10 Burst results for "Pat Spearman"

"pat spearman" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:19 min | 4 months ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"And I was excommunicated as a result, but I think that experience really helped me to see patriarchy in a way that other people have a more difficult time. You know, people who are secular sometimes think they are free. Yeah. Sometimes think women and men are equal in our society. Sometimes think, you know, they live in a place where patriarchy doesn't exist. And I have some bad news for you. There is nowhere where patriarchy does not exist in this world. If it did, if that place existed, I would go to that magical island and never return. As a lesbian, I'm trying my best, but you don't have to be Catholic. You don't have to be evangelical. You don't have to be Mormon to suffer from the political influence of these groups. And I think it's really important to make that clear that they have a disproportionate impact on public policy. Right. All right, so you brought up the ERA, the equal rights amendment. And so much of your work, including your book, focuses on the equal rights amendment. So why? What's the connection? Yeah, so I actually learned about the ERA because I was raised Mormon, and the Mormon church played a very outsized role in the defeat of the equal rights amendment in the 1970s. So my mother and my grandmother were assigned to fight against the ERA by the church in Arizona where I was born. And, you know, Arizona never ratified. They're very talented women. It worked. And the ERA fell three states short because of women like my mother and my grandmother in the 1970s. Unfortunately, the ERA went through what I like to call alone. So when it fell short of its deadline, initially proposed deadline, it went through several decades where there were no additional ratifications, but it was revived in 2017 in Nevada. So a queer black preacher named pat spearman senator pat spearman in Nevada..

Mormon church Arizona ERA pat spearman Nevada
"pat spearman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"You see, my goal was always a seat at the table. It's what women are conditioned to believe success is. And when the chair doesn't fit when it doesn't reach the table when it's wobbly when it's full of splinters, we don't have the luxury of fixing it or finding another one. But we try anyways. We take on that responsibility and we shoulder that burden. Now, I've been fortunate enough to sit at a few seats at a few different tables, and what I've learned is when you get to see trying to fix the seat, won't fix the problem. Why? Because the table was never built for us in the first place. The solution, build better tables. So, allow me to be your very own Ikea manual. I would like to present to you a set of guidelines. I very eloquently call how to build a table that doesn't suck. I've been told in very literal. Now, right off the bat, let me tell you, this assembly is going to take more than one person or a group of people. It's going to take everyone. Are you ready? Should we dive in? Let's do it. Up first, don't weaponize gratitude? Now, don't get me wrong. Gratitude is a great word. It's nice. It's fluffy, a solid 11 points in Scrabble. However, let's be clear. Although gratitude feels warm and fuzzy, it's not a form of currency. Women are assigned 10% more work and spend more time on unrewarded, unrecognized and non promotable tasks. Basically what this means is all the things men don't want to do are being handed to women. And a lot of those things largely include things that advance inclusivity, equity and diversity in the workplace. So hear me when I say a woman shouldn't be grateful to senator table. She should be paid to sit at a table. Especially once she largely helped build. And a woman state shouldn't be threatened if she doesn't seem grateful enough. In other words, corporations, this step involves a woman doing a job and being paid in money, opportunity, and promotion, not just gratitude. And women, now go ahead, live it off. Look at life. And women, a moment of real talk, trust me, I've been there and I noticed so tough, but we have to understand and remember that being grateful and being treated fairly are not mutually exclusive. I can be grateful, but still know exactly what I deserve. And that's the way to do it..

Ikea
"pat spearman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:35 min | 6 months ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Inventors to thinkers, whose decisions to explore new paths led us to where we are today. This episode is part of a crossover season with ordinary equality, all about the women whose work and activism contributed to the ongoing history of equal rights amendment. You can head over to that show to hear a longer version of today's episode in an interview with pat spearman herself. Today we're talking about one of the living torch bearers of the ERA. She may not have started her career fighting for the ERA, but she's become one of its biggest champions. She fought for Nevada to ratify it and they did. 45 years to the day after Congress first passed the amendment. Let me introduce senator pat spearman. Pat was born Patricia Anne spearman in 1955 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Her mother was a business school graduate and executive secretary, who later became a traveling evangelist. Her father was a veteran tuskegee university graduate and electrician. They met as members of the wings over Jordan choir, singing in large venues all over the country. Pat traveled with them, but they were traveling through a deeply racially divided United States. Most venues denied black people from using the front door, so even the performers had to enter through the back. They'd often bring food and drinks with them, so they didn't have to patronize segregated and often dangerous restaurants or hotels between stops. In 1962, pat herself came face to face with this reality. She saw white men drink from one water fountain and spit in the other. When she went to drink from the one that he had, her mother had to stop her from drinking in the white only fountain out of fear they'd be targeted. She was only 7 years old. When pat was a teenager, her family relocated to Alabama and she became one of the first students to integrate a local high school. She remembers racial harassment from other students opposed to integration. An experience that continued into our time in Norfolk state University of Virginia. Pat would later say these encounters lit a fire within her to fight back and make a difference. In college, pat joined the ROTC and in 1977, joined the army. When she enlisted the army was unwelcoming to women, an entirely banned gay people from joining. Still, pat worked in the military police corps of the U.S. for 29 years. During that time she became a celebrated lieutenant colonel. At the same time, the ERA, which pat would later champion, was dwindling in popularity, precisely because opponents claimed it would force women into military service. The very service that pat had voluntarily entered. After serving, pat attended the episcopal theological seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. She graduated with a master of divinity and once again found herself confronting the racism and sexism of conservatives. When invited to preach, she was often introduced as the speaker rather than her proper title of the reverend. And was even asked to stand away from her proper place at the pulpit. Pat remained undeterred. In 2005, she moved to Nevada and founded her own church, the resurrection faith community ministries. She served as pastor. In 2012, pat began her political career by challenging Nevada state senator, John Jay Lee, a two term incumbent. He opposed abortion rights and same sex marriage, issues pat ardently supported. On the campaign trail, pat was a force to be reckoned with. The combination of her formal speaking experience and her dedication to equality, galvanized voters. She spent just one 15th of the money her opponent did in the primary and won by a margin of 26 percentage points. Upon her election, pat became the first openly lesbian legislator in Nevada state history. She prioritized and continues to support legislation to promote equality, veterans and energy, EV, or eve, as a nod to the first woman in the Bible. In 2014, the equal rights amendment came back to pat. It fell short of ratification in the 1970s, and a group of women were searching for capable legislators to carry bills in the states that hadn't yet ratified it. Nevada was one such state and pat was one such legislator. She introduced her first bit at ratification in 2015. But the bill didn't make it out of committee. Ratifying an amendment from the 1970s, nearly 40 years later, was a leap in logic for many people. One legislator even told her that the quest made Nevada look like a laughingstock. But pat was determined to ratify the ERA if only because of its importance to pursuing permanent equality. Pat reintroduced the bill in 2016, and again the following year. Women's marches and the growing momentum of the gender equality movement lent the Bill much needed strength. But the bill was coming up against the same arguments. It would force women to lose benefits and register for the draft. In the 2017 session, pat took the floor wearing all white, a nod to suffragists, and argued for the ERA. At the end of the session, pat had accumulated 8 nays and 13 eyes. Nevada ratified the ERA, the first state to do so in four decades. Pat continues her fight for equality across all of her occupations and titles today. Since Nevada ratified the ERA, she helped two additional states ratify Illinois and Virginia. She is currently running for mayor of North Las Vegas. Every time I see a good fight, I'm gonna get in it, and I'm not gonna quit until we win it. Thanks to senator pat spearman for sharing her voice and wisdom. All month we're highlighting innovators. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at womena. Tune in tomorrow for the story of another innovator. Special thanks to women's co creators Jenny and Liz caplan. Check out ordinary equality, the podcast and the book.

pat Pat Nevada senator pat spearman pat spearman Patricia Anne spearman Norfolk state University of Vi tuskegee university episcopal theological seminary John Jay Lee pat ardently army U.S. ERA Indianapolis ROTC Indiana Jordan Congress
"pat spearman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:46 min | 6 months ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"This month will manica is brought to you by LinkedIn. LinkedIn is a hub for conversation about what it means to be professional today. And what the future of work might look like. LinkedIn members are discussing the changing landscape of when, how and where we work. And what it looks like when we need to take time away to focus on family or mental health. These days,.

"pat spearman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I saw on Tuesday. That UNLV. Took down at statue. Of the running rebels there. And there were some complaints by the native American Student Association. And you know on the piggybacking everything. That's going on right now. Systemic racism. Just from the death of George Flood with. Black, people but of course native Americans as well, but hey rab. which is a very cartoony assembly Sam Looking Guy The statue has been greeting visitors. Outside of the UNLV Tantalum, Nice Center. For the last thirteen years, but despite the statues name. The school said it was an image to western settlers and had nothing to do. With the confederate states of America. But you all these native American Association called for its removal, saying it represented a dark time and their people's history. have been asking for its removal for years saying that it was overdue. and. Roxanne McCoy who is the Las Vegas Chapter President of the? N. Double ACP, said quote. Even when they tried to spin it and say something else. It is offensive to native Americans. You can try. To like dance around and say it's not confederate when you put rebel. Then you put that image in there, I'm not looking at just some old white man with a big hat, hanging out in Vegas and quote. So the statue will be given back to the donors who funded it. WHO WERE UNLV ALUMNI? And the President of the School Marta Maiava said in recent conversations with the donor. We mutually agreed. It was best to remove that statue. Over the past few months I've had discussions with multiple individuals and stakeholder groups from campus, and the community on how best who university move forward given the recent events throughout our nation. And now UNLV is considering they're going to have to change their name of the rebels. Running rebels remember Iki Woods had talked to him about plan for the rebels. If you're listening chaos, HP Las Vegas Right now I love to hear what you think about this. At one eight, hundred eight seven play. So. Remember UNLV. They started classes. In nineteen fifty seven. But U, N are started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy four. And, this is why you and are kind of got pushed out of shape, because UNLV got way more famous, and they're like we shouldn't have to call ourselves. UN Are Worthy University Nevada's like cal cal is California, and then everybody else has to say cal. La like UCLA whatever. And so. that. You NFL that unlv massacre. was called beauregard for a long time, and it used to be a wolf who wore the stars and bars back in the day. And so the university did admit that they used a confederate team mascot, which was unfortunate. But since the eighties, they've gone with the floppy hat. Hey, RUB! That was supposed to move the school away from any. Confederate imagery and just pay homage to or mosh to Western settlers. So the State Senators Pat Spearman from Las Vegas. She believes that hey. Rab was never supposed to be a confederate symbol, but still supports the. The taking it down all right. Let's go to Chris, who is in Oakland go ahead, Chris, what's up, man? Hey Rick thanks. Good morning, man, thanks for taking my call just really interesting topic that you just touched on. I was actually wanted to call you. Kinda, weigh in yesterday Day You local radio here in San Francisco discussed the possibility of forty niners San Ford and has the name you know. The guy you know, hey, Whoa, point nine is predominantly white. Men came out to California in eighteen, fifty, eighteen, forty, nine, hundred fifty stolen land, basically right James K polk started the war with Mexico basically. We basically took half of. You know Mexico net war, but for united maybe an issue. You know I've always liked as lifelong sports fan. I've always liked how sports teams kind of reflect their local geography right so the Pittsburgh steelers St was big day, right? The Pistons, right the outgoing trait for united, always sounded like a good California name, but that's something to think about I. Mean if you look at. I mean I know. You have a lot of issues with the Washington Redskins, and then you're talking about the running rebels and I. Know Ole Miss Yesterday I. Think is saying they're probably gonNA change their name. But you look at some other stories. team names like the Texas Rangers. Project and Tex Rangers and you know now there are police force, but you know if you were native, American or Mexican American probably say differently I mean what those guys did. The after the civil war was was nuts You know but again looking through our lens of twenty twenty. It's easy to say change this change that, but you know I just kind of issue which take you? One other thing I wanted to. I'd like to ask you. The forty niners thing I. thought was completely. Just about the gold, rush but are they like saying well, you know. coolies built the railroad and the mission system was going on during the same time, because I never once associated forty niners, and the Goldrush which was every heritage on the face of the Earth Russian the Sierra shirt with any with anything overtly racist. What were the reasons behind it? matere right? You know that local media legend. Work in the same building and I've I've met him I. Besides you wreck, he's my. He's my idol. Right I mean five. When I on retail, but it wasn't. Until matere, so he's the guy that brought it up actually and again. That's what I. Always Thought and I taught you know eighth. Grade History in Oakland for ten years before being a lawyer, and so to have that even be a question that the foreigners. Yes, I mean. It looks you know you see the the I. Forget the Guy's the mascots. Amy Looks Very. You know wholesome, whatever or host, not the right word, but you know I mean he looks just like a hey, a cowboy guy, and hey, you know this is the forty niners, and this, and that and I think what what Phil was saying was that it was more than just okay on the surface..

UNLV Las Vegas California President Oakland American Student Association Mexico unlv George Flood HP School Marta Maiava American Association Iki Woods America Chris Roxanne McCoy Rab Washington Redskins San Francisco
"pat spearman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all that analysis Stewart the Supreme Court ruling this week that the civil rights amendment protects LGBTQ employees against workplace discrimination was a huge win for advancing equality and continuing conversations about equal protections for everyone in this country under the law but we have a long way to go protest this weekend to put a spotlight on intersection now Eddie and the specifically the importance of trans gender rights in any meaningful conversation about change while the same time the trump administration was in the process of rolling back health care protections for trans people on a recent special episode of the podcast ordinary quality hosted by lawyer and advocate Kate Kelly Sheehan trans activist Charly Charly climber explored the intersection of trans rights and the equal rights amendment a piece of legislation that's been stalled for years back in January I spoke with Kate Kelly about her podcast all about the IRA it's history in the current state of the amendment as the first segment in our ongoing series keep one hundred since then Virginia became the latest state to ratify the ERA the thirty eighth to do so decades after it was initially passed by Congress in seventy two and the house also voted to extend the deadline for the hearing which had been one of the major obstacles to its federal adoption in my conversation Kelly we address them ieri basics I began by asking about recently renewed interest in the E. R. A. drafted nearly a century ago by suffragettes suffrage activist Alice Paul the equal rights amendment like you said was written by Alice Paul in nineteen twenty three and has really been around for almost a century it died in nineteen eighty two when the deadline that Congress attached to it expired but all that time there were women who kept up hope and kept fighting and kept pushing for the equal rights amendment and so finally after at the women's March sprouted and women started really organizing in a big way and a national form the equal rights amendment resurfaced and people have started actively organizing it to support it and really treating it like it never died that it just had a period of latency and now it's being resurrected so in twenty seventeen a queer black preacher named Pat Spearman senator Pat Spearman resurrected the equal rights amendment she got it ratified in Nevada and then everyone thought whoa this is the first time in thirty years that this has happened it might actually be possible we might be able to get the equal rights amendment into the constitution and so that started a whole new wave of advocacy to get women into our most foundational document at this point why do we need the E. R. A. there are what people call sort of a de facto ERA so things like Ruth pater Ginsburg deck where she litigated cases before the Supreme Court trying to argue that under the Fourteenth Amendment women were protected however women don't get the full list for highest amount of scrutiny under current Supreme Court jurisprudence the women get what's called intermediate scrutiny other categories like race and religion those get this higher form and it's harder to keep laws that didn't discriminate on those bases on the books for women it's easier to pass and keep sexist laws on the books and then there's another reason we need the equal rights amendment which is in in clause two of the equal rights amendment and it really creates a new Avenue for Congress to pass laws that protect women and girls right now there are only certain powers that the federal government has in the federal Congress can only pass certain laws so for example the violence against women act the private room in the in the violence against women act was struck down they said it was unconstitutional we need the equal rights amendment so that we can have more robust laws that protect women who have been the opponents of the ERA the opponents of the equal rights amendment are largely conservative you know the conservative movement who uses sort of these culture war type arguments so their initial arguments were that it would cause gay marriage to exist that you know the use the bathroom arguments they said that women would be put on the front lines of military service and all of those arguments have kind of fallen to the wayside so women serve in the military in full capacity women you know women gave our marriage equality exists we already have that so a lot of these arguments are moot now they really focus on rapid active rights and trans rights until they're kind of using these cultural touchstones to fight the real reason that they're fighting the equal rights amendment is they don't want constitutional quality they don't want us to be on equal footing my guest is Cade Kelly she is the host of the podcast ordinary equality all about the E. R. AG you touched on it your first answer but I want to circle back to the very beginnings of the E. R. A. who is Alice Paul and why did she write it I was Paul was a suffragist and she sort of had this second tier second wave of of the suffrage movement and she is largely credited with helping the nineteenth amendment the women's suffrage amendment get into the constitution and so she elevated the tactics used really confrontational measures she protested she picketed she really she learned from the suffrage movement in the U. K. she brought over those tactics and she moved past the Elizabeth Cady Stanton's on the Susan B. Anthony's and she really took it to the next level and that's how we got the nineteenth amendment initially the equal rights amendment was on the platforms of both political parties so until nineteen seventy two also on the Republican platform and it had wide support in fact in nineteen seventy two it passed with a huge majority in both houses of Congress in both parties so it was at wildly popular amendment at the time there were hundreds of thousands of people marching in the street in support of the equal rights amendment and it had almost universal support that's so interesting to think we went from there two people fighting against it so what was the turning point for the E. R. A. so the turning point for the equal rights amendment you know right when it was passed in both houses of Congress in nineteen seventy two right after that a ton of states immediately ratified under article five of the constitution you have to get three fourths of the states are that's thirty eight states and right away thirty states ratified they got to thirty five and it was a lot of movement but it got to some of the harder states so it got to states that have have less infrastructure for women's rights and are less advanced when it comes to quality and so as it got to the harder states some of.

Stewart Supreme Court
"pat spearman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The current state of the amendment as the first segment in our ongoing series keep one hundred since then Virginia became the latest state to ratify the ERA the thirty eighth to do so decades after was initially passed by Congress in seventy two and the house also voted to extend the deadline for the hearing which had been one of the major obstacles to its federal adoption in my conversation Kelly we address them you're a basics I began by asking about recently renewed interest in the E. R. A. drafted nearly a century ago by suffragettes suffrage activist Alice Paul the equal rights amendment like you said was written by Alice Paul in nineteen twenty three and has really been around for almost a century it died in nineteen eighty two when the deadline that Congress attached to it expired but all that time there were women who kept up hope and kept fighting and kept pushing for the equal rights amendment and so finally after at the women's March sprouted and women started really organizing in a big way and a national form the equal rights amendment resurfaced and people have started active we organizing it to support it and really treating it like it never died that it just had a period of latency and now it's being resurrected so in twenty seventeen a queer black preacher named Pat Spearman senator Pat Spearman resurrected the equal rights amendment she got it ratified in Nevada and then everyone thought whoa this is the first time in thirty years that this has happened it might actually be possible we might be able to get the equal rights amendment into the constitution and so that started a whole new wave of advocacy to get women into our most foundational document at this point why do we need the E. R. A. there are what people call sort of a de facto ERA so things like Ruth pater Ginsburg deck where she litigated cases before the Supreme Court trying to argue that under the Fourteenth Amendment women were protected however women don't get the full list for highest amount of scrutiny under current Supreme Court jurisprudence the women get what's called intermediate scrutiny other categories like race and religion those get this higher form and it's harder to keep laws that didn't discriminate on those bases on the books for women it's easier to pass and keep sexist laws on the books and then there's another reason we need the equal rights amendment which is in in clause two of the equal rights amendment and it really creates a new Avenue for Congress to pass laws that protect women and girls right now there are only certain powers that the federal government has in the federal Congress can only pass certain laws so for example the violence against women act the private room in the in the violence against women act was struck down they said it was unconstitutional we need the equal rights amendment so that we can have more robust laws that protect women who have been the opponents of the E. R. A. the opponents of the equal rights amendment are largely conservative you know the conservative movement who uses sort of these culture war type arguments so their initial arguments were that it would cause gay marriage to exist that you know the use the bathroom arguments they said that women would be put on the front lines of military service and all of those arguments have kind of fallen to the wayside so women serve in the military in full capacity women you know women gave our marriage equality exists we already have that so a lot of these arguments are moot now they really focus on Reppert Aktiv writes and trans rights until they're kind of using these cultural touchstones to fight the real reason that they're fighting the equal rights amendment is they don't want constitutional quality they don't want us to be on equal footing my guest is Cade Kelly she is the host of the podcast ordinary equality all about the E. R. A. you touched on it your first answer but I want to circle back to the very beginnings of the E. R. A. who is Alice Paul and why did she write it I was Paul was a suffragist and she sort of had this second tier second wave of of the suffrage movement and she is largely credited with helping the nineteenth amendment the women's suffrage amendment get into the constitution and so she elevated the tactics used really confrontational measures she protested she picketed she really she learned from the suffrage movement in the U. K. she brought over there's tactics and she moved past the Elizabeth Cady Stanton's on the Susan B. Anthony's and she really took it to the next level and that's how we got the nineteenth amendment initially the equal rights amendment was on the platforms of both political parties so until nineteen seventy two also on the Republican platform and it had wide support in fact in nineteen seventy two it passed with a huge majority in both houses of Congress in both parties so it was wildly popular amendment at the time there were hundreds of thousands of people marching in the street in support of the equal rights amendment and it had almost universal support that's so interesting to think we went from there two people fighting against it so what was the turning point for the E. R. A. so the turning point for the equal rights amendment you know right when it was bought passed in both houses of Congress in nineteen seventy two right after that a ton of states immediately ratified under article five of the constitution you have to get three fourths of the states are that's thirty eight states and right away thirty states ratified they got to thirty five and it was a lot of movement but it got to some of the harder states so it got to states that have have less infrastructure for women's rights and are less advanced when it comes to quality and so as it got to the harder states some of this conservative anti ERA backlash really ramped up started also started noting the culture war saw a woman named Phyllis Schlafly started a group called stop ERA and she was very articulate intelligent organizing genius to be honest and she organized women to fight against the equal rights amendment really what Schlafly provided was the optic that the equal rights amendment was sort of a battle between women or differences of opinion between women but the truth is the people who voted against the equal rights amendment more men the people who put in poison pill amendments against the equal rights amendment or men even to this day the vast majority of the state legislatures I sometimes up to eighty eighty eight percent of the state legislatures are men so the people actually keeping women out of the constitution are men she was sort of a shield or screen to make it the perception that it was women fighting the equal rights amendment but really it was meant my guest is Cade Kelly she is an attorney and E. R. A. fanatic and I say that I love it from the system isn't bad the podcast ordinary equality what is keeping the ERA from becoming an amendment at this point so under article five of the constitution it's got to get ratified by thirty five cent at sorry thirty eight states three fourths of the states the Virginia today will vote to ratify the equal rights amendment and that will become the the final state necessary under the constitution there are few other procedural barriers there was an original deadline that that is in play so other amendments for example the twenty seventh amendment which is the most recent amendment it was originally proposed by James Madison and the not ratify till two hundred and three years later in the.

Virginia
"pat spearman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of them and W. NYC I'm Alison Stewart this year all of it is commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteenth amendment which back in nineteen twenty secured a woman's right to vote in twenty twenty we're gonna be looking at ways women have helped and are helping to maintain democracy recalling the series keeping it one hundred Hey I don't know keeping it one hundred means telling the truth keeping it real and the reality is democracy is something that has to be nurtured and protected a perfect example is playing out in the headlines this week nearly thirty years after the equal rights amendment was initially passed by Congress in a completely bipartisan vote in nineteen seventy two and signed by Richard Nixon it is still today being debated as in this week in Virginia on Tuesday Virginia state legislators committed to sending an advance resolution it ratifying the equal rights amendment to a full vote why the renewed interest in ideas been around almost fifty years we want to know so we asked lawyer Kate Kelly to join us the ERA is her jam and she hosts a podcast about it called ordinary equality the title comes from a quote by the author of the IRA Alice Paul who said quote most reforms most problems are complicated but to me there's nothing complicated about ordinary equality check out this clip from the podcast explaining what the E. R. asus section one equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex on account of sex on account of sex what's so controversial about that anyway and why is it such a big deal voice you that voice you heard is Kate Kelly and she is in our studio night now K. welcomed all of it thanks for having me alright so this sort of suddenly March twenty seventeen Nevada ratify the R. A. in two thousand eighteen Illinois did we talked about Virginia what is this renewed interest in the past few years an ERA so the equal rights amendment like you said was written by Alice Paul in nineteen twenty three and has really been around for almost a century it died in nineteen eighty two when the deadline that Congress attached to it expired but all that time there were women who kept up hope and kept fighting and kept pushing for the equal rights amendment and so finally after at the women's March sprouted and women started really organizing in a big way in a national form the equal rights amendment resurfaced and people have started actively organizing it to support it and really treating it like it never died that it just had a period of latency and now it's being resurrected so in twenty seventeen quare black preacher named Pat Spearman senator Pat spearmint resurrected the equal rights amendment she got it ratified in Nevada and then everyone thought whoa this is the first time in thirty years that this has happened it might actually be possible we might be able to get the equal rights amendment into the constitution and so that started a whole new wave of advocacy to get women into our most foundational document at this point why do we need the E. R. at there are what people call sort of a de facto ERA so things like root Spader Ginsburg deck where she litigated cases before the Supreme Court trying to argue that under the Fourteenth Amendment women were protected however women don't get the full list for highest amount of scrutiny under current Supreme Court jurisprudence the women get what's called intermediate scrutiny other categories like race and religion those get this higher form and it's harder to keep laws that DeMint discriminate on those basis on the books for women it's easier to pass and keeps access laws on the books and then there's another reason we need the equal rights amendment which is in in clause two of the equal rights amendment and it really creates a new Avenue for Congress to pass laws that protect women and girls right now they're only certain powers that the federal government has and the federal Congress can only pass certain laws so for example the violence against women act the private room in the in the violence against women act was struck down they said it was unconstitutional another example is that female genital mutilation loss of there's a federal law banning FGM however that law just last year was struck down by a District Court judge saying not that it was okay but that it was unconstitutional to pass that law we need the equal rights amendment so that we can have more robust laws that protect women who have been the opponents of the ERA the opponents of the equal rights amendment are largely conservative you know the conservative movement who uses sort of these culture war type arguments so their initial arguments were that it would cause gay marriage to exist that you know the use the bathroom arguments they said that women would be put on the front lines of military service and all those arguments have kind of fallen to the wayside so women serve in the military in full capacity women you know women gave our marriage equality exist we already have that so a lot of these arguments are made now they really focus on a rapid active rights and trans rights until they're kind of using these cultural touchstones to fight the real reason that they're fighting the equal rights amendment is they don't want constitutional quality they don't want us to be on equal footing my guest is Kate Kelly she is the host of the podcast ordinary equality all about the E. R. AG you touched on in your first answer but I want to circle back to the very beginnings of the E. R. A. who is Alice Paul and why did she write it I was Paul was a suffragist and she sort of had this second tier second wave of of the suffrage movement and she is largely credited with helping the nineteenth amendment women's suffrage amendment get and to the constitution and so she elevated the tactics used really confrontational measures she protested she picketed she really she learned from the suffrage movement in the U. K. she brought over there's tactics and she moved past the Elizabeth Cady Stanton's on the Susan B. Anthony is and she really took it to the next level and that's how we got the nineteenth amendment how was how was the ERA originally received so it was written in nineteen twenty three you know just on the coattails of the nineteenth amendment which in nineteen twenty gave mostly white women the vote and then the movement moved on to saying okay now that we have the vote we want we want to be included as equals in the constitution initially the equal rights amendment was on the platforms of both political parties so until nineteen seventy two was also on the Republican platform and it had wide support in fact in nineteen seventy two it passed with a huge majority in both houses of Congress in both parties so it was wildly popular amendment at the time there were hundreds of thousands of people marching in the street in support of the equal rights amendment and it had almost universal support that's so interesting to think we went from there two people fighting against it so what was the turning point for the E. R. at so the turning point for the equal rights amendment you know right when it was passed in both houses of Congress in nineteen seventy two right after that a ton of states immediately ratified under article five of the constitution you have to get three fourths of the states are that thirty eight states and right away thirty states ratified they got to thirty five and it was a lot of movement but it got to some of the harder states so it got to states that have have less infrastructure for women's rights and are less advanced when it comes to quality and so as it got to the harder state some of this conservative anti E. R. a backlash really ramped up started also started noting the culture war so woman name Phyllis Schlafly started a group called stop ERA and she was very articulate intelligent organizing genius to be honest the thing about Phyllis Schlafly which is so ironic issues all of the implements of women's rights to hold that Sir of course she went to law school so she was a lawyer she was trained she was extraordinarily articulate and she organized women to fight against the equal rights amendment really what Schlafly provided was the optic that the equal rights amendment was sort of a battle between women are differences of opinion between women but the truth is the people who voted against the equal rights amendment more men the people who put in poison pill amendments against the equal rights amendment or men even to this day that the vast majority of the state legislatures sometimes up to eighty eighty eight percent of the state legislatures are men so the people actually keeping women out of the constitution are men she was sort of a shield or screen to make it the perception that it was women fighting the equal rights amendment but really it was meant which is very interesting because I believe and correct me if I'm wrong in Virginia it was the most female legislature ever yeah this week because Virginia did as I mentioned say they're gonna send it to a full vote yes of Virginia's actually voting today both in the house of delegates and the Senate is the most being a legislature they've all ever had and it's also the first ever in their four hundred year history the first ever female speaker of the house so I lean filler corn is going to be the one to take the equal rights amendment to the finish line my guest is Kate Kelly she is an attorney and he are a fanatic missionary I love it from the system isn't bad the podcast ordinary equality so I want to get your take on a couple of things one this idea of maintaining democracy as we were trying to develop this series we just want to concentrate on forty one to conserve the idea that democracy democracy I think as we've all Sir to realize is something that you have to protect and you have to take care of how do you think how would the ERA help maintain democracy I think it's really important to remember at that the suffrage movement was just the first step women wanted to get the vote women wanted to run for office women wanted to really participate in democracy but I was step number one step number two was to get us into the constitution women were intentionally left out of the constitution in its initial version that that at the constitutional convention you know there there were people Abigail Adams for example was writing to her husband John Adams and saying that don't forget the ladies that women should be included in the constitution so even their contemporaries even their wives were telling them include women in the constitution the constitution was modeled after the earthquake confederacy and in the Iroquois confederacy women were treated as equals women were delegates and so the they essentially copied and pasted an idea and stripped out women to even at the time they were doing something that was against the very very concept that they were modeling it after it was an intentional choice to leave women out and women wanted to participate in art and democracy as equals even at the time and so the equal rights amendment is sort of a a fix for that foundational mistake of leaving women out of the constitution this can impact our participation in democracy and so many different ways women suffer from unequal participation in all levels of our society including elected office including boards.

Alison Stewart
"pat spearman" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"pat spearman" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"The states again. It's the system that we have of the federal government participating with the state governments and so three fourths Earth's of US states have to ratify any amendment in order for it to actually get into the constitution. And so what happened with the equal rights amendment is right away many states aids ratified it was on the platform of both political parties until Nineteen seventy-two wildly popular Picked up a lot of steam it was immediately ratified by many states and it got up to thirty five states unfortunately the number that's needed thirty. Eight not thirty five And so the deadline which was imposed used by Congress. They put a deadline seven-year deadline so the nineteen Seventy nine was set for the deadline. That deadline was extended by. Congress wants to nineteen eighty to and The equal rights amendment still fell three states short in one thousand nine hundred. I'm looking at the timeline. Now and like you said three fourths of the states have to ratify it. So that's thirty. Eight total and up until nineteen. So there was kind of a snowball effect until the late nineteen seventies and then in Indiana in nineteen seventy seventy just kind of stopped right and just curious that you know like what the cultural climate was that. I'm just thinking out loud. Like what the cultural. Hey it's kind of a wild moment in time. Because the women's rights movement was in full bloom in the early seventies You had marches for the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment In order to extend the deadline there were marches. Hundreds of thousands of people marched on Washington was a huge nationwide issue And there was wide support for changing the amendment. What changed how did it go from? You know rapidly getting thirty states to right away. Ratify it to slowing down while two things happened. One of the culture wars really picked up And a woman named Phyllis Schlafly who is One of the most powerful figures ears in American political life If not in those decades certainly even perhaps in the century she started a movement called stop. Era so she. She started organizing women to advocate against the IRA and the reason that was successful as they use a lot of scare tactics so they would say things like housewives. Swabs are going to be forced onto the front lines at the military dragged. Out of their homes You know they would. They would use the bathrooms argument. which was is even putting today but also at the time they use gay marriage so they was marriage equality? This is GonNa Cause Gay people to be able to get married so they use a lot of scare tactics in order to fight the equal rights amendment but also towards the end it was coming down to the state. The unratified state and a lot of the unratified states are places where women's rights are constantly under attack. Where where women are really falling behind? So you know there were fifteen states. That didn't ratify in twenty seventeen of this this incredible woman. Her name is Pat Spearman and she is a senator. She's a black preacher. A black preacher in Nevada and she essentially resurrected directed the rights amendment. She got the equal rights amendment ratified first time in thirty years anywhere that it had been ratified and she got it ratified in Nevada in twenty seventeen eighteen. And so this reignited the Movement for the Equal Rights Amendment people thought OK well states can still ratify today and then Illinois followed suit so Illinois Loyd ratified it in two thousand eighteen And then we had just one more state At this point we're almost to the thirty eight threshold required by the Constitution. And and that's really where we are today. The next most likely to state to ratify Virginia being currently brought up in the Virginia Senate and the Virginia House of delegates gets it almost passed in Virginia last year in two thousand nineteen so we are just a hair's breath away from getting that final thirty eighth state that is fascinating fascinating. I didn't know the history about Nevada. I didn't I didn't know that in two thousand seventeen. I knew the twin in Nevada. The I keep saying Nevada Nevada. I'm not really sure added in Nevada so a Tina Vada I knew that it was ratified in two thousand seventeen but I did not know the history and now that I'm looking at it. That is pretty remarkable from nineteen. Seventy seven Indiana being the last state to ratify to two thousand seventeen so that that was. That was huge. I'm I'm assuming that if she had not done this people would probably forgotten you know our immune some people who never forgot there were people fought for the equal rights amendment all that time who were advocating in the states who never really gave up on the dream of having an amendment for in the Constitution to protect women But it was largely forgotten and efforts in the women's movement sort of went to other other causes and other issues but there were some women who never forgot and and constantly advocated. What really one of the things that kind of brought the equal rights amendment back onto the table is the twenty seven th amendment so the most recent amendment to the constitution is called the Madison Amendment It was proposed by James Madison has to do with congressional pay. It was proposed by James Madison. But it wasn't ratified edified until the early nineteen nineties. So two hundred and three years later a particularly agitated gentlemen in Texas decided that he was going to create a movement to ratify the the Madison Amendment and it did get ratified so people who are in the Ra movement. Were looking around and thinking way. Okay okay it. Two Hundred Years can pass. An amendment can still make it into the constitution. Additional states than thirty years is not too much then we can still bill agitate and we can still get this amendment that we've always wanted so the equal rights amendment would be the twenty eighth amendment to the Constitution. You know and and again I am endlessly fascinated by women who uphold harmful patriarchal norms. Like this Phyllis Shave with. I just can't I can't wrap my brain around around super interesting character. She's very talented. If you watch debates with her it's fascinating because she debated waited some of the most prominent people in the women's movement at the time and she really honestly wipes the floor with them like she is always more prepared. She's very very intelligent. She's always on point. She is a very very fascinating and talented woman The problem is of course she always gets blamed with the defeat of the equal rights amendment. But for me. I think it's important to remember. That sure. She was the face of it but she she ran for Congress twice and she lost both time. I'm so she never actually voted against the equal rights amendment. The people who voted against the equal rights amendment were meant. They needed cover. They needed to say that that it was just a fight women against women but it was not the people who kept it out of Congress where men the people in the state legislatures to this day. In some of the states where the amendment have not been ratified have eighty percent men in their legislatures. Even the Federal Conver- Congress today The vast majority are men so the actual the people who are truly keeping us from constitutional equality are not women She she really put a face to it and she organized and she helped defeat feet the equal rights amendment but the end of the day the decision makers the people who had power the elected officials were met. I'm glad you said that that. That's that's a really excellent point because representation matters and it seems like that that repeats itself throughout history that you know women often. I see that a lot happening with Nancy Pelosi in a lot of other examples we can think go where you know. The name is wrapped around women. When we love our favorite exactly I I mean the things she did are very very sad the way that she changed the conversation at first it seemed like it was women against men in power but she inserted herself into the conversation in a way that made it seem like it was just a difference of opinion among women and that is not true Also she is not the one who would benefit from keeping the equal rights amendment out of the Constitution that is men who directly benefit from not having us on equal. WHOA stature so I I I always hesitate to blame things like this on women She's a fascinating figure and an important person in the movement but it is it is not her fault she never won election show. She never actually got to vote against the cement right not to mention that men can't alone pick up this fight right right and it is the right thing to do regardless of what your gender at scores.

Nevada Congress James Madison Indiana Nevada Nevada US Phyllis Schlafly Virginia Federal Conver- Congress Nancy Pelosi Illinois Virginia House Washington Virginia Senate Pat Spearman Texas Era Phyllis Shave
The Latest in U.S. Legislation

Ask the Experts

06:21 min | 3 years ago

The Latest in U.S. Legislation

"And Tom Paula calluses on the phone talking talking us through the this year session and new bills at are out. And what's happening? So Tom you wanna finish up before we went to break a couple just to to remind listeners that there's a great website, WWW dot L, E, G dot state dot N, B got US. That's the legislative council bureaus of the legislature's website. And you can go there. It's very user friendly do search for whatever topic that you're interested in and you'll find the Bill there. It's just a fabulous resource for citizens dealing with the the water issue. There's an interesting Bill coming up AB two. Sixty five which would require the desert research institute to study water treatment and recycling so of interest of the conservation community, and then just keep in mind. There's also the again going back to the economic benefits we have a b three thirty one which would create an office about recreation and a grant program to help boost our tourism industry in the outdoor recreation area. So a lot of bills others that are dealing with conservation measures in general. So again, I just encourage people if you've got a particular interest not uniquely on conservation issues, but everything's up there on that. Let's cancel bureau website, and a great resource, you can put your opinion on bills directly online. Find your legislators contact information and to plug into the whole decision making process up in Carson city. That's right. Find your Bill track at follow it participate be a member of sustainable society. Things you said going to break was when you save electricity. You save on water. And what's interesting is. Conversely, that's true as well. So when you save on water also save on electric city because people don't think about well, if you're saving some water, you're saving water. That's great. But you also saving the pumping of that water. So there's a lot of lectures, e goes into getting that water delivered to people's faucets. Excellent point. So other things happening in the legislation. When do we expect to see some of these bills voted on well today, we'll be a big day again for a major advancement in clean energy with SP three fifty eight against shut up to Senator Chris Brooks? He's been moving that advancing that concept ever since he's been in the legislature starting off as an assemblyman. So again wanna recognize some of the folks that have. Kudos to the entire legislature. As it did move forward unanimously. But a couple of folks have been working at it for a long long time. Also to various groups that have supported us such as Nevada conservation league and others that have been really just getting the word out explaining the benefits later this week. Again, we have a b four sixty five that is coming up. So that is the Bill that would provide expanded solar access program and facilitate solar getting to lower income neighborhoods and an opportunity for lower income consumers to get some savings from solar. So those are bills that are coming up this week again, there's an opportunity to support or to voice your opinion. One. Also, go back to the electric school bus issue. That was again, Senator Chris Brooks working in conjunction with Senator Pat Spearman and trying to get more electric transportation on the roads specifically in the school sector, which I think is both. Great for the environment. But also provides an educational opportunity as kids get a chance to see what electric Motors can do as as we get those types of day calls on the roads time, I heard a metric one time that the Clark county school district is a second largest buses earn the US. Is that true? I was I could well be you may have. Yeah. It sounds sounds certainly plausible. They are the fifth largest district. And I think they're in districts that sized they're the most spread out most districts that are huge like that Lanta LA New York are more compressed than so more kids are are walking to school. So the school bus program. That's a great idea is this a pilot program, or is this a you gotta do this. So how knows Bill go to work a pilot program. Right. I mean, just the sheer number of as you allude to sheer number of buses, there's not funding in order to provide all all school districts. You know, certainly. Not all buses will be going electric. But certainly enough can get on the road where we can start to see some empirical data verify the cost savings estimates. See how they play out in in the real world. Be able to see how batteries perform under different conditions of high heat and so forth. And then also provides an opportunity to really see some interesting concepts. When you've got a big battery and about you've got an energy storage device that mobile, so there's been some interesting discussion as to addition to transporting students what could those batteries on buses be used for? And it's, you know, the idea of electric storage is certainly an important concept. Now, we have with electric school buses, the the idea that there was a need or backup power. You've got a big battery and a chance to move it on over to a facility that may not have power for whatever reason and get. Some some backup to critical facilities through electric school buses. So number of interesting ideas, how electric batteries and vehicles can help improve the grid down the road. We'll see more vehicle to grid integration. And the idea that batteries in whatever vehicle can help manage the grid more economically. And we also went to space seeing some ratepayer savings for everyone as we get more electric vehicles on the road as we'll be able to leverage our electric system more efficiently. So good stuff than about alleged. Sure is looking at. And so it's an exciting time and the energy relevant about. And thank you for for your interest and keeping people informed as to what's

Bill Senator Chris Brooks United States Tom Paula Clark County School District Desert Research Institute Senator Pat Spearman Carson City Nevada Conservation League Senator Lanta La New York