now Sir Tomkins drums his fingers and mutters to himself. Please be home. Please be home easby home. Residents von Speaking Yvonne. I'm on a payphone so I can't talk long but I'm starting a business. A mail order business. Selling high quality climbing and hiking here is going to sell everything serious. Outdoorsman need so people can get everything they want in one place sounds cool. What are you calling it? The North face seemed appropriate after Mount Temple. Good name but Tompkins once more than ours approval. He needs products for the north face to sell and for that. He needs Shuna hard. You see shipyards not just a climber. He's also blacksmith back. In nineteen fifty seven he bought a secondhand hammer anvil and ever since he's been making and selling climbing batons piton of the pegs climbers hammer into rock faces to support their ascents most batons are made from soft iron. Which means they break. If pulled out of the rock but yards batons are different. He makes his from steel. And because their steel they're strong enough to reuse shards. Been selling them on a small scale but now Tompkins wants his new retail venture to stock them. So I wanted to ask you sell me your towns at a wholesale price so I can put them in our catalog sure sure. How many do you need? And I'm thinking maybe if we went to the operator. Your three minutes are up. Damn money's run out Yvonne. I'll mail your first order by. But Tompkins isn't the only one about to turn his love of climbing into a paycheck and that's because shards. Transforming his piton making sideline into a proper business. It's nineteen sixty five and in Ventura California craggy-faced landlord unlocks the padlock on a chain fence gate. And pulls it aside? He turned to avant Cunard and his climbing. Tom and beckons them inside an this way. The two climbers followed the landlord through the grounds of a now abandoned slaughterhouse. She naarden frost or here searching for a home for their new business. Shoe art equipment. Last fall they wowed tight-knit climbing world by making the first ascent of the near Vertical North American wall of El Capitan in Yosemite. And ever since there's been a rising tide of climbers mailing shoe with orders for his steel piton. So now she naarden frost out to tap into that demand by starting a business that designs makes and sells peons and other climbing hardware. They're not after riches they just want a few more dollars to fund their climbing trips. They also want to be based somewhere where they can lay down their tools and head to the beach. Whenever the SURF's up this sleepy beachside town is perfect. They both stopped through the premises after the landlord. She yards short muscular guy with a determined. Look on his face. Frost follows behind. He's being poll thin with a crew. Cut that accentuates years. The landlord leads them to the ramshackle building that used to be the Slaughterhouse Boiler Room. It's about the size of a small store and made out of car gated ten. Well boys here. It is like I told you. It ain't much but it's cheap step inside the ten shed. It's gloomy mid small. The roof probably leaks and the grounds uneven. And it's exactly what they're looking for a dirtbag home for a dirtbag company within weeks. She moved his blacksmith gear into the shed and Shenar. Equipment is in business. Not that shoe. Narc CONSIDERS HIMSELF AN ENTREPRENEUR. He sees himself as a craftsman and artisan who makes climbing equipment the traditional way with a hammer and an advil. It's like the industrial revolution. Never happened all the same she yards. Timing is spot on in the mid sixties climbing is still a niche hobby. But it's growing more and more people are looking to reconnect with nature by heading outdoors to hike and climb nowhere. Is that trend? More evident than in the San Francisco Bay area. And that's inspired shoe. Narves Buddy Doug Tompkins to move the North Bay from a mail order. Operation run from his kitchen table and into brick and mortar. It's October nineteen sixty. Six and in San Francisco's North Beach neighborhood and opening party for the North Bay store is underway. The store might be new to this Bohemian corner of the city. But it fits right in with the radical bookstores beat poets and strip joints that define it in the north faces. Window is a huge poster of Bob Dylan at the door to hells angels. Stand glowering and sleeveless denim shirts inside a hot new local bands playing live. They call themselves the grateful dead as women in Flowing Gypsy style. Dresses and beaten guys enroll necked jumpers sway to the music. Doug Tompkins handout glasses of wine. He's having a great time even though no one's paying attention to this sleeping bags tents piton ropes on display. But he wouldn't have it any other way. Is he just like vonts yards climbing hardware business? Tompkins didn't start the north face to get rich for him. It's about embracing the outdoors lifestyle and for Tompkins. That lifestyle always comes first. It's spring nineteen sixty seven and in the north face store a customer's checking out the store sleeping bags while Tompkins watches the clock from behind the counter. Work days seem to last forever. Excuse me I'm going climbing in Castle Rock Colorado and I need a new bag. Which do you recommend? Tompkins looks at the customer with envy since opening the store. He spending more time helping others pick out climbing gear and scaling mountains himself. Well for maximum more if you WANNA go with the model two hundred if you want. Lightweight it's the model one hundred. Thanks I'll take the one hundred and it's going to be a great trip. We're thinking of doing the athlete's feet route you know the one Royal Robbins did North base founders zones out the customer Jabar's away. This isn't the way it was supposed to be. The store was supposed to subsidize a life of climbing instead. It's just become a job. Something's gotTa Change. And then he has an idea that makes us smile creep across his face. It's time to dump the north face a few weeks later. Tompkins sells his store to two brothers for fifty thousand dollars not bad for a one store business that struggling to break even the brothers open to more north face stores in the bay area only to find they can't cover the costs the demand. Just isn't there America's yet to discover its passion for outdoor sports a year later after losing sixty thousand dollars the companies up for sale again and in May nineteen sixty eight they find a buyer an ambitious Stanford. Mba named HAB clump. He pays sixty thousand dollars for the north face. This former high school quarterbacks got a plan a plan that will transform the North Base. From just another dirtbag outdoor store into the flag bearer of a new industry but while the north faces new owner is settling in the company's founders. Enjoying his return to dirtbag life. It's June nineteen sixty eight in. Tompkins is spending the Day with Dr Surfing on Ventura Beach. Tompkins squats down on the Board. Is Seawater sprays. His Tanto arrives the way to the shore which is board under his arm jobs across the warm golden sand to wear short sitting. She barely acknowledges his return. He's too engrossed in the book. He's reading Tompkins flops. Onto the beach towel next shenar rolls on his back and puts his hands behind his head to look up at the blue sky. What's your reading conquerors of the useless by Leeann l? Teret it tells the story of how he made the first ascent of Mount Fitzroy in Patagonia. Back at fifty two. He says it was his greatest and toughest climb. Fitzroy's only been climbed one time since then the mention of Patagonia brings a smile to Tompkins Lips. He went to that vast mysterious Argentine wilderness. A few years back Patagonia's amazing Yvonne. H- you'd love it. What a challenge. Fitzroy would be. That's a great idea. We could drive the whole way. Make it a real adventure surf in Mexico. Ski and chilly. Eat the local foods strength. The local spirits to we could also film it. Make a movie out of it. We'll need what six months? The smile on Girard's face Vanishes Doug. I got responsibilities now. A business to run. And you've got a kid to go quiet annoyed by realities intrusion on their daydreaming. But they're thinking the same thing screw business screw responsibility. Tompkins is the first one in the water. We're going to do this right. Yeah we are. They are adventurers dirtbags and responsibilities. Well they're just another obstacle to overcome by sunset. Their minds are made up. They're leaving for Patagonia and it's going to be the adventure of a lifetime and adventure that will transform them and in time the world.

Doug Tompkins the North face Yvonne San Francisco Patagonia Tompkins Lips Mountaineering Fitzroy von Cunard Burbank California San Francisco Bay North Bay Slaughterhouse Boiler Room North Base avant Cunard Mount Temple Sir Tomkins California
"patagonia" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

The Budget Minded Traveler

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"patagonia" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

"All right sorry to leave you guys hanging but i am going to stop it right there ford and i pretty much didn't stop talking for five weeks so you know i have to cut us off at some point but stay tuned because that conversation is happening in the very next show it'll be episode eighty nine you can find everything that we mentioned in today's episode on the show notes page at the budget minded traveler dot com slash eighty eight the other quick link that i'm going to give you guys right now is to the big guide that i wrote about our trip down the cut at that are out throttled and you can find that at the budget minded traveler dot com slash patagonia road trip all one word and also don't forget that i am leading trips to patagonia every year now i'm about to do my third one this year it is open for registration and you can find all of my trip information at the budget minded traveler dot com slash trips that will take you straight there right now there is a trip to jordan coming up in may that still has spots left and planning patagonia for later this fall and there will be more coming so check that out if you're interested in traveling with me super super cool to be able to travel with you guys there's a video on that page that kind of shows what it's like to travel with me that we made from the last patagonia trip so go to the budget minded traveler dot com slash trips and check out that video and i hope to see you on one of my future trips and in the meantime stick around because i'll be right back with that next conversation so.

jordan patagonia ford five weeks
"patagonia" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"patagonia" Discussed on How I Built This

"I realise that all of these hundreds of thousands of different flight patterns in different colours shapes and hurting her totally unnecessary you can replace all of that with knowledge and technique it is a good lesson for man hitchhike i started seeing a world is to simplify your life because everything pulls you to be more and more complex and so i think what i learned from flight fishing is at if we have to either were forced or we decide to go to a more simple life is not going to be an impoverished life it's gonna be really rich function are founder of patagonia he never took a penny of investment by the way saloons a hundred percent of the company and because of that the company doesn't make the numbers public so despite the fact that endless growth may not be avenged charge thing patagonia reportedly did three quarters of a billion dollars in sales last year their best year ever hey thanks for listening to the show this week if you want to find out more or listen to previous episodes good how i built this duck in p r dot org and if you have a chance please subscribe to our show through i tunes in let other people know about it could also right ask directly at h i bt at npr deng org or tweet us sets at how he built this show is produce this week by rump teen arab louis also composed the music is also to niva grandson as mexican poor and jeff rodgers i'm garros and you've been listening to how i built this from npr.

founder patagonia jeff rodgers garros npr billion dollars hundred percent three quarters