20 Burst results for "Pat Brown"

"pat brown" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:38 min | 3 months ago

"pat brown" Discussed on How I Built This

"Of cash to figure that we had half the company basically was to some extent involved in this going out soybean farms for the better part of a year. But this is the kind of thing you have to do. When you're working on south problem will you? Don't know the brute the solution is you have to be not afraid to try things that may fail and Accept that as part of the job. This is not the last expensive failure. We're going to have in our history by long shot. You know as of today we're going. I can tell you for certain we are going to have more expensive failures in the future. As we try to figure out you know how to achieve but the point is we don't have a map to to where we're going it means we have to explore. We have to try that. We don't know for sure will work and some of them won't work and if we're afraid to do that then you know while we shouldn't be scientists and we shouldn't be trying to do there and I'm proud of it because that's the way we have to be so okay so you spent a year basically on this idea that didn't work exam which I'm sure was was hard but But then I guess I mean you discovered a away to essentially grow the the leg hemoglobin by read by putting it in yeast and putting it into the cell and then by doing that you can make it at scale you can basically have lots of it. Yeah they're and basically just grow giant from enter tanks full of the yeast and break. Open the cells and extract. The leukemia go bananas. It's very scalable economics work. Well see you you basically from from what I understand like this around twenty twelve two thousand thirteen that you really kind of start to produce this stuff at scale but that's not the impossible you can't just go into these vats of yeast and grab a handful out and form a patty and grill it. That's that is not. You're still far far away from the actual like impossible at at this point right well. That certainly wasn't sufficient. This was not a sequence of things. So we were. We were working on scaling up to him protein at the same time. We're working on figuring out the texture and the rest of the flavor chemistry and so forth. Okay so bad even before you lodged even before you had a product. People were clearly paying attention because Google reportedly heard what you're doing an offer to buy your company they reportedly offered like two or three hundred dollars just an astounding amount of money. Which which you turn down. So we've never confirmed that I I I got you but you're not going to confirm or deny the let me let me just ask you this question. Why would you have turned that down? Well you know I think Google is a great company and the people. There are lots of super smart people there. This company impossible foods has a very simple highly specific mission that we are completely a hundred percent focused on achieving. Nobody else has that level of focus and commitment no matter how smart they are and the mission is to get people to stop eating animal meet. The mission is to eliminate the need for animals as a food technology and by doing so to save the planet from an environmental catastrophe. Nobody cares as much about as I do. And My colleagues do and I don't want to put the mission at risk by by putting it in the hands of someone who's not as committed to it as we are. That's really what it comes down to so you forge ahead and you continue to kind of interest and work on this product until you got something pretty workable not just workable good enough to actually put out. Put out into the world twenty. Sixteen the Burger. The impossible Burger was launched And you guys sort formed a partnership with David Chang the famous chef in New York of Fu. Tell me why you guys decide to do that. Instead of like you know shipped all the stores you decide. We're going to start with this one place. How did how did that was the thinking behind that. I think it was something that was pretty obvious. Under the circumstances so we had been in contact with a number of chefs that we would give samples of our product to just to get feedback because again the thing is we were not interested in launching veggie Burger. If it didn't satisfy a very hardcore meat lover wasn't going to move the needle on our mission so we were setting high bar for ourselves so we were giving samples to chefs to get their feedback and had been doing that for quite some time. And I see at the time currency flow to David Lee Belong to some Green American organization. The Jiang also belong to and he was going to that event in New York and he brought a sample and Casey could see Dave Chang to have them tested checks kitchen restaurant and he cooked it on his stove. And then just like immediately started Tweeting like my mind is blown. We are the point. Is that Dave? Chang is exactly the kind of person we want to launch with because the main value we would get from launching our product at the time when we had very limited production capacity. You know the amount of money we could bring in from sales was yeah was irrelevant. Okay the only. The value of a sale to us is awareness and brand building and the single most important message that we need to deliver to consumers who never heard of us is delicious. Meat doesn't have to come from animals. And Dave Chang is such a hardcore meet guy that he wants banished all vegetarian items from his menu on principle. Okay and there's no more sincere and voluble. Endorsement than to put our product on a menu for a chef to put on the menu because every chef puts a dish on the menu. They're putting their livelihood in the reputation on the line for the subsequent restaurants relaunch initially again. They're not high volume but they were high credibility restaurant because they were run by uncompromising chefs who are known primarily for their meat. Get you going like high end restaurants in New York and San Francisco and La Right and the thing about chefs. Is that what they want? Is something new something challenging and the thing that's different about our product than any place product is that it has the magic of meat that that only chef can see and there's never been a plant based product because of the the team primarily. That does the magical thing that meet does when you cook it which is transforms completely. You can tune the flavor profile by whether you cook it. You know rare or well done and stuff like that and think for a chef having the creative possibilities that that opens up just makes it exciting for them so. I think that's part of why we were so fortunate to be able to work with these great chefs. It was something new for them to put their artistic skills to use pat. I I wanNA talk to that Obviously a lot of what you do is proprietary and patented in secret. But I'm curious like how do you as you kind of improved it and got it to where it is today? How do you is it? Spices is it. Is it like I don't know is it is a different like ingredients. How do you? How do you is that? I taste spices at all. I mean and it's actually. The ingredients are relatively few. I mean it's the flavor is almost entirely from simple small molecules like amino acids vitamins sugars. Things you can find in vegetables animals. Whatever same simple ubiquitous bio-molecules plus hime as a catalyst and that's most of what's behind the flavor. We don't put spices then. There's no like meat flavor. Rinse in there. It's pretty straightforward. It's it's that the way that we approach the problem was. We basically asked the question. How does how does meat do it? How does meat from cow produces that flavor because if meat from a cow can produce at flavor with bio-molecules said that it contains which we knew at the time? Were extremely similar in competition to the things that are found in plant cells. If we can figure out how meat does it then. We don't have to fake the flavors. We can build in the exact same flavor chemistry into our product so that it does the same thing and it it literally creates the flavor in real time. When you cook in the raw form which you can you can actually eat.

Dave Chang New York Google David Chang Burger bio-molecules David Lee Jiang La Casey San Francisco
"pat brown" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:36 min | 3 months ago

"pat brown" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR. I'm Guy Roz so it's around two thousand. Eleven and Pat Brown will soon be walking away from tenure job at Stanford to create meat from plants. But before he can even begin to find the ingredients and do the hard science to create an impossible burger. Pat has to raise a ton of money and so he starts just down the road from Stanford with a well known investor named Vinod Khosla. You went to Vinod Khosla and you pitched him what get a Daklak. A PITCH DECK WITH SLIDES IT. And and what did the? Who is your peculiar. Give me your elevator pick. Did you have an elevator pitch? Well it was no. The funny thing was extremely amateurish. Okay on a business perspective because basically was like a mostly lecture about how incredibly destructive the you know and we'll be food industry is and then practically my last slide was. Oh by the way. This is a one point. Five trillion dollar global market you know. In retrospect that could probably have been my first and only slide that I buried lead so you raise the money you raise some money from from Khosla to launch a company that would kind of re imagine a way of producing meat And by the way how did you come up with a name? Impossible foods so when I started the company I we just had a placeholder name. Beat two point zero and then we when we decide we're going to launch a product. We felt like okay. Now we need name that actually works the brand name and we engaged a naming company as an advisor and we were told us by far the most difficult clients they ever had they were they would give us twenty names and say those all suck those are terrible and then in the fourth round one of the names they had was impossible and as soon as I saw that one. I felt like okay. We're done. It's perfect because we wanted something that was memorable. That actually looked good in type. That was an impactful word. A word that gets a little bit of an emotional response and that captured some of the challenger spirit of the company and a lot of our investors was a bad name. Is it possible that such a negative so I sort of launched this thing you've got it's two thousand eleven? How roughly? How much money did you have to remember? We had nine million dollars. Okay so you had nine million dollars and who do you. Who Do you recruited to help you? You want you have this hunch. Pretty strong hunch that you can basically replicate animal meat from plants and we're not talking about like a Tofu Burger. You're literally talking about a completely new kind of neat that it's only works hard hardcore meat. Lovers love right preferred preferred to what comes from cal. Otherwise we're not going to out compete the incumbent industry. So how do you recruit a team? I mean you've got some money and a runway. Now you've got probably runway of who knows maybe a year at least before you raise more money and just to be clear. This is not a knock on you. I think this is actually a great compliment. Because you're a science you're scientists but obviously you showed some entrepreneurial spark throughout your career at Stanford but you did not have a business background so you have to start to build a business. Who how did you find the people to help you out? Yeah for I mean I literally was you know I I would say the large majority of people in in the in the US. Probably have more business savvy than I had when I started this company seriously seriously in fact my wife. Madge is all our finances. Thank God she does so. We needed someone who actually knew what they were doing. Because there's obviously a lot of a lot of expert management required to to run a business even when that's that's not making money so The very first person I hired was a guy who had just about to graduate from Stanford Business School Very Sharp Guy He had grown up on a dairy farm had actually worked as an engineer at General Mills. So I knew something about the food business. He understood the problem we were trying to solve and the NBA and he had an MBA and it and it was and he was a very smart guy so yeah so that was taken care of and then the rest was pretty much all scientists and we were hiring people who had a hardcore basic science background sort of molecular biology biochemistry biophysics and they went to work. Basically studying meet in molecular terms the same way they would study. You know a disease or something like that. See you in all these scientists were were going after this idea that you could make meat without animals right. So what did you do like wool? Where did you start to look well before I founded the company? I had an idea that particular molecule in meat by globe which is a protein And it's what makes me read. Global is what's called Margot it's okay it's very closely to hemoglobin. It's him protein and hime is. What carries oxygen in your blood. It's what makes your blood bread. And he the molecule is found in all animals now we all animals but in pretty much all plants and bacteria and fungi and every form of life. It's a building block of life. It is pretty much a basic building block of life so he hemas very obvious aspect of neat because it's what makes meat red or pink. Okay Okay Yeah. But there's another aspect of him which is one of the most potent catalysts in nature. And when you think about meat when you cook meat something really dramatic happens. That doesn't happen when you Cook Broccoli. And that is it transforms Broccoli or Veggie Burger at soft. It gets warmer bushier. Nothing magical happens when you cook meat you get in the cooking process this real absolute explosion of Rama. That's you know this meet that in the raw form has of minimal odor maybe a slight bloody odor taste suddenly becomes potently flavorful and generates this explosion of Rome and I knew that there is a molecule in in legumes. The Root Rot Najah contained a lot of molecule called leg hemoglobin. That's him protein. It's actually very similar to mine. And so you're saying that legumes like peas or Or or Soybeans have these these route NACHOS and inside. Then there's something called what's called again for soybeans. It's called soil hemoglobin and I suspected so. There's one obvious thing that that he does. Which is it gives the meat. It's red color but what I suspected was. It had a role in the flavor because he was such a good catalyst so anyway. I did some calculations and concluded that there's as much human the root nodules of the US soybean crop as there is an all the meat consumed in the US. And if you could isolated if you can get it then you've got the the holy grail here. That was the harvest a part of the soybean plant that nobody really cares about Therefore we felt like we could get practically for free and get this molecule. That was going to be important for for me anyway so when I raise the money one of the first projects we started was out. How to isolate like hemoglobin from route nachos and contentious as a stupid question. So forgive me you literally pulling out the the root nodules right physically as if it's something that you hold or touch and then you've got extract the extractors Logan. That's the from from these tiny little nachos on the roots of a it was a cockamamie idea. Why is that? How come this was so complicated? It's let's let's put it this way. It's totally doable. But the problem was that it was just a very difficult scaling problem. First of all these root nodules are these little tiny balls. They're mixed in with the soil. You have to separate them out. You have to get rid of all the other stuff to get joined up like hemoglobin. That's food safe and all this stuff it just all those all those scale that exactly. It's it's totally doable. It's just not scalable any practical where it's like trying to pick leaves off of time. Have you ever done that? Little time leaves a lot of work. That's a very good analogy the seeming simplicity and the actual challenge of of doing it at scale so it was in retrospect about idea which. I'm one hundred percent responsible for that idea because you have to burn through a lot.

Vinod Khosla US Stanford Pat Brown Guy Roz Stanford Business School NPR Daklak NBA advisor Madge General Mills engineer
"pat brown" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:04 min | 3 months ago

"pat brown" Discussed on How I Built This

"Help you manage projects and even a company that has robots to prepare your made to order pizza company by the way raised three hundred and seventy five million dollars before it went bust and recently yet another media company was launched one that raised more than a billion dollars with the goal of bringing. Us Ten minute video clips. Now I have no problem with any of these businesses and I wish them well but every once in a while. When I'm strolling through San Francisco I think about how much brainpower in the tech sector is spent on scaling lifestyle and productivity products and how little is spent trying to solve world scale problems now. There are a few notable exceptions. Of course say what you will about his quirky personality. But you on. Musk is one hundred percent. Committed to ending human dependency on fossil fuels. And he's trying to do it at scale. Another exception is my guest today at Brown when pat set out to start a business. He didn't just want to solve a problem. He had or make a better and more efficient product. He literally wanted to change the world from most of his career. Pat was a biochemist Stanford he was even involved in groundbreaking genetic research but around fifteen years ago. He heard a statistic that floored him. Worldwide Agriculture and Forestry and particularly livestock production is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than all emissions from transportation all the emissions from cars planes ships and trucks combined our love of beef and poultry and lamb and pork is one of the biggest drivers of climate change in the world. And I'm as guilty as you are because I eat those things to anyway. All this got pat thinking could there be a way to stop producing meat from animals away to meet that would taste as good as animal meat but require considerably less water and waste and he knew from his biochemistry background that in theory it was possible that you could do it from plants so in. Pat set out to make meat from plants. He wanted to make beef that beef. Lovers would love beef that looked and smelled and even bled like beef. Even though it didn't come from a cow and short he wanted to make plant that was indistinguishable from animal means with the hope that if more animal lovers could come to love plant meet greenhouse gas emissions would go way down and the story of how pat built would came to be known as the impossible. Burger is amazing. Not just for how he and his team figured out the science of it all but also because pat set out to do this. He was almost sixty years old and he walked away from an incredibly successful career to take a huge risk. And now just a few years later. The impossible burger is in fast food restaurants across the country and pads company. Impossible foods has been valued at four billion dollars. Now these days during the lockdown like so many of us pat is not going into the office. I'm sitting in a room that was originally where my three kids shared a bedroom and most recently was my youngest son. Isaac's room which is Usurped as my office. And that's where you're running impossible foods out of March. Yeah later in the episode. We're going to hear a bit more. About how the pandemic has affected pats business but let's start at the beginning when he was growing up. Which kind of happened all over the place? My Dad worked for the CIA. I didn't realize it until I was quite a bit older and His job segment of various overseas posts So we lived in Paris for four years That's where I started school and then came back to the states and then he was sent to Taipei. Was he a spy or was he more of of a desk? He was an intelligence officer. I guess you could say and Was Gathering intelligence on mainland China and ran various operations but he never did any. You know sketchy bad business. So he is a Swedish most altruistic guy. Who's like the opposite of what you if you have this notion of you know the CIA and spies being very unethical characters is dead opposite of that so when when you were a kid. What did you think Your Dad did? Well I it's embarrassing in a way. I mean he would just say you know when I asked him what he did. You say you know I worked for the government and I thought okay that makes sense with the government. I only found out what Israel job was when one of my good buddy's somehow mentioned that his dad worked for the CIA. And I thought well that's kind of weird. Because he he works for my dad anyway and you got a pretty big family. Right six siblings. Yeah Pretty Well. I have to see him. This is the answer is yes. Were you a pretty good student as a as a kid. I was actually not a pretty good soon. As we came back to the states I felt like I just done sent back a grade and I just became very disengage because I thought it was kind of like why am I wasting my time and I was a chronic cutter of classes and I mean when I was in Taiwan we. My classes were in a three story building. That had this kind of Concrete girl work on on the one side of the building. So one thing I would sometimes do would be just randomly. Walk out of class and go climb on this. It was like a climbing wall. I in retrospect I just feel like it's amazing. Kick me out but you must have been a good enough student because you went you go onto the University of Chicago which is pretty hard school to get into Well I mean first of all the a lot of people realize back in the day I think getting into college was much less competitive but I had could sat's so I think that that made up from my grades to some extent but Yeah I mean it was just lucky that I grew up at a time where you could be a less dedicated student. Still get into a good college when you got to University of Chicago. Was it clear to you that science was going to be the thing that you would do in life. Was that already just a given as far as you are concerned. I think I was kind of open to a lot of things when I was in college but I tend to gravitate toward science and math. I mean there was a period of time and I thought I actually might. I loved math. I loved sort of higher level math classes in college but I felt like I wanted to do something that made the world better and I didn't think it would be a satisfying for me in the in the sense of feeling like I was contributing. Something curious about something that that happened when you were in college or like right as you graduated from College. Which was you you. Eight year last progress you became a vegetarian and one thousand. Seventy six Which was kind of a hippie thing to do in nineteen twenty one like was not? That common was not a hippie. I mean so really what. It came down to was an entrepreneur. Fraction of kids at some point in their lives. Try to become vegetarian. Tried to stop eating meat right primarily because of Discomfort with the ethics of it and in my family that was true pretty much most my siblings in myself and there was a time when we all sort of in concert decided to stop eating meat. I felt like if if I don't need me to be completely healthy and while nourished then I'm only eating it for aesthetic reasons. There's no physiological reason why need to purely aesthetics and I felt like that was I just couldn't justify the killing in making animals miserable for my pleasure basically as opposed to from and I think that was kind of the way my siblings and my parents felt about it that that was that was why we all just like Bam like a square wave decided to stop eating meat. Well so but when you made this decision you would. You had no idea that one day you would be involved in food or food production. Your you get your bachelor's degree in Chemistry and then you jump into a PhD program in biochemistry at the University of Chicago presumably. You're thinking all right. I'm going to. I'm going to do a lot. My life is going to be about you know working in a lab and and pursuing scientific.

Pat CIA University of Chicago San Francisco Worldwide Agriculture and Fore Musk Isaac Burger China officer Taipei Brown Paris
"pat brown" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:44 min | 3 months ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"Is not until you get them to the track and they get to the other fifteen. Sixteen brands were not. You know what you've got so you're all of them are good. Put the cap on cowboys and Jerry. Only big yacht great. I always wanted to be a cowboy. But it's not until you get into the game until the fire and you ask to make a plane or you ask to prevent a plate then and only then will you know what you guys get. Everybody look good right now. Trump is short. Ooh everybody time. Everybody jumped high which football's play. I've seen a lot of guys that can run passenger man when it put them pads on look like or the play like Jane and all of a sudden that Cheetah turned into a snail. So we're about to find out. Bela we go by what you say is true by the way quick point of border one time in nineteen ninety two. Jimmy Johnson came to me the first day after the rookies came in not in pads just insurance and he'd taken kid in the sixth round who will go nameless for the sake of this conversation. Jimmy walked over to me and said so and so can't play. I said you just drafted him. He said I know but I saw him out here today. And he can't light up and he was right and you couldn't play okay so now I'm going to change. The subject to the ultimate differs maker in this debate. That we're having right now and I'm going to be objective about this because it's still going to come down to Dak Prescott Rain Dakota Prescott. We know he's going through some grieving because he lost his older brother and God help him and his family were with him on that. We're thinking about him but Shannon back on the football field when push comes to shove it's time to ask. Is this deal ever going to get done? And my point is there's such new momentum off this draft starting with CD lamb that. I'm hoping that once Dak gets through with the process you never get through with grieving. Your older brother but once once he gets back to the negotiating table. Which will happen pretty soon. I'm hoping he will feel the new momentum. I'm hoping you'll say gee I've CD lamb. He could be a new number one receiver. Maybe even better than Amari. And I still got Gallup and I still got Zeke and I still got that line and we have a better defense. And it's time to compromise a little bit. It's it's time to come to the middle of the table and try to get this deal finished for the sake of the football team so again if that is a hold out through whatever camp we have obviously he's going to miss the virtual off-season that they're going to have but if he's a hold out through camp through whatever preseason games there are hack if he's a hold out for games one and two which is still a distinct possibility. All bets are off. So now it's the ball is in Rain Dakota Prescott Court and I'm trusting. He's football character to help. Get this deal done. And they always try to make. A compromise is always the players have to take. The compromise is always the player. Peter That's being selfish no jerry. No no no you keep talking about. We've made offering. It's gotTa be right for us and you say oh. We have time to play football. He'll be here to play very dismissive. If I'm that Prescot I'm holding steady going. They keep.

Jimmy Johnson football Dak Prescott Rain Zeke Rain Dakota Prescott cowboys Peter That Jerry Dak Bela Trump Prescot Jane Shannon Gallup
"pat brown" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

04:13 min | 7 months ago

"pat brown" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Pat brown's father had been Joseph brown was known for running scams and gambling operations in San Francisco with the help of businessmen William Newsome the second Pat brown became governor of California for two terms during his governorship awarded the squaw valley concession contract to William use in the third and his partner John Colosio the deal was criticized for the state of California paying for everything and getting nothing William Newsome the third grew up with the governor's son Jerry was training to be a Jesuit priest John closing selling Paul very Nancy D. L. Sandro daughter of Thomas deal with Sandra junior who is known for smuggling heroin U. S. with lucky Luciano in the Baltimore mafia John policy Celeron William Houston's daughter Barbara over on going disputes about the squaw valley concession William nuisance senior threatened to hurt the governor politically just as governor brown was running for a third term against Ronald Reagan he lost but eight years later the former governor Jesuit son Jerry he claims the governorship in nineteen seventy four he appointed William news and the third to a placer county judge you in nineteen seventy five three years later the state court of appeals William Newsome was an attorney for oil magnate J. Paul Getty named in the nineteen sixty six Guinness book of world records as the world's richest private citizen while serving on the appellate bench in the nineteen eighties the help Getty son Gordon secure a change in state trust laws that allowed him to claim the fear of a multiplayer trust after news from retired from the bench he became the administrator of the Getty trust providing seed money for his son Gavin Newsom Nancy Pelosi's nephew hello to start the plug Jack business that led to a career San Francisco politics as mayor of San Francisco and kind of governor of the state of California Gavin Newsom was informally adopted by the Getty's after his parents divorce and recently succeeded family friend Jerry Brown to be the current governor of California hello for eighty years these four families of rule over the state of California politically and with the help of Comilla Heris Maxine waters Adam Schiff and Dianne Feinstein California's uncontrollable state government spending has amounted to over two trillion dollars in debt the highest tax rates in the country the homelessness population is on the rise so much that a typhus outbreak has reached epidemic levels thousands of needles from illicit drugs later the streets they have made California a sanctuary city they have been steadily chiseling away at the second amendment they have passed laws for mandatory vaccinations and they continue to aggressively oppose our president on every front on October first two thousand sixteen right before Donald Trump won the election president Obama transferred full control of the internet from the US government to independence California nonprofit stations in the cyber war scenario the US government may not have control over the internet even if it secures military and government domains and I. P. addresses the targets in cyber warfare are likely to be.

Pat brown Joseph brown
"pat brown" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:16 min | 10 months ago

"pat brown" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The mission is very simple it's to completely replace animals in the food system by twenty thirty five the use of animals as food technology eighty is by a huge margin the most destructive technology on earth and really poses a catastrophic threat. It's fresh water in the world and the biggest issue is that about fifty percent of the entire land surface verve is actively in use right now either growing feed crops or grazing livestock and that land footprint comes at the expense of all the bio-diversity that previously occupied that land in the past forty years we've basically wiped out half the wild animals that were living on earth back then and it's just across the board mammals birds reptiles Amphibians fish even insects and that has happened so fast and it's continuing accelerate because the driver is the land footprint of animal agriculture and overfishing and the demand for meat and fish is growing faster than population that's Pat Brown and this is the retrial podcast uh rich role podcast hey everybody how you guys doing what's the latest how are you my name is rich role I'm your host this is my pod cast welcome did you enjoy the live event podcast within Q.. And Paul Hawkin if so did you catch the video version I hope you did if you missed it please check that out not only am I super proud of that entire event I'm extra crowd of my team for the incredible production value that they brought to that still basking in the glow of that experience and we're already pretty hard at work at planning more live events just like this for two thousand twenty so stay tuned and we'll keep you posted on that I gotTa Tell You I'm a little bit wiped it out a it's been a crazy month to say the least I spoke at the nantucket project a couple of weeks ago hosted conversations there with Russell brand Dr Zack Bush podcast favorites in fact Russell shared short clip of that exchange that you can find on his youtube channel check that out then home to perform at the live event and I jotted to tell you ride for another event called original thinkers which was super cool everybody should definitely check out of an out spoke there hosted another conversation with Zach Bush came home got another couple of shows up then I just drove through a big brushfire to get here to the studio today the Santa Ana winds are kicking up again which is a little anxiety provoking after last year's experience and what else I'm about to head up to Stanford for my thirtieth college reunion next week which is just insane all of this in fact is surreal. I guess I'm officially old at this point but I gotTa tell you I don't feel old I feel grateful I feel energetic and super enthusiastic about my life and about today's episode so thank you guys for showing up I feel very blessed to do this thing I think the word is is grateful and I do not take your attention for granted so most of you have heard about this thing called the impossible burger and I imagine many of you out there have already tried it arguably it's the plant based Patty that comes closest to fooling people that it isn't real beef and I think it's fair to say that the impossible Burger has become a bit of a phenomenon it's widely available at all manner of restaurants all across glow lots of fast food chains etc so what's the story behind all this how did it come to be and what is the intention the mission behind it all all today I'm very excited to host the man responsible for upending everything that you thought you knew about plant based meet impossible foods founder Pat Brown in addition to being a world renowned geneticist pat is a former Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator as well as a professor of biochemistry at Stanford University he's also the founder of lyrical foods which makes kite hill artisanal nut milk based she eases and he's the founder of the Public Library of Science a nonprofit publisher pioneer the open access business model pat was elected to the national Academy of Sciences in two thousand two he's a member of the Institute of Medicine and his numerous accolades include the American Cancer Society Medal of honor and the NAS award in molecular biology. Basically this is a guy who was moved action spurned into action by the urgent need you to redress global climate change any founded this company impossible foods with one clear goal to eliminate a radical animal agriculture which is as we all know one of the biggest contributors to planetary warming and he's doing this by providing delicious nutritious and much more environmentally friendly alternatives to meat and dairy directly made from plants so this mission statement is ambitious some would say Sir it's audacious but you simply can't deny the impact that he and his team at impossible has already made and pat is a guy who's just getting started and today he shares his story but first let's support the sponsors that make today's drop possible starting with my good friends at Roka Roka is a performance driven eyewear company creating some of the best sunglasses and eyeglasses on the market.

founder Pat Brown investigator Burger Howard Hughes Medical Institut nantucket Stanford University youtube Institute of Medicine national Academy of Sciences Paul Hawkin Roka Roka Public Library of Science Dr Zack Bush Patty Zach Bush American Cancer Society Medal
Lab-Grown Meat Is Coming, Whether You Like It or Not

Freakonomics

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Lab-Grown Meat Is Coming, Whether You Like It or Not

"The UN estimate that you often hear from originally was created in this report called livestock long shadow is something around nineteen percent. But that nineteen percent roughly number is a global number. Actually, there was a a study that came out pointing out some flaws in that. So they reduced it somewhat. In any case. There is a growing concern in many quarters over the externalities of meat production over the last five to ten years. There's been a lot of negative publicity of stories about environmental impacts about carbon emissions about animal welfare. And if you just look at the news stories, you would think boy people must be really cutting back given the sort of frightful stories that you see on the front pages of the newspapers. But if you look at the data itself demand looks fairly stable, and so that suggested me either it's it's hard to change people's preference on this or something about me consumption. Some people would argue that were evolved to like meet that it's a protein vitamin packed. You know, tasty punch that we've grown to enjoy as a species. There are some people that even argue that it's one of the reasons we became a smart as. We did the vitamins and nutrients are in that meet allowed our brains to develop in certain ways that it might have not otherwise Pat Brown saw that same strong preference for me when he decided that the number one scientific problem to solve was replacing animals as food. And it's a problem that nobody was working on in any serious way. Because everybody recognize that most people in the world, including most environmental scientists and people who care about this stuff. A love the food that we get from animals so much that they can't imagine giving those up Brown himself was a longtime vegan. So I yeah, I haven't eaten you know, beat for decades. And that's just a personal choice that I made long before I realized the destructive impact of that industry that was choice for other reasons. And it wasn't something that I felt like you know, I was in position. Other people to do. And I still don't feel like there's any value in doing that Brown makes an interesting point here. Many of us when we feel strongly about something and environmental issue or social or economic issue we're inclined to put forth a moral argument. A moral argument would appear to be persuasive evidence of the highest order, you should do this thing because it's the right thing to do. But there is a ton of research showing that moral arguments are generally ineffective people may smile at you and nod, but they won't change your behavior. That's what Brown realized about meet, the basic problem is that that people are not gonna stop wanting these foods, and the only way you're going to solve it is not by estimate you halfway and give them a substandard product that doesn't deliver. What they know they want from meat or fish or anything like that. The only way to do it is you have. Say we're going to do the much harder thing, which is we're going to figure out how to make meat. That's not just as delicious as the meat. We get from animals. It's more delicious and better, nutritionally

Pat Brown UN Nineteen Percent Ten Years
"pat brown" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Freakonomics

"I had the best job in the world at Stanford. My job was basically to discover and invent things and follow my curiosity. Brown. Did this for many years and was considered a world-class researcher one of his breakthroughs was a new tool for genetic mapping? It's called the DNA micro array that lets you read all the words at this L is using and effectively kind of start to learn the vocabulary. Learn how the genome writes the life story of a Sal or something like that. It also has practical applications because what it's doing in sort of a deterministic way specifies potential of that cell or if it's a cancer cell. Some people think the DNA micro array will win Pat Brown Nobel prize when I bring this up. Just shakes his head. And smiles it's clear that his research was a deep passion for me. This was the dream job. It was like in the renaissance, you know, having the magic he's as patrons or something like that. But after many years Brown wanted a change he was in his mid fifties. He took a sabbatical figure out his next move. It started out with stepping back from the work. I was doing and ask myself the most important thing, I could do what could I do that? We have the biggest positive impact on the world and looking at what are the biggest unsolved problems in the world. I, you know, came relatively quickly conclusion that the use of animals of production technology is by far. And I could give you endless reasons why that's true. But it is absolutely true. By far, the most environmentally destructive thing that humans. Do there is indeed a great deal of evidence for this argument across the entire environmental spectrum. The agriculture historian James McWilliams in a book called just food are used that quote, every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture ends up having its deepest roots in meat production. Monocropping excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer addiction to insecticides rainforest depletion land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming. All these problems McWilliams rights would be considerably less severe if people ate meat rarely if ever, you know, there's no doubt that meat production has environmental consequences. Jason Lusk again to suggest that it's the most damaging environmental thing, we do as I think it pretty extreme overstatement, but what about the greenhouse gas emissions associated with raising me, especially in the US, which is the world's largest beef producer, our own EPA environmental protection agencies suggests that all of livestock contributes about three. Percent of our total greenhouse gas emissions. So I mean three percent is not nothing. But it's it's not the major contributor that. We see that that number..

Pat Brown Nobel Sal James McWilliams Stanford researcher Jason Lusk cancer US EPA producer three percent
The Future of Meat with Pat Brown

Freakonomics

03:00 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Meat with Pat Brown

"Had the best job in the world at Stanford. My job was basically to discover and invent things and follow my curiosity. Brown. Did this for many years and was considered a world-class researcher one of his breakthroughs was a new tool for genetic mapping? It's called the DNA micro array that lets you read all the words at this L is using and effectively kind of start to learn the vocabulary. Learn how the genome writes the life story of a Sal or something like that. It also has practical applications because what it's doing in sort of a deterministic way specifies potential of that cell or if it's a cancer cell. Some people think the DNA micro array will win Pat Brown Nobel prize when I bring this up. Just shakes his head. And smiles it's clear that his research was a deep passion for me. This was the dream job. It was like in the renaissance, you know, having the magic he's as patrons or something like that. But after many years Brown wanted a change he was in his mid fifties. He took a sabbatical figure out his next move. It started out with stepping back from the work. I was doing and ask myself the most important thing, I could do what could I do that? We have the biggest positive impact on the world and looking at what are the biggest unsolved problems in the world. I, you know, came relatively quickly conclusion that the use of animals of production technology is by far. And I could give you endless reasons why that's true. But it is absolutely true. By far, the most environmentally destructive thing that humans. Do there is indeed a great deal of evidence for this argument across the entire environmental spectrum. The agriculture historian James McWilliams in a book called just food are used that quote, every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture ends up having its deepest roots in meat production. Monocropping excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer addiction to insecticides rainforest depletion land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming. All these problems McWilliams rights would be considerably less severe if people ate meat rarely if ever, you know, there's no doubt that meat production has environmental consequences. Jason Lusk again to suggest that it's the most damaging environmental thing, we do as I think it pretty extreme overstatement, but what about the greenhouse gas emissions associated with raising me, especially in the US, which is the world's largest beef producer, our own EPA environmental protection agencies suggests that all of livestock contributes about three. Percent of our total greenhouse gas emissions. So I mean three percent is not nothing. But it's it's not the major contributor that. We see that that number.

Pat Brown Nobel SAL James Mcwilliams Stanford Researcher Jason Lusk Cancer United States EPA Producer Three Percent
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"I was like, please. No, Saint It has is. to be broken. Pocket. My mother. My grandmother always leaving me money somewhere are pollute something on your dress up. Even a mother, you know, like they wanna give something to like a make sure you're eating take care of. Now. I'm the person that has to do that for myself. And now, I have to do it from my mother and my art because they are getting older. We are we are passing each other in in life phases. You know? And so now, we are they're handing the baton to me. And it's my responsibility to take care of them. So I do get a little fussy because I feel like a parent. I also think just seeing you with. Your your mother and your aunt. And also seeing you with your cats that you you're a nurturer, you are you fussy fucking nurture, but you are nervous. So fussy, my grandfather. Yeah, he's very fussy by the all took care of you. But I always say, I will say something that is so natural for you. Yeah. I think people would growing up people used to be scared and my grandfather because he was hiding dad. Said dad told you said, we're right hand. Yeah. But that we still use those people like they will be scared to come over our house, you know. And then when they see I'm like, I pay my grandfather. No attention. I don't think you'll understand like he was like that. And we ain't nobody paying attention. It's like the dog owner you like you have a pip. Graham by. Forget you. My mother, and I we my mother my aunt, and we stopped at Bob Evans this. I know and I'm mislaying been. Bob evan. Bob Evans, actually, they had a they have a great stew at go to Bob you got to. I mean, you gotta be a basic bitch to go there. Okay. If you feel really down and now go to Bob Evans, we'll because oh, you know, who we were with with Zeh nab because I went to go pick up. This is when they why was first bringing them to New York, and I went and stopped in guys nab at this club in DC, and we will drive a back and we stopped at Bob Evans. And this is how I knew I was a basic bit. You know, I grew up in the suburbs of Maryland. I grew up everything still basic elements. Well, it wasn't until they nab was like we were like you want to order something like, oh, no, I'm good. You know, I was like a place full of food. We she went over here. The when Lucille. They have bought the bread there. But the bread was trashed the bread. They gave us was good. But the bread I bought a peanut butter loaf and a pumpkin bread loaf, and I gave I fucked up and I gave the not Pena, but I bought a banana bread loaf, pumpkin bread loaf. And I forget which I gave, but I gave her the one that was tasty one because the one we had trash, but by that is has a great stew, a great stew with mashed potato base. That's to slam that meet a slow roasted and that Pab looking good. Yeah. Like this to all right. We got a close up for today next week at close to to have the, but I'm giving us time. 'cause we got a we got a good seven minutes for you to let us know. What's going on with you? What you got popping. I'll give them some days that's going on with me. And then let us know when you're gonna come back because with friends like. Was so so. Hey, this is Pepe Brown. I the neighbor Yemen. He came over here. My rollers in my house us. I am. I please check out my YouTube. I am posting my shows say documentary view show that in this sounds like it would be funny. But it really is is so check it out a post on Thursdays. And I want you to check it out. I want you to see it. So as comedian Pat Brown on YouTube or you can check out my website comedian, Pat, Brown dot com. Have shows coming.

Bob Evans Pepe Brown Pab Bob evan YouTube Pat Brown Bob Pena Maryland Graham Yemen Lucille Zeh New York DC seven minutes
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"She was like I'll help drive, and I was like I became I grandfather before seconds like now, you only the draft. I thought about said the day of licence away ever drive again. The Lewis spoke to me said no, let your mother come up in just put her on the car too. And so I started off the trip. And then my mother was I could tell she just wanted to drive a little bit and stuff like that. So I was like when we got to the rest of I sorry, my you just you drive, and or something I think we stopped somewhere. And then we went to arrest we stopped somewhere and I switched with her. And she drove. And then we started the rest stop. And we came back. I said, no you dry keepdriving. It's you know, it's all good. And I love my mother, Dr I just let her drive us to feel good for her to Philly, helping she was helping his she was doing something. And you know, I appreciate that. I was like I watch it, you know. And but my mother said to my aunt she said, and it was so sweet but sad at the same time. She said, you know, Yami fusses at us a lot, but she loves us. She protects us, you know, and I say. Yeah. I think I got a lot of I'm I'm in a growing face, right? Because you know, I just turned forty and which are probably shocks to say. I finally said it I'm like fuck it. I'm only going to get older. So why am I hiding is unit is well, thank you are preciado it, and I'm just forty and I'm gonna be forty for the next thing years, but he turned forty in. And people don't say in you, don't get pushback. Like, I know what I'm doing. Again, they laugh your forty exactly if you don't get that. Then this one girl last week. I rented this girl at the young girl from UCB, and we were talking was turned me and a couple other comics talking or whatever. And then I kinda was talking to her a little bit more. She was trying to pick my brain about southern girl. I'm forty years old. She's like, oh my God. You're forty. She's like I thought you were like twenty eight twenty nine I was like girl, you ain't that fucking twenty eight twenty nine. But I am very like I think it's with me. It's how I carry myself energy. Right. So it's like well this bitch. She warned down yet and this bitch. No, I'm not I'm not worn down because I know kids man, hustling me down. So but just the older I get I and I'm transitioning, and then I don't have my grandparents here transition and the word you wanna use. Bye. How vivacious you are an energetic. Yeah. But I don't have my grandparents here like they were the authority figure figures in my life because they raised me. And my mother was also a figure, but my my mother, and is dealing was a little different. You know, when I the times I did live with my mother, we had more of a like she'll say like more of a marriage like I took care of all like, she get paid. I get her, you know, access or checking account. This is when I was a teenager, and I'd be paying the house bills and cooking meals while she's hard come from school. I cooked meal. My mother had food and stuff, you know, things like that. And then when I started driving picker from work, whatever I have to go. So it was just that kinda like we worked together as a unit and with my grandparents, I I just had it was just a kid right here. I date took care of everything at the thing. They always put money in my pocket up until the point where my grandfather dementia really just took over every. Thing he was still giving me money. And this is what I was make money on TV..

Lewis Yami fusses Philly UCB forty years
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"So it need to be black history month for sure, and yours truly is the voice. I don't like to say voice of God. Because I'm not the guy, but I'm on the God, Mike. Intro in her into the special. So as great I want you to be because you after she asks you to do that. I was saying to myself I want you to do that on my special. I would love to. Yeah. Devin, people the voice that you have carry that. There was amazing that she picked you for that. I think that's you are the perfect person for that. Thank you. I that better to do. I would love to I want every like I just love bringing people on stage. You know, I hosted for many many years in New York City. I got to a point where I was like, I don't wanna host more because I would host it still, you know, people don't understand the host is also a comic. I hate it. When I came from Atlanta, I used to host all the time. And when I came here, I swore that I'm like, I'm not. Yeah. You like I'm done I'm done. But there's a part of it. There's a part of me that I haven't hosted. The last person that got me to host was Patrick mulligan at the stand, and I hosted a couple of shows with him. And I said, Patrick you only person can get me out of host like I ain't trying to host now. I don't know my new situation they gonna ask me eventually those over there. But I don't wanna host. I, you know, but I missed bringing people on the stage. You know, I missed like gear amps when I'm like, oh this ship out to be fired. You know what I'm saying? You know, what is really good? Emcee. But sometimes he brings me I'm like, you gotta tone because you'd be giving people too much like too much build up 'cause they'd be like damn bitch with Diana Ross comedy coming out here. Larry. Larry, larry. I sometimes I say, I'm like, did you? Wikipedia me like the nickleby going through your high school books. She was the oh get ready to come into the stage. She used to play Julius Saka. Great champion of the spilling be and. And you'll hear about four allergies pass..

Patrick mulligan Larry Julius Saka Mike New York City Devin Diana Ross Atlanta
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"If somebody leaves apple pie baking on window seal, and they go to church and they come back, and I ate that apple pie. My ass. Idyllic little story for a metaphor for fucking child molester. Is more. So that I'm fat bitch. Okay. Okay. I like have a lot of power now. When I was growing up one of my it's a weird. I don't want to say, I don't know if I could call it a fetish per se, but I used if we yes, I used to fantasize about pies on window sills all the time. Like that was my thing. But I think also when I was a kid. There was always some story that lady was baking pies constantly thinking about what is that a blueberry pie? 'cause I hate blueberries boo berry by that blueberry pie or is that apple pie, you know, like that. So I I do kind of go to that. And then they had a great scene in life the movie remember when? First of all, I don't know why they had that they prison so close to survive held, right? She lived there for you gotta be if you're you're you're next door to a prison. That's your neighbor. He went over there ate that pie. He dodging bullets to get that pry, he ate the shit out of that. And I felt like my life had been fulfilled, my childhood life had been fulfilled that moment, I was able to grow up and become a woman because I wanted to eat that fucking by two. But I think you know, what happens is I think we've become a culture right of people black white and everything in between all religious of sexual preferences, everything between people human beings. I think we have come to a point in our in our space where it's one thing or the other right? So people are so one I this is where I stand, and this is my opinion. And I don't wanna hear anything you saying everything you saying if it doesn't line, you know, exactly what I'm saying thinking. Is asinine and separates people. Because I do understand the conversation of saying to women be careful. There's nothing wrong in my opinion. Saying to women be careful, but I don't think they're saying. I think they said is that's what you get different. I think because the Carroll is free Antef, right? I think because some I think because the loudest voice of that of women shouldn't be doing this. And what about that? And why did this happen is so loud and forceful that this is why it happened because she did this because the parents allowed this or whatever that you don't hear the undertone of other voices. I I'll give an example. And I'm told you this before and I've said this on the park before I went on Keith nigger Earl two and a half years ago. I think it'd be about twenty three years ago. Shut the Keith. Girl. I love the podcast can't wait to come. Back him Keith all of them, but I got into some him hall there. Because you know, they told a story about a woman who decided she was going to rehabilitate a guy that she met in a chat room and brought the gods at her home and the guy raped her. And my first the first thing in my mouth was thank God. He didn't kill her. And then it became a series of. I'm victim blaming and I never at once said that that guy was not COPA bowl and responsible for what he did. That's that's out the question. But also, I would charge a woman even now. Don't bring a man into your home. You don't know like that? That's a fucking drug addicts and this and that because that could happen. And once that happens. There's no more debate on what you should have should not do. Because now your life has been affected. Right. Very negatively. So. But that's putting up. No boundaries boundaries in cautions. But the problematic to me in these situations when we're talking about young women for one they don't have the experience of knowing that things like our Kelly can happen to them. So they going in wide eyed. In Bush's tailed about simply wanting to either be around seventy which is fine and normal or to have someone of a celebrity status to help them in their careers. I think a note that you said bushy tailed just so we all know, I'm not the only one living Allison wonderland Bush's..

apple Keith Bush victim blaming Kelly Carroll Antef twenty three years
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"It's unnecessary for me to ask your stance on our Kelly because I know what you're saying is you will woman, and you got a brain. I don't wanna talk about the issue of R Kelly because that's a waste of time. The man is trash straight up and down trash and. If you really want to be upstanding, man, and a man of good, carriage and citizenship. You can wait to these girls are of age and consenting to have a relationship with them. But you don't wanna be with consenting women. You want to be with women that you have to force them nippy late because you have a power thing because power was taken away from you because you were kid that had power taken away from them. So you decided to be a victim that turns around and victimizes innocent people instead of being better. So with that being said, I feel bad for him that he was victimized. But all of that goes out the window when he turns around and does the same thing to other young women. Now, my problem is all of not all of but a large majority of black man decided to chime in about what they felt black women and black people as a whole should and should not be talking about. And shouldn't should not be saying. And that's why I had most of my problem there were police in language or police in the u black Beijing, I wasn't even you start. What a no starter. Not started. Black this. All right. Oh, oh, y'all full of shit. He been doing this. Why y'all just now? And it's like first of all, I'm not the DA understand like this type of situation should have this. This is not a citizen situation. Right. 'cause we all been talking about our Kelly say, no, we just started why he has not been prosecuted, and why he isn't net now because people are talking about it again. And it's become a big deal again because we have social media that we did not have at the time. When this first started, it was more gossip for the barber shops, and gossip force hair, salons nails, lawns also new day in terms of experimentation for me. And and people, and then also would rape culture, we recognizing that putting the onus on women to not be situations that they can be manipulated in sexually abused is not. Not how you how you prevent sexual assault is not how you prevent. People taking advantage of you. So, but they've always putting the onus on women's what you had on how late at night you were there. Now, even to the call now that I like a friend of mine, he just did a video of the. Off the documentary, and his take was where were the parents really, we're when when are we going to blame the predator if it was any other predator, if it was a it was a sabertooth tiger walking the streets of New York grabbing kids are I one response would be why want the parents protecting the child it will be let's get this fucking sabertooth tiger off the streets. Right. But that's that's where we go into because. Black men in some men in general don't want to see themselves as this individual. So they they're they're they're taking him out of taking taking the onus off him responsibility. He's not COPA. It's all these other people that are even if he is he's a he's a he's a tiger tiger's. Do tigers. Do we shouldn't? We shouldn't have them around them as everybody else's fault for having them around the tiger. Which is not a good. Stance to take I will say that. I have seen some black men say. Those very same things and still say, I'm not not demonizing him for what he's done. I think when I stripped layers off of it. I'm not the question of where were the parents and things of that nature. I think our secondary questions because I agree with you. Before we could ask these questions. Why is he still roaming the streets? Why does he still currently have girls in his home stand? These are things. This is. Not grabs. And I think when some people say. What what about the parents? That's their way of going while the Paris thing is okay or the parents saying shit, then we can't really blame him..

Kelly R Kelly Beijing New York rape assault Paris
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"Bin. You know, I'm clearance girl too. So I have one or two three things that got a brand to it and the rest of people like I can't find it. That's because it don't exist. No more because I got the last thing when it was marked down all the way to the ground. Right. Right. Right. And I think some people get money, and they want to have these things to fulfill something lacking in their life. Oh, absolutely. You know, number one. Tony Brexit has lupus. Okay. So she might not even think she was spending defined the cure. No. I'd say my time is she's extended her life. I have some friends who have lupus who who have extended their life. You know and changed their diets and stuff, I think, you know, number one the reason why there's no cure for lupus. And there's no. Research done on is because of the facts black women, right? They just had the pass. I was watching TV one the other day. They just had maybe a law passed the law to require doctors to treat black women. Equally. When it comes to more what tally rates for the maternity wards. Right. 'cause black women are not getting the same treatment as white women. So maybe she felt like, hey, no telling how long will be here. So I'm enjoying every moment. He while. I'm here giving my Gucci. So where and let me turn his bisexual, man. Yes. Can you sell the Gucci where some full is right? She has to who does. He I missed that one. No. She married. Shimmer this cat named. Tony somebody the other. He was from one of these groups condition or something like, oh, he was a Tony to. Well. I knew that we're gonna work out too, many people call net name. This was I wasn't in. I wasn't as fuller. Dull when that was happening. What I'm saying? I was wasn't paying. I was you know, Toni Braxton's generation. Away from me. Right. So I wasn't really we wasn't really worried about low. Tony got married. She I remember the most I remember about it is that I did a TV show about it, and that Toni Braxton loves Tiffany. So she had a Tiffany theme wedding. That was the only thing I remember. But she married his guys that was her third rank Rupp's that probably was probably was and she married. His do. They had two sons. She has one son who has autism. He's autistic so one of the son's name denim. I know because I remember I was like denim. But you know, yes, Tony's life. Tony Tony also doesn't she has in diversified her? Entertainment portfolio. You gotta do it. All you gotta say diversified her her her boyfriend portfolio because he's she's dating to buy extra Zo. Put out there. Kiss. Another man do not mean you are by sexual. Advocates the man, and I don't like minute up. Although I did. I think kissing his just like asked to me. I think as as like a nice as nice as a black man's eyes and a black woman as pretty much kinda judging say, yeah. So I feel like kissing the same thing because I've had some great kisses from men I had some kids that were. Yeah. Right. And then media whereas girl because I'm horny. I don't you know, when it comes to Bergman. I don't I'm I'm gonna say I'm playing just because I guns, but. Girls. But it'd be honest with you, I don't I don't necessarily think he gave. But I definitely think that wasn't a father son relationship. My daddy. Ain't never kissed me. Like that. My mom ain't never kiss me. Like that. So the only person I've of kids like that other than the man that I'm a relationship with is. I kiss my cat's like that. Because I love my cats. You Tunc I don't tongue kissed him that. Well, that's what you said. They also kissing lips. I kiss my cats when they lit. No. But did you you said that Bergman and? The way they did. You know, what it was the lean in? The league, man. Wanna planes landing and there's a lot of wind shift. It was like that you know that movement, and then it was a point where if they act contact, and then it was sexual. No, I close my eyes when I'm kissing some. I know, but you know, you you close your eyes probably when you about to land. But you look most people look until you get close enough to know, exactly. Where your lips about to plant? Okay, close..

Tony Tony Tony Brexit Toni Braxton Bergman Tiffany Rupp
"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"pat brown" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"Up Jin reminding you podcast since twenty thirteen. Give joy away. Big. You know what? Raven in friends white. Hey, everybody. Welcome to another installment of rant everywhere. Yemeni friends. We just going get right into it. Pat Brown is in the building. I have grabbed everybody on insta- live. Are other the. Yeah, I like when they excited. Yeah. How you been Pat? I've been good you say that we like we having hang hung out. Just last night. Just what eating Swedish fish in television. Yes. Why still gotta treat you like, a guess. Respect, even though my respect on put a little bit of respect on it. You know, speaking of that Toni Braxton Bergman broke up. No who. I still don't even know how she found Birdman try to act like they had a friendship. I think the window was open, and sometimes it happens. Right. The birth. She called the bird flu over. No. You know? I said, you know, I mean, maybe you don't. I think the issue I have is once I Liga tug kiss another nigga in the Mt. I'm good, dude. We can't be together. Right. And I'm saying because I can't be competing with women and men I got already got a wide pool. I got to compete with. And then you throw in Dixit a mix. I always thought that they got together on a purely. I won't she went broke thing. And he rips people off, and so they was gonna try to figure out a way. Well, how how do I rip people? Also, I won't ever go broker, right? Yeah. Well, she'd have been better off when she went broke for the fourth time fifth time would I don't Toni Braxton either knows the bankruptcy laws. Mark thing is how do you? Keep going bang. Grunts. Like like Oprah said, why are you buying Gucci civil where our overs at our have Gucci overs like bits, I'm billionaire have Gucci's. So I I understand by Gucci silverware. Because you know, I have a shopping problem. Do I ever I have Shabbir problem? I will buy Gucci silverware. But I also will shop at the bargain.

Gucci Toni Braxton Bergman Pat Brown Dixit Toni Braxton Jin Raven Oprah Mt Mark
Once Impossible, Engineered Burgers Catch On

Business Wars Daily

04:31 min | 1 year ago

Once Impossible, Engineered Burgers Catch On

"Business wars daily is brought to you by papal when it comes to growing your business. You need a partner you can trust for today and tomorrow and pay pal processes over ten million payments per day. That's experience you can rely on. Visit pay pal dot com slash growth to set up a free business account today. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. Happy Monday, everyone if you're like me, you may be feeling like you indulge just a little too much over the holiday weekend. And that it's time to return to some healthy eating, maybe even give up meat. That's true. You're hardly alone. Consumers have been snapping up new kind of plant based burger that not only tastes like ground beef. It looks and bleeds like it. It hasn't been available everywhere. But that's about to change in the process, creating what could be a well bloody rough war between rivals backed by some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley. So far impossible foods are Redwood City California start up as made it's impossible burger available only in restaurants from fat burger to white castle. But next year it's coming to grocery stores. The company announced this month that'll put impossible foods head to head with beyond meat who's plant based burger was the first to be sold. And supermarkets not next to the veggie burgers. But in the meat section ten days after impossible foods announced it supermarket intentions rival beyond meat said, it's planning to go public with the one hundred million dollars at hopes to raise a company will expand into restaurants. So what are these things exactly they're not veggie, burgers, like Boca, burgers, and MorningStar farms patties, which have been on shelves for years, rather, they're engineered from plant proteins and intended to look smell and sizzle just like meet the products, which in beyond case also include fo-, sausage, and chicken strips are designed to tempt omnivores not just vegetarians founders of both companies see their missions is feeding a world with nine billion people without harming animals or worsening climate change impossible food CEO Pat Brown molecular biologist has an even greater ambition. He wants to end the use of all animals in food production by twenty thirty five. The broader mission has captured the attention of social investors like Bill Gates who's invested in both companies on a more prosaic level. These burgers might just help with those early December diets that is before the Christmas Turkey and ham Tempus all over again. From wondering this business worse daily? Hey while you grabbing a quick snack. Take a second. Give us a five star rating on apple podcast, Google podcasts. Stitcher or your favorite listening? Apogee? Thanks. I'm David Brown. Be back with you tomorrow. Business wars daily is brought to you by pay pal when Zeke was a kid spending summers on his grandfather's farm. He knew he wanted to be part of bringing wholesome food to people. He started his artisanal Honey company be raw by creating a network of dozens of beekeepers across the country. When he got his Honey into high in national stores, he thought he'd made it, but when he saw his margins decreasing due to distributor fees and seasonal production. Made it difficult to meet retail demands Lee decided to take his products primarily online from the get-go. He featured pay pow prominently on his site because he knew it gave his customers confidence that he was a legitimate business with quality products over the past five years. Pay palace helped him convert more clicks into sales and expand his business. He's grown every year and added new items like t candles and beauty products. So when you're ready to grow your online business pay pal can help you turn shoppers into buyers. Visit pay pal dot com slash growth to set up a business account. You can sign up for free today. That's pay pal dot com slash growth.

David Brown Meat Zeke Redwood City California Partner Bill Gates LEE Silicon Valley White Castle Pat Brown Morningstar Farms Apogee Apple CEO Google One Hundred Million Dollars
"pat brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"pat brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Society becomes how we behave. Next time. You're stuck in traffic. Consider the fact you're part of the problem. The point I walk to work. Mugs. You get the point. I mean, the point is you no, I take responsibility. When something goes wrong relationships. Go south take account to your own relationship to the issue. And so I I learned a lot from that. And look I'm someone again, I I'm gonna make mistakes. I will take risks. I'm not reckless in life. I I've done some things that that I will permit the regret I do things that I don't regret that I learned from that weren't mistakes. And one of them is a perfect example. I came out with an economic developed plan worked with McKenzie and the Brookings institute traveled the country, virtually and physically to learn about best practices on economic development. Had a press conference about a thousand people showed up that was a mistake. I don't regret that mistake as it was overshadowed gone ahead of the ski. So you know, Jerry was dealing with a twenty seven billion dollar budget deficit. I was focused on the two point four percent unemployment business background, and it wasn't his priority at the moment. And he's the governor. I'm not and he was right. I was wrong in that respect though. I don't regret the effort. I do regret not being respectful enough of where he was at that moment. And I hope to next Lieutenant governor considers that exact. Did if you talk about that. I know it's hard to eat chicken talking to Jerry about these kinds of things is never easy. I mean, I also there's a familiarity issue just known him forever. You know, Kathleen Brown's Godfather's my grandfather, my grandfather ran Pat Brown's campaign or charity for district attorney in San Francisco goes back generations. And so there is a familiarity that also. I don't wanna say contempt because there's no because that's a quotable thing. So I'm not gonna say that. So I went out on my way to correct that statement. But I, but I it is but the familiarity met this relationship is a little different put it that way than the traditional Lieutenant governor governor relation. Well, I think we're going to have to leave it there. Thank you so much for coming back into homelessness about Jerry, you notice that. Yeah. I'm being very indulgent records. Would you tell them? I know he'll listen listen that thank you so much for coming in..

Jerry Brookings institute Kathleen Brown Pat Brown McKenzie San Francisco twenty seven billion dollar four percent
"pat brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"pat brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And so Joe would say I was the youngest person in Pat Brown ministration and the oldest person in Jerry Brown's ministration. And we would all laugh and be proud that he had served both Brown. Your uncle is in the book. Yes. Because there's some great correspondence between him and Pat Brown and also he did a really wonderful oral history. I mean, there's a lot of the book is drawn from documents and archives at the Bancroft library, and and your uncle did a really terrific oral history. And he tells a great anecdote about helping in Jerry's nine hundred seventy four campaign and being in a bar in Palo Alto in your uncles was one of the few people from the Pat Brown sort of group who made that transition. There were not a lot of them. So I was very interested in him. And he tells his story about being in a bar in Palo Alto at during the campaign and Jerry says to him like, why are you supporting me because it was a very hotly contested primary with three much better established Democrats running, and he says first of all, I know your father, and I like your father, you know, second. I like what you stand for and third you're gonna win. Very practicing. Yeah. And he became he made him. Jeremy him finance chairman further her northern California, Jenny thanks so much for for that memory. And Jerry Brown as governor surrounded himself, the first time, especially with a lot of interesting minds people he found to be stimulating but creative thinkers, but who didn't necessarily know the issues and the policies around agencies that he put them in charge of right, right? And he did that very deliberately because he wanted to shake things up. So being an outsider was in was an advantage and three if you look at the world of the the environmental realm, for example, where he brought people in put them in charge of agencies that they had as advocates been attacking before. So it was President Trump will yes in the reverse. But you know, empowering people to try to make government do some of the things that they had been pressuring it to do from the outside. They had Pat Brown and Jerry Brown. I think it's fair to say complicated relationship. They were very different people that relationship, I think evolved as time went by. But how would you describe that that father son relationships again that sort of talking to people who knew them for a long time, and who grew up with Jerry. And so new Patas Jerry's dad, I think that sense from them those who've known in the longest he said, it was in many ways, really typical father son relationship. I mean, what father and son don't have complicated relationships, and particularly if you're going into the same line of work. So they were had this sort of common core beliefs and a lot of ways and yet we're so different in personality in some ways in philosophy. We were talking a moment ago about Jerry Brown, not being particularly a few sieve or motions person in public. And I wanna play a clip we mentioned that he'd run for president in nineteen ninety two against Bill Clinton. And here he is speaking at the democratic national convention. About his father. And I wanna thank. One other person and is missing his first convention since the depression. A man who beat Richard Nixon in nineteen sixty two and.

Jerry Brown Pat Brown Patas Jerry Palo Alto Bancroft library Bill Clinton Richard Nixon President Trump Joe finance chairman California president Jenny
"pat brown" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"pat brown" Discussed on WCHS

"Pat brown profiling dot com her website and the panthers of people who've been waiting to uh to offer they're thought so i'd like to give them a chance to do so then we'll get into further discussion with you that okay our required all right the basil calls in from long key florida hello finally it to you i take a different view it it it to me people want to continue what what work yet today but what work yet they may not work anymore what do you mean by what works work yesterday may not work anymore what act in fact about which so politically correct that will allow people like maxine waters who is willing to gate eight hundred two hundred thousand to follow it god knows where data you go she has she has always spoken and very inflammatory terms that is correct within the confines of the first to bed but at her her status as a member of congress about exactly sure what we could quote do about that ideally of course her constituents would thrower out of office as but to be at the corruption charges little bit brought up against her or inflammatory tone they don't feel that way so i don't really know of any way that a free society can deal with a maxine waters except to grit our teeth a bearer of basil no remember the truck driver with pulled out permit eighteen wheeler and go ahead would have written with nearly you well there been such incidents like that but i remember something like that so what about it it's a bad thing other than that what about that guided good to be what we went to the person that oh i could well all right so that social that air responsible twit i don't deny that but again are you suggesting that we lockup irresponsible it's basil look i wanted to do so i gotta go to jail but because we don't you if you're in irresponsible twit what law if you up either basil i will tell you what i am thinking appeal give me a second what are you thinking at the time it approaching way turkmen leader i have to make the mine i i'll tell you what i'm thinking basil.

Pat brown congress florida turkmen