18 Burst results for "Pat Williams"

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Your host Pat Williams guest is at large this book is just now always quite a poor Franklin in Washington the founding partnership it and curious and I'm just going to lay out the use partner these these two names together and you give us a little insight as to what the relationship was let's start with Washington and Jefferson Washington and Jefferson were close friends and colleagues during the revolution they both were delegates from for Jeannie after the second Continental Congress but during and then Washington made him secretary of state but they they they drifted apart during his presidency as Jefferson became concerned about Hamilton's influence on Washington and did they really never reconcile by the end of their by the end of their lives they were they were really quite distant Washington and Hamilton Washington the Hamilton were like father and son they Hamilton it first served as Washington's aid during the revolution brilliant man absolutely brilliant and in many ways he filled the gaps in Washington's ability because Washington was a leader a statesman tremendous statue tremendous wisdom but he really wasn't a detail person and he really wasn't quick and Hamilton was all those things and so as a team they were brilliant they broke apart during the late in the revolution when Hamilton wanted what was concerned about the collapsing government and economy and wanted Washington essentially become a king and Washington didn't want that and so they broke apart later the revolution will Hamilton resigned as his his eight during the late in the revolution but then at the constitutional convention where Hamilton served from New York and Washington from Virginia that would have been five years later they got back together they work together during the convention and then washing the Washington made Hamilton his treasury secretary and the rest is history they work together hand in glove to make national market economy Franklin Washington and John Adams how did all that fit well nobody like John Adams he was insufferable as portrayed in the wonderful movie seventeen seventy six the musical both of them I mean it would be to go back the one thing in common is the George Washington Benjamin Franklin and John Adams along with Richard Henry Lee and Sam Adams were the early advocates of independence day war for independence a year before the declaration of independence is seventy seventy six they were early advocates they had they'd realize that England would never support us so that brought them together as an alliance at the second Continental Congress but John Adams was unstoppable he just couldn't get along with people in contrast Washington and Franklin rose people people one was a back slapper one was a little more distant but they really got along with people and would you John Adams which justice and respect any any would always thought he deserved more credit than everybody else and that just made him unstoppable he worked to get Washington removed as commander in chief at one point and later reworked to damp Franklin removed as the ambassador to Europe both of which would have been ridiculous and the rest of the convention arrested the second all time first thought this was crazy because Franklin was the key diplomat that was indispensable Washington the key military leader was indispensable and Adams turned on a boat and tried to get him removed our guest and boy he's a good when it's been ed Larson author of Franklin in Washington we got more after this on the Pat Williams weekend our it's news ninety six five in Orlando will be right back she rules work.

Pat Williams
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

14:47 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Your host Pat Williams doctor crow our guest in that first segment we talk civil war with this book caught in the maelstrom by Christian Tate joins his columnist for the hill political and economic commentator for fox news MSNBC CNN her new book is just come out the liberal invasion of red state America and what our read it it is Kristin I loved it thank you how are you doing thank you so much product great to be with you I am not excited to be on the show what is the liberal invasion of red state America all about and and why is it happening so record numbers of people are fleeing blue high tax state places like New York and California and they're relocating to low tax red state places like Florida Texas Arizona and Utah and this trend has become so significant that now New York and for New York and California are going to lose congressional peak while Florida and Texas are both going to pick up the but this is a trend that is tolerating but what's so frustrating is that many of you blue state though mastic migrant end up getting to red states and then just voting in favor of the same policies that created the dismal situation may flat so my book the liberal base in a red state America explores why these trends are happening but also what the political and economic consequences are why should all Americans be concerned with is trend well because the trend of people moving in large numbers red state is turning our conservative stronghold more blue it's turning them more liberal so the last but the last year all the top hadn't stopped growing state all be low tax state so you know places like Arizona and Texas we're the top ten fastest growing state all of these same time state trended to the left in the twenty eighteen elections if you look at the cop fastest growing cities in the country most of them are located in Texas and Democrats did better in Texas in twenty eighteen and they have been over two decades the data suggest that a significant portion of these domestic migrants continue to vote for Democrats when they get to read date but here it was really scary and and out at me when I say that but this is true Texas could very well become a witness state in the next decade and if that happens and especially if it becomes a solid liberal state Republicans will not be able to win federal action ever again I mean unless something else really strange topic they will be done so if people if people in my age group millennial they don't realize that but California used to be a very red state it used to be a stronghold for for conservative now of course it's a permanent last waking state the demographics in Texas right now are almost identical to California in the late nineteen eighties right before it switched to a permanent left wing trong old so we cannot take our red state for granted and just assume that they will always go for Republican these trends are real they're happening and it's shifting the political map in ways that are not good for Republicans Kristen Kristen taters are gassed of the book the liberal invasion of red state America Justin when did this trend start can you pinpoint it well I'm originally from New Hampshire and I saw this trend happening back in the night you know what I grew up in New Hampshire it with a very purple gate our motto up there is live free or die and as I got older I I witnessed first hand Massachusetts resident walking up to New Hampshire because New Hampshire is much lower cost we don't have a failed their income tax but I'll be absorbed at such high numbers of Massachusetts resident the state became more and more relaxed weighing that now I don't even call New Hampshire purple state anymore it's pretty much a Democrat state so I've noticed the trend for a long time but it's become a lot more a lot more large scale in the last few years because the Republican tax bill account and local tax deduction that ten thousand dollars which is obviously a limit that a lot of wealthy people in New York and California and Illinois usually exceed so losing not deduction gave the higher earners all the more reason to pack up and head south to the Sunbelt because their thought it Hey you know I can no longer deduct the sky high local taxes I guess I should go to Florida where there's no income tax or Texas where there's no income tax so that the twenty seventeen tax bill will really that up to this trend Kristin Tate is with us a Christian what are the new city states I read a lot in my book about the world urban divide one of the very interesting things that I discovered researching for my new book is that doe mastic migrants who move to cities are far more likely to vote for Democrats all those who moved to world role or even more suburban areas are more likely to vote for Republicans so what's happening is we see that they themselves like if you look at this for Florida within the state community you are becoming more polarized so you see that the city becoming a lot more blue and and liberal and then you see the rural areas becoming a lot more red and conservative the problem is the cities are absorbing the people at far faster rate than the world area you have the city basically can't pulling out any of the vote coming from the world areas and effectively controlling the electoral votes of each state so you know you have really deep red areas in a lot of parts of Texas for example but these folks are being vastly outnumbered by the sheer number of people moving to Austin and Houston who tended to be very left wing and it's changing not just the politics but the culture of the state as well you see the small town folks who have lived in their state her whole life basically hiding there will completely over run by the new liberal hipsters moving in and invading their city Kristin what is the new economic terror reality that you talk about so you know we talked a lot about already but this is a story that's bigger than just taxes it's about cost of living as well and I do now with the for my book down to one hundred dollars will purchase you only about ninety dollars worth of goods and services in New York and California but that theme one hundred dollar bill will get you about one hundred and ten dollars worth of goods and services across most of the Midwest and also in states like Utah Florida Arizona and Texas so it's an affordability issue but what's happening is I these state absorbing the large flocks of people become more popular and more to the lab we are seeing the cost of living start to go up in these places so you know this doesn't example Austin Texas it's still very affordable compared to New York City but that's changing because as people move and naturally the call we're going to go up you know demanded going up but at the same time we see new resident supporting politicians are who are Democrats who support more restrictive building log for example more regulatory policy that may call for businesses go up which is trickling down to consumers so Democrats voted for at the local level we see the call going up to about it the new economic reality for a lot of these traditionally conservative states that are just being inundated with left winger for moving at Kristin taters with this Chris I want to know what is the significance of Portsmouth New Hampshire introducing resolutions to declare the New Hampshire K. coastal city a sanctuary city well as I mentioned Pat I grew up in New Hampshire and it used to be a really really awesome state I mean like the ultimate going state very libertarian but all of these people are moving up there to take advantage of the low cost of living in the low taxes and they are changing the fabric of the culture up there so Portsmouth if it's a kind of a commuter fifty for Bob Dole lot of Massachusetts people move up the Portsmouth and then commute into Boston for their day jobs and they are changing the culture in New Hampshire it's becoming a liberal utopia so port Smith made it so but sanctuary city is just a bunch of virtue signalling by the people who move in and they do it to make themselves feel good about themselves and then you know you in the blink of an eye all of a sudden we how refugees being shipped up to little to no Hampshire which you know traditionally has not been that kind of place I mean it's been a very very other said libertarian kind of conservative state so right before our eyes we're seeing the state undergo this massive transformation not just economically but culturally as well and I think you know these declarations of sanctuary cities the perfect example about how the cultural fabric is being changed against the well of a lot of native red staters why do you call Colorado east California well call Rado is very similar to New Hampshire actually on the west coast it's just absorbing huge wall of California liberals who again are trying to fully you be exorbitant cost in California in the cockpit so what do they do they all moved to Colorado and then vote in favor of the same policy that called the dismal fiscal situation they left back home in California so Colorado has really thrived in the past few decades because of the gas and oil industry out there but it you know kind of died because all of these liberals move into the state her job and then they vote in favor of resolution been policies that are meant to crack down on the gas and oil industry which has made the economy there so strong so they're sensually killing the goose that laid the golden egg out there and we've already seen Colorado way collapsed Colorado's number one of those states that people call it when state and a purple state but I mean in a decade it over it's basically going to be a permanent police state because of all these Californians hello is geographic clustering arriving polarization one of the very interesting sociological term that refers to the trend of people to move near other people who share their own values and opinions without even realizing it and one of those values of politics so people from consciously tend to move to areas where they feel like they fit in with the culture and politics is a big part of that so what we're seeing is that people who tend to vote for Democrats are moving to more urban areas with other people who think like that and so the Democrats are all kind of clustering themselves in cities and urban utopia well people more likely to vote for Republicans are more likely to move to rural areas and you know neighborhoods in small town America that may share their values so what does it it basically create many geographical echo chamber where you never have to be exposed to anybody who has any ideas that are different from yours so community use are becoming very very polarized against one another because people are just moving to places let other people think like them and then we see the world area is becoming much more rad and the city becoming much more blue and it kind of bad you know because people don't even want to be exposed to opinions that are different from their own anymore Kristen is there any hope for conservatives do you have an optimistic note for us thank you so I want to make it clear your listeners this book is not all doom and gloom there's actually some pretty significant bright for example I found that the children of domestic migrants are far more likely to vote for Republicans than their parents so if somebody moved from say Illinois down the taxpayers that they may be very likely to vote for Democrats but if they have children tax that their children are much more likely to vote for Republicans either people the children who are people who have you know lived their whole lives in taxes they know why the state four inches so that gives me hope that perhaps will be the pendulum swing in the other direction I don't think you know a big message in this book is that made of red staters hobby obligation to tell their neighbors what has caused conservative eight to four and it's not just a coincidence that Republican state are far more likely to have strong GDP growth and low unemployment this is for a reason it's the low taxes business friendly regulatory environment the right to work laws so if you grow up in a red state and that's where you live and you see your date being invaded by these last winter you've got to tell them look the reason our state has done so well is because we have voted in favor of conservative policy there don't you dare ruin the you know that the growth by coming in here and boating in favor of these big government policies that just won't grow Chris didn't know will love Donald Trump still be our president come mid November you know I think you well because Donald Trump is actually acting as a great you know he's done a walked in sort of counteract the trend but I talk about in my book because wallet true that.

Christian Tate CNN Pat Williams fox MSNBC
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

12:55 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now here's your host Pat Williams Tim o'brien was our guest in that first segment but talking about his book dad's may be box little paper is with us former adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center former teaching fellow in government at Harvard College his new book is called in the cauldron it's a World War two thriller I think that's a good way to describe it isn't it Lou absolutely terror tension all sorts of things going on give us the background here in and and what does that title mean Lou in the cauldron really this is the story Joseph grew he was America's ambassador to Japan in the months before Pearl Harbor and he had to deal with a set of complex thing and very tense and in some cases terror in dealing with various forces both in Japan and the United States and trying to avoid the war he saw coming and that's basically what the book is about and we have to remember that people sometimes forget is if we were talking about **** Germany I would not have to explain the brutality of the government but hearing his hand in the most before Pearl Harbor Japan was also a very repressive society you had a situation where lease were everywhere she can also serve basis no dissent was allowed an industry word in a person can find themselves arrested thrown in jail subject to a rific torture and beyond that assassination report and the political landscape and in fact so much so rudely self with the target of an assassination and when he left the American embassy in Tokyo he had to carry a gun because of that fear of assassination so that we talk about the court and that's what we have to deal with and trying to get United States as a fan to come together so that there would be no war what reports was he sending back to Washington well he was sending back reports to Washington about the impact of the economic sanctions which the United States has imposed on Japan those sanctions have been imposed by the United States only for nineteen and Pearl Harbor in an effort to curb Japan's military aggression in China and Southeast Asia those economic sanctions that crippled the Japanese economy right is being rationed there is no way for cars and if you cars that your personal cure street at charcoal engine even imported coffee we're not available it has been replaced by another brew about with the New York times correspondent that it was better not to ask too many questions but despite all the the crippling effect of the sanctions group tried to explain to president Roosevelt's state economic sanctions would not free range of pants with needs that there is this mindset in Japan was part of that time arrives your dice spirit and he said we're told United States Roselle and secretary of state Cordell hall Japanese leaders and that the economic thank you play that they would never bring magic dance with the band the Japanese leaders and I laces through a suicidal war with United States would be better when the humiliation of succumbing to American pressure the attack on Pearl Harbor could have been for it could have been avoided well grew certainly believe so keen there were people there elements including the Japanese prime minister and including the emperor in the summer and early fall of nineteen forty one now listening that samurai do or die spirit they were very anxious to avoid a war with United States because they understood the risk of war with the United States and New they could never lasted a long war with United States United States is so much larger than your canisters of population resources so there were elements in Japan and of course you had the emperor who is revered and he was supporting a diplomatic resolution and so we thought that that might offer some hope for avoiding war and he believes that was the chance for avoiding war the military in Japan come so overwhelmingly powerful well it was for the sound right your dice spirit military had just grown up as your pan wanted to make itself into a world power and they thought they would do that through military they have to Japan is an island nation and they needed reporters to support their very large population so they needed resources from other countries actually China and Southeast Asia and so over time military became very powerful it's true but under the Japan had a convoluted system of government they will have to have the sanction of the emperor for anything they want to do and up until you know the fall of nineteen forty one the answer was pushing the military also a billion leaders trying to get a diplomatic solution to the problems with the United States but United States did not make it any easier for Japan for those elements Japan wanted to happy because they saw no chance secretary of state Cordell hall who is overseeing discussions with Japan as they say they recognize the risk of war in Japan and in nineteen forty one they supported and initiatives have discussions with hall in Washington DC you see the two countries to reach an agreement but secretary of state Cordell hall there is virtually no chance the United States and Japan reaching an agreement he regarded Japan is one of the worst international desperados and the history of mankind I need to strive to do you but no promises of the jacks on paper will be worth anything but he couldn't tell that to the Japanese directly because in the spring of nineteen forty one America's military capabilities were woefully inadequate and so president rose up in the military military chief tall to drag out the conversations with the Japanese as long as possible we did it kept talking to them from the spring into the summer and the fall of nineteen forty one battery green is that he knew would never come to fruition and by the fall of nineteen forty one according to all that Japanese leaders were very frustrated about the lack of progress in the discussion and they were beginning to sense that the United States not really interested in an agreement and that United States was merely playing for time to build up its military capabilities and so going back to your question about how the military became so powerful by the fall of nineteen forty one Terry leaders convinced that the emperor that the United States was never going to enter into an agreement with them and that they either have to attack the United States and hope for the best or just continues to be that subjected to these economic sanctions which as I say we're crippling the Japanese economy blue paper is our guest the book is called in the cauldron what was Roosevelt's thinking during all this period you're right about little what was going on in his mind well well well it was much more concerned about Hitler and Germany was about Japan and so that's world most of his attention was focused and she was referring largely to secretary of state Cordell hall in the in the deciding in crafting policy toward Japan and so all of that example of how that impacted things in the summer of nineteen forty one the Japanese prime minister said that he would come to American soil the neat rows out anywhere on American soil Hawaii Alaska where every once in the if you want to come and talk rose up and hopefully the two leaders could reach an agreement and eight when he says this eight eight the Japanese prime minister told ambassador grew about this and said he was prepared to make concessions to avoid war well Roosevelt prided himself on being a you had a lot of charm who prided himself on his ability to meet with foreign leaders and thirty six Cordell hall it was about not to meet with the Japanese prime minister and so rose well yeah okay and did not meet with the Japanese prime minister and that prime minister ultimately resigned in October nineteen forty one and was a plate replaced by a general from the Japanese army so in terms of your question Roselle which is really dependent on hall and and I think he was convinced by call that there is really no chance just Canada United States really reaching an agreement was that a mistake by the U. S. and Roosevelt not to have that meeting well better late about that nobody can answer that for sure but grew the American ambassador busy was that again no guarantees in this business but he thought that it was it was a chance that it rose all had met with the prime minister there was a chance that they could have avoided the war and I I should say on that wait after the war after Pearl Harbor grew and the other members of the American embassy were arrested and taken as prisoners of war and they were held and the American embassy in Tokyo for six months while the United States and you can work out a diplomatic exchange agreement so that in this lesson you can return to the United States and Japanese diplomat in United States to return to Japan and during that six month that he was there grew detailer sixty page report detailing his criticism of American policy in a month before Pearl Harbor we believe I can help in those months before Pearl Harbor was completely inflexible and he said that his reporting to the government in Washington lifeline tumbled into a late at night and so you prepare to report the sixty page report which you want the gift to Roosevelt and secretary of state Cordell hull and in as clean back the United States in August nineteen forty two rue ambassador grew wrote a letter to President Roosevelt Jamie hopes the Roosevelt would be to report because he said he was sure future historians will read his report to examine the question whether Pearl Harbor could have been avoided so in response to your question you know group believe that there was a chance that the war could have been avoided and so that they give you a quick note on that what happened well it's all never saw that report because when grew returns United States in August nineteen forty two we came to Washington you show the sixty page report the secretary of state Cordell hall glanced report hall saw that the report criticized decisions which hall had made in those months before Pearl Harbor all immediately demanded that group destroyed every quarter and as a subordinate official in the state department we felt he had no choice but to destroy that record so there's no evidence that Roosevelt ever saw the report we knew about it destruction but I think the whole was afraid or concern because going back to your question report outlined groose you that if his recommendations had been accepted that there is a chance that.

Tim o'brien Pat Williams
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

14:28 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now here's your host Pat Williams Ryan Clancy very very interesting a man to talk to a lot through the ultimate guide to the twenty twenty election Ryan I want to plow into part three of your book restoring our democracy fixing the system the road ahead I think we're all interested in that topic can you explain all that to us yeah to listen to your or book is really about is that so many people are frustrated with the political system as they should be first the easy thing is to blame the politicians but part of this we all have to look on ourselves and it is a fascinating and sort of depressing survey that we found that has been done for about fifty years Gallup does it in the question they ask is pretty simple people would it bother you if your son or daughter married somebody from the other political party in fifty years ago almost nobody said that would be an issue for them something like five percent so that would bother the most recent fighting is half the country says that it would bother them if their son or daughter brought home a Democrat or Republican in here's what's really striking about if you look at the other polling on attitudes around marriage it used to be fifty years ago people have a major problem with interracial if they don't most people support it if you look at fifty years ago people have a problem with same sex marriage today most people don't in so what you what you are finding now is discrimination is decreasing when it comes to race when it comes to to gender and sexual orientation the one place that discrimination is increasing it is when it comes to political affiliation so in effect what people are saying is I have no problem with my son or daughter up bring it home somebody of a different race or eight eight different you know I or the same gender but to the holiday dinner table but what I can't bear the thought is the thought that they might bring home a Democrat eight campaign that's something I think we're all of us need to look at ourselves to say you know only part of the solution or part part of the problem he's got to stop demonizing from the other party and recognize that we are all fundamentally American before anything else Ryan let's let's do ya know to service the specifics here your reaction to the recent news of the impeachment of trump by the house what effect will that have on the twenty twenty election you know I think it's too early to say you know what I think it it's a symbol of how polarized country even though we've had you know several weeks of impeachment hearings basically nobody smokes so if you look at the poll done for impeachment and you look at the polls done now you kind of see the same thing which is Democrats tend to support it Republicans don't in an independent or a little split down the middle with with at this point like a a little bigger share of them saying they don't quite support it either in Seoul you know this whole process will conclude in early twenty twenty I don't know that it'll have that big of an impact one way or another of the election next November I think it'll get fought on another thing Ryan assuming assuming that the Senate we'll turn this down vote against it why did the Democrats knowing that one even bring this up at all you know it's hard to say I mean up speaker Pelosi kind of resisted doing this for a long time even though there were people within the party who wanted to begin impeachment proceedings against the trump much earlier in so I think what happened is you know in in the wake of the release of you know the kind of some of the transcripts around the to trump's phone call with the president of Ukraine the pressure on policy is so significant from people in her own party that she but she felt that she had to bring it up and I think you are correct that the all indications from where we sit now is that this will go to the Senate they will not be enough votes to impeach and the Senate and then I think by early twenty twenty will sort of be back to where we were before this all started who do you see coming out of the democratic primary here that has a chance to win the presidency anybody well you know you know the interesting thing is so much of it is depending on what the economy looks like it's twenty twenty you know that the famous old line it's the economy stupid it really is true and so I think the two things that people need to pay attention to is one one of the economic condition but I think the most important thing in this gets lost sometimes is that from national approval rating in the approval ratings of the of the you know but Democrats whoever that is that it doesn't really matter that what really matters in what's going to matter in twenty twenty is about five or six state of Florida ironically probably won't be one of them Florida has has kind of become yeah Florida has become a little bit less of a swing state of Maine is probably more solidly in trump's column but this this point that isn't to say that that won't be a battleground but the ones that are really going to matter are gonna be up in the Midwest I mean the basically the way to look at it is if the twenty twenty Democrats skerries all the district all the states the pillory one in twenty sixteen which they probably will but if they pick up Wisconsin Michigan in Pennsylvania in a Democrat wins the White House so it just just those three states really matter a lot easier the interesting thing is right now trump is doing pretty well in the states he he is a leading among all the top Democrats including vice president by in those states right now now a lot will change between now and the election but I think if people really want a sense for what's really happening a little less attention to the national polls and pay attention to the state level polls and you know Wisconsin Michigan Pennsylvania maybe Minnesota well those are the states that are really going to decide Ryan Clancy is with us the ultimate guide to the twenty twenty election what's going through Hillary's mind right and you think she wants seriously your temperament this it's hard to say you know she she has been doing some interviews lately you know the one of the people of no labels is senator Joe Lieberman said he he has a line he liked to you sometimes I think it's true he said the the only cure for political ambition is embalming fluid hold it his his point is that you know people who run for office space to keep running for office so I certainly don't think it's likely for another run search for secretary Clinton but you never know with the story of the impeachment this week what's going through bill Clinton's mind all of a sudden his impeachment is all over the news and I'm wondering what Bill Clinton is thinking like why can't this just go away where the he bring in this on yeah let alone Andrew Johnson he's probably saying leave me alone it's been decades you know I think one of the troubling questions for us all to think about it this country is about almost two hundred fifty years old who only had four for impeachment about three the event of the last fifty years in so I do in when when president Obama was in there when President Bush forty three was during their respective presidencies you know you saw people calling for them to be impeached no whether it was over the Iraq war room or or what whatever it was in I think that that's a problem we're going to have to reckon with I'll be that is the bar for impeachment over time getting to fight down it it it it is it turning from what the founders saw it which is a sort of hi Marie did exercise to protect the constitution of the Republic to just another partisan spectacle of minutes this is something to think about Ryan I don't know how others react but to me the whole thing of impeachment is nauseating because you don't like the answer you thought this was a wrong thing or you thought this was out of line and you threaten impeachment a chest is just terribly upsetting I think there's just one man yeah I mean I I mean I I certainly understand that perspective I I mean you know one of the one way to look at this is it you know what I think this is where a few the Democrats there are many but but like Tulsi Gabbard yes she would present for the impeachment in her her basic position was what the president did I mean it's pretty clear that he did this he talked to the president of of Ukraine and the answer is suggested that aid to that country was contingent on them opening an investigation into one of his political opponents that that was wrong in yet she said I'm not convinced that that clears the bar for an impeachment especially given that you know how divisive that's going to be and you know we're in an election year where you know eleven months from now voters are going to have their say one way or the other so I you know you can sort of see no will come of this both ways right I'm from Wilmington Delaware that's where I grew up my mother's house is about a quarter of a mile down barley mill road from Joe Biden's house so we we have always followed uncle Joe very very carefully what kind of a president would he be well I'll be full disclosure here I'm biased because I used to work for did you know that I did it where in well yeah no no I was a speech writer for a no kidding right sting yeah so I mean lucky the only thing I can say is forget about the policies for a moment yeah I just found it to be one of the most just fundamentally decent people that I've ever met in politics in so whatever you think you did call I mean this is just you know he's a good man I like you know that counts for something this this I'm also impressed even though I'm a rock ribbed Republican Ryan I'm also impressed with Dr by Mrs Joe by what do you think she's she's a superstar yeah she's she's choosing Peter grapes and educator preferred tell to an oral right Ryan I want you to talk a little bit more about the young congressman you brought up a little while ago no they're in here area Brooklyn well the young lady can't seem to avoid controversy always has an opinion on something lefty upon lefty tell me more about her what we know about or what we know about her background yeah I mean you'll come to a lecture this fascinating a lot of people know the story hello there was a log sitting member of Congress there Joe Crowley some people thought he was going to be the actual actually the successor to Nancy Pelosi but he really either didn't see Castille come coming or or didn't take the challenge seriously enough and you know what ended up happening is he lost for one the reasons I described earlier primary turnout it's not very high and pretty small group of dedicated activists have the power to flip open election and as they did here I don't think there's any doubt that Ocasio has bought a lot of new energy into the party it comes by her beliefs honestly I think the challenge for Democrats is she don't advocate a kind of politics that may not play so well national in a letter to be looking for evidence for that take a look at what has happened in Britain with P. vote they had over there at the labor party which was led by a guy named Jeremy Corbin's what about socialist advocating a lot of the same kinds of policies supported by Cancio in labor got the biggest **** kicking they've got in forty years and so I I think there's something to pay attention.

Ryan Clancy Pat Williams
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

09:37 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Host Pat Williams of folks that first segment was doctor Allison Stanger well the book she wrote it's called whistle blowers well we're privileged in the absence of Christopher Crawford our engineer Nikki football has stepped in and is seeing is through this and when Nikki football shows up you better start talking football it it it's kind of the story is an inequity that is yes that is the story wherever you go people want to talk football yes so I am curious about the colleges final four okay and how you see it but did they get the poor right schools yes they did yes of any year that they have done the college football playoff this was the year where we didn't have any hand wringing there was not much debate because Utah lost to Oregon in the pac twelve championship and local home of beat Baylor all beaten over time and you have three undefeated teams and then one one loss teams in the top ten this was the only for the you could really have so was it was the easiest year of now the I believe it's six years right six year history of the college football playoff now let's talk about these two first round match up Sir in the final four and and tell me how you see it what what what goes through your mind so I love the way that these games are on E. S. P. N. I love the way the US can put this together because you have the first game which is LSU in Oklahoma that's the first game that's gonna be a game where when you've got family around it's holiday time right it's because the games on December twenty eighth you can enjoy the appetite this games gonna be over fast L. A. she was going to handle Oklahoma there are there there are quite a favorite on I don't think that Oklahoma is good enough defensively there was news this week that thought Oklahomans top running back was suspended for this game so he's not going to play in this game because of a a failed drug test so welcome is not gonna have some punch offense with a they have a Heisman candidates are in jail and hurts I think they'll be able to score enough points but are they going to be able to defend del issue and Ellis you seems like they're on a season of destiny would kill borough I in their coach at OSHA run I just think that they're going to win that game easily now the second game is gonna be a lot from that I can't wait for this game Ohio state and Clemson Clemson the reigning champ tell us more about that game I picked Ohio state to win which feels controversial because everyone thinks that every dad that Clemson is kind of been slept on this year in fact Clemson is the favorite this game despite being the number three seed Ohio state the number two seed but Ohio state has this guy named chase young who's their defensive end in a chase young had been suspended for two games this year you could have made a case for him to win the Heisman I think he's the best football player in the entire nation quarterback defensive player whatever and he's a guy that's very tough to deal with I think he's going to be all over Trevor Lawrence in this game and I think that the the the offense led by Justin fields and and and Dobbins the running back Ryan days their first year head coach taking over for urban Meyer the former Florida coach I think that Ohio state is just going to have a little bit too much for Clinton again that is going to go down to the final possession I think it's probably a touchdown or feel go either way but I think Ohio state wins and you have the top two teams Ellis you in Ohio state plane in the championship now let's go to that championship night when the to keep teams hook up tell us you in Ohio state what kind of a game will we see what will it be what the what will the act should be what's it like first of all the story lines headed into that game are going to be outstanding because Joe Berle who is the quarterback for L. A. she was in Ohio kid he groaned in southeast Ohio in fact his Heisman Trophy acceptance speech he talked about how we grew up in this poor area in southeast Ohio infected it it it it brought on over a hundred and hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of donations to food pantries in that area because people took it to heart people from Louisiana all where he places college football Ellis you know Joe Berle went to Ohio state to play for urban Meyer sat the bench there and finally decided you know what if I'm not going to play because they brought in another transfer quarterback I'm gonna go to LSU it's worked out well from C. of the former Ohio state quarterback playing Ohio state and then Ohio state its first year under Ryan day after urban Meyer left looking to win a title their first title since twenty fourteen when the college football playoff started and I think it's going to be a high octane LSU offense that plays a very good brand of defense against that Ellis you are that Ohio state defense with chase young who I mention and some other really good pro prospects and that is going to be I I would imagine LA she would open up as a slight favorite in that game but it's going to be I think an instant classic like so many other games that we've talked about I think back in fort scoring you have the defensive minded at osier run against the offense of mine did Ryan day the head coach at Ohio state I just think that it's going to be you know it and also I I I think the coach that nobody thought could do it and and and and always run when he was hired he was L. issues like ninth choice you know what she went after Jimbo Fisher one after all these different cultures everyone said now and it was wrong was the interim head coach after they fired les miles there was like I will I guess we'll just get on the job okay I guess we'll give it to him and this is third season and three years later he has a chance to win a title so I think that that game is going to be must see television mom must you know must be around your television for that when I I can't wait for Nikki football is our guest here I want to talk about urban Meyer okay but his name keeps popping up already has it NFL potential coach and then you hear him he is the year you USC program just seems to be disintegrating into yeah they're strange fruiting which terrible I understand I mean what's going to urban Meyer's mind is he getting it she could get I I I think he is I I can't tell with urban I I can't I think open is the kind of guy who just grinds himself down to the bone any reaches that point of exhaustion where he has to walk away worked on healthy for him to stay in its current state nine no Florida Gator fans want to do you know the whole you know faking the the heart palpitations the and you can then go to Ohio state I I think it's all genuine like I think that urban Meyer is a guy that cares about winning and cares about running is program and works himself to a point we all know that person in life that just doesn't know how to take a rest on thank you Pat your read you're right all these books and you try to put a baseball team together to I mean I were they just exhaust themselves and I think urban right now is playing with the idea that if he's going to coach in the NFL it's gonna be right now and the Dallas Cowboys job is going to come up Jason Garrett's going to get fired I it's going to be it does urban Meyer who's already coach to blue blood college football programs in Florida won a title there Ohio state won a title there there's nothing left for him to do in college football I think other than coach Notre Dame which may or may not come open soon does he want to dip is told in the in the NFL ranks in goal coach for Jerry Jones where they have one of the best rosters on offense and defense in the NFL where they are going to pay him a pretty penny and he can be the C. E. O. of that program I think that's what's going on here with urban the U. S. C. thing you mention top twenty five players recruits in California none of them went to USA I don't know if it's clay Helton I don't know if it's the program what I do know is it's harder to get kids to stay home now than ever because with social media and with television and everything the world is just a lot smaller used to be daunting for a kid you can grow up it was like you knew if I grew up in in Los Angeles let's say twenty years ago I know you S. C. R. U. C. L. A. right I knew I knew the California programs I may be new or again but I stayed on the left coast now you turn on the television on you know a Saturday afternoon you get the CBS SEC game I'm looking at all the full stadiums of all these things it's tough not to want to go to El issue or Florida or Alabama I think that's what's going on with U. S. you'll button clay Helton clay helping doesn't have the sizzle that a new coach whatever I think that's where her to Nike football is our guest I I'm intrigued with the new year's day bowl offering here in Orlando comes Alabama do not make the final four of course and a and a very interesting Michigan club yes but talk about that game here it's kind of a head coach that has everything to still proving a coach that has nothing to prove right but when you've got a Nick save in in his team disappointed they don't want to be here they they just don't they don't want to be in Orlando they want to be playing in the college football playoff and I wonder how many of their guys are going to actually playing this game because it's become it it's become kind of a trend that NFL prospects sit out the bowl games well how do you play ball game when your entire team is NFL prospects that's what that's what Alabama does and they have I think three at a three wide receivers that will go in the first round and their backup quarterback is going to play because they're starting quarterback is already hurt their starting running back may not playing this game either and so it's Nick save in an Alabama team that's been smoked in bowl games before and kind of down the whole we don't want to be here against Jim Harbaugh Michigan that Jim Harbaugh is done basically anything everything a coach at Michigan you would've wanted at a coach at Michigan except beetle have stayed when the big ten I think he's he's still winning sixty to seventy percent of his game since he's been there and there's this feeling of well he's underachieved his underachieving just hasn't won the one game he needs to win every single year I think Michigan is is a.

Pat Williams Allison Stanger Christopher Crawford Nikki football engineer
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Here's your host Pat Williams campuses with issues in Austin his book is called ten years and no man an interesting chapter mad I want you to talk about it you can only run away for so long what what what do you mean what do you mean by that we'll tell we can also be used as a form of escape I you know an emperor of all that I work meeting people at nine to five life idea like but you know mentally you have to sort of grow up you know you can't run your young child forever yeah every book has a chapter in every you know everybody has it you know there's always the next chapter and and and and and so you know so long with your letter from point thanks so me a lot of people who think travel will solve all the problems doesn't it but it definitely gives you the screen too your boundaries and get out of your comfort zone eight in that space away from them sort of your routine and the trigger of a bad habit you have back at home you can sort of finding you Hey in that time I've sort of cloud marked out you know came a drop in more competent person I knew what I wanted more from my life I sort of just learned about life and I learned about the traveling that's just me a lot of people find it through other opportunity by yeah like I I one Jo Ellen I figure out what I wanted and then I was like alright I'm ready the fell down mad cow disease travel over five hundred thousand miles state in a thousand different hospitals in ninety different countries so what a book what a life and now a man explain the chapter at the towards the end of the book simply called the light yeah well I mean this is sort of you know on the on the heels of the last ones which is where I decide Tyler was right with the world well I was Argentina and Chile and I was just not right not the panic attacks over trying to balance work and travel at a time my friends of my life there were twenty when I realized that I find joy in and none of it anymore on the most joy when I get one and then the other now I stay home I work I get my work done and then when I travel I'm fully focused on traveling you know I want your travel working travel anywhere yeah but like you still have to find a balance between the yeah the the bigger my my couple more on how to live do you want it and the other I think your book at any time met you in the book with the chapter simply called home what are you writing there are you a little gains on on me coming home in realizing our next chapter of my life you know I I had met a girl and I had she won the traveling and I realized that I think I want to go home and I want to be one place I want to date I want to have I thank the you know of a community three only grow when they have roots and I had been in a corner for awhile and I was running the ball in the keep keep the cycle of life going in Austin will be your permanent home I yeah I mean for now I mean what to know that I wouldn't know about right you know maybe I'll I'll have the conversation hello.

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Your host Pat Williams Serena Russo is with us from New York and as advertised Maria what you're talking about a reader for life teenagers Phyllis and. well you know the question we get a lot about teenagers is is it too late you know my teenager or just suddenly stopped reading or maybe might my teenager which is never a kid who like to read it all the time I start now to help and the answer is yes it's never just like it's never too early writers like we read our babies before we even know that they can understand a word of it your you'd have to have faith that your teenager can become a reader because it's just like everything else people develop at different rates people go through different phases in their life and some people don't discover their love of reading until later but you know what you said before about finding that moment where there's the books about a subject you're really really curious about that's a great thing for parents of teenagers to remember you know it could be that they just haven't found a book on a subject that fascinates them that they have to read and you can help you can help them find that because you know there is so much going on we call books for teenagers the official name is why a write young adult the whole category there's usually a whole shelf at the library and a whole shelf at the bookstore just for these YA books written for teenagers and with the teenager in the central role but not like that a grown up book that Scott a teenage protagonist will be kind of how the the grown up perspective may be looking back on the teenage years are being projecting forward a little to when that teenager will become an adult but with YA it's right there in the moment because when you're a teenager you don't know what it's like to be an adult. in your in your total teenage head that space and so these books are great for that to help you to relight help teenagers if they're not alone your books can be friends books can be a place where you just escape from all the pressures and struggles of the world and find support and comfort so why eight books are a great way for teenagers to find that you know so when it comes to teenagers who are just checked out of reading who used to read it like perks my daughter for example how to hear where she she was a big big reader as a kid and then just and when middle school seventh grade kicked in and she was thirteen and it was just boom she stopped and just for that year for some reason she needed to put her mind on other things she wanted to make a big switch in her identity and maybe she thought the books that she used to like we're sort of be beers. then when she turned fourteen suddenly came back so it was really hard to be patient during that year and I you know worried but I'm so happy that I didn't push her I didn't turn it into yet another saying that she felt judged often are felt pushed and pressured by a grown up and now she's you know she's back to her her reading life and it and she's changed her she's someone who also reset all fox she read this you know she read the Michelle Obama biography here ma'am are you he wants to keep she wants to kind of keep up with what the what what adults are reading out to you as well as obviously there so many just look at the New York times why a bestseller list even some of those books like he you give by Andrew Thomas that's been on there for two years now and you know inspired by the black lives matter movement but every kid loves this book it so well told you know there's a movie this character star has just become a kid that every kid just routes for her and wants to hear about so there's so much there for teenagers but you gotta you gotta help sometimes get him to the library get him to the bookstore you know look up to yourself what are the books and other teenagers are enjoying and maybe help just give a chance to loose nuts to your teenager Terex and Maria in closing I must vent and it's simply this in going into a bookstore now and I live in Barnes and noble so I I'd live. it seems every third books title includes the worst of the four letter words right there on the front cover right on the front table and everywhere you turn in the store there they are. so strange. I will see you won't find that on the wires so. that is something that you can really rest assured they're still you know they're still there there could be top topics for teenagers to have to deal with some really tough stuff in their life these days they have to be aware of what's going on in the world but the publishers really take their responsibility seriously and you won't find that you won't find a four letter words on the cover on the way that leads to a room. Pamela Paul have written the book how to raise a reader we've got more after this on the Pat Williams weekend our it's news ninety six five in Orlando. this message is for all of you sitting in the passenger seat and apologies if it gets a little uncomfortable but how does it feel to be at the mercy of someone who thinks a random text is more important than your life someone who takes their eyes off the road while speeding along in a three ton hunk of steel freaky right well why not just ask them to stop or better yet volunteer to text for them it might be a little awkward but believe me feel less learn more at stop tax stop rex dot org brought to you by the ad council the national highway traffic safety.

Pat Williams Pamela Paul Maria Phyllis New York Serena Russo Orlando. three ton two years
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The statistics on the player profile stats reading the Guinness book of world records you know what kid doesn't love that get your kid that you know it's a great birthday present by the way for another kick at the mechanistic arose record label a flight out you know so yeah it's really true find your kids interest and get a book that supports fatter that helps them you know to explore that because right what are kids doing on their devices thanks Laurin they're trying to find out about the world in their books do that but you as the parent help the help now great we don't have the newspaper coming into our house anymore a lot of houses every day so you as a parent of to make sure the books are coming in. how to raise a reader that's the name of the book Maria rue soul and Pamela Paul have put it together Maria is the children's books editor of The New York Times book review which Maria by the way is a highlight Sunday mornings for me. when I get my times delivered in the drive way and I immediately go to the book review and we have a childrens page every week. you have to wait and I will look now for the for the author of that children's page with a lot more focus a lot more interest in what I see Maria Russo or Pamela Paul I'm going to say yes I know those people found it so nice they don't you know we're gonna come back and when we do we're gonna talk about part for a reader for life. teenagers your teen reader this is the Pat Williams weekend our it's news ninety six five in Orlando stay with us. now the three things you need to three. a career coach and she either high school is being accused of taking a picture up a woman's skirt on school grounds police were called to the school around six PM Thursday after receiving reports of the incident involving forty eight year old Michael Johnson and the victim.

Laurin Pamela Paul Maria editor Maria Russo Michael Johnson The New York Times Pat Williams Orlando forty eight year
"pat williams" Discussed on Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

15:54 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

"Welcome to the show today pat well Kelly. It's really nice to chat with. You and I appreciate the invite. I've got a burning question here. I know when you talked Arlando. You told us your secret to reading as many books as you read but you've written more than a hundred books. How have you done that well one one day at a time Kelly. I I gather information every day. Write it down. Keep it filed always looking for stories always looking for anecdotes and I keep all that you know categorized into so when it's time to write a book when that subject it really is burning within me and I find a publisher well. Most of my research is already done through forty plus years of the gathering and collecting so that's the style that I've I've used and it's been effective for me as long as the ideas keep flowing and as as long as I can find a publisher who's interested you know I have. I have more books in the pipeline. We're here today to talk about one of your latest. It's called the success intersection and in that book you say that you can t just how to find the secret ingredient for success and not just in business but in life as well. Tell us about that. Kelly here's here's what I discovered when your greatest talent intersects with your strongest passion that is what I called the sweet sweet spot in your life when that intersection takes place. That's the sweet spot in other words. That's where you're GonNa have success because your talent is merged with your passion and that's dynamite combination the younger you can figure that out the better. I was seven years old when I fell in love with baseball and I knew at age seven seven exactly what I wanted to do with my life. I wanted to be a ball player and I was for quite a period of time and then that transitioned insist and over into the executive end of sports which I've been doing my whole life and had had some talent there at an enormous amount of passion so I've been living right there in that sweet spot my entire life so that's what I'm writing about. That's what I'm encouraging people to really really study and analyze and evaluate in their own lives and the lives of the young people that they are overseeing children grandchildren youngsters in classrooms and on sports fields it's an important area and that's the meat of this book uh-huh and tell us about finding our own talent. Sometimes that can be difficult. Sometimes people have talents that they're not even aware that they have have and then other people think they have a talent and just keep at it and add it to the point of frustration or even failure so so how do we go about really finding out what are true. Talents are jelly. I think that's where mentors come in and or teachers or life coaches who who can really evaluate and speak openly to to uh particularly when we're young and those words where'd you will never be forgotten. Let's let me let me give you an example An eighth grade teacher says to one of her students Mary Mary I see in you and norm ass- writing talent boy. I'm so impressed with the way you write and I I. I see a future there for you. In that area this is Mary. He'll never forget that. She probably never never occurred to her that she had writing tally but now it's been confirmed by your teacher or let's say coach says to one of his young players. Ah I am so impressed with your leadership up you know the other kids on this team or following you I. I noticed that at recess as well. You know they gather around you. I I see great potential in leadership for you Jack. I really do well. Listen Jackson remember that his whole life right so my point is that we need people around us who were telling us and spotting in talent and talking to us about it. I remember when I was a young baseball executive. I didn't know whether I was doing any good or not. Kelly okay I didn't know but but but the the man who I was working for with the Miami Marlins phillies farm club builds Ernie he you. He signed a picture for me of him and then the meat is a when he signed was Pat Williams a man with a great presence present but a much brighter future in sports. That's how he signed it and I is is that never had occurred to me. I didn't know whether I was doing well or not. Raw Oh and that's an signing that picture boy that gave me hope that I was going to I was going to be good at in this particular area and then I was how old was I twenty you for twenty four and that picture that he signed you know I thought boy I'm I'm gonNA be okay here. I think it it looks like I'm GonNa be able to make this his era. I still have that picture by the way Kelly it's still I bet he signed that picture for me over fifty years ago but I still have it and those kinds of comments and that kind of encouragement is even even more meaningful when it comes from someone that you admire and you respect whether like you said it's a coach or whether it's a player or whomever it is a teacher a parent but somebody that you really respect it. Really I mean it kind of. It's a message about you know how we should as mentors tours ourselves. We are mentors everyday people and we don't even know it really and it's a powerful lesson in how we should talk to people too because Oh okay so you're you're. You're you're spot on there. You're spot on you know if we can offer a word of hope or encouragement because oftentimes young people don't know whether they're doing a good job or not whether they they show signs of a real good ability and whether they've been a future in that field so when an adult somebody somebody that they admire or respect tells them that so. I think there's a there's a burden here also on the adults that there's a lot of responsibility bounce ability here working with youngsters to give them a Colt give them encouragement and above all giving him a career paths that they do have ability and this is an area where they can make their living and they can do well here and they've got a future when your talent beginning to emerge and you begin to have success. I think passion you know really kicks in that. You know if you're really succeeding. You're excited about what you're doing. You've got some inner fire without passionate. you know you just can't really do a good job. I mean you can have wonderful talent. Kelly but if but if there's no fire in your belly and you don't come to work with enthusiasm and energy and zeal yeah boy yeah you're just going through the motions. Asians one of the things that you talk about sometimes is being a successful failure. What do you mean by that well. We're GONNA have setbacks backs. Kelly and you're GONNA have disappointments but here's what I'm really trying to teach and advance waste those periods of of struggle or failure learn from them benefit from grow from them to take advantage bandage of where you stub your toe so to speak because when we are when we are not when they do fail when we do land flat boy we teachable Oh. Do we have a teachable heart that causes That's the way we're wired. when when we're doing well and succeeding we tend to become very self sufficient. I've got all the answers now. You know we get a little cocky a little arrogant but when when tough times hit and we're and we're struggling we're failing. Oh boy are we. Are We teachable so that's the point I'm making. Don't waste those tough times. He's learned from that grow from now because on the other side. We're going to be a lot better as a result of the tough period we went through. I if basically we if we have a teachable spirit and if we're willing to learn exactly you were talking about passion of course this is about how passionate talent intersect act but when you were talking just a few minutes ago about the passion and that you're really we're just going through the motions if we have a talent but we don't have the passion for it yeah we can do it but it really doesn't light my fire. Don't have the fire in the belly like you said but you tell the story about Chris Martin who is actually a member of the pro football hall of fame and he didn't like football. So how did he achieve that kind of success yeah. That's a good story. Curtis Martin you know was had many other interests and football was not among the highest but somewhere along the line he he came back to football in the hall of fame had a terrific career and and eventually realized that he had a gift he had a he had a talent and he felt that God didn't want him to waste it that his talent was playing pro football and eventually he got got that straighten out of his mind and went on and had this magnificent career. my point is you've got to really look at that talent and study that talent and see what God has given giving you. Kelly and be realistic about it. you know even even though you may not be truly excited about it. You've gotTa gift God God gives all of us when he places his dad on this earth he gives all of us some skills some abilities ladies and I think he expects us to use them and not against them and not waste them. we're here on this earth short time we all all purpose for all of our lives and we need to really understand and look at that realistically then door better businesses. God has wired us There's a town in every one of US different talent and every one of us and passion excitement enthusiasm for our work really brings out the very best talent we have so it's a it's a it's a dynamite combination a combination and I I. I'm simply writing Kelly about talent and passion. They both have to be there. I if we're going to be living up to one hundred percent of our potential so how does all of that relate to the legacy that we leave. I don't worry a whole lot about my legacy. Yeah I guess see I don't think about it every day. I just go about my business which is helping to run a an NBA team which is speaking which is writing which is mentoring I don't think every day you wonder how this is. GonNa play out. You know after I leave this earth. I we just go out and do the very best we can enjoy what we're doing reach as many people as we can. I think our legacy will take care of itself but I tell you this. it sure is it's nice to have a good legacy. I'm I'm finishing up a book a book. That'll be out next year about coach John Wooden and his summer basketball camps that he ran for many years touching thousands of youngsters and you talk about a legacy see of this man not just as a great basketball coach but as a great impacter youngsters wow what a legacy he has but I'll tell you this go to wooden was not going through every day thinking wonder how this is. GonNa play out with my legacy you know after I'm on. I I just think we go out and listen as coach wooden. 's father taught him and coach wouldn't live by this every day. Make AAC each day your masterpiece where there's a good one. Kelly that little quote probably should be taped up on our shaving mirrors and our computer screens. thumb tacked up in the lunchroom. Make each day your masterpiece that's that's a good way to go about life. It it sure is and you know there's one thing I heard somebody say again again for the tenth time years ago another day another dollar and I for whatever reason that stuck in my head and I got to thinking about it you know what if days he's really were dollars and I did some quick calculations using the average life span of an American which at that time was seventy eight point six years and it came out that we have in an average lifetime twenty eight thousand and some days and you know if those were dollars you say wow twenty eight thousand dollars to spend in a lifetime. There's not very much yeah we waste them so much. Waste our hours on things we don't like and things don't fulfill us and things that don't have an impact and what you said just played right into that you know make every day a masterpiece make everyday count. I mean it's a it's a big responsibility. But what a fulfilling life you leave. When you do that Kelly people ask me frequently. How do you get everything done. How do you do it all well. I'll tell you how I do it all. I don't spend any time doing things that I don't think are important for me for example. We live on a golf course but I don't play golf. takes takes too much time. You've gotta practice every every week. You gotta play every week so I don't play golf I don't collect stamps. I you know I don't fish..

Kelly publisher Pat Williams football executive Mary Mary baseball US Miami Marlins John Wooden NBA Jack Jackson Curtis Martin golf. basketball Ernie Chris Martin twenty eight thousand dollars
"pat williams" Discussed on Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

15:24 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Here's your host, Pat Williams, Simon Critchley, our guest in that first segment talking about his book tragedy, the Greeks. Ray locker former Washington enterprise editor at USA today as a new book at boy, it's dandy Hague's coup how Richard Nixon's closest aide forced him from office. But Tomac books put it out. Greetings ray. Welcome to central Florida. Great to be there. Pat. Thank you. Let's let's start very basically. And, and here it is, who was general Alexander, m Haig junior. L Hague was along career. Army officers started out West Point graduate in nineteen forty served under General Douglas MacArthur and Korea had a number of jobs in the fifties and early sixties became a staff officer to Defense Secretary Robert McNamara and the wind that Johnson ministration. That's where he became school in Pentagon, intrigue was recommended folks in the Johnson and become the military assistant to Henry Kissinger, when he was Richard Nixon's, national security advisor. Hey, became his deputy shortly thereafter, and then Nixon made him the vice chief of staff in the army, and then he came back to the White House following the resignation of Nixon's first staff, h r Haldeman came after the White House in may nineteen seventy three and served in that job until Nixon resigned in August of nineteen seventy four. Now tell me how Richard Nixon fits into this book. Well, Richard Nixon came in office in nineteen sixty eight people thought that he would be a hawk on Vietnam, and interns, and steady turned into more of a dove than many people in the military, including hey, expected, and Haig reacted against some of Nixon's policies believed that Nixon was selling us out to the communists on Vietnam, had people that he spoke to, hey, so Nixon did not enjoy all of Hague's loyalty. Tell me about, where Henry Kissinger fits in this book Kissinger, Nixon's picked to be national security adviser, and with Nixon, he ran basically secret government inside the administration so much of what Nixon to do on national security and foreign policy, rance Kissinger, who has a presidential staff person was not subject to congressional oversight. So that many of the things that Nixon was doing secret and spawn Waibel reason side, the government is people other agencies want to know what Nixon Kissinger were doing primarily the Pentagon, and the State Department, and that secrecy to one action after another, that embroiled Hagen a couple of controversies that led him to try to cover that up. My guest is Ray locker the book is going to Hague's coup. Here's the next name, I want you to explain to us Melvin layer. Mel layered was longtime congressman Republican from Wisconsin named Nixon's Defense Secretary in nineteen sixty eight served in the first term. He helps cover up what's called a military spy ring, that was stealing documents from the White House and taking them back to the Pentagon, including details about the secret initiatives, China, people have long thought that where it was a wife of. Hey, but intern instead, what I found is layered, and Hague worked together to help cover up the details of that military Spiring once layered became a White House staffer in nineteen seventy three who was runs Ziglar. Ziegler was Nixon's press secretary from the time he took office till the day he left he moved to California with Nixon who left office and was involved in some of the details of the hardened that Nixon received from successor, Gerald Ford in nineteen seventy four tell us about Spiro Agnew. I knew was Nixon's. First vice president, former governor of Maryland, he was involved in a bribery taxes, Asian scandal that forced him to resign in nineteen seventy three. Was at the forefront of trying to push Agnew out of office, knowing that Nixon would never leave with Agnew as vice president, because no one really wanted to be president. So, hey led the effort to get Agnew to quit and used a variety of techniques to put leverage on Agnew. Bernstein and Woodward, who were they? Well about what we're Carl bursting where young reporters at the Washington Post. They did a lot of reporting on that really details. Linking the Nixon campaign to the Watergate break in nineteen seventy two, but in the end turns out that they were summoned to Hague's home in September of nineteen seventy four for a late night meeting, which, hey, basically told them many of the details about what happened at the end of the Nixon administration and it was, hey, who helped shape, the book that Woodward, Bernstein wrote that was published in nineteen seventy six called the final days parts of in that book were dictated almost verbatim by. Hey, then later denied having anything to do with it. Fred buzzard. Lawyer originally from South Carolina. He was the general counsel to the defense department under Mel layered. He also knew Hage from West Point, and he was Hague's, pick to be Nixon's chief defender on the Watergate scandal Hagen his memoirs, which came out, nineteen Ninety-two said he recommended buzz heart for that job with little enthusiasm. Well that was a lie. I found I listened to the White House tapes that had how Haig suggested to Nixon that he hire buzz, heart and basically, praised him up and down the board. Set out great. A guy was and how great job he would do including how he had helped cover things up for Mel layered. It seems that. Hey, had a problem with the truth. Oh my God. I mean, the thing that struck me about this is when you read Hague's memoirs called inner circles, basically every key point involving his time with Nixon. He tells some kind of why it's not hard to find out. I mean there when you can listen to what he claims about buzz heart and how he hired him. Oh, I had no one. Then you listen to the actual White House tape, and you can hear hey recommend to Nixon, you know that he should hire buzzer affective. He is and how he's a person of a first rate person, you know, that's a lie. And they're in so many things like that. It just I almost lost count. John dean. John dean was the White House counsel under Nixon. He was the guy who basically led the cover of the White House involvement in the Watergate break in. He worked with Nixon closely on honing that cover up through a week's worth of conversations, Marcha seventy three and including one in what she told Nixon, there was a cancer on the presidency, which was not the White House, the cover of the Watergate break in, but it was the blackmail attempts that they kept getting from White House for Watergate, burglars to give them money to make them go away. He turned on Nixon because other people in the White House realize dean was the problem with the cover up, not anybody else. And then he testified and some very well watched Senate hearings in June of nineteen Seventy-three that kind of led to people thinking that Nixon was volved in the cover up. Haldeman. Erlich. Mun. HR Bob Haldeman was a longtime Nixon aide, he became White House chief of staff when they got elected president, John Erlich men and also also a longtime Nixon associate became the White House counsel chief domestic policy adviser to Nixon, they had to resign, eight both thirtieth, nineteen Seventy-three because of their connections to the Watergate scandal. And that really left Nixon exposed alone in the White House invulnerable to people like, hey. Gerald ford. Gerald Ford was the house minority leader Republican from Michigan. He was named by Nixon, become vice president after Agnew resigned in October nineteen Seventy-three Ford is also very close to Mel layered who had tipped him off earlier that Agnew was in serious trouble and might have to leave so Ford new little bit more about what was happening inside the White House. Then he led on, he became president after Nixon resigned and then pardon Nixon on September eighth. Nineteen seventy four who was Len garment. Len. Garment was a former law partner of Nixon in New York. He joined the White House when Nixon became president was briefly the White House counsel after dean resigned then served a variety of jobs inside the White House during the final fifteen months of the next Nixon respected, and liked them. Garment was democrat, while Nixon was a Republican, but they had a nice relationship and garment said he was basically cut off access to the president by Haig and bus heart Leon. Jor s-k-y. We enjoy working was the second Watergate special prosecutor named to replace Archibald Cox, who Hague Nixon had forced to head fired in October of nineteen Seventy-three. George was an interesting pick, former head of the American Bar Association, former prosecutor during the Nuremberg war trials very well-known respective lawyer out of Houston, and his pick was engineered by a lawyer named the Morris Liebmann, former ABA official who is also close to Hague. John and Martha Mitchell. John Mitchell Nixon's, first attorney general, he was his campaign manager in nineteen sixty eight and nineteen seventy-two. He was the attorney general. Seventy-two shortly after Watergate, Martha was his wife, who is mentally ill alcoholic and had a habit of saying, a lot of things in public about Watergate, and related things that they were very provocative, also turned out, basically not to be true, Elliot Richardson. Elliot Richardson was not the direct successor. Mitchell attorney general, but he was at Terni general in nineteen seventy three. He'd also been secretary of health education and welfare, and the Defense Secretary before Nixon picked him in may of seventy three to become attorney general, and that was after Richard Kleindienst his predecessor had resigned kind of fall out from the Watergate scandal, which had picked Archibald Cox to be the Watergate special prosecutor and resigned instead of firing. Cox Nixon and Hague's orders in October nineteen Seventy-three that was called the Saturday massacre, who was James Schlesinger. James lessons was very intellectual guy who had been deputy director of the office of management and budget. And in the energy commission was CIA director in early nineteen Seventy-three then name to be Defense Secretary after that he served up into the Ford administration, then tell us about Johnson. Johnson Ricca was the chief federal judge overseeing the Watergate cases. I think he was a judge in the US district court in Washington longtime Republican loyalists. Some people thought he was kind of a hack, but he got these cases and was thoroughly suspicious of what was going on in the water believe what our investigation believe. There was a cover up and really drove a lot of those cases how. Sirius was Nixon's drinking. Well, a lot of people who knew Nixon well said he didn't drink a lot. But when he did drinking couldn't handle it, and his drinking got worse, during his second term, particularly as the Watergate scandal worsened. There was one incident in October of nineteen Seventy-three after the start of the war between Israel, and Egypt and Syria in which the prime minister of Great Britain Edward Heath called the talk that Nixon at seven o'clock in the evening. And Kissinger said he can't come to the phone, the last time I talked to he was drunk so that happened more than people want to talk about, but he was definitely particularly later in the evenings. Not really all there. There was another incident a couple weeks later after one with Edward Heath in which. Hey and Kissinger, and some other people took the United States on military nuclear alert because to Defcon three which was really unprecedented in the middle of the night, while Nixon was asleep, and they didn't tell Nixon, they had done that until the next morning. And there was a transcript that, I that I saw which Kissinger that evening asked. Hey, if they should wake up the president Hake said, oh. Relaxer is the author of Hague's coup. We've been another segment with raise in Washington DC right here on the Pat Williams weekend. Our it's news ninety six five in Orlando. Now, the three big things you need to know. Three breaking news tonight, thirteen.

John Mitchell Nixon White House L Hague Nixon administration Mel layered president rance Kissinger Washington Bob Haldeman Spiro Agnew United States Haig Gerald Ford Ray locker Pat Williams vice president Henry Kissinger
"pat williams" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"I don't think there was much of a shot at the playoffs even six weeks ago, but they're playing with great consistency. And great focus. Give coach Steve Clifford. A lot of credit. We've been healthy. That's a big part of it. And and the key here has been the defensive end we've held clubs under a hundred points by and large which is tough to do in. This current age where the ball is flying up from all angles every night and the best part of it is a city of Orlando's gotten excited again about their magic. I know feel it a game behind the nets for six place a huge game tonight the team half game and. You're the or the Detroit Pistons and the Heat's right behind with the with the Charlotte Hornets right behind all that. I mean, what what do you think about the evolution of the game? Where three pointers are better or viewed as a better shot than say, a mid range jumper or something? Like that rich. I'm enjoying it. I'm I'm I go back in this league, the nineteen sixty eight so I've seen every single possible. Evolution of the game. Right. These are the greatest athletes we've ever seen these young men playing the game today from all over the world, by the way, they're a hundred NBA players from other countries on rosters right now. But I love the way it is. You know, there was a long period when the coaches had the tight reign, you know, on on the game and their teams and their players, but it's it's wide open. Now, Devon Booker goes for fifty again last night. And James harden on any given nights getting get you forty to sixty and I'm enjoying it. Eventually. Yeah. I mean, you look at it. It is a such more of a wide open game. And you talk about how best athletes on the planet. Now your comes on. And I know that obviously these are there rules about talking or what have you? But I think he's coming out for sure. And I know you're a guy that that drafted Barkley back in the day. Would you say that's the best comparison were LeBron is a better comparison for what we're seeing it to who's on could be some Barclay in him. He's got some Carl Malone. He's got some Shawn. Kemp in him. Maybe he's a combination of all of them. I I learned about him rich. My my roots in sports, go back to Spartanburg, South Carolina. I was general manager of the Phillies farm club there in the mid to late sixties effort all started for baseball. Yes. Okay. And so my friends in in Spartanburg have been telling you about these high school fee nom for number of years. It's been kind of interesting to track. But the thing I like about him when he competes, and there's there's a wonderful joy about him on the court. You can tell he loves to play. He's a great team guy and his teammates like him. So it's been great fun to watch him. But he's a he's a combo platter. That we haven't seen before. Yeah. I guess what you're hearing like LeBron is is is more of a maybe a comp because of just his size and the and the maneuvers that he could make are so difficult to stop once. He's going you can't you can't stop him. Well, the big guy, and he's got the footwork of a ballet dancer. He handles the ball. He can bring it up Cording. And the fact that he's left handed doesn't hurt. Right. That that's an adjustment for people to kind of get used to the lefties, but Barkley was that way Richie. Take the ball off the board and dribbled out of traffic pickup speed midcourt put it behind his back. Make dazzling pass to somebody on the wing or Charles. We'd keep it himself and go up in slam it through and I mean. And you came away saying how can guy that big that huge do all that? Right. Well, big z can do it. And it's it's been fun to watch. He's been an attraction all winter long for all basketball fan was Charles not coming out of college say that always Charles like coming out of calm. Well, he was big we had the fifth pick in that draft in nineteen eighty four..

LeBron Charles Kemp James harden Barkley Spartanburg Steve Clifford Carl Malone Orlando NBA Barclay Detroit Devon Booker South Carolina Charlotte Hornets Phillies Pistons general manager baseball
"pat williams" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"And then you're you're shortstop Martin Ritchie mart Ricci Martin and Andrew cash on the mound. Watch. They'll the Yankees nine nothing to that's baseball. Susan that would be great. That'll be baseball. Nice. Nice. Let's go to Patrick and Cincinnati take your phone call before he got Pat Williams out here. It's patrick. How you doing first and foremost, thanks for having me on the show big Tyler respect for you. Thanks for calling. You first your first up. What's up? Yeah. I was going to ask trivia question. But I think everyone's gonna know like in the spirit of major league baseball opening day. First professional baseball team. What city? Oh, cincinnati. Yeah. I not gain ever played major league. Baseball games. Cincinnati. Cincinnati. Got one for you owner who hates instant replay, the most that he wanted to make it never happened again in two thousand and four voted against the best wrinkle replays ever seen in two thousand nineteen he owns which team. Now, you got me on their Cincinnati. Just continuing your theme here. Patrick around know, Mike Brown, Paul. I'm sure that goes to Paul Brown was given the check Mark away. But. Mike brown. I you know, what I was going to get rich. I'm sorry. I cut me off guard. Sorry trick. I'm sorry. Patrick. But look man congrats on your opening day. Enjoy it. Whoa. What I when I do have a question because I mean. Kinda sneaky. I mean, the reds like no like, you know, they have a lot of work to do. But like there's a player named Jerry voter who I seriously think every picture and major league baseball if they give list of like top ten hitters. They don't wanna face. I think most of them will say Joey was up there top ten I forgive Joey tweak. You know, I'm just saying like this imagine this lineup like Nevada plea that Kemp who's not in starting lineups day, which I don't understand. I guess they want you guys to hit. But you got kep week bottle. Suarez sneaky, good. I'm just saying offensively. Patrick, thanks for the call. That was a sneaky good call from Patrick Cincinnati as well. He didn't he didn't sound like Darius Rucker, right? Did you see that tweet from Darius Rucker? Now. He said I predict the yeah, the reds are going to win the World Series this. So I wrote back Darius to it's the reds account responded the millennial in charge the reds account responded. I love Joey Votto. Did you see the athlete article about that? That was the spoke to bunch of major league players or what have you to see who's? There is also a part of it about the shift. Okay. Quoting an unnamed player should they ban the shift and the quote was just hit the ball. Just hit the afternoon ball, the other what use learn hit the F in ball, the other way and most people responding to that thought that was vital. He was the most likely to have been that player to have been quoted about that. I did see the sixty percent thing. Harper's the most overrated Boyer. Hey, man. He's won the MVP. Right. And he is dynamite. Let's just see what happens in Philadelphia. Because as we know it's not always sunny there despite the great program from Charlie day and crew rather why the red sixty six to one right now to win the World Series. Let's again, this is the problem with baseball. There's only literally five or six teams that you think has got a great shot then they'll have one or two that come out of nowhere. And then, and then you know, that fan base will be lit up the wave the white towels and Tober make it a tough spot to play like walkie lesser. Nobody's talking about the brewers is point last year. Nobody fact fact not talking about them probably until the all star. Maybe the Reggie that team..

Patrick Cincinnati baseball Cincinnati Darius Rucker reds Mike Brown Joey Votto Paul Brown Yankees Martin Ritchie Susan brewers Andrew cash Ricci Martin Suarez Tober Pat Williams Philadelphia Nevada
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

15:12 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now, here's your host, Pat Williams. Welcome back, folks. Break may our guest in that first segment talking about his book Jefferson's treasurer. Andrew del Banco is with us. He is a history. Professor actually, professor of American studies at Columbia University in New York, and we're going to talk about is intriguing new book, which I just devoured. It's called the war before the war. And first of all, welcome Andrew. I'm so glad that you could join me. Thanks glad to be with you subtitle is fugitive slaves and the struggle for America's soul from the revolution to the civil war. How did you become interested in this topic? Andrew. Well, I think every American ought to be interested in the topic. It's a it's a direct route into the darkest chapter of our history chapter that lasted several centuries. And it tells the story of human beings who confirmed what everybody knew including slave owners that no one wants to be enslaved, and these were people who took things into their own hands and exerted great courage in the face of great risk and ran from their so-called owners seeking freedom in the northern states or in some cases further north up in British Canada. It's a story that goes all the way back to the founding of the nation. And I try to tell it from that point up through the civil war chapter one is simply called the problem. What are you writing there? Well, if you think about it this way that is that when the founders of our nation came together in Philadelphia in seventeen eighty seven delegates from thirteen former British colonies, actually, only twelve because the Rhode Islanders didn't show up. But when they got to Philly, and they try to make a nation. They realize that if they were honest with themselves they were representing two nations in one of them. Slavery was the bedrock of the culture and the economy. In the other slavery. It was rapidly becoming peripheral or marginal to culture and economy. That's not to say that they weren't any slaves in the north. Indeed, slavery was technically legal throughout the north into the seventeen eighty s but for reasons of climate and historical development. Slavery was quite clearly on the way out in the northern states, but it was central to life in southern states. So in order to put these two nations together, they had to make certain accommodations with each other and one problem that immediately expressed itself in which is really at the center of my book is what would be the status of a human being who was enslaved in a state where slavery was legal who fled to a state where slavery was not legal in order to address that problem. They wrote into the constitution of the United States a clause, which we have come to know as slave. Clause, which stated and I'm paraphrasing here that no person owing service or labor in one state can escape that obligation by fleeing to another state, but must be returned to the party to whom such service or labor is due. I described this as kind of international extradition treaty that is a greed in principle that slaves could not run away. And that citizens of the north were obliged to send them back to their masters. That was what they thought was a solution to a problem turns out, it wasn't a solution at all the second topic, you write about Andrew slavery, and the founders what are you telling us here? Well, it's one of the difficult paradoxes if that's the right word of our history. Anyone who thinks about our history confronts, this sooner or later that the the great founding fathers, and they were great who expressed the principle of liberty. The idea is Jefferson put it in the declaration of independence that all men are created equal some of those same founders owned human, beings, Jefferson included. So this is a contradiction that requires hard thinking on the part of of all of us. I think to understand how that that could have been possible. And I try in this book to explain it not to excuse it. But to explain it to try to return the reader to the circumstances of life in the eighteenth century and to explain how a man like Jefferson could hold these two concepts in mind at the same time that human freedom was the highest value. And yet he owned independent on the labor of unfree human beings. So tough question. And I think everybody ought to think about it. Some the book is called the war before the war penguin press. Put it out Andrew del Banco is our guest a compromised constitution is the next area right about Andrew. I tell us about that. Well, you know that word compromise which recurs throughout my book is a complicated word. Sometimes we mean it in a good sense. Right. Sometimes we mean, and if we think about what's going on in Washington right now, I think most of us, regardless of where we stand on the political spectrum would like to see a lot more compromise. We think of it as a as a as a sign of adulthood and responsibility when people who have fundamental disagreements are able to find some middle ground. So that we can move forward as a society. So in some respects, the constitution was the first great example of compromise in that sense. These were people coming from very different circumstances cultures who agreed to create a new nation, which meant that all sides had to give up something to to get something. But there's another sense of the word compromise. Right. That we when we use it in. Ordinary language. You know, we talk about a compromised situation. We find ourselves in a compromise situation by which we mean, a situation that we're not proud of or that reveals a weakness or that we've we've compromised our principles we've given up something really fundamental that we believe in in order to get something that we want. So I I try to be attentive to both of the meanings of that word compromise and describing the constitution itself. It's a great document created our great nation. Without it. We might still be a bunch of separate states trying to get along with one another and fighting over all kinds of things, but it was also a compromise document in the sense that it it evaded the the fundamental question of whether this would be a nation in which slavery human servitude. Mentioning ownership of human beings would be tolerated it compromise that question by. Evading it it constitutional one of the striking things about it. Andrew can I get to the next topic with you the first test that's the fourth topic in your book? And I'd like you to explain that to us. Okay. Well, by the seventeen ninety s it became clear that this principle that had been written into the constitution that people in the north were obliged to return runaway slaves. The slave masters in the south. It was goal is all well and good to state the principal. But the constitution had failed to state. How is going to be enforced? You know, who's going to send these people back. The local police department and say Watertown, Massachusetts, the government of Connecticut or the federal government itself, which at that time had very very little power very little manpower couldn't really make its word stick. So in the seventeen ninety s a congress passed the first attempt to to toughen that fugitive slave clause, and and make it work. And so that's part of the story that I tell is how the federal government tried to get serious about the fugitive slave clause and for various complex reasons. I guess I would. I'd say if you're really interested, please read my book, it didn't work out. The federal government could say it all they wanted to. But if citizens have Pennsylvania declined to cooperate with a slave owner in Maryland Virginia was in Pennsylvania looking for a runaway. There wasn't much that could be done to make it happen. So that was the first test of the fugitive slave clause. And I think it's fair to say that the United States failed that test if by failure you mean failed to enforce the fugitive slave caused the constitution in the chapter called caught one word. What are you telling us? Well, I'm telling few things in that chapter. But I think the core of it is that black people who were enslaved in the south, but who were theoretically free in most of the north by the second third of the nineteenth century found themselves caught between two regions of the country. One one of which they had no rights at all by law. They're not even the right to learn how to read or to be taught how to write or to keep the wages for their for their labor or to marry by choice, and the other part of the country where in theory slavery didn't exist, but in reality most white people in the north really didn't want to have much to do with black people northerners who were against slavery or against it for many reasons. Some of them on moral grounds out of outrage and indignation at the very idea of slavery, but many more were against slavery because they didn't want southern white people bringing their black quote unquote servants into their neighborhood. So as we learn from some of the brave people who ran away from slavery and found themselves in the north. It was no picnic up there for for African Americans. It was a it was a place where racial prejudice racial discrimination, racial animosity, and contempt was very widespread. And so I think it's fair to say that African Americans found themselves caught between two regions neither one of which really welcome them at all Andrew the sixth topic that you write a better simply called war of words. Can you unpack that for us? Well, there's a literary dimension to this story as well. That is by the eighteen thirties and eighteen forty some of the runaway slaves who had I secretly or because they had a master or mistress. Who believed they had a right to become literate had a escaped to the north and began to speak and write about their experiences. So a whole new literature came into existence literature that we now know as the fugitive slave narratives that many college classrooms, some high school classroom students have the opportunity to read those those texts today, perhaps the most famous was by Frederick Douglass published his memoir in eighteen forty five. And so those those pamphlets and magazine articles and books took up the cause of emancipation and brought it into what you. My call the living rooms of nineteenth century Americans. And there was also the growth of of of of journalism in the first half of the nineteenth century that began to write candidly about the realities of slavery. Fiction most famously novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe called uncle Tom's cabin which gave a very vivid picture of the circumstances under which enslaved people lived so writers including poets like Henry, Wadsworth, longfellow, and John greenleaf. Whittier entered the fray and began to try to alert readers wake up readers to this fundamental reality at the heart of American life. I want you to get into the topic of into the courts. Well, as you can imagine. When a let's say a slave owner pursued runaway into a state in the north and the local citizenry didn't cooperate which often happened me would take his case to court and claim that look there's a constitutional principle here that says I can get my property back. As always is the case when you go to court things are not so simple and arguments were made in court about say the requirements for proving the identity of the run away or the right of the runaway to due process trial by jury and the other basically privileges that white Americans took for granted. So the courts began to become a place of arbitration, you might say where the issue was was attempted to. To be resolved, some states passed laws called personal liberty laws that were designed to make it more difficult for slave owners to retrieve their runaways by prescribing certain legal requirements or requiring the slave owners to pay legal fees, and so on so forth. So southerners began to contest the constitutionality of those laws and said look that conflicts with what it says in the constitution. So there's a complicated story that I try to tell a simple accessible way in that chapter leads to the United States Supreme court made an important decision in eighteen forty two in eventually to further decisions in the eighteen fifties. Most of which went in favor of the slave owners. Most of which that is upheld the constitutionality of laws that stated slave owners have the right to retrieve retrieve their runaways, but it's an intricate story. And I hope readers will be able to follow it. Andrew del Banco is our. Guest. We got another segment with him right here on the pet Williams weekend. Our it's news ninety six five in Orlando. Now..

Andrew del Banco Jefferson United States Pat Williams federal government America Columbia University New York Canada treasurer Professor Orlando Supreme court Philly congress Frederick Douglass Philadelphia Watertown
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

15:16 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now, here's your host, Pat Williams. My guests in that first segment Brian back in Chicago talking about his book Stalin's strive David area is with us. He's in New York between two thousand nine and ten David was based in a van working as a photojournalist for CNN and does his book. This is Cuba an American journalist under Castro's shadow. Boy, David that sounds exciting. How are you? Yeah. Well, thank you. Thank you. Thanks for having me on. How did your time in Cuba come about? What's the background here? Well, you know, I was working on the international desk at at CNN in Atlanta. And I had I covered a number of stories Latin America, Panama, Nicaragua, and Mexico, some of the drug trade stuff, and they're just became a hundred journalists in Nevada decided up and leave for Mexico, and I just put my hand up. And you know, at the time there was a there was a lot going on. There's a financial crisis. There's two wars. And so Cuba was sort of relegated a bit of an editorial backwater four for much of the rest of the networks on know a little bit. I realized that so much what happened in those intervening years. And that's kind of what a lot of this book has to deal with it. Just sort of the, you know, the first hand accounts at sort of a marriage of politics and intrigue, and you know, everything that, you know, about Cuba, and a lot of things that you don't just started to wrap up in this for Mike respects is kind of a naive American. Journalists going down. There figure things out. Well, David, I guess I've got a lot of naive questions. Where did you stay? Where did you live? The first month. I was holed up in the hotel Nacional, which is sort of the the the main or at least one of the main my most iconic hotels in Havana. Just like right along the northern rim of the Malakand overseas. Much of that four lane highway, and it's got a long legacy of former mobsters lucky Luciano. These gold framed pictures when you walk down of Fidel and shea and the rest of them. But after that, I moved into a house in Miramar, they tend to keep journalists group together for obvious purposes. You had only limited options of where you could live, and I moved into this house on on twenty six I street near and had this sort of this oceanside house that was beautiful on the outside. It must've been a multi-million dollar state back in the day. But on the inside, you know, it was it was something that had been gutted maybe by virtue of the sticky fingers of the state or the fact that the part of the black market trade that exists down there. One one house was emptied the six things everything's lightbulbs to you know, eventually be. Kitchen sink would be would be sold on the black market. And it was sort of my first little rude awakening into Cuba now by virtue of the embargo, which at the time didn't allow ships to dock and a Cuban port the hit doctrine American ports for excessive stuff, six months. My furniture wouldn't arrive for another seven months. You know, it was it was sort of living in this in this hollowed out beautiful home in Miramar which leafy suburb of Havana. But with little in the way of actually any amenities. How did you get about? Well, you know, eventually, I got myself a little moped, which I purchased from the Mexican embassy, you know, at the time, you could only purchase from other people of your categories. So so that for me involved journalists or diplomats, and it was a color coding system that is sort of reminiscent of the east German style of being able to monitor exactly who was what? And so, you know, government big shot security officials would make way because they could see the color and number on plates. Whereas I had the bright orange clay, you know, when I when I was driving around. There was potentially extra scrutiny on me. But I also could only purchase cars from somebody else that orange plate. But before that, I get around by the way that most Cubans get around, and it was, you know, by lack of real public transportation. They are you you travel pretty much by car pooling, the Colombo Tayo, which is sort of resembling the. Strikes hand of taking a drink of a bottle. You just sort of throw you some out in these old Chevys and Fords and Plymouth's would rumble down for maybe the price of the equivalent of a dollar, you jumping these these cars would run sticks routes throughout the city, and they were called, and you just you get in one of these and you get a chance to really interact with the Cubans that you might not otherwise. And you know, it was it was an interesting way to kind of begin to understand what country was about where you looked upon with suspicion. You know, I think there was a degree of scrutiny because I was an American journalist and there's only. And you know, we were considered him anyways as sort of an instrument of Uncle Sam, which has been, you know, the enemy of of of the Cuban government. But but from the Cuban people perspective, I would say that everybody that I met down. There had an uncle or a cousin or brother in south Florida. Either south Florida or New Jersey or Spain. And so there was a lot of Kim activity in terms of American culture, and Cuban culture and the dates back to back to the culture, and the old cars baseball and music, and you know, there's there was more trade between Havana and New Orleans before the turn of the revolution nineteen fifty than any other two cities in the Caribbean. So, you know, these were sister cities Cuban New Orleans, and you could see some similarities in terms of the architecture, but more to the point, you know, there's only ninety miles and separates Florida and Cuba and prior to the collapse in relations. There's a lot of lot of back and forth. You know this. This is an island that in for some was sort of the Las Vegas of its of its era a lot of casinos and a lot of gambling. But obviously that all changed when Fidel Castro came to power. Why has it every? Nobody in Cuba left. Well, it's a good question. I would say that you know, there is. You know, when you look at when you look at sort of the the dynamic that's taking place in Cuba. I often hear people describe how terrible it is. And those who are savor of of of Cuba Castro's remind how good it is with the healthcare systems and Barbara to everything else. I think the the real answer is that neither one of these cases, right? There are some real redeeming qualities of the socialist government that's been put in place there by virtue of the things I just mentioned and yet if you're young, and if you're politically active, you have a voice, if you're interested in journalism is just one of the most stymying places that you you can find yourself. No that's starting to change bit. But you know, it's sort of this push poll. And so, you know, increasingly you have younger generations that are just booking to make something of themselves and their they've traditionally gone to the United States now that normal release valve in which, you know, Cuban regime, they just make it to to US soil. Eventually had a path to citizenship is not over having been clamped up during the Obama administration. But you know, there is there's a lot that's taking place in terms changed now, but there's no longer that release valve. And so I think I think we're really on the press this a real change in. What that looks like he's not going to be clear, but it will probably take shavings. Most profound for him after rebel Castro passes away. Now, of course, the new constitution is potentially coming into into shape next month. So we could see the beginnings of a real reform in Cuba. What that looks like it's hard to tell. We'll be Vietnam. They transitioned out of communism into like the beginnings of working till capitalism. Or will it be more of a Russia where these sort of varying oligarchs just jockey propounder and gave rise to someone like Vladimir Putin? So you know, there's this can go either way at this point. How is Fidel view today? Well, I think you have to recognize that the vast majority of Cubans have only known now three leaders in their lives. Row wall. And that was Miguel tia's canal the new president. For the most part, the vast majority of of the last half century has been Fidel. So, you know, I think in many ways he is somebody who on one hand is considered somebody who effectively thumbed his nose at the at the US government, which were many other governments in the region had not been able to. But on the other hand, he is somebody who used the view is not only patriarch, but you know, in some ways, you know, a part of almost a royalty. There has brought a system that has not been responsive to change his clamp down on dissent has been somebody who who is really not open to the to the wheels of the people. You know, I think Fidel in many ways had been interested in what propagated Fidel's power whether that was communist or that was something else. And so he'd shown a real greatness and being able to pivot for for his purposes now that we have sort of. The trappings of of something new this new constitution coming into place the old guard starting to fade away. I think that's the real question. Now, what comes next, and there's some there's some areas to encourage by this new government under Madeo Miguel Diaz canal has shown a willingness to engage with the people. He's he's pushed the internet. There's three g now across the country for cellphones. This was unheard of. When I was there. But you know, it still is an old communist system. It's still has a legacy of the Castro's and everything that that breaks. So, you know, a real interesting time for Cuba. This is Cuban that's the name of the book. Saint Martin's press put it out the author is with us. David Oreo Oreo stall who spent a couple of years down there writing. Here's a statement that I want you to expand on the fists of the regime are still up and guarding against the spectrum. It's old nemesis. Just ninety three miles north. Any thoughts on that? Yeah. Yeah. Well, listen, I think back in two thousand fourteen when President Obama made that announcement of normalization with with the old foe that is Cuba and eventually into traveling down there. There was the sense least among among among many foreign policy makers that I spoke to that. You know, this is the dawn of a new era that this, you know, we can sort of put pass bygones be behind us. And you know, we'd make a nice speech, and we sing by essentially be be the beginnings of a real change, whereas the fundamental thing that has that caused the devolution of relations between these two countries has not even begun to be resolved. And that's the claims the claims of American property and businesses that were seized by the Castro government beginning in nineteen sixty and that spawned the sanctions that's beginning is tower Kennedy ministration later slapped on Cuba. These things have have are still on the books and over time. The interest rates have have reason to an excess of seven billion dollars. That's not even to talk about the property that has been the uncertified plants of Cubans that that were forced out of their homes. So you know, if you really gonna talk about the resolution between these two countries, that's where you have to start now Cubans from their perspective, they say the unites os os. An excess of that amount of money in terms of of damages that they they wrought by virtue of the bay of pigs and multiple assassination attempts against the Dell and the old Cuban senior intelligence officers that I was able to get access to basically told me that. You know, don't really pay attention to what's happening at at t at the, you know, the rhetorical level. Look, fundamentally what these different intelligence groups are doing look at what's not being doing being done on the claims. And so from their perspective, they're not letting their guard down, and you know, that's replaced in to the the the difficulties in terms of pushing this process forward, particularly now, the President Trump is taking office. So, you know, I think despite everything has changed between these two countries. There's there's a heck of a lot that has. And that's all that old Cold War mindset is still very much a part of the us down there. David. What can you tell us? What did you learn about Cuban cigars? Well, I tell you some of the best cigars personally, if you ask me is not are not in Havana. Although that's where the Cohiba is. And you have been to the various rolling, facilities and factories and plantations, but you out to peanut that real province in the west. And there are there are these these stashes that that Cuban farmers are allowed to keep either personal comes consumption or for private sale. It's usually about between five and ten percent at Knox. And those cigars are not treated with any kind of chemicals. They don't last as long as it kind of cigars, you might buy in Havana and the stores, but those are some of the best cigars I have ever had and the people who who make him who till the soil are out there every day drying leaves there's something just the nicest people I've encountered there, filming one day and women. Saw me sweating underneath a Cuban's son. She just offered me some coffee, and and you know, some food inside a bit of water, and she didn't know she was she was dirt poor and still she she just, you know, this is kind of how she wasn't. That's how many people are out there. There's a there's a real generous spirit particularly out in in the in the frontiers. David stow is our guest we've got another segment with David right here on the Pat Williams weekend. Our news ninety six five in Orlando. Stay with us..

Cuba Fidel Castro Havana David president United States Castro Pat Williams Cuba Castro CNN New York Atlanta Mexico Chicago Latin America David stow Miramar Brian Nicaragua Las Vegas
"pat williams" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:53 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on KTOK

"Check it out Tuesday at ten nine central on BT also on Tuesday Daniel Radcliffe, Steve who Shamir starring the comedy miracle workers based on the twenty twelve novel. What in God's name see it Tuesday at ten thirty nine thirty central on TBS, and that's your TV tipoff on iheartradio. Good morning. Oklahoma's first news, NewsRadio one thousand K T. Okay. With leeann views pent Williams is the vice president of the Orlando Magic. They were in town earlier this week play in the thunder. He's also the author of the newest book called character carved in stone. Pat, first of all, what do you want readers to take away from your new volume only, very briefly a few years ago? I had a speaking engagement at West Point. And after I spoke to the, athletes, and coaches, they gave me a tour of the campus. And I got the trophy point a nice little park looking out over the Hudson. And I noticed that there were twelve concrete benches there at the end of each bench on either end to the bench. There was a word carved into the concrete words like compassion trust. Character loyalty, there were twelve of those kind of words. That the West Point the students are meant to live by. So I thought boy we could do a chapter on each one of those words, and then we used a West Point grad who exemplify that particular word Dwight D Eisenhower Douglas mccarthur listening. Yes. Grant, Omar, Bradley, Mike's your chef Steve that's the meat of the book. We had a wonderful time. Putting it together. And coach K at Duke wrote the foreword forest where which we were pleased with. So the book has just coming out Li it's just getting into storage now Amazon way to order books up the purpose of the book to inspire people to live up to those West Point standards. I think that would be the bottom line character. Carved in stone is the name of the book, and he is the Orlando Magic vice-president Pat Williams with us on NewsRadio one thousand Katie. Okay. Do you think some of those words that you see carved in stone? Have they become pasta? Have they become out of style? Or is it a situation where we need to revisit them as a nation as a society as a world. I think that's true. I think we need to Kutch. It'll be me reminded to be people of character. Parents teachers coaches grandparent's pastors youth workers, we've gotta be always alert that we are teaching character qualities. To our young people. But they do not come into the world with those character qualities automatically embedded in them. They need to be taught. Those those words and how to live lives of character. And that puts the onus in many ways on those who are in teaching positions at home at school sports or at the church. So I think that's what I would hope comes from this book that adults read it and say, you know, I need to be a character person myself. So that I can pass on those qualities to these youngsters under by supervision. Vice president of the Orlando Magic, Pat Williams. He's author of character is carved in stone. And I'm pleased to say that I think the NBA has taken a lot of this example and required players to live up to a certain standard of character. Well, that's truly I've been in this league now well for fifty one years nonstop, and I'm so proud of the NBA for being so aggressive in so many different areas off the court. Leading the way with so many charities. And even though they're not in headlines all the time. Our players are urged encouraged to get involved in their communities to reach out to take advantage of the influence. They have is great athletes to make a difference out there in our country and around the world. And speaking of worldly, the NBA is a worldwide sport, we have a hundred players this year in the league from other countries think about that for a minute, and and the impact of the NBA. In almost every nation on earth is absolutely mind blowing to me. Character carved in stone, and we're talking to the author Pat Williams, he's vice president of Orlando Magic on NewsRadio one thousand Katie. Okay. Of the words, you saw carved in stone at West Point that day is there one for you that stands above the others. Oh, that's a good question. And I'm not sure that you could break them down, and and and and determined one more than the other. But let's let's go with compassion. We did a chapter on compassion using general Ulysses s grant as the example, we need to be people have compassion. We need to people who love other people who care for them. Those that need help we need to touch me reaching out to them. And encouraging people uplifting them. Rooting for them being cheerleaders for people. I think that word compassion, it's awfully important Patrick Williams. Vice president of the Orlando Magic we look forward to the next meeting of the Orlando Magic.

Orlando Magic Pat Williams Vice president West Point NBA vice president Oklahoma TBS BT Patrick Williams Katie Daniel Radcliffe Steve Dwight D Eisenhower Douglas Amazon iheartradio NewsRadio Hudson Kutch Duke
"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

14:14 min | 3 years ago

"pat williams" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now, here's your host, Pat Williams, Mary Jo banker our guest in that first segment talking about her book. If you ask me Mitch Albom is withers bestselling author screenwriter playwright sports columnist. Mitch good to catch up with you. And hope you're doing. Well. Thank you, Pat, always great to talk to you. Your new book is been out a little bit. The next person you meet in heaven, the long awaited sequel to the number one New York Times bestseller, the five people you meet in heaven. How is your book going Mitch what what are the early reports well debuted at number one on the New York Times list? So you can't ask them more than that and has been going great ever since thanks for thanks for asking about it. But most happy just on the sales of it. But that people who read the first book that by people you mean haven't seemed to be based on their females discussions with me. When I go around the country seems to be very satisfied with the sequel. That's what you always worry about. I've never done this people before. So I I didn't even know how to do it. But it seems to catch the same message. And and and good feelings of the first one met you've been on tour for really from October ninth all the way into November about a month. How did the tour go? What was the reaction? Great. It was great. I got a chance to talk about. How lives affect other lives, and I did long talks when I went down. And I I use myself actually as an example because so many things have happened in my life that ricocheted me for one thing to another that if one person wasn't there to do it while life will be totally different starting from a very early on in my before I ever wrote Tuesday's glory or anything like sports writing career. I was trying to be a Sunday magazine writer. Yeah. That's what I wanted to to do in journalism, and I sent my clicks off to a newspaper that was hiring a Sunday magazine writer, but I had written a lot of stuff for sport magazine up to that point. So a lot of my sports. I ended up getting a call from the sports editor of that paper. It was funny because he called meals and Finland's on a on an assignment, and he called me all the way over there. He said, hey, you know, that Sunday magazine writer w ply for said, yeah, you didn't. Get it. I didn't get it. You call me all the way over here. Tell me he said, well the guy who was looking at that job. He read your Quincy. So there are a lot of sports clips. So he walked them across the newsroom, and he put them on my desk, and I've been reading them, and I think they're pretty good if you'd like a job as a sports writer, I got one for you here. And that's how I became a sportswriter. And I don't even know the name of the man who read my lips. And instead of throwing them in the garbage, which is what most people do. They don't wanna hire somebody. He walked him. All the way across the news, many changed my life, and I don't even know his name. I can't even thank him. So, you know, the five people you meet having the next person, you mean, having one of the tenets is pretty much of that that you never know in your life. Someone you encounter for a minute five minutes five days by years the rest of your life. You can have a profound effect on how they live their lives, and I'm kind of walking proof of that. And that's what I told audiences around the country. That's great. No Lord, indeed works in mysterious ways the truth. Mitch. You're here in in Winter Park, Florida on October eleventh at the Bush auditorium. How did that visit go? Oh, they're great. I mean, you know, I I have great readers. They don't come to me as a curiosity. You know, they're they're if they come out it's because they were moved by something that I wrote Tuesday's or more than five people. You mean having all we other books, and so a lot of them wanna share stories with me when the talk is over, and and that was the no no exception in Florida there a lot of people came up afterwards. It shared stories about how those books have helped them the change. I think that's the most rewarding thing I think an author can have even more than sales. I mean, it's always nice to have book sale. But you never know why people buying your books. They might be buying them to laugh at them. You know, but you know, I hear from my readers a lot. And they they show me that the messages of the story that I'm right? Getting getting Mitch. Our book ideas for you like plane stacked up at O'Hare when one takes off the next one moves up. Yes. And having been through the plain stacking at O'Hare as well as writing I can I can vouch for both experience. And yes, I have I say to my literary agent. Now, you know, I've reached the age where I had more ideas than probably years left. You know in terms of how long it takes to write them. And I worry about prioritizing them now because I've never been one to suffer writer's. Block knock wood. I always the opposite way. I just can't get to all the things I'd like to right? There are many other ideas that I'd like to pursue. And I hope the Lord gives getting enough time to do Mitch. Where did your intense desire to make a difference through charities in Detroit? In haiti? Where did that all come into your life? Love to say that I was born that way at that. And then I did have parents who raised me with those principles. But I have to be honest and say that once I got out into the world and particularly into sports journalism. I was pretty selfish for the first fifteen sixteen years of my career. You know, I I I just worked at being better at my craft. I I was very ambitious. I worked in every field. I could newspapers radio television. I never said no to anything because I thought if I saying they won't ask me again. And all my efforts went into just making myself, better, richer, more popular, all those types of things. Decently. And then nine nineteen ninety five when I was thirty seven I reconnected with an old college professor of mine anymore Schwartz who I happened again talk about circumstance, I just happened to see on television one night talking to Ted Koppel. Well, what it was like to die from the Gary disease. And he was a person who I had lost touch with for those sixteen years while I was so busy being in business, and I had been very close with them in college, and I felt ashamed that I had fallen so far out of touch with them. I didn't even know you had a terminal illness. And so I went to go visit him I thought it'd be a one time visit and it turned into another another another and during those visits with him. We discuss what's important when you really know you're going to die. And the cost he did because he was weeks away from dying his lessons really had an effect on me. You know, wasn't someone talking satirically someone talking about hey, I know I'm not going to be here in a few weeks. Let me tell you what now matters to me as I'm leaving the world. And one of the things you talked to me about what's being involved in my community. And he said, what do you do for your community what he can do for people around you? I said what do you mean charities things like that? And I said, I I guess I write checks, and he said, well, anybody can write a check a you've been giving a voice you reach a lot of people, and you need to use that voice for something other than just aggrandizing yourself. And that really never left me, you know. And and I started my first charity that year, which was a scholarship program for kids to study the arts here in Detroit who didn't have money and since then it's blossom to operate. What's called say Detroit? This is an umbrella charity that operates nine separate charities underneath a poison run an agent Haiti and Puerto Princesa we have forty seven children that we raise. I'm there every month without fail three or four days every month. And I'm proud of those children one of them. I'm looking at is ten feet from me when I'm talking to you. 'cause he's he's sick. And so we bought him about him up here for medical care. And it's been a remarkable experience to say that he said to me before he died, you're gonna find out that taking just makes you feel more like your dying giving makes you feel like you're living. And I never forgot that sentence. Giving makes you feel like you're living in I have found now many years later that that is the absolute truth of life. Mitch Albom is our guest bestselling author. I'm intrigued with your wife Janine. Where does she fit in with all of this Mitch and how how do the two of you relate to your charities? Well, she's my she's my shining example. I mean, she was kind and generous long before I kind of turned around to. She's I say a daytime Saint she is she's just as kind people giving the people, and that's in her nature. And she always said to me, you know, I don't care. How successful you are. I don't care can even know what I what I did for a living when she met me. I was I was already pretty well known in sports on television. And all that. But she didn't follow it at all. And so she met me she's done. I told her I was sports writer. She said later told me she felt sorry for me. 'cause she thought how can somebody make a living doing that? She knew about it. So I know that she was never never got involved with me for financial reasons or celebrity reasons or anything like that just because she saw something in me, I guess that she could log, and and I've been honored to have her in my life, and she comes with me to Haiti and the kids adore, of course, thing, you know, she's been on they never had. And she adores them know the biggest test was a couple of years ago, you probably know this. But one of our kids are maybe a little Chico she took ill. She was five years old and developed a brain tumor turns out to be a very serious brain tumor. They bought her up here thinking that maybe she could get an operation, and then could go back, and she never went back, and she became my daughter and. We took care of her and they call us. She would die in four months. And I said, no, she won't because she's a fighter. I know this kid she's gonna say we're gonna fight and together deneen myself and gca fought that brain tumor off for nearly two years. And that was still I think the longest I've ever heard of any child living with this particular type of tumor just called the PG and those two years where the most difficult, but the most rewarding years of our marriage, and we got to be a family, and you know, really got to see what my wife was like a mother as well as my wife, and I was simply and how it brought us together and even death of a child can really lower marriage apart. If you're not careful because you all feel so guilty. Like, why didn't we must have been something? I could have done you have no place to take that out. So you take it out on your spouse. And next thing, you know, you you can't look at the person without seeing the face. That child. So, you know, you have to be very careful to pull together through that we have and it's brought us closer together. Not further apart, and I told her temper making her. Her heart. Mitch Albom has a new book out the next person you meet in heaven came out in October and has already soared up to charge. Mitch with all of this. Do you still have a great interest in sports? I have an interest great interest in that. You know, I can't lie and say that a mid January NBA basketball game holds a lot of intrigue for me anymore. I you know, I tend to look more at the bigger pictures. I'm still, you know, still love the big play offs and the showdown they fill the big rivalries. I still, you know, cheer for new and exciting personalities and talent to come along. But, you know, first of all the sports, the journalism business is really changed since when I got into it, Pat uruly days, and to you know, there was a symbiotic relationship between the press and the athletes back, then athletes kinda needed depressed to to, you know, relate their story to the public because they had no other way of doing it. And if they ran a foul of of the media, you know, they were likely to be chastised. And so, you know, they sort of respect them, and they understood that. In many many ways that was how people found out what happened in the game and who the personalities world well today, every athlete has their own Twitter account and their own website and their own Instagram. They're telling their own stories, they don't need media. And therefore, they treat me very disrespectfully frequently, and they don't understand what they're there for their understand why they're critical of them in any way because they think that everybody should just be positive. You know, this way you spend your own Twitter account. And so it's really changed and the athletes today, the young ones have grown up not knowing anything, but this so they really don't understand the history of sports journalism or the role that had ever played in the days when people need to tell the stories, so I wouldn't start back up in it. If I were starting over again, I've had fix something else. Because I could see that you know, you would just be always on the outside of everything. And and people would always prefer to hear directly from the Brian James and Tiger Woods, then you writing about LeBron James. It's different. And and they can and they do so, you know, but you know, my interest in the game and the narratives is still great and just not, you know, not the regular season stuff so much more after this on the Pat Williams weekend. Our it's news ninety six five in Orlando. Now..

Mitch Albom writer haiti Detroit Pat Williams New York Times Twitter sports columnist Pat Sunday magazine Florida Finland NBA Winter Park sport magazine Pat uruly Orlando sportswriter LeBron James Quincy
Orlando Magic turn to Lil' Penny doll for draft lottery luck

Get Up!

01:35 min | 4 years ago

Orlando Magic turn to Lil' Penny doll for draft lottery luck

"A lot of these have to be considered but it's going to be interesting interesting so doubling the franchise values maybe that's an exaggeration maybe it isn't i do think it is arguably a boon for the sports industry and in every conceivable way including networks like espn and others that cover the world of sports this just brings people into the tent for sure i think for what we do because you know having been on this side of the camera while it's always very touchy when you start dealing with gambling topics you're not certain things to say what if nothing else is certainly makes that easier we don't have to think about so many rules like we want said oprah's pandora's box as you guys alluded to anna can be a gift and occurs because now athletes are going to be a lot more conscious of who's betting what based on social media and what's out there is no question of that this is it's a rich topic and we'll continue with it meanwhile tonight in chicago it's the draft lottery sons have the best chance to land the number one overall pick the grizzlies have the second best chance help they're both really proud of their seasons neither one of them have ever picked first overall landau magic have themselves their own little good luck charm they have the fifth best chance to get the pay quit pat williams is going to bring little penny to the draft remember little penny penny doll and so he's gonna be there tonight as a good luck charm jalen if you were asked to be the person representing a franchise the draft lottery what would you bring good luck good luck little thing that's a great thing that's a great question a pistons fan so that's probably it'd be the squad i go represent.

Espn Oprah Pandora Chicago Grizzlies Pat Williams Anna Landau Pistons