6 Burst results for "Pat O'brien"

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

04:49 min | 3 d ago

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Well, thank you for the question. Well, let me put it this way. I don't think I said exactly that I said she you will the violence by her failed policy by disbanding Cadiz Unit by dismissing twenty five thousand cases by not charging persons with the police presented to her for murder charges, and by essentially not monitoring people that are out on bond or electronic monitoring to make sure they don't re-offend. and. That certainly would fuel crime if everybody feels wants to commit crime that there are no consequences or accountability. A you mentioned early on the case of Jussie, smollet and that really you know we talked to the state's turning about that in the last hour what is your thought about how that was handled and what impact has with the relationship with the voters in the city and the county? The voters are going to tell what impact it has but my take on it is it's Kim Fox's said, it was a problem in communication. I say it's a problem, a public official doing political favor for somebody who has political power, and that means that instead of having everybody be the same under the law she put one person above the law and. You, can't do that and when you lose your integrity, all of the decisions you make, they'll be a lot of which can be questioned will be questioned not based upon whether in fact, somebody disagrees with but they find whether you decided made that decision for the right reasons she'll bounce back and say, I'm not the only one was scheduled to talk about. The. The wrongful convictions she mentioned the four teenagers charged in the murder of a medical student back in nineteen, Eighty, eight and and you were the prosecutor in that case. So what do you say about the fact that Chicago was once considered the false confession capital of the world and John Burge and everything in between and that you were part of that. First of all that Steven Falls Confession capital was made by one of the. Plaintiffs attorneys who were suing the city. In the Rosetti case, there were two quarter, forty confessions or admissions by one of the defendants to his acquaintances and one of the four actually testified against. The other in the last trial confirming the confession. And confirming that they did was no way that given the evidence I was given that you wouldn't prosecute now subsequently, DNA test which weren't available at the time came into being and they showed that this system made a mistake. They made a mistake and I made a mistake because I tried but I, tried it in good faith and I tried to based upon what I have and never was anything. Done to me in connection with a penalty based upon my good faith action, there was never any finding against me in state or federal courts. So he's never one penny paid out by the county based upon my actions now and the twenty seven wrongful convictions..

John Burge murder Kim Fox Cadiz Unit Rosetti Chicago Steven prosecutor official
"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

03:09 min | 3 d ago

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"How would you have done things differently, the first thing I would have done after that first night of a writing I would have went on television standing next to Superintendent Brown and said that anybody who lutes destroys property breaks windows will be prosecuted and everybody who is exercising their first amendment rights will be protected. That's the started. And then the reason why Kim Fox's failed is the mayor took a particular action which is appropriate and lawful this curfew. What's is Kim Fox. To on her own she basically guts that billy to get control of the streets when there is rioting to me, that just sounds like somebody who doesn't understand what her job is, which is to make the community safe the neighborhood say and to be a voice for victims. She's a prosecutor. So I I don't know what in that moment how she made the streets safer in that moment that was happening in understand the idea of afterwards saying she's not going to prosecute but as a prosecutor, what role should cheat play in law enforcement or at least addressing the public before any charges are brought to the court. The role, she plays it to tell people what the consequences will be engaged in certain actions which could deter and then entire in terms of what happens as it's ongoing, you should have a unit in the State Attorney's Office on the street with the police, and if there's going to be arrest, those assistant states attorney should make sure that the arrests are valid. That evidence that is part of the proof of that arrest is basically inventory and kept in connection with the person that's arrested, and then when the person appears for bond hearing that States Tony speaks up and gives a voice to the fact that whatever the background that person is, whatever the crimes are that there's an appropriate bond that's recommended by the state's attorney. You've been endorsed by the Chicago Police Union What do you think needs to happen to bring down crime and more importantly improved community police relations in in Cook County. Well. That's the fact that I was endorsed by the Police Department just tells me that police union exception union, but with the exception of, in Fox, every other state's attorney that's an incumbent has been endorsed by the Union. So she's at war with the police and you've got to have a situation where you not only police the police for excessive force but you need their cooperation because they gather evidence and make arrests. So I think that you essentially have to those two roles and they're not inconsistent and they can be done together. Yesterday on Twa, you were talking about that you squarely and solely put the blame of Chicago's murder rate on Kim Fox, do you think? Do you think that's fair. Do you think that's fair to do to the Cook County State's attorney because violence in Chicago and the murder rate has been consistent for decades and decades and decades whether it's Republicans or Democrats in the Cook County State's Attorney's office..

Kim Fox prosecutor attorney Chicago Police Union Cook County State Police Department State Attorney's Office Cook County Union Superintendent murder Chicago lutes Brown Fox Tony billy
"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

04:47 min | 3 d ago

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Okay now, let's hear from her chief opponent Republican Challenger. Pat O'Brien is a former Cook County judge and prosecutor Mr O'Brien welcome to reset. Thank you and good afternoon to you and all of your listeners. So why do you want to be the next Cook? County. State's attorney. Well, it didn't start out that way but after small let's. I started looking at the office and found that Can Fox. Basically had failed in all the ways that are prosecutor has to be judged. She wasn't Charging the. Kind of crime she wasn't watching people after they were charging monitoring to make sure they didn't re-offend and she wasn't trying cases and where it was appropriate winning cases. So I found that terms of violent crime instead of stopping, she was doing it with her failed policies. Public corruption she's done none and all she has to do is look at our list of donors in order to find persons that she could investigate, and because of Smolensk she's lost her integrity and there's no way when you lose that that you can get that back. Well, you've criticized Fox's being soft on crime to focused on criminal justice reform and you would quote restore integrity order just mentioned why focus on Fox why not focus on what you would do at the office But I will. But first of all, she's an incumbent, which means you're running against her four years of policy and part of running against. That is being able to point out what her problems are now in terms of what I would do. Because of the way, gangs have affected the West and south side some of the suburbs I would in large gang unit. Make. Sure that it had a assistance with the experience drugs and guns. And Fed, them with the gangs police officers in the city and suburbs and had them vertically investigate and prosecute those crimes, and then I would make sure that witnesses would feel free to come forward by starting a witness relocation unit, which would be available in order to get a witness, end their family that includes their kids relocated to another city so that they wouldn't fear gang retaliation..

Cook Pat O'Brien Fox prosecutor Fed Smolensk attorney
"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

05:40 min | 3 d ago

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Can say even though we work in partnership I, still have to be a check and so what I can assure. People about the next four years that we will operate in the same way we have in these past four years working collectively with respect and also with accountability with those in law enforcement when we talk about transparency. How do you think your office has done with translating letting the voters are letting the citizens of Cook County know what you're trying to accomplish and what's happening behind the scenes. Prosecutor's office in the country to put every piece of felony case level data on an open data portal so that people can see it and over the course of the last four years, we've updated and modified it to be user friendly so that people can see not just work that we've done in my administration, but the administration prior we put every piece of data that we had available from our our system. So the folks can see it and I think that's incredibly important because as I said earlier. A lot of these races people use sound bites people use phraseology that they think will resonate language tough on crime or soft on crime and people WANNA. Know what does that mean? What are you doing? Are you prosecuting more done cases versus low level offensive I WANNA, be able to demonstrate to the public when they have questions or women want to know what and how we're using our resources that they can actually see when we talk about racial justice are retreating black defendants the same way that we treat white. Defendants for the same crime. When we talk about the inequities, are we spending more resources sending people to prison for low level offenses versus Oh for violent crimes and I think the best way to address that by being asked transparent as possible and I'm very proud of the work that we've done obviously bring up the the case of Jussie smollet and and being sort of grabbing the headlines in your first term as a state's attorney. But when you look at that a lot of that had to do A. transparency. I think a lot of citizens and Cook County wanted to make sure that that you weren't giving any favorable treatment to your friends or to celebrities or people who are who have the money and the resources to be able to game the system, and there was a special prosecution and everyone. But that's really what it's at the core of it. Is this idea that that giving giving your friends and family or celebrities or rich people have money better opportunity to to gain the system? What's.

Cook County Jussie smollet Prosecutor attorney
"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

05:32 min | 3 d ago

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"And gun violence in Chicago, you respond to that I came into office in two thousand sixteen, we had over seven hundred and sixty homicides. Four thousand people shot the number one referred prosecution wasn't gun wasn't shooting was in homicides it was low level retail theft. And so yes, we were doing a fantastic job of prosecuting low level offenders who weren't keeping US safe. We weren't making communities safer by going after people for low level offenses and not using sources to go after those who are committing violent crimes. Until we did was shifted who we were targeting into use of our prosecutorial discretion and in two, thousand, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, and twenty, the number one referred prosecution in our office been done and we've in fact, prosecute at twenty, seven, hundred more guns in the last three years then my predecessor had. So it's not about not prosecuting shifting who we are targeting to make sure communities are safe. and. That's what's fundamentally important. Here we have a lot of people that we are prosecuting who have substance use disorders. Forty percent of our cases that come in our office are drug cases of those the overwhelming majority of people who possess them have a history of drug addiction. When people want our communities to be safe they want us to be able to say people who have substance use disorders me treatment and people who are causing devastation to our communities, but violence should be locked up. What do you say to when people say well, a lot of the criminals they don't feel like they're going to be punished that if they go and smash a a window on Michigan Avenue that they know that this current state's attorneys not interested in punishing them so they can do whatever they want what's your response or something like that? Response Insane look at the data and look at the research i. Reality. News Zinc has been a particularly difficult year across the board, but we've added the reform policies starting in December of Twenty Sixteen and Crime Rates in cook county went down and seventeen, eighteen and nineteen, and so these aren't new policies. This isn't a new shift the just happened in the course of the last six months but that doesn't mean that we shouldn't even in these moments look and make sure that our policies are effective and keeping community safe. But we have to stop the you know soundbite judgements that we make particularly in the middle of crisis. What we've seen in this country is a history of. Criminal Justice policy that decades later we try to unfold that's enacted in the midst of crisis and panic, and we cannot panic. We have to look at the totality of the record and when we do, we will see that these policies have addressed reforms..

Chicago cook county
"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

03:37 min | 3 d ago

"pat obrien" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"I'm Justin Kauffman and this is reset. With Election Day just a week away research checking in with some of the candidates asking for your vote today, we start with the race, for Cook County State's attorney coming up. We'll hear from Pat O'Brien the Republican but first we welcomed the incumbent Democrat Kim Fox Fox was swept into office four years ago largely because of her pledge to reform the criminal justice system here in Cook County State's attorney welcome back to reset. Thank you for having me, Justin. So let's get right into it. Why why do? You deserve another term as the Cook County State's attorney because we've made a lot of inroads in the last four years to keep our community safe and reform what has been a historically broken justice system here Cook County and those inroads have been related to establish of our gun crime strategies, unit address, violent crime, some of our most devastated neighborhoods to vacating wrongful convictions of those who wrongfully convicted at the hands of corrupt law enforcement, as well as addressing issues related to mental health and substance. Abuse, disorders. Champion when you came in for years ago, it was all a reform agenda. A lot of things are talking about how do you feel your record stacks up with the promises you made on the on the campaign trail back in two thousand sixteen. First of all, we knew that we had a long road ahead of us because the reform agenda was to take on a system that had been fundamentally broken for years but I think we've made great headway. Came into office we were known as a false confession capital of the United States and in just four years, we've vacated more wrongful convictions here in county than any state in the union, we were able to work on marijuana legalization in the vacating of convictions that for amounts that are now legal, but we've been able to address issues like they over form, and so while we have made headway certainly, there's much more to do but I think my record stacks up to the agenda that we laid out in two thousand sixteen. States Fox. Your opponent was on w. w last night and said the murder rate in Chicago the high murder rate it's on you. How do you respond to that? First of all I think people in Cook County are smarter than my opponent wants to give them credit for and fearmongering, and basically blaming not what people here expect from people who want to lead them. The reality is when I came in the office twenty sixteen, we had a horrible year violence much like what we're seeing now in year over year for three years violent crime homicides went down and this year has been an incredibly difficult. Year here in Chicago much like places all across the country from New, York City to Albuquerque New Mexico. And we know that this year between the pandemic, the civil unrest economic loss has been devastating to communities and so for. Miss. O'Brien to be overly simplistic about what's happening in our country. Tell us what is leadership will look like and I actually notice leadership looks like from his history and the office, but really he underestimates the integrity and. Intelligence of the voter when he makes overly simplistic statement, you know there's this idea of really kind of stems around prosecutions in who's being prosecuted for what crimes that's been a big part of your reform agenda two to limit or to to decline the the amount of prosecutions because it felt like at one point in Chicago County, we were prosecuting everybody but that falls into the narrative that is for your opponent and others that you're not. Putting prosecutions at the top criminals are getting out and they're they're doing other crimes they're continuing crimes, and that's why we're seeing an uptick in a surge when it comes to murders.

Cook County State Chicago County Kim Fox Fox attorney Pat O'Brien Justin Kauffman United States Chicago murder marijuana Albuquerque New Mexico York City