35 Burst results for "Pasta"

Ready to shop with a "smart cart?"

Talking Tech

01:47 min | 2 d ago

Ready to shop with a "smart cart?"

"You pandemic has brought about a ton of tech innovation when it comes to shopping between ordering everything online in curbside pickup. The next phase of this might be the smart cart according to my colleagues at the cincinnati enquirer supermarket chain. Kroger is testing smart cards where shoppers pick their items place them in the car and leave without ever having to go to a checkout or register i this is how they work. The carts themselves use artificial intelligence to recognize what you put in the cart. So you can take a box of cereal. Draw pasta sauce a gallon of milk. Whatever it is the cart will recognize what you place inside. It also has scales built so if you're buying produce it will wait for you in the cart and then once you're done shopping you back up your items and then you make a payment directly from the car itself. This idea of checkout free. Grocery store isn't new. We've seen amazon experiment with this already. Last year. they opened in grocery store in seattle where users can download an amazon go app. They scan a barcode to enter the store. Then they scan what they're buying and once they're done they just walk out and received by email and it's all done within the app. The fact that kroger is testing smart cards is a pretty big deal. The cincinnati-based grocer operates several regional supermarket chains in thirty five states stores. That you may have heard of like fred. meyer harris teeter ralph's marianas and host of others. The company has nearly twenty eight hundred stores so the fact that they are testing this out is pretty significant. Once they get to a final place it's going to be at a lot of different locations so it looks like your grocery experience is going to get a lot more technologically advanced in the months and years to come

Kroger Cincinnati Amazon Meyer Harris Teeter Ralph Grocery Store Seattle Fred
The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:38 min | 3 d ago

The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

"Today on the show. I am joined by planet money producer. Alexi horowitz ghazi and alexi. Hello first of all parody cardiff alexi. You've brought us a kind of pasta mystery. Not just any pasta. Cardiff dismissed all about a very particular. Pasta shape called bucatini. It's basically just spaghetti with a hole in it in. The story comes to us. By way of a self avowed bucatini fanatic new york magazine writer. rachel handler. When did you know that you were bucatini. Hat or bucatini bopper. Look what do we call ourselves. Ivan bucatini had because. I just think it's cute but i definitely didn't grow up in a bucatini household by any means we are definitely spaghetti. Family the mystery part of all of this began. When rachel started to notice last spring that her beloved bucatini seemed to be getting harder and harder to find at our local grocery stores in new york until eventually it seemed to be totally gone and then one day in the fall rachel was on the phone with her also pasta obsessed mother who lives in chicago and her mom kind of mentioned off hand that she was having the exact same problem. Racial literally haven't been able to find bucatini anywhere and she was talking specifically about to check out. The check is a one hundred and forty year old italian pasta company so when she said that i was like slow mo i was like because i thought it was like a new york problem like a very classic. Sort of like you know history. I can't find my bucatini. Whatever like who cares. But then i was a coli though. Sorry can i swear. Oh yeah okay okay. Great it's like holy if you can't find it that means that this is a real issue. And then she told me that she had actually reached out to the customer service department to check. Oh i just sent them an email. it's a classic move. It was like full of typos. Which is like a way. That mom's ready meals. But her email said i am a huge fan of bucatini pasta huge in all caps. I have not been able to find it for many weeks at any store. It is my favorite pasta cook than the sentences in all caps with four questionnaires. Are you still making it. Please tell me how to get some not too long afterwards. Rachel's mom gets a voicemail from a regional dicicco sales representative named brian. And then when. She played me voicemail from brian. I was like holy like this goes deep. There is a cover up like something weird is going on. Brian told rachel mom that she was likely having trouble. finding check. Oh bucatini. Because of an fda hiccup the hecker exactly for some reason the fda which is the food and drug administration seemed to have put a hold on the import of check. Obu katini and now. Brian was telling rachel's mom to sit tight and check the shelves a few months down the road and the fact that this little pasta mystery seemed to reach all the way to the federal government. That was something that had dogged. Journalists like rachel could not in good conscience. Look away from. This is the turning point for me. Yeah the next day. Rachel pitched the story to her editor but in the back of her mind. She wasn't sure it would go anywhere. And i'll just felt so big. And i think all of us figured nothing would really come event. At least i did. I was like i'm never going to figure out what's going on but began calling to check. Oh i reached out to like five or six different people. Email and phone call and voicemail and no one got back to me and then i was like something in santa's happening and i don't know and at that point i was like there's there's a story hammond

Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Cardiff Alexi Rachel Rachel Handler Ivan Bucatini Alexi New York Magazine Cardiff New York Food And Drug Administration Obu Katini Brian Chicago Hecker Federal Government Santa
Did COVID-19 start in bats? How did it transfer to humans

Science Vs

01:52 min | 5 d ago

Did COVID-19 start in bats? How did it transfer to humans

"But it doesn't believe isel you're listening to virus hunters in the democratic republic of the congo. They are checking on their local bat. Population tested the animals. Potential pathogens as you may know bats are well known vectors or hosts for viruses and bacteria. That could jump from animals to humans. They include corona viruses like sars and mers and viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers like ebola and marburg when they spill over into humans and cause illness. We call these zoonotic diseases. Although we still don't know the exact origin of the corona virus that causes covid nineteen the prevailing theory. Is that it circulated and bats and then most likely jumped to an unknown animal before then spilling over into humans. Possibly at a wet market in china where live animals were sold and then butchered for meat. Now we went to about stuff. We knew what we have come of there. You had to be really careful. Oh they bite. The researchers know that he single bat bite could become the start of the next pandemic there. Eight bats just in this net alone now local men who just pastas as. We arriving told us that they did locally. Eat bats but bigger fatter ones in these. They catch in the trees. Now these ecologists have said that. They haven't yet discovered traces of the abode of viruses. Such but they have found the antibody a similar situation that has been seen in china where the bats are seen as part of the process of the spread of covid but perhaps not the original source but in a sense these are a sentinel species a species. Which if you monitor them. You can somehow monitor the movement of these viruses

Hemorrhagic Fevers Democratic Republic Of The Con Marburg Ebola China
Bill Bruford (Yes/King Crimson) 1980 Interview

The Tapes Archive

08:47 min | 6 d ago

Bill Bruford (Yes/King Crimson) 1980 Interview

"In this episode. We have one of prog rock's greatest drummers bill at the time of this interview in nineteen eighty. Broussard was thirty one years old and on tour with solo band supporting his album. Gradually going tornado in the interview buford talks about why he left. Yes how robert fricke try to cancel the king crimson. Nineteen seventy four central park concert and the advantage of making a name for himself and banned by yes genesis and king crimson as always we have music critic mark allen at the helm conducting the interview. One last thing before we get to the interview the tapes archive. Podcast is a proud member of cyrus media a global community connecting passionate fans with podcast and experiences about artists and topics loves. Thanks for tuning in. And now it's time to open the vault over. No i'm not gonna player stations here and i'll give you rush especially in that not many commercials. Well the recent that lies these senior can add vocals eventually note. I don't know that wouldn't think by. Anthony singapore quite probable. There's nobody bill. Prince discounts finals. I it's just that this particular album. Not on kuwait's america would voice and something this hotline dance especially yes and on such a huge level. You made your holiday every two years now here you are. i just. You're staying with less than had to move with yet more. Yes that's not the only ask you how. How does as eddie feel about the. Because you're obviously made a name for yourself willy. Mason soldiers is that america beside more for music and the whole thing is a viable proposition. She's really good. It doesn't so listen. I'm going to be stable kind of and who who doesn't doesn't mind. I like to be able to play madison back on. Not that i ever have to and And trump's although there's not a whole level of problems occur pasta two three thousand seats by now we can just play music or problems. Did you have that are raised now. A group of flannel. It's magic pilot very easily that level. It's incredibly uninspired. It's amazingly easy to find some to seventy thousand blackout faces. Eight any pressure tool because the sounds inside. North and the whole shemozzle would sucha an isolated insulated kind of fair so much no reaction no visible reaction from anybody to your play like in a club. You can see people reacting in those places. None of that happens to. It's an extraordinary ritual. It's an amazing amazing feeding of power. But it was a strategic. Bit of works really got me to america to keep interest in on wants to in future thing this. I've had this time. And american gotten how planners do places north america generally in american about me and on you always make a good to substance feels. Good gets me and say you need some sort of strategic planning for thing like that genesis suitable time. You've got new playing it. Got my face around. It wasn't the best musical world. Then it wasn't gonna be paid for by a five month job which was fine. I could stay. Probably but i had other plans so i think we used each other way. German ankles return for it. Because i was having or without america trying very hard to exist by five synthesizers to buy a hop hannah's to buy another tunes. It's europe is a very strong place to and we could pass numerical together for the good work here more or less decided book. America's favorite and no sheppard's son to healthy strict with north vessel for any given output the musical direction. You're likely to gain the speech. Must people. you'll disseminate music. Quickest efficiently probably followed by canada. I wasn't sure that he would be person. You would like to talk to as many as i liked to. I actually. I am doing this as a promotion exercise. There's no doubt about. I need you know with mike to rice about what it is. Because i'm interested in. It really wants to get it across that. It would be lovely day. It's an insane people kind of associate. What communist play. There was no constant need to keep talking about see we have tried to compete with. Americans are americans be comforting to six weeks which seemed like forever but an american band will six months about thinking. It's an order to compete a tool to be in the same race as all must make use of here in college is coming in at smaller the low level where you stopped club. We're not we're not on the bottom is out. I mean the clubs club sold out and that's great. That's not actually at the starting gate and a lights to up. Cities is the american system. Sex could sound systems by much. And sometimes you can to the radio same time so food good system and there's no other way to do it. I mean next level of this hour talking about what the next rung. Up hewlett america. You have to be seen to keep climbing runs. And she else kills loose successful in the country. And i'm sitting. We'll be able to come back short and hopefully find some colleges and smoke. Fix that will. That will be good year to something like that and then we'll worry about what happens. Then what would you want to tell people about your music. It's not death you serious one out about the guggenheim museum. It's not it's the instrumental music. This must be either jazz or classical something like work about some h. Difficult music. And i see that tool. We have supply interesting music fry or or accessible particularly. I think we when we play. We play in such ways to invite people in this environment. Rob repel oppress them and defy. Likes which is not at you. Some refunds out. But i don't like a lot to recession music. Most standardized breath cheating quick tudor or the need to survive really. It's an era fear round action especially because in the bottom. That's right if there there's definitely a climate of whereas the sword go full next. It's partly to good specific management company that we're announces gun because well there's potential that may not be too modest talked about the groups that you played in about people. I band savoy grounding. Savoy was my best friend and that was pretty awful three days and that was that was good that i came up with my first guitar hero. Gibson's she was guitar by then. I looked around a bit and came close. Yes and that was good basketball break. Excellent be very well and I've had enough about six hours. Somebody because i didn't want to spend a lot one time insisted on the last one that can agents. I love sweating. Giving trump generally and i was thinking how am i would support each other and a plane can crimson. Then he sees you superior way. And so i said well that sounds great and off. You went five mercantilist. Some last show ever played in central far out you that that was an emotional night was in when i talked to him about that. He said that was the closest that i'm to being great. Since the first and like you said that the last king clinton in the i can principle the best. It was extremely good easy. You might like no one further anecdotes about that story. Which is the chinese absolute damnedest to cancel events about some sounds which inaudible kind of buzz to hear any sound system and said it was impossible for us to play and he was cut gerald and bullied threatened in two thousand people and he was just about dragged on student and now he will no doubt hail it is being here on the strongest span of did. He's a man of fiction on many levels and not least of which is that. That's enough the mandate about that greg. We really pavlik and blue myself. One of those great night's you believe you're strong as you are. I really enjoy that.

America Robert Fricke Cyrus Media Anthony Singapore Mark Allen Broussard King Crimson Buford Willy Kuwait Eddie Mason Prince Madison Rob Repel Sheppard North America Hannah Hewlett Guggenheim Museum
Build Your Personal Search Engine With Datasette

Talk Python To Me

04:13 min | Last week

Build Your Personal Search Engine With Datasette

"Let's start at the foundation of this recent work you've been doing and in some sense it's sort of a natural progression writes in the journalism side of things where the origin came from. So tell us about dataset data set. Is i on its website. I call it an a multi tool for exploring in publishing data. Basically it's a web application which you can point at a sequel light relational database and it gives you pages where you can browse the tables and one queries lets you want like type in custom sequel queries and one them again. Not die tobias lets you custom templates and out things ten. Let's you could have been back out as jason be so you can use it for. Api integrations and it. Lets you publish the whole thing on the internet really easily. So it's it's a loss and one of the biggest challenges i had is. How do i turn this into a bite size description that really helps people understand what the software does the point now. Where if i can get somebody on a video chance. I can a fifteen minute demo but at the end of it going. I totally get this. This is amazing but that's not not sliding software. It doesn't scale well. Yeah well let me see if i can with my limited exposure to it in knowing some some what we're going you have this data source that's pretty ubiquitous or can become ubiquitous in terms of like some sort of etl with sequel light. Right ziegler. light is everywhere. What's beautiful about it is. There's no please set up the server and make it not run as root and then put it on your network and sell the magic sequel light sequel. I it boasts the most widely distributed database in the world which it is because it runs on every phone. My watch a sequel light tracking my steps every iphone app every android app every laptop. That old running the down here your phone. That's crazy it's a file formats it's a sequel database is a singled dot d. Be biden's on disk. Which like you said makes it so convenient. Because i didn't have to ask kasit happened to set me up post schema or anything like that. I just create a file on my laptop and and that's my database. Yeah and it's even built into python right. It just comes with python. Yeah exactly so. That's super cool. And it's great that we have this data format that if we have data in there or you could do like an api call and then jam the data and they're right like something to get it into that format which is great. But you can explore that with like beekeeper studio or some data. Visualization sequel management studio. But that doesn't work for journalists. That doesn't work for getting it on the internet. That doesn't give like The transformations in some sense. I kind of see it almost like as a really advanced web based like data. Id but user friendly earned a year with an but the emphasis is absolutely on on publishing getting it online. And then it's on being web nights it like everything and data set can be good on his jason as well as html it can get. Beat you e-content csv to you. It uses you pasta sequel query and get in a query string. C can bookmark queries all of that kind of stuff. Yeah i think the key. That's really the key idea is how do you take relational databases and make them as web to this possible and cheap and inexpensive to to host into run as possible so you can take any data that fits in a sequel database which is almost everything and stick it online and that people can both explore it and stop like integrating with it as well on the another key idea. Indict set his dates plug in system. I've actually written over fifty four it now that add all sorts of different things different output formats to get your database out as an atom feed when i cal- the'd of play against visualizations that plot the daytona map will give you charts line graphs. And so on. I just this morning released a authentication plug in that. Supports the indy off with indication mechanism. So you can use india with logan to to password. Protect your room your data all of these different things and honestly having a plugin system is so much baden. 'cause i can come up with a terrible day for feature and i can build it to plug in and it doesn't matter that's just an awful idea that nobody should ever have implemented because i'm not causing any harm to that core project.

Kasit Tobias Jason Ziegler Biden Logan India
Embracing sexuality as a person of faith with Pastor Alex Pittaway

The Gays Are Revolting

04:19 min | Last week

Embracing sexuality as a person of faith with Pastor Alex Pittaway

"We're joined by alex piece away. Who is a gay passer from. He's been alex welcome. Thanks so much. I wanna ask you now. You are a reverend. what do we call you. Is it like the queen. Reverend i after all look just postures just alex titles such ranks so called. Alex lit for the lord. Sure what god one bless you. I've never heard that you discover the podcast through gay christian bible study. I think there has to be the first time anyone had about the gays revolting through a christian bible. Study that you know of in a positive It was actually It was the first month that i moved to brisbane and someone who's a really great Sort of leader in our church. He was running a group. A bible study for gay christians and he affectionately called homo group and he invited me along one night because a lot of people in my church go there. And so we We're looking at a pace of scripture which talks about being counter cultural as a reference point. It was this podcast And people were discussing. What gaza garage in the vein of being sort of counter cultural. And they're sort of version of counter. Cultural will being counter cultural by being quia by being gay by being lgbt. I and Being christian being spiritual at the same time And so yeah it was. it was through here that That i i had it Gosh that would have been way back in two thousand eighteen. I think july august. And how long have we been doing show by we've shed a lot of biblical moments on. It's not a surprise to me that they might be studying your trips to wait on. Wellington dotting the alex. You're the possible for church. Made up mostly of lgbt on people who've been rejected from mainstream churches yes so Mcc has been around in brisbane for forty five years And you know we've been cold at the church For gay people We've been cold especially during the eighties and nineties. The the church that has aids We have an aids quilt by sydney congregation in brisbane congregation. And for a while we were the only people who would do funerals for people who died of aids in nineteen eighty s and ninety s And we lost about one third of all of pastas globally. hiv aids. Yes so we're very much a church run by the people. It's called dumb. If you're a church history node like me then Congregational model of church. Which means that the church decides the pasta is the church decides what direction even what beliefs the church has is very much a grassroots organization. And it's not so much sort of top heavy pasta decides everything Organizations is much more much more grassroots than that overall. Unfortunately in australia the landscape spiritually is very very tough for gay people. I think melbourne is probably the most a gay affirming city in terms of church. Wise there are just many many more gay affirming congregations. When i say affirming it means you don't just have to sit at the back and we'll take your money but don't you think that you can get married or anything else. It's people know we will do your marriage. We will Support your relationships we. We're not trying to secretly ten. You straight we don't think you're going to hell. And we fully welcome you. So there's many of those In melbourne including mcc melbourne including several anglican churches several uniting churches in sydney. This probably about five or six in brisbane. There's just three out of hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of churches. And it's it's sad because you know in america despite america being a much more conservative place in indianapolis the city that i studied in to be a pasta. There are something like thirty five. Well affirming churches

Alex Piece Alex Lit Brisbane Hiv Aids Sydney Congregation Alex Gaza MCC Wellington Mcc Melbourne Including Severa Melbourne Australia Sydney America Indianapolis
How to Save Your Marriage

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

05:11 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Save Your Marriage

"Going to promise you one thing and that is that we could save your marriage so many times on the show. We've talked about marriage problems and often the solution for serious problems is marriage. Therapy easy to say you'll go but many times the one spouse will not go so what we're going to do is try and make it easy for you as a gift. We're going to give you two free days of marriage therapy. You won't have the expense and you won't have to leave the house. Starting today you will get a chance to look inside a marriage therapy weekend and here is what you'll see. We took eight couples who all admitted their marriages were on the brink of disaster. They spent the weekend with dr horrible hendrix. Who conducts these marriage workshops across the country and in the course of the weekend amazing results happened. Marriages were saved. And today you can begin to say yours. Tim and vicky webster have been married now. For two and a half years they are separated and vicky is expecting their third child. My next couple. Layton and debbie. Clark have three children and i've been married for six years. Derek and valencia. Stevens have been married for five and a half years. George and beth pasta have been married fifteen years and they have two children. Randy and pam mal have been married over twelve years and they have two children. Joe and karen stricklin have been married now for two years and they have three children from a previous marriage. Jim and laurie tolliver have been married nine months. The last of the eight couples has the biggest obstacle to overcome. James and mimi had been married six years. Mimi has filed for divorce. They came to the seminar truly to save the marriage. James and mimi lacey also joining us the mastermind behind this particular kind of marriage therapy and the author of this book which the therapy is based on called getting the love. You want getting the love you want. It is a guide for couples. Please welcome our marriage man. Harvard this. I have been watching some of the tape from the seminar and it is it has helped me and my relationship tremendously really has really just in learning how to fight fairly and so forth. Why is this different. It's different because there's a focus on an understanding that couples issues arise out of their childhood. And that when they present themselves in the relationship we have to understand that they come from someplace other than just the marriage so the workshop helps couples understand that provides them with some tools experiences information to help them resolve those childhood issues in their relationship. So we take the position that divorce is not the solution to a marriage that Working on marriage and resolving the childhood issue is the solution. So when you're married to someone you have to look at them for everything that they brought to the marriage before they got there exactly. Yeah childhood most important. You have to look at the childhood issues that were brought knowing that most of the conflict couples experience in their relationship comes from unresolved pains and hurts in childhood that are presenting themselves in adult form in the relationship. And if you know that then you know you're relating to a person when they're angry at you or upset or acting sort of crazy and you don't understand what's going on that relating to a person who's wounded and hurt and are dealing with that wound and hurt with the only skills and tools that they now have and that what you have to do in a relationship is to acquire new skills to deal with the old issues they have to be dealt with and so. The exercise that we're going to see now is called container. Exercise called a container exercise and this exercise comes actually at the end of two days of very intensive work. So it's about probably sixteen hours into the workshop before you get to this before you can get to this part because it takes a while to get to these kinds of feelings and the container is an exercise designed to help a couple deal with. What is what. I call a residual childhood rage. The hurts and pains the feelings. That are leftover that are created when when his little and get hurt and so. That rage shows up in marriages as Anger rage hurt and so forth in this container helps you deal with that because it has to be dealt with and resolve it so that you feel closer and more intimate afterwards. It creates compassionate intimacy rather than the distance that comes with most fights nats call container. Why because one person has to just listen. One person has to justice and one is a container that is they receive and listen and the other person is asked to go into their childhood hurt. It starts with something that happened in the relationship but then there to push their anger into the childhood memory and then into that pain. So there'd be a lot of expressions of intense anger and then tears usually come and then after that some talking and then when couples are doing this and they're real life you know in their home or in the workshop they alternate one listens as a carrying holding nurturing parrot and the other one goes in becomes regress like a little child back into that paint. Oakland alternate

Dr Horrible Hendrix Vicky Webster Beth Pasta Pam Mal Karen Stricklin Laurie Tolliver Mimi Lacey James Layton Vicky Valencia Debbie Mimi Stevens Derek Randy Clark TIM Harvard
Los Angeles remembers Tommy Lasorda

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

02:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Los Angeles remembers Tommy Lasorda

"Mourning the loss of two very iconic figures today with word of the death of Dodger legend Tommy Lasorda and former Los Angeles City Council member Mr Los Angeles Tom LaBonge. We begin our in depth team coverage with the passing of Tommy Lasorda. Among the stories about Lasorda from those who knew him and knew him. Well, the tales from Lasorda himself from Dodger broadcaster Ross Porter, one of my favorites, Itwas Don't tell people your problems. 80% or glad that you have them. 20% don't care speaking there with our own randy cartoon. And then there was the time that the Dodgers lost a tough game and assorted told his beloved wife, Jo, to meet him in the car on seeing his players looking low decided. Decided to have a talk with him. And so he had a team meeting after loss. And he said, you guys have lost confidence in yourself. Even the best team in the history of baseball than 18 27. Yankees. Had losing streak longer than this. So quit giving up on yourself. Go out there and play the best you can play because the car and Joseph well would you say in the speech, so he's older. She says that true. He said. I have no idea truly a shocking day for Dodger fans here in Southern California and across all of baseball who who might have thought that somebody like Tommy Lasorda would live forever bleeding bleeding Dodger Blue, But it's the sports writers. The sportscasters who spent so much time with Tommy Lasorda, who have so many amazing stories to tell that part of our in depth team coverage live now to KNX 10 seventies John Baird. You've seen the video of Tommy Lasorda leaping up after Kirk Gibson's famous home run in the 88 world, Syriza and you've probably heard some audio to of Tommy Lasorda going off. It was Tommy Being Tommy. Bill Shaken is the longtime sports writer for the Times Managers used to be larger than life. They were the focus of the team, and when Tommy was sorta was running the Dodgers And you wanted to talk to him in his office after the game. He was running a catering operation Pasta and all. Bret Lewis was in L a sportscaster and spent more than a decade and KFWB, he says. Tommy was something else. And it's truly so gregarious. Any crowd he walked into, he owned it. Head. Sobel was also a longtime sports reporter, A KNX and KFWB. He knows all the Lasorda stories and the fiery personality, you know, he was volatile, but but a fun guy. Had nobody more passionate and Dodgers history, that's for sure, he says. Lasorda was just a blast Reporting

Tommy Lasorda Dodger Lasorda Mr Los Angeles Tom Labonge Ross Porter Los Angeles City Council Dodgers Baseball Syriza JO Tommy Being Tommy Bill Shaken Times Managers Yankees John Baird Kirk Gibson Southern California Joseph
Tips for Cooking Faster and Healthier

The Zest

09:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Tips for Cooking Faster and Healthier

"Okay. Let's get to the tips. What's tip number one hit number. One is my favorite one in. Its put it i. It's keeping a cutting board out on the counter. This way. this being wooden cutting board preferably a big wooden cutting board is always ready for you. So to cut a piece of fruit or to cut a vegetable for a snack that way. It saves his step. You don't have to go underneath. Bring out this big wooden cutting board put it on the counter it just a permanent fixture in your kitchen That's good you know. I started keeping my pots and pans on the stove which visually i don't enjoy but it saves me from having to reach under the counter and get them in anything that saves me one step makes me more likely to cook. So that's great. Keep your cutting board on the counter. How about number two Number two is Create flow if you can't in your kitchen called wash chop cook so it's to put your cutting board somewhere in between your sink and your cook top so you wash the fruits and vegetables you cut them and then they go right to the stove and it's is effortless flow if this is something that you can create in your kitchen or if you are designing a kitchen to keep this in mind that you want to wash the food. Cut the food. Cook the food so wash chop cook. That makes sense now. How did you come up with that because it seems so logical. But it's one of those things that could be a little annoyance if you weren't really planning it out so this is this based on personal experience. It is based on personal experience. I was working with the kitchen designer and she tipped me off to this and i thought this was years ago. I thought okay. She was completely right. Because if you think is on the other side of your cook top then you're carrying wet food over to the cook top and it's nice ice to just to kind of keep it all contained in one area. Sometimes these big fancy designer kitchens. They look good but as far as cooking is concerned. It's it requires a lot of steps because the kitchen is so big in the sink. His way over on one side and the cook top is way over the other and the refrigerators in the opposite corner. And so you end up exhausting yourself in some of these big kitchens because they were designed for aesthetics and not from work and i always say design your kitchen from work a kitchen as a place of work. It should be a pleasing place but its ability to serve your needs. Cooking comes first before it's static function over fashion hundred percent function over fashion in a kitchen. You mentioned the keeping your pots out on the cook top One of my tips is to if you can install a pot rack. Because sometimes i don't know what to cook i'll look up at my pots and I will get an idea for something to cook. Because of hot reminds me of something cooked in it a week ago a couple of weeks ago so i like to look at my pots and i like for them to inspire my cooking. Oh that's good. That's a bonus tip all right number three. this is so important. You've got to be well-stocked you've got to have the kitchen staples in your pantry refrigerator and i have an exhaustible list of these available to anyone. It's the basic salt pepper oil butter eggs onion garlic. I could go on rice and this means that you don't go to the store to buy butter. You have to go to the store to buy rice. It's already in the pantry. And so you can have one special ingredient you brought home and you've got everything else you need to make that so you've got to have a well-stocked pantry does the definition of a well stocked. Pantry vary from person to person. I understand that there are certain staples. We all need like oil and salt and pepper. But if you're on a particular diet or if you notice yourself. Eating the same foods you know i found an old public's receipt in coat in a winter coat that i haven't worn in years because i don't live in ohio anymore. I never need my winter coat. And it had steel. Cut oats raisins blueberries. It was the exact breakfast that i eat to stay and the receipt was like fifteen years old so for me. Those things are staples. Should people kind of pay attention to what they're eating regularly and include those in their list of staples absolutely. I think that The more weekend habitual is healthy. Eating and your menu sounds like a very very good example of a great breakfast. That's okay. I also encourage people to every now and then step out of their comfort zone and buy a new ingredient and see if it becomes part of the routine or part of the staples for instance. Curry paste is is a new staple item for me. I used to use curry powder. I still have lots curried powder. But now i use paste and i prefer it. That's fun and then when you find a new recipe on pinterest or something you have that as one of your staples and having kids. I don't know if you have kids but it's fun to let them pick out like a new fruit or vegetable at the the farm. Stand to just. Oh what is that and then we all get to try it together and yes. My breakfast is healthy. But it's kind of all downhill from there. So i'm curious to hear the rest of your tip so i can like round out my day in a healthier way. What is tip number. Four sharp knives. You've got to have sharp knives and they don't have to be expensive. It just has to be sharp. And i teach people how to sharpen knives that are not expensive but to keep a good late on. You'll work so much faster and you'll work so much safer. If you have sharp knives a chef told me that. I should sharpen my knives. Every time i cook. And i've started doing that and it makes a big difference. My over sharpening. No i don't think so. I honed my knife with just a quick couple of passes on the honing steel before i cook but then every now and then i'll get out all my knives and i'll sharpen them on a stone and if people don't like to use the stone they can use an electric sharpener. That's okay but the steel is something you could do. You can hone it of four. You cut anything. And that's just an takes five seconds to make a couple of passes on the on the honing steel okay. That's actually what i'm doing. So i'm honing and i don't know that i've ever sharpened my knives. So that is something. I will look into when we're done with this conversation but thank you. That's a great tip especially if you're gonna be chopping vegetables and things like that and fiber food will dull your knife high fiber foods del share knife and i want everyone to eat a lot more fiber so you have to have sharp knives it. You're going to cook. Fiber cooked high fiber foods. Oh interesting so if somebody has a perfect set of knives than they may eat out a lot. 'cause there's never chopping the veggies. It's right that's right. Yeah if you're gonna if you're gonna cut fruits and vegetables with skins that are very high fiber. You got to have sharp knives okay. That's a great tip tip number five okay Purge tools and gadgets if you haven't used it in six months throw it away. And i usually tell people to take all of their gadgets. Put him in a box and send them to the garage and then as you need them pull them out and if you pull them out within a year they get to stay and if you don't pull them out within a year maybe you want donate 'em to restore because i really believe that too many gadgets they cluttering the kitchen and i think they robbed the kitchen energy and focus and so the things that get to stay in the kitchen or only the work or utensils and gadgets and pieces. That really serve you. That don't siphon off your energy or your attention. I love that. Marie kondo would say to spark joy. And actually i've heard a lot of people say the same thing about getting rid of clothing if you don't wear it in six months or a year you probably never will. So that's a great one. I believe that and then go. Moving onto number six is the same thing but with pots and pans. I think you should have your workhorse pots and pans that review and the rest of them. Don't clutter your kitchen or waste faced with all of this extra fancy stuff. He needs saute as any frying pans. Saucepans you know oh and cast iron you should have some cast-iron do i wonder if it's aspirated final. Like i want to be the type of person who makes waffles every sunday. So i have a waffle maker and i want to be the type of person who makes pasta every monday so i have a pasta machine. Is it just about getting real with yourself. Like this is the level of cook that i am and i don't need a bunch of fancy gadgets. They're just actually gonna slow me down. I completely agree. You know you just come clean with yourself. I think they can rob you of attention or especially precious face and whatever you. Don't leave these gadgets. Out on a countertop countertops capricious precious real estate. And sometimes i walk into people's kitchens and they've got like a bread machine out on the counter and i ask. When's the last time he used that. I don't know a couple years ago. I would recommend that that bread machine probably go away because countertop is a very very precious thing in the kitchen and you don't want that brand machine to make you feel bad because you bought it. You may spend a lot of money on it and you end up using it. So your kitchen should on does has sparked poise arc inspiration sparked work and efficiency. Yeah i completely agree.

Pinterest Rice Ohio Marie Kondo
Imposter Syndrome With Kevin Cokley, University of Texas at Austin

The Academic Minute

01:59 min | Last month

Imposter Syndrome With Kevin Cokley, University of Texas at Austin

"Kevin coakley distinguished teaching professor at the university of texas at austin examined imposter syndrome and why college students often have this feeling. During the academic year many students will experience heightened positive feelings in academically competitive and stressful college environments. The impostor phenomenon often referred to in the popular press as the impostor syndrome is the sense among high achievers of feeling intellectually phony fraudulent while high achievers are typically thought of as individuals who have excelled academically in many ways college attendance retention and graduation. Make students high achievers given them more than twenty percent of freshmen. Do not return for a second year. Researchers found that impassive feelings negatively impact mental health of college students increasing feelings of depression and anxiety students who feel like an impostor have difficulty internalizing their accomplishments. They see themselves as incompetent and believe they fooled others into seeing themselves as intelligent and accomplished impossibility have been linked to maladaptive perfectionism or excessive. High personal standards imposters and perfectionist are similar in that they are both driven to excel. They different in that professions are driven by an internal pressure of having high standards while imposters are driven by internal experience of intellectual phoniness and self doubt. My research found that impulsive feelings are especially salient among students of color. However it is important to keep in mind. That students of color are not monolithic. For example my researchers found that asian american students tend to have higher feelings of impossibly them then african american and let the neck students additionally we found a stronger impact of perceived discrimination on the possibilities among african american and latin next students professors can address in pastas among students of color by including books and articles written by scholars of color discussing the contributions of scholars of color in your field and having meetings with students of color and affirming your belief in their potential and deserve news to be there.

Kevin Coakley University Of Texas Austin Depression
Big Tech is poised to feel the regulatory heat from Europe in 2021

The 3:59

03:42 min | Last month

Big Tech is poised to feel the regulatory heat from Europe in 2021

"So you has traditionally been tougher on big tech ran. The us have even even for starting to play up. Now what can we expect from the eu regards. Regulations looking forward into twenty one so i'm the eu justice week has released two major pieces of legislation. That really wants to push through over the next few years and these are going to kind of define how they regulate big tech in your fees to come. The first piece of legislation is the digital services. Act now this covers everything from kind of moderation and illegal content at stopping illegal goods being sold online to antitrust so real variety of stuff that on it's going to apply to all companies that basically have an online presence in europe and the second piece of legislation is digital markets. Act now this is the piece of legislation that the big tech companies have really been favoring because applies strictly to them. It's designed to kind of look who the gatekeeper saw in the industry and assign them extra responsibilities that mean that they weren't able to push small play out the market and that they won't be able to stop at the tech ecosystem within your from growing. So that's the bit that they Really not looking forward to yell. At one time the Digital markets act incur breakdown in simple terms of what this will empower the you to regulate what how this changes the practices for some of these big tech companies. Well i mean obviously We weren't narrow until the legislation is actually pass and put into practice but effectively. It's going to be challenging them to be a lot more transparent about the processes that going to have to put the allowed algorithms to be kind of audited and examined in a way that they haven't necessarily done in the past and at The commission has not she named the companies that will be subject to these extra checks yet but we can kind of guess based on who we know the tech giant's to be what might be kind of coming for them and the the power civic will give the u. l. things like you know. Give them great to antitrust pasta interference and tell tell these companies that they either have to stop the practices. they have to change their practices. All that they you know they might be blocked altogether within the eu or or potentially even broken up digital services act. What exactly does until what what practices as potentially change for these companies. Well and i think that this will probably have less effect on some of the big tech companies who already made huge changes in europe. But i think that this is a way to look at this piece of legislation is really to think that it's designed to protect consumers so it's designed to for example if If a service that you use accidentally deletes you'll data you know. Give you recall to kind of complain and you know the the service will have to compensate you equally like if you know you are sold illegal goods the service through which those illegal goods being salty. Oh yeah counterfeit goods or whatever that a dot service will have to be show that it can like track and trace down those that person. That salty is good.

EU Europe United States
Nina Jackson and How to Help your Student Thrive

Qualified Tutor Podcast

03:00 min | Last month

Nina Jackson and How to Help your Student Thrive

"I love to see. am. I hope to invigorate teachers. Children and young people with what i call the face. This show but lemon. So you've got the structures and systems of the school and we can't get away from that and we can't get away from exams and data in tasks and things like that but we can't embrace. Is that when teachers have this connection with children and young people. That's the sort of like. Oh wow phase moment wet. Children are so engrossed in what they're learning they pasta infectious personality on to others in the classroom as well as the teachers. And as my dear friend how a roberts would say sometimes it's about bothered nece noah. I'm on really bulbs to be learning about this. You become bulbs. Didn't you become engaged when somebody explode. Uranium phase emotionally cognitively. A neurologically boom shaka la suited. So for me. We've got an access all areas of education. We've got to give teachers in show john empowerment to be brave to test to try and if it doesn't work that's okay to know what we'll try a different way because there is always another way so for me. It isn't about practice makes perfect. It's about pocket. The passion pocket the passion for you are as an educator ozzy lunar but you've got to get to know the children in the young people that you work with. I mean you've got to know the inside out. So i'm a consultant practitioner. I still teach. I adore to work with children and young people. Sometimes i see the slight children and young people as while you know we wanna we wanna get into that sort of in an minds to find out what made it brilliant for them so hike s what i wanna do is in life now. We'll you know rocking on that. Brilliant age of fifty five onto fifty six only like. I'm wow look. I just wanna live life but give other people just this purpose. An empowered woman to be able to serve themselves on to serve others as well that. What's the point or the pint is your purpose than becomes of service to others. Still if you are able to serve its at that with your brilliant your passion your energy your knowledge expertise the way that you can connect with people through relationships in culture than you can have more woohoo moments

Roberts
U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:44 min | Last month

U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

"The uk government appears to be trying to use the news that a covid vaccination has been licensed for use in this country to create good pr around brexit but england's health minister matt hancock who claimed fast tracking the pfizer vaccine was only possible because the uk was able to act outside of european union. Regulations has been firmly contradicted by the chief executive of the h. r. a. the body that handled the process. Well joint for more. On this by vincent mcilvanney. He's a political reporter and one of monocle twenty four regular contributors. Welcome back to the globalist vinnie. Can you tell us how. The story unfolded i. We had the great news that the vaccine had been licensed then matt. Hancock really dived into controversy. That's i think there was a genuine needle relief and celebration yesterday that the government made this announcement and they'd obviously planned this. Kathleen they have. The scientists going through detail televised press conference yesterday morning just to the public in very layman's terms. How the vaccine had been approved what it would do how it would be rolled out and then we have prime minister's questions where boris johnson and stone had a pretty friendly about They did simply questions about how the rollout would happen. it was. It was quite a public education session then in the afternoon the government seem to trip over itself They started to say. There was a bit of pushback from the germans at the brit. Saying that this was you know a real day for british signs that this was great for. They don't this and then. My ankle comments on braxton. Also jacob re smog sang we could only approved vaccine so quickly because we've left the eu last month we change regulations vaccine didn't need eu approval which has slower and this ready then lead them into problems because that has been debunked has been fact checked by various organizations to say that. That's not the case. It was actually permitted under eu law And that was the point. Made as you mentioned by the head of the ease at medicines regulator on wednesday that this states could act unilaterally and false tracking it. So it's very strange that they have tried to do something which shouldn't be political. Shouldn't be kind of you know doused in one camp or another particular when it comes to leave or remain when it comes to brexit which is still divisive issue here in the uk at a point where we still don't have a brexit deal and then negotiations are ongoing to try and sully it somewhat by putting it in minds of some of the public with brexit is not a good idea and as you say germany took exception to this. Yes they did. They perspective said quite rightly in this european achievements. And perhaps the british government's if they done this. I with the oxford astra zeneca vaccine something which we expect to happen in the next ten days or so then they could claim you know a real big moment for british science and claim that the own but to claim that this landlocked. Because you've fast track vaccine that was developed at the over. The you know in the comfort. And that's gonna be coming from. Belgium is a bit of a strange move by the government. This is the government absolutely desperate for some good news. We have the worst death figures in europe and yesterday was another six hundred forty will so debts in the previous twenty four hours we the west infection rates and so you know they are really desperate now to make sure that they can trump it some of these achievements as their own and i notice. Boris johnson appear to roll back a little bit when he was asked about it later and he talked about international efforts and really quite successfully dodged the question. Yes he did. i think he knows. And perhaps the scientists said got to them that you cannot tie this to to brexit something. That is incredibly divisive and that pass. It wasn't true you know. There's enough missing formation going on about of cave nineteen vaccines that. The government really shouldn't be contributing to it and this something that she came up pm cues and the prime minister sort of echoed that said labour had put out last month and m seems the government will be moving forward that there will be some kind of penalty and fines in put in place to stop the misinformation and the spreading of anti vaccine summation on social media and on the social media platforms themselves. Something that they will have to watch out for. We're waiting for details on that still but it's not a good idea that the government would be putting out false information itself on that same day. Of course this isn't the kind of stuff damaging stuff that we're seeing spreading conspiracies about what the vaccine will do to you. But it's still doesn't help you sell your message somewhat. Absolutely i mean this. I suppose was an attempt just to trumpet. britney's truly global. Yes to trumpet global britain. Something that trying to do. It's also you know the final few days really off. The brexit negotiations going on central london images lost night if boxes and boxes of pizza being delivered to the negotiators so they won't see talking late into the night prisoners facing a real problem and i think part of why the government probably wants pasta quickly. Is that if by the end of this week. We don't have a deal. One becomes very unlikely and so at the end of this month. The uk will leave the european union now. All countries have struggled with their economies. Jerry the pandemic but imagine the double whammy in twenty twenty one of britain also suffering the effects of that no deal brexit. We know that it would be hugely detrimental to the economy and so britain than any country around the world needs to get its workforce vaccinated. Needs to have them feeling confident. Needs the well to think that this is a place that you can come and trade and do business in because it's safe and they need people back out there as much as possible working and so the vaccine really is so critical to be rolled out here to make sure that life can get back to as much as normal as possible because the economy is facing this double threat unlike any others around the well. The yes are repercussions in europe full brexit but not to the extent of the areas here in the uk. I mean the prime minister has warned that there may be logistical problems. Getting the vaccine out particularly to care homes. Yeah that's right. And i think we have to look at the separate vaccine. Say of the fis at biotech. One has very specific needs so has to be stored at just under minus seventy degrees centigrade and has a lifespan of about a month as well and so they don't want basically it cannot be moved again so we're getting the first eight hundred thousand off the forty million order coming from belgium in the next few days. Now that number you have to divide it by two. Because you need to inoculation say britain's ordered forty at that means twenty million people can be vaccinated and the clock is ticking to make the most of that investment in this vaccine to get it to the most critical people but because of the coach storage requirements. It seems that they're going to need to put it into key. Sentences rather than sending out in small batches perhaps to you know local pharmacy. Or a cabaret miss. They thought they would. So what will happen is it will go to places like hospitals where they have that cold storage than going to put it into centers so the nightingale hospitals that have been built and also places like sports stayed the emc. Say think as well in those kind of facilities and instead of bat say you have in town eight also cathodes instead of the vaccine going in small batches of the cabins because of these requirements on the storage. Because it doesn't like they moved too much you will instead means academy ten dis on trips to those senses to the hospital in order for them to get inoculated. Have to do that twice at intervals of two weeks. And after the second vaccine injection seven days later they will then be a not some killer's this they will then not be able to for the effects that there's a slight effects of the vaccine it's being described as a bit like hanging over by some participants in the study. But you will then be guarded against covid nineteen but they used the is one for the most critical people. Nhs staff a care home staff the most elderly in society those most at risk and they need to use as much as possible as quickly as possible at because then what i think will happen is the much cheaper and easier to store and distribute ox sudanic vaccine which is the one that britain has invested. Most in will be the one that most of the population gets

Brexit EU Matt Hancock Vincent Mcilvanney UK Boris Johnson Zeneca Britain Pfizer Braxton Hancock Kathleen British Government Matt England Stone Europe Oxford
What the Latest Retail-Sales Figures Could Mean for the Holiday Season

WSJ What's News

05:00 min | 2 months ago

What the Latest Retail-Sales Figures Could Mean for the Holiday Season

"Us retail sales rose for a sixth straight month and october but the pace of growth was slower than expected and that suggests that us shoppers or getting more cautious corona virus cases surge. Joining me now with more details is wall street journal economics reporter harriet tori. Hi harry at. Thanks for being here. So the past few months have shown stronger growth in retail sales but october showed less than expected increase. What happened so what we saw. Were steep declines in retail sales in march and april due to the pandemic and then a big pickup in may retail. Sales are up over eighteen percent since then. The group has tapered off but it really did taper off quite a lot compared to the prior month so we saw a month a month increase of north point three percent whereas in september it was one point six percent so it's really slowed pretty considerably and this was also slower than economists expecting. They had pencilled in a zero point. Five percent increase so it did disappoint relative to expectations. What are they attributing the slowdown to certain key. Categories of spending She posted declines last month. So for instance. One of the big ones was grocery stores now. The decline is relatively small. Sales were down zero point. Four percent but still grocery shopping is a big cass. Agree so there was that there was also a drop in clothing sales sporting goods sales and at general merchandise stores so for instance department stores and then a few categories did well contributing to their rogaine so vehicle sales a continuing to perform pretty strongly. They were up electronic sales. Were up and also of course. Non store retailers which are online merchants. Like amazon and october was a pretty good month for them in part because retailers have been pushing promotions to try and get. The holiday season started earlier this year. So we saw that. For instance amazon prime day this year. It was in october rather than july and a few other retailers had other promotional events going on kind of to match that also retailers have just been exploding over the pasta up. Nearly thirty percents from october. Twenty thousand thousand nine. So online spending has really boomed as you mentioned this year. A lot of retailers did roll out the holiday discounts and sales much earlier than usual. Is that a shift. That's working out for them. So far is it a bit too early to tell. It's a bit at least it's hell. I think what's interesting about the situation. That brennan the moment is we have seen of course and they. At the end of the summer we saw the end to the supplemental unemployment benefits. So this extra six hundred dollars a week. That unemployed work had been receiving on the labor market has been improving but the gains in. The labor. Market have been slowing. So what does that mean that. Means that people have generally less income than they did a few months ago so just spending is become a little bit more cautious for big part of the population. These people who are either unemployed or who might have had the hours carpool worried about losing their jobs. Now on the other hand you have another group of people who are able to work from home and can have things delivered to their homes and because they're not traveling then already going out as much dinner than going to the movies means really saving a lot of money The using it to pay down debt and to home improvement projects and things like that and so these consumers are expected to actually spend quite a lot during the holiday season. They might not be spending on vacations but they probably will be spending on nice electronics for their families gifts. Or perhaps they'll be decorating the house improving the house in some way so it's quite early to say but one thing that we're definitely seeing. Is this divide. They call it the qe shaped recovery. So you have. The upper arm of the k. Is generally knowledge workers who can shelter in place. What from home and then on the bottom half of the cave. People who are really struggling with declining in service sector employment as we head into the colder months what are some shifts businesses especially restaurants or considering to help drive sales through the end of the year. We'll it's tough restaurants in you know the northern hemisphere because the cold weather is closing in. So they're having to become pretty creative and then the other thing that we're seeing of course is the fact that a lot of places now introducing new shutdown measures local level so some restaurants are doing things like that trying to push outdoor dining in space heaters and things like that and of course really pushing the curbside pickup and delivery options but it is definitely a very difficult time for those types of businesses. The service sector in person is really really struggling on the other hand you see a lot of businesses that already doing very well in the pandemic so for instance. Today we had the home depots earnings. And that's a company that has seen sales and earnings increase markedly because people are just staying at home. And they're spending money on improving their homes and on doing the painting the garage door and things like that so there are definitely winners and losers in this particular

Harriet Tori Amazon Corona Wall Street Journal United States Harry Brennan
How Investment Advisors Invest Their Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:54 min | 2 months ago

How Investment Advisors Invest Their Money

"Josh bam co riddled wealth management and author of the new book. How i invest money. Welcome to the show. So josh in this book you talk to your fellow. Money managers about how they invest their own money. What they do with it. Is this kind of like asking chefs like what they cook for themselves when they're at home. I think that's a really great analogy. I hadn't i hadn't thought of that. But i like it. I'm gonna steal that steel steel away. So yeah tell me about. Were there any surprises. There were There were a few constance. We heard a lot about index funds of being a building block for portfolios. Yeah you're basically like placing a bet on the stock market going up on the index itself. Going up and this is like one. Oh one investors thing like this does not seem like what pros you know. All the stuff would do. They're like extremely basic but they're basically a good way because what you see is what you get and for better or for worse. You don't have somebody who's trying to beat the stock market and failing and then we heard a lot of people who had made investments that they know mathematically or logically weren't necessary than one of my favorite child is my bob. See right who He's got a couple of decades on me but his his his concept was sometimes the financial investment. That looks the the most illogical makes the most sensible when you incorporate the emotional aspects and he's talking about a beach cottage that he bought that is now where all of the memories of a stanley are made. And it's where he spends time with his grandkids and financially. It's not a good investment will probably not break even on it but that's not the point. What was the craziest thing you heard. I think i was surprised. That howard wounds in he's an angel investor out west. I was surprised that he owns zero bonds. Oh yeah because the banzer like that's sort of like the i guess if we're going to keep our chef analogy. That's like pasta. That is like everybody's got pasta on the menu. I almost think it's even more elemental than that. I almost think it's the water that you boil and rinse vegetables at our best. When we say bonds we're referring to his treasury bonds which are colloquially speaking the risk free asset supposed to be the safest thing yeah we his his entire persona is wrapped up in this idea of just growth as far as the eye can see and he's willing to bear risk and he's ever accomplished in his life has come as a result of bearing risk bearing more risk than others were bear. And so that's that's like an invest an example of an investment philosophy overlaps with the life philosophy. Did you get any sense of of how these investors deal with their money at a moment like this like in a moment of crisis. Because i imagine that is a question. You're getting all the time. If you're going to be a financial adviser to investors and you're gonna be worth anything to to those investors you have to have an investment philosophy. That's long-term in nature and that is built to endure market events economic crises et cetera. You have to get people to believe in what they're invested in if you expect them to hold onto that portfolio through market volatility. Their relationship with their investments is casual and not spiritually and emotionally meaningful. Been it's easy for them to discard those investments. The minute the sledding. It's tough and so. I think one of the biggest trends in the market twenty twenty is on. Es g or environmental social and governance focused investing so these are portfolio's being put together based on the premise that investors want to have their money go to companies. That are doing the right thing doing the right thing in terms of did the environment when we say governance are they treating shareholders fairly. We say social or the promoting women. Are they hiring. People that are non white forty year old males on. Es g is the only category of mutual fund that saw positive infos this year really and the good news is that the millennial generation They care about what they own. They wanna have a connection with their portfolio. So i would say that that that's like one of the the silver linings of this moment in time is that wall street is waking up to the fact that this is a new generation of investor this generation not only didn't panic from volatility volatility actually drew them closer in. Okay josh you heads knew. This question was coming. How do you invest your money. While i'm at one hundred percent crypto so same same so in my 401k as is your retirement invest directly in the same strategies that our clients do on the other end of the spectrum. I'm doing some things. That are a lot riskier than what i would do for clients so outside of my retirement accounts. I'm making veteran vestments. I'm backing friends. Were starting companies so like for me. That's what makes me feel good to be able to support things that i myself believe in people more importantly that i believe in so what is like the most amazing investment. You've made what's the one that got away. The most amazing investment i ever made was in my own company in two thousand thirteen. My partner and i put up fifty thousand dollars. We built the firm that i think could be doing ten million dollars in revenue next year. Wow so the best investment you ever made was in your own having your own business your own entrepreneurial. Venture was there when the gateway well. When i was a teenager. I owned all of the dot. Com stocks is a teenager nineteen. You were like a man. I was like. I don't even know what is doing but definitely investing in stocks earrings at the mall was really does an idiot savant. Because i didn't hold any of them. I had a bunch of stocks that no longer exist. But i also owned amazon. But i didn't hold it like so like all right so i've long since we bought. It said oreo be fine. But like i'm saying you know you say to yourself. How can you really regret that decision. How could you have possibly known of the thirty. Publicly traded dot com companies from nineteen ninety seven nine hundred ninety eight that one of them was going to become as big as important as amazon. And you wouldn't pick amazon by the white. It was a company that sold books bucks. Yeah totally so anyway but like i. Don't i try not to dwell on stuff like that you know. That's that's an argument in favor of indexes on because what happens in an index as the companies that go bankrupt and disappear the smaller. They get the more they shrink shrinking importance in the index. Because they get so small whereas the winners that keep on winning balloon in size within the index One of the best regret minimization tricks. I know of is to at the the index to its work. And had you done that over the last thirty years rather than trying to outsmart the market. You probably did better than ninety nine percent of other investors. Excellent will josh. Thank you so much for talking with me. It's my pleasure. Stacey thank you so much for having me. And i hope

Donald Trump is finished, but will 'Trumpism' prevail?

Between The Lines

08:07 min | 2 months ago

Donald Trump is finished, but will 'Trumpism' prevail?

"It's been more than a week since the us presidential election joe biden of course has claimed victory whereas the president is yet to concede defeat but when donald trump eventually leaves office the question. We have to ask ourselves is is trumpism. Really finished after all the media conventional wisdom the new york times washington. Post the major networks. Cnn msnbc all that conventional wisdom is that the twenty twenty election represents a repudiation of trumpism and what's trump luckily to do after he leaves office well for more. Let's turn to patrick. J buchanan senior adviser to president reagan nixon and ronald reagan. Pat has been a regular fixture in america's opinion pages and cable television shows for generations. Ninety ninety two and ninety six pat buchanan ran for the presidential nomination of his party. The republican party on america first platform pass walking back to you between the lines. Good to your tom now. Let's start with the election itself to spotted trifecta of crises health economic racial the us congressional and presidential contests were very tight. How do you account for that. I think there were tight for this reason. The covid virus which hammered us in march and april and then all during the summer and full took the lodge. That's two hundred and thirty thousand americans and they induced an economic decline unrivalled since the great depression. And then you have to racial turmoil in the country. And the wake of the killing of george floyd in minneapolis riots. And and things like that. So he's really damaged trump in the eyes of the public and his administration and normally they would've killed any presidential candidate. But i will say that in the fall. When trump was further behind he basically one mechanic team won the battle against biden. It was surging at the end of the campaign but he did not get over the top or at least so far so i think what you can say is trump and trumpism won the campaign. They lost the election because of the burdens. They had to terry which were too happy to cross the finish line. And let's not forget that in the late up to the election the metric conventional wisdom the polls the pundits. They predicted a democratic sweep. A blue wave washing the republicans out of power capturing the senate and delivering an alleged democratic congressional majority if the democrats did indeed have a clean sweep of the congress and the white house what would radical progressive in the american takes. What would that have made if you had nancy. Pelosi in control of the house and chuck schumer and control. The should i which looks less and less likely now and preston biden into white house. Biden's problem would be the tremendous pressure from the progressive left wing of this party to impose his leftist agenda. The party home to the country in the first two years of his administration. And i think it would be virtually impossible biden to resist the democrats cheap to kill the filibuster. Which would eliminate the ability of the republicans to stop their agenda and we would be off to the races with medicare for all the green new deal statehood for puerto rico statehood for dc. Defunding the cops. Pack the supreme court the whole left wing democratic agenda. They would try to ram through with fifty one votes. In the senate and biden frankly would be restraining force because republicans wouldn't be able to do it if they lost the filibuster in the senate which is what. Barack obama urged the democrats to take away if they win the senate okay now bought and has pasta to sydney electoral college. Votes needed to win the white house now given that it's very hard to prove widespread electoral fraud pat. Why want trump just accept defeat. Here's trump is demanding that he be allowed to play out last play of the deal. Because i think he feels he has been treated horribly by the democrats and the liberals in the press and he's not gonna do them a favour. He's got a right to make sure. The counselor made and certain things happen by certain dates. He's not going to speed up the transition. It's not gonna be a pleasant transition at all. He's going to treat them the way they felt. They treated him when he came in with the russia investigation and all the rest of it. So i think what you're getting is. Trump is looking at upon this if it succeeds is a hostile takeover of the government of the united states. And he is acting to resisted with every legal constitutional weapon. He has so it's This is not a cordial country power at all. Okay but with dany. Before the nineteen sixty presidential election between richard nixon and john f kennedy. That was very taught. There was a lot of speculation about electoral fraud in texas and illinois. And that of course benefited. The democrats won that election now. Apologies for the very scratchy. Sound quality of these vintage news report from sixty years ago. but he's nixon. Your boss pat here. He is at four. Am at republican headquarters. After the election conceding. Defeat to and and results shows come in if the present trend continues If mr kennedy and senator kennedy will be the next president of the united states senators kennedy now. And i want you know that. Certainly this trend has continued and he does become our next president that he will have my. That's richard nixon conceding. Defeat john f. kennedy in nineteen sixty pat buchanan. Why can't trump do a nixon accept defeat graciously that at four am gathering. My wife was present. She worked for richard nixon and the nineteen sixty campaign and travel. The country would and the point is that was a different time in a different country. That america's today america's bitterly divided and one of the contributing factors is the is the belief correct in my view that donald trump was denied. Not only a good transition but donald trump was investigated by the fbi and during the transition. They went after his state of the fbi did and they had a two year investigation beach. Kim they try to defeat him then they tried to overthrow him. And i think trump feels this and he says i established nothing. They can go. I mean they can go too far as i'm concerned and we're going to run this old way out and make sure every ballot is counted and all the towns are accurate. And whether or not we're going to go to court and exercise our rights and we're not going to pretend otherwise that this is a pleasant for easy transfer of power this was a hostile takeover and trump's view. I mean they're campaign run against him former first lady. Michelle obama is already talking about the house and he could and racism and the rest endemic pain in what he come folks voted for. So i think look you gotta divided country and there's no sense pretending otherwise and trump is not gonna gauge any pretense.

J Buchanan President Reagan Nixon Biden America George Floyd Senate Donald Trump Pat Buchanan Preston Biden Joe Biden White House Sydney Electoral College Msnbc Ronald Reagan Republican Party The New York Times Richard Nixon CNN Chuck Schumer
Digital anthropology with Genevieve Bell

UX Podcast

07:38 min | 2 months ago

Digital anthropology with Genevieve Bell

"I think i think many of us when when we actually think of technical systems we think of the modern digital technologies but technical systems. They've been around weavers an awful long time they have. And it's nice to get to talk to you. And per james and often when i start conversations not usually podcast but other conversations. I'd stop by actually acknowledging. I am and that's partly a story about an older technical system are today. I'm sitting on the lands of the wall and nambi people. I don't want to pay my respects to the eldest pasta present and to acknowledge that this compensation will be listened to on the lands of traditional owners and traditional elders all over the world. I wanna pay my respects to them to and from a pot of acknowledging the place where you're standing with the place where you're starting is whenever i want to think about technical systems or about build a future all telling stories about the future. I like to imagine that most of those stories didn't come out of nowhere right. They start somewhere with someone. And i'm lucky enough to live these days in a country where humans have been building technical systems. Well first closest forever as we can probably get so. There are technical systems in australia. That died back. Forty sixty thousand years. And i was thousand years. Yeah absolutely humans deliberately creating structures that changed the world in order to create different kinds of experiences. I was lucky enough. Two years ago to go visit one. I in a town called warrener was on the new south wales queensland border. So you're thinking of a map of australia. Go two thirds of the way up mostly to the right and the river system and there's a place where a large riba abandons basically and on that band there are a series of stone. Fish whiz archaeologists argue. About how old they are. But the running argument somewhere between four to forty thousand years old in either instance that makes them some of the oldest human built technical structures in the world and these are deliberate right. They extend columbia in distance. Downriver they are a series of stone u-shaped pens that were built to contain the fishes. The water moves up in flows down that river in the fish. Move up that are filters the fish. Basically in flow of their series of fish fish traps all they built like fishnets. That is the origin story of the one of the ancestors decided to build a stone. Fish nets they will lost photographed in use in the nineteen teens So a system that is thousands if not tens of thousands of years in the making it suggests incredibly on robust understanding of hydrology of fish behavior. These have been carefully tended and curated over seasons and he is in decades and they were not built for the sake of them are. They weren't because someone said got some startling lying around. We should do something with that comes from quite some distance. It's dry stone. If you know anything about that. Kind of technology said dry stone walls familiar. I suspect in your part of the world as mine and they were utilized with complicated social patents about who tended them who will job to the fish but ultimately what they was in the service of doing multiple nations to gather on the banks of that river and trade conduct rituals exchange information a human at scale and so he has this system that says the humans that lived in that place on the stood stone but amsterdam hydrology. They understood the behaviors of fish. And i thought about people and human society. And so whenever i think about technical systems in my now life twenty-first-century like to hold that idea in the back of my head that it is possible to build technical systems. That are not just technologies right. They are systems of knowledge. They are ways of understanding the environment ways of making sense all the end supporting human behavior and that those things don't have to be At all to each other they can actually exist as a system of systems. And so it's kind of this powerful image that sits in the back of my head most is not that system if it lasted that long forty thousand plus years then they have been managing it. I guess you mean they're they're also iterating it. Because the absolutely there's evidence of that system evolving and growing over time expanding and contracting in terms of where the storms will being moved. And of course it's also system that existed through a period of european colonization of australia so when europeans i turned up in that set of river valleys in the eighteen eighteen twenties. They sold the ways. They knew that average won't people had fish there by the time. The townships built there later in that century Europeans took some of the rocks out of the river because they were smooth and well shaped and use them to make the foundations of the towns nearby. Thus both changing the way that system work but also taking some of that knowledge and in some ways inserting it into a whole although structure and in the meantime new concrete ways will put on that river to redirect the water so that it could be used for shipping and that sort of changed those systems. but no. you're absolutely right. That's a period of time. So thirty ten thousand years forty thousand years multiple changes in global environment such that people would have had to have thought differently and continued to write and evolved that system and work out what worked and then they were willing to change and how to go about changing it and i think you know for me. I don't know about you to. I've spent a long time silicon valley and it's been a long time around engineers and the notion of site someone right. Here's the thing that system you'll building. I need to get at least ten thousand years out of it. Forty would be excellent but tanzi bottom is other than stewart brands long now foundation. I can't think of that. Many people who are thinking on a ten thousand horizon for a technical system given given that we've we've done those can achieve those kinds of technical systems of those kind of periods of time on scale given the frustrations with with how many the systems we're dealing with the developing six silicon valley valet or in the digital sphere. That feels frustration. Feels were not building stuff with that kind of sam. Not we're not just diligence but thoughtfulness and consideration for how. It's going to do what it wants to should be doing. In the beginning we do. Also i think we have not necessarily thought about technology inside those other relationships and responsibilities. Right when i sort of may one of the things about these fish traps in war and other systems like them is that they want just about starting right. This is not olympics oriented system. We have a phone system. It's not that right. It was designed with the intention of supporting human activity in known human activity and things that mattered and it was designed into the environment rather than pretending that it didn't exist with a blank slate right so there's a. I'm not sure that we miss the ball. I think it's that we allow ourselves to imagine different starting point and we haven't always thought about technologies that way you look back at multiple points in the history of the west in the history of technologies globally. We've often been willing to imagine. That would different starting points and didn't always start with. Oh have this technology. What will we do with it. It often started with this thing. We should look at how to do better. Or i think being trying to think about having a soul or or attention we need to resolve. And we're going to put technology in the middle to resolve it.

Warrener Australia New South Wales Queensland James Columbia Tanzi Stewart Brands Long Now Founda Amsterdam SAM Olympics
Speech and Systems

Exponent

06:15 min | 8 months ago

Speech and Systems

"A few weeks ago and is about to publish zero trust information that basically made the argument that you would think would not be a controversial opinion, but that there might be some upside social networks you know in that you can surface information. That might not be surfaced. And I actually told you before I published at that Oh. This is going to be a controversial one and you're like why. What's? I'd have been right. It was at a virtual I would point I add three journalists from a particular newspaper attacking same time on twitter. For literally not attacking out anything about any. Neither here nor there. So that case sort of I saw it coming, right. So fast forward to this week. I wrote a couple of pieces about sort of moment I mean it's almost hard to know how to characterize what's going on. We had delay the PODCAST, so the helicopters that. Were over, your house could move on. Protesting. We've covered and everything I felt like it was necessary to go out with suitable precautions, but yeah I was out there a couple of hours earlier, yeah, and I felt that I needed to write piece, and his first one was about growing up in Madison. This sort of. Sort of city ranked number. One City live in America where that came out. When is in high school was very excited about it, and it turned out. It's not necessarily a great place to live if you are African American, and to understand the history of that and things like redlining, and you can still see the scars from that today, and you can see it very clearly in a place like Minneapolis where. The murder of officially the homicide right now of George Floyd and you're the racial covenants that were in place in Minneapolis that's still define sort of the makeup of neighborhoods, today and point that forward the Tech Angle here and this isn't a cliche. Let's see we can work in tech. Hear to me, this is such a text story because of things like phone cameras and social networks that show what was likely. Almost certainly we know was happening for many. Many, many many years, but was just swept under the blanket, swept the rug, and no one knew about, and that is something that is important and meaningful. It's important meaningful for the world broadly important meaningful for people like you and I to understand. Yeah, you know our position in the world and I think it's something that's important and I appreciate the feedback. I got for that article. Generally you know people like it and sort of with that in mind. We get into the article in a bit, but with that I wrote an article the next day sort of defending facebook's this isn't did not take down president trump's tweets, and in this case I'd legs Masonite is sort of posted it and then think about it and. I was pretty surprised at the extremity of the feedback. I don't feel bad for publishing it, but it was one. I didn't quite see coming. In the way to Zero Trust, information and degree to which this has become a almost tribal and political point is pretty incredible, and that's why award you are. You sure you want gasoline this? We already had Charlie podcast or you wanted to do another one, but you wanted to die. Right in so here we are here. We are I mean those along as deducted. That's why reticent that's why I'm reticent. And it makes sense. Let me just state it clearly upfront. I have been a facebook critic over the years for a number of things, but I am not going to criticize them full leaving up the tweet, the comments of the president of the United States of America like starting down the path where a private company that is like a route from a elected official to the people of the country. Country that a private company should be standing between those two entities and deciding what's okay for that to get passed along, and what's not okay K for that to get pasta along. It boggles my mind that people think that we should be going back into the gatekeeper era on something so fundamental to democracy. It just boggles my mind so apparently. I'm to Fatu now on not being able to pick. Pick up on when these things are going to go incendiary, because like I didn't pick up the one on zero trust information that you found yourself in a fight with journalists on. Even though you did, but this one I would have picked up on either. It's like I'm down to give. facebook crashed when I feel like they deserve it, but I feel like they deserved that this time and I. I certainly don't feel like you deserve to fascinating in such a well reasoned logical way why that was the right Cole, yeah, I'm fine to be clear, so we kind of fast forward to the end here. The conclusion is right up front, but I think it might be sort of back up because it's been a I, think developing over a few weeks, and it does predate sort of the current. Moment with the protests and the video of George, Floyd and so even before that happened this started with twitter, attaching effect label, or you get the facts label to to trump tweets and these tweets were about trump. You're saying that Malan belting with peaceable to huge amounts of fraud. Obviously, the question about mail in balloting is the top of mind because of the crow virus, and they attach the labels. Trump did not like that to say the least bit. That's a good place to start. How did you feel about twitter attaching those labels to trump's tweets? Question Okay, so we certainly not at the point of taking post down, but this is such a slippery slope. It's so difficult I. Mean on one hand good on them for making a decision, so they made a decision like okay. This is how we're GONNA do it. We're GONNA attached reliable. But like how does this play out at scale like a week and a goes through every elected official and decide when they? They nate, fact, checking and win then not, and where are we going to get a common set of facts from I think the twitter get the facts post. Initially, that was referenced underneath that trump tweet. Correct me if I'm wrong, but pointed at something that had a factual inaccuracy in that's right. Did like they planning on building out a wikipedia style organization with an accepted set of facts that everybody agrees on bike. I get it in the instance, but like I'm trying to think about how this works on mass, but I don't know how it works at scale

George Floyd Minneapolis President Trump Twitter Facebook America Fatu Masonite Madison Charlie Malan Cole Floyd Donald Trump George Nate
"pasta" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"pasta" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Put them in a battery in batter and you can get rid of a lot of them that way. I mean they're really taste great. That would be a simple way to do it. The other thing you could do is just to slice them. Emma Saute am and then freeze them after. You've done that. And then just add them to soups and stews. Throughout the year. They freeze I guess they would if you have them. It's the problem I'm Lou with any vegetables. The amount of liquid so once you cook them and get rid of the excess liquid then they would freeze very nicely and they like fat. I imagine most mushrooms do so saw payment payment oil or butter until their tender ish. And then you know freeze them in batches and then you can use them that way. This time of year in the fall. How many pounds announced you end up with sprang like say the ten pounds pretty quickly? Yeah it's like give them away because it's just more than I can deal with I think grilling and shopping. Two dollar is something you can freeze would be great. Yeah once you come down or deep frying battered. Yeah thanks for calling yes. Thank you time for some cooking inspiration from one of our listeners. This is David Harrison in Rochester. New York I have a cooking tips. I use the tomato test to determine whether my knives are sharpened. Sharpen up some people try to use a serrated knife on a tornado which is fine and convenient but I like to use use my other knives as way of telling whether the knives are sharp enough for general use. If I can't cut a tomato with a regular non-separated knife I know he's trying to sharpen the Nice So that's my tip. Thank you bye. If you'd like to share your culinary hacker secret ingredient on milk street radio please go to one seventy seven military dot com slash radio tips next up. It's Mad French food scientists. Alex I news. Alex how are you. I'm I'm good. I'm good super 'cause I've been working with a puff pastry recently..

David Harrison Alex I Emma Saute Lou New York Rochester Two dollar ten pounds milk
"pasta" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on House of Carbs

"But maybe you only want four mouthfuls because you're, no, you're hoping you're going to be with a loved one. At some point later in the evening, you cannot eat a pound and a half of that delicious. With your one because you're going to smell like that for the next twelve hours. It's one of the great things. The meat BAAs especially if they're bred them as they absorbed the bad breath from the other stuff they can. They can play offering role. They really important breath buffer. So another thing that we haven't talked about yet is the consistency of the pasta. Sure. Because what you don't want is for them to make the pasta two hours earlier in the pen is all stuck together, right? You almost you almost need like another two people who have the small pots and that like like the stuff from 'cause we did, I making fun of vegans, and I'd like gluten free pasta. So feel free shit by the way, the vegans, it's, it's just fun. Like take the teasing. We're just teasing. It's fine. The vegans have no sense of humor. Part of the problem is every it's so bad shape everything. It's like, why can't we tease you? Nobody can be teased and Richard. Your stand. This is a chores, settle, Dan, look, you so uncomfortable. I'm defending the vegans. I don't think it's a defender offense, like we can't teach people. We people all the time people all time cigarettes all the time with the choice choice. With the gluten free pasta if you buy like the small little boxes. Yes. And you put that on the thing bowling water cooks in like a minute, or if you buy like the really fresh pasta, it's almost kinda premade. So I would think you need the two extra people that are like, I'd like the ravioli. That'd be great, puts in the thing as they're making the sauce somebody else's making. So there is almost like two people working on your plate. Well, that's interesting. That's a different thing. Right away. So ravioli is its own animal. Anything like tortellini ravioli stuffed pasta that needs to be like precooked and really kept in some kind of container where those those individual morsels cannot all congealed and convenient congealing bad. Now, popaginos mistake, the pasta would actually congealed together almost like an alien that was like and ending cells to to their credit. They did not care now to us if you want to break up this giant possible that you just dumped on your plate, take some sauce poured in there. Yeah, take your fork. Now, he put the chemicals, tomato sauce. You're on congealed the past to breakdown pasta mountain. Here's the interesting thing about that customized experience at a pasta bar. Putting it into a pan with ingredients edition of heat and some kind of oil or butter has the effect for the next Paul by itself will will. Render the pasta, more malleable, recharges it. It refreshes it. I'm sure chef. David Chang could give us the chef scientific sex. Rejuvenation, but for pasta. Said that not me. That. Just gonna just gonna try. It's a pasta ju- rejuvenation pasta chew. It's pasta jubilation. That's as far as we're going with. And and and if you have like a small like you have a dozen pen as in their right, bang, they're ready so fast, but it is as though they just came out because there with the ingredients mixed in there recharged and there are there al-baatikh and ready for your pastas dente and ready for your pleasure. This the best thing about the pasta bar, which we haven't even really talked to by other than the end to ban stuff. Why can't I have three different choices on the same plate glorious. So glad you made the point, some pre made stuff that was, but you know, every half hour, they're pre making stuff. So they're, here's like a little finish eating Frago. Sure in. Here's some penny Raby Atta. Yes, and I don't know. Tortellini invive, whatever in you just go. And you do the three and the plate and do little mix and match. So people Siser the important thing there is to one Joe house favorite Joe house. Fair. Let there be no doubt. You cannot to your order point, be a dick and walk up there and try and take over two of the pans and have the pasta. Chef prepare fresh versions of those two things. So if you want to amend the chef only thing, you want to supplement the possible experienced by having a couple of pre assembled choices that are right there. And that are under some kind.

David Chang Joe house Raby Atta Dan Richard Paul twelve hours two hours
"pasta" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on House of Carbs

"I, I love the variety of options available in that in that diet. It's on a diet that I personally can I give you my favorite. Go ahead. The vegan who also smoke cigarettes. The perfect storm of what the fuck are you doing? What's going on? There are a lot of those folks. So why somebody vegan for a combination of hell, diet health, ethical, moral, ethical, moral. Environmental lot of people are making that that you know where to cigarettes fit into all this. Right, right. I, I don't know any vegan cigarettes. Boecker sad. There's a couple of California New, you know who you are, has probably dated one or seven of them. Yeah, one for sure. You dated a vegan cigarettes. What was vegetarian vegan? She's a vegetarian cigarette smoker. What was what was the line of thought there because animals see, I didn't realize that animals have to die for me to say she aided out there. You dare me my God. What about the best person argue with about? Got so back to the pasta bar. I think five or six, but I think you need the vegan sauce to take care of the vegans, the your lame, butternut squash idea. That's actually great marinara is also, you know. Way to be against that. So here, here's the experience I had that I think really could be done and replicated and really elevate the pasta bar. First of all, I love the customize option. So you walk up to person and you look at them in the eye? Yeah, just the pasta. Barsha pasta bar chef. There's so my though. Right. Sauce? Oh, my goodness. In a penny vodka circle. A pasta sauce. Sasa may see my very ticket, the cabinets Newton, the ice cream. So my remember that was ones that can I recommend you stashing delicious possession? I know I knew you're going to say delicious. It was happening. Delicious. It was a great recommendation by the ice cream saw. So, yeah, maybe. I mean, this is the thing right? If you had somebody there to help you and this is the pasta, chef him or herself could play this role and it so happened, I'm not going to drop. Am I going to namedrop? Yeah, I was there with Adam Rappaport the editor chief of appetite magazine who might have been through pasta bar to in his debt. Yeah, so he walks up there and he knows he has a clear sense of what flavor profile he wants in his mouth. The brother says, I'm want sausage. Okay, bam. The guy guys a little olive oil. The pan sausage goes in puts marinara and they're no, no, no, no, no. What what? Rapa was in the mood for was a green experience. So he he started with sausage. Pesto came in broccoli, small broccoli chunks came in. Well, he whipped up a little little batch on the pan. This is almost like an par. Yes, this is exactly what it is, and this is why the possible to be elevated. Now living second rocky counter, go ahead. That sounds like there's a line now or what will you can always. Adamant where beenish it had. Good. My can I get my own sauce with broccoli and sausage pesto. Now everyone's waiting for him for these places have been around the block once or twice..

Rapa California Sasa Adam Rappaport appetite magazine editor
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"That's so interesting but yeah so on the machine and that's what's going on but of course the texture of your pasta is going to have something to do with your cooking technique yes it is and alemi i almost don't know what to do with your non sauced pasta concept because okay normally whenever you're cooking a pasta and a sauce what you're going to want to do with it is cook it cook the pasta too about all dente in very hot water you boil the water then you drop in the pasta could as quickly as possible right because the longer that you cook pasta and water the soggy or it's going to get you don't want soggy pasta could a high heat very quickly and you wanna stop it like a minute or two before you think it's really done a little bit before dante actually when it's still a little bit too chewy stop it drain it let it hang out for a second in in the meanwhile you should have heated up your sauce to to a good good good firm simmer so when you drain your pasta you can put the drained pasta directly into that sauce and let it finish cooking in the sauce itself that helps it absorb a little bit more of a flavour which is good times for everybody hypothetically except for you oh and i don't i don't know what to do about that you're really you're really blowing my mind here i guess i guess my recommendation for us to really watch that all dante thing and then maybe add like like reserve a like a cup or so of your pasta water and.

dante
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Often after that you'd bake it for an half an hour to melt the cheese that was probably one of your toppings of choice who pastas popularity in italy soared to new heights in the seventeenth eighteenth century especially in naples and sicily as documented by the poet goethe it can be bought everywhere and all the shops were very little money as a rule it is simply cooked in water and seasoned with grated cheese this macaroni they served us was exquisite the pasta seemed unparalleled to me and its whiteness and fineness this is a quote from the part of this rise in popularity was because it was becoming more accessible to the common folks and increasingly a staple in their diet people from naples who had once been nicknamed leaf eaters now we're called macaroni eaters and all of this had to do with with with i the developing recipe for pasta that was being created the types of flour in the flower processing and also specific for naples naples climate and weather was really particularly suited to pasta production because the temperature there fluctuates from hot to chile throughout the day which helps form ideal and even texture all the way through a piece of pasta if it's too warm the whole time that you're that you're drying pasta out your possible get crunchy if it's too cool it might not firm up all the way through into the middle going back and forth will prevent a crust from forming but dries the whole thing out more like the texture that we're used to today sure one reason posited for this shift of pasta from the air stock rec to the commoners which i always feel so when i say that is that the the comers no longer had access to meet or could no longer afford it perhaps or at least not as much of it and we had become cheap there was also the whole religious thing you meat on fridays what have you but the big one was industrialization and the invention of mechanical pasta press to help speed things along and make.

naples italy sicily naples naples chile
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Another author franco's than cat day wrote about pasta in thirteen ninety see basically describing situation two friends sharing played pasta in one eating way more than the other and this is something else i can relate to my apologies to anyone who's ever shared food with me we work at it's fine thank you learn thank you and one thing to note again this early pasta was not exactly like our positive day for one it was cooked a lot longer there was no out dente really back then and it was mixed with a much wider range of things like honey a lot of sweeter things and we'll probably associate with posit today probably the the production techniques were different at that time leading to a different necessity of cooking yes exactly at first pasta was another one of those aristocratic foods a food fit for fancy feast a papal feast from the sixteenth century featured ravioli with a paste filling of pork belly cow udders raisins cheese sugar and herbs and spices probably listen eleven is that a kfc reference yep if you're wondering how positive was made at the time great question it was typically mixture of flour in maybe breadcrumbs although today's a standard pasta flour molina didn't arise until sometime in the middle ages mixed with ethics and goats milk and then and thinly sliced into strips with a roller cutter and then left out or usually hung on some sort of rack or even kind of like a close clothesline type thing totally yeah to dry and once they were dry you boil them for up to half an hour and then you covered him with your sauce and topic of choice.

franco milk
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"As well it probably originated in central asia and then spread westward from there some historians even argue over whether or not an italian tomb dating back to fourth century bc depicts pasta making a quick ment suggesting that it is older than previously thought however that's just about the only potential evidence of pasta in pre roman times italy so it probably isn't a possum making device on the tomb but something else it wasn't until the twelve hundred ce that possum mentions grew more and more frequent macaroni like we mentioned no key vantage shelly just translates a little worms ravioli among them and this was probably due to increased trade archaeological evidence of a durum wheat noodle called laguna yep the that is the origin of the word lasagna goes all the way back to first century see and this was oven baked instead of boiled so that's a bit different than what we think of now one of the first references of pasta being boiled actually comes from the jerusalem town mood and a discussion over whether boil dough constituted unleavened bread thanks to its long shelflife dried pasta was often found in ship stores which helped travel to new places and one of the first type of pasta was probably the sonya the noodles were laid out in the sun to dry and then cut with a tool designed to leave behind those curly interlocking edges this was a popular choice to replace mute during lintz interesting since hell lasagna now has meet of it but it was i served in a similar way to flat breads or like an open face sandwich exactly yeah there you go pasta makes an appearance in several italian literary works author bo cacho wrote something i can entirely relate to in fourteenth century ce it was a fantasy of chefs rolling macaroni and ravioli denham mountain of parmesan cheese oh.

asia bo cacho jerusalem
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Heart stunned language who's touched your and one of my other favorite things is in late twenty seventeen david rudnik who is a graphic designer and a pasta expert okay he ranked lesser known pasta shapes based on how good they taste and how well they do sauces for this ranking he made charts rubrics he wrote short reviews like this one for few silly bucatini frontal pasta with near infinite surface areas or this description of the trinity as triangular shape almost conveys blade runner esque neo future noir and cold heartless form the fits our age that is pretty delightful wow yeah he did this for many many many types of pasta i've got to say of never thought i i've never had an emotion about blade runner and pasta senton well it's it's time to start thinking about bladerunner when you lost lauren o apparently okay definitely seek that out if you're interested it was very it was wonderful david redneck yeah italians eaten estimated sixty plus pounds of pasta a year for americans that number is around twenty pounds so they've got us beat there for once we're not doing the most of the eating of something congratulations to someone yeah i'm not sure who case yes depends on your outlook i feel like we're losing out yeah oh man so we do have a general pasta history and overview perhaps but first a quick break for word from our sponsor this episode is brought to you by ziprecruiter are you hiring every business needs great people a better way to find them something better than posting your job online and just praying for the right people to see it is it critter knew there was a smarter way so they built a platform that finds the right job candidates for you ziprecruiter learns what you're looking for dentists people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job these invitations have revolutionized how you find your next higher in fact eighty percent of employers who post jobs on ziprecruiter get quality candidate through the site in just one day and ziprecruiter doesn't stop there but even spotlight the strongest applications receive so you never miss a great match the right candidates are out there ziprecruiter is how you find them right now our listeners can try ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to ziprecruiter dot com slash food stuff that's ziprecruiter dot com slash food stuff ziprecruiter.

david rudnik lauren o eighty percent twenty pounds one day
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"My favorite dishes in atlanta ooh boca lupo so good i was talking to joe about that when we started i started talking to him about the pasta he was eating you're interrogating i bet and okay all all of this has been a lot of words and very little practical advice i would say that traditionally the the only rule as as you said earlier any is to kind of match the delicacy or not of the sauce to the delicacy or not of the pasta like the the texture of angel hair or or or so would get lost in something really chunky sauce mate of like whole roasted cherry tomatoes and chicken sausage slices in a spicy tomato puree for just just off the top of my head uhhuh but something like a curly sealy or like a ear shell shaped arket they would be really great for saas like that contrary wise a light garlic cream sauce with we clams or like a broth e summer sauce with chopped fresh tomatoes and basil those would get lost on those chewier pastas and meanwhile neither of those types of pasta shapes would really highlight eight medium heavy sauce like say a a media raghu or like a heavy cheesy cream sauce you'd want to medium pasta for that a like a regatta knee or a pepper delhi but more butts all that being said there are so many shapes of pasta and so many types of sauces and depending on the effect you want i think that you can really play with a with a sameness or contrast of textures and different stuff yeah one of my favorite things researching this episode has been reading the opinions about pasta shapes from chef so yeah and the the shade they'll throw macaroni oh people don't like macaroni oh no it's great i was reading some of these things like hand too.

atlanta joe
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Hopefully if the glass isn't like razor thin at the top the same way that that happens the sauce can kind of pull almost outwardly in specific types of shapes of pasta so the curvier it is like at certain points the more the surface tension is of the saas is gonna come into play also with an all of these shape categories you can have a whole spectrum of thickness or thinness of the pasta and that's going to affect the mouth feel the shoe end your basic ratio of like pasta sauce in any given bite the thicker the pasta the more it will be featured on your palate and of course health the pasta is physically made makes a difference here hen made pastas have a little bit of variation in thickness from piece to piece or even across single strand and the draw more attention to themselves in your mouth they give your brain something novel in each byte machine expressed pastas are uniform and will highlight the sauce more yeah and then you've also got the potential for surface texture is the pasta smooth or ridged like like like riffles have ridges yep averages to share reached pastas create greater surface area for the saas to stick to and also a little bit more potential for greater surface tension meaning that you will get more sauce flavor with every bite it also creates a lumpy or chunkier mouth feel on the past itself and he's making a happy face and i'm guessing guessing those those are the ones that you like.

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Sample yeah and okay this has to do with physics what yeah yeah because you're you're mostly talking about surface area and surface tension of sauces here if you're going to consider pasta shapes you've got a few categories to work with here sheets a long drapey noodles short curly noodles tubes butner shell shapes and dots and these are all going to affect how your plate of food looks and how you physically get the pasta into your mouth important considerations ford failed to do so in my case sometimes me two up plus the surface area of all of these different shapes affect how the sauce interacts with the pasta like think about it like if you blow up an equal amount of marinara on top of an equal weight of cooked lasagna sheet spaghetti noodles and macaroni elbows the the wide sheet is gonna look like an open face sandwich the spaghetti is going to kinda mix into the saucer the sauce into the spaghetti in the macaroni and the sauce are going to sort of incorporate if you add chunks of say girls keeney on top of any of those you're going to have to go through different methods to get a bite of pasta plus sauce plus veg into your mouth considering each shape right and furthermore the surface tension of the sauce is going to come into play when if you've got like a if you've got a noodle shape that's cupped or curved in any way that creates an opportunity for the sauce to to stick to it in a way that sauce normally wouldn't stop because saas is a flow flowing thing sure right like a scoop it's a scoop yeah sure sure but but the same way that if you carefully add water to eight glass it will dome up above the lip of the glass.

saas ford keeney
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Other versions of the story have lucretia borgias bellybutton instead of being ass was the inspiration there you go some ladies bellybutton and another fun fact i stumbled upon the possible origin of the name of the priest strangler pasta which i haven't heard of before but so what is what does this look like it looks like it's really uneven tubular shape i kind of reminds me of in check smith's that been there's that thin things case sure they'll squiggle yeah the squiggle but it's also got like ridges share it's a very uneven shape okay i've never had it but a local restaurant soda soto an atlanta has pre stringer pasta so it's a tightly wound uneven noodle shape and it originated in the tuscan region or once upon a time prese got to eat all they wanted anywhere be house or restaurant for free and did they take advantage owners of these establishments star to darkly joke that maybe they'd get lucky and the priest which choke on the uneven pasta shape before they moved onto the more expensive second course pre strangler see if we're talking about types types of shapes to yeah yeah there are over two hundred from a cini to pit to z three hundred types of dried pasta in italy alone i read in severe that there are over thirteen hundred types in italy but this may be that there are thirteen hundred names but not necessarily thirteen to thirteen hundred distinct shapes by law dry pasta in italy must be made with durham seem lena flour and water and there are a lot of regional pastas to you've got or so in greece spate sel in hungary and germany perogie and poland once on in china and the rain the main reason we have so many tights has to do with all the different types of sauces and toppings certain pasta shapes are better for certain sauces and certain flavors do better with lighter pastas versus heavier pastas for.

smith atlanta italy durham china lucretia borgias greece hungary germany poland
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Yeah working they would give me this look like i'm not sure they'd ever been asked to do that before i feel like i'm confessing some kind of secret over i don't i don't think that i've heard of someone doing that that's it's one of my weirdest food thing i've never down realizing that i've just never watched eat pasta so yeah i'm really bad at eating pasta i have friends that take pictures of me doing it and lauren and i've discussed this because i've long hair oh yeah if you don't holder yeah it's difficult and then the the noodles are long it's a tricky thing to eat it is apparently jc is really good at it as i was going to mention that leader more more on that later but right now pasta pasta shapes what is it it can be very right things yeah it's just a wild i like a plethora of shapes you can find in the pasta world openness immediate a myriad yes there are so many in i guess sort of one of the questions right off the top of the bat that i had that a lot of people have when they see just how many there are is does it the shape impact the taste are serve any real purpose at all yes yes the answer's yes awesome your answer the question okay episode ova and i got to admit that i'm a person that generally has no idea what i'm going to get when i order pasta at a nicer talion please which for me for a long time was macaroni grill i have since graduated i can i can tell you at a macaroni is that a cini angel hair was on linguini i thought i knew tortellini was but nope i was totally wrong found out when doing the research for this but i did learn that the shape of tortellini is rumored to be inspired by venus's bellybutton the legend is that venus stopped by a small village where two famous chefs bologna and dana an peeping tom of an innkeeper were and the peeping tom innkeepers aw venus undress through the keyhole and was inspired to make a filled pasta based on her belly button or.

lauren
"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on FoodStuff

"What is it it's few city jerry the hard part is to find a pasta the catchers individual why you silly because you're sitting no okay so this is where kramer was making sculptures like little many figurines of all the people in his life do you remember that one based and he would choose a pasta based on their personality right so for jerry because he's funny are still e each os few silly pasta and then there's a whole other plotline going on at the same time as this where there's a proctology just involved and their jerry's joke about the proctology is their stories always end with it's a million to one shot dr a million to one oh okay all right and george's dad falls on top of ucla jerry and he has to go to the rocktile gist he says it was a million tuck billion and as a as a kid one of my favorite dishes this is just like a personal thing for me was spaghetti and he's got the song spaghetti is ready when it's six the wall and i would sing it and the noodles at the wall and my mom would come into noodles everywhere because of its ready it's supposed to stick i don't know i don't know if actually is true that's the test that i would do i think they're cleaner tests you can just eat you can eat a piece and if it's no there's no song about that well actually they are yeah but this is one of my weird is food things is i do not to this day eat i keep separate the spaghetti sauce and the noodles okay you you add it do them separately or do you add them by by by eat them separately oh well and it's because i love the taste of the noodle so much i don't want this but getty to get in the way to get in the way one of my weirdest food things though even in college i would ask for it separate and the ladies and the.

kramer jerry george ucla getty
"pasta" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"But yeah he offered alfred pasta and he was like fire pasta right he's like no i'm i'm about to go go out with in shares was the aero and he's like yeah he's like okay you know you were allergic to girlfriends might be you know this might be the one or some shit in the us like nine like that we just going out and then there's why ask her if she wants some of this fire pasta about living and also noticed when he lived airs really try to put his foot in the foster the pasta and okay that's as much as they're they don't want me to to to revisit teddy perkins right i was like that's weird even for dairy right even for darius that's that's strange right so put that out there in case anything comes up later i feel like even for darius geared right so so okay now at this point where were you feeling about the stuff with his mom like i'm the first time i watched it in the very beginning i thought he'd gotten a made 'cause i keep noticing how much nicer the house er in is and like little things that like that like that lend themselves to saying to showing us the paper boys like increasingly more successful so at first when she first came on or when we first saw her in the four in the background i thought she was a maid until she started like fussing atom and then i'll and then there's something about the way that he moved that i was like oh he's dreaming and we're seeing or not dreaming.

alfred pasta us darius teddy perkins
"pasta" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on 710 WOR

"This psychological disorder demonic possession whatever you wanna call it but she has not rid herself it yet but he showed it to doctors and they say well it's not a medical condition it's not a neurological must be the devil so that's what i good morning natalie you're talking about you know how much that creeps me you know we were just talking about ainsley earhardt you know the host of fox and french's new book the light within me i think there's only darkness within you i really do any light within you well really does and his head just spun around three sixty in your piece of pasta how about this headline pasta is good for you say the scientists who what scientists well let's see well they get their degrees they're saying that the pasta is really good and you know you don't you don't gain weight well it turns out duquesne wait this is being called into question is it turns out this this scientific survey was funded by an organization called the barilla's group which is the world's largest possible gorilla pasta pasta actually it's always good deals on it very decent pasta so three of the scientists who are behind the study they're saying they have a conflict of interest because they have ties to this barilla's group and also russia collusion so i mean it's it's unbelievable how they're calling this the question really the best the best pasta i have to say is i get it at the marines you know that she famous cheese shop on bleaker street in the village they make their own pasta they hand rolled nothing better than homemade pasta ravioli is delicious yeah that's the sensation about this at least ten peer reviewed studies about pasta published as two thousand eight we're funded directly by barillas so here listen to this this is a quote here from an health expert the purpose of these studies is not to do basic science about the benefits of the mediterranean diets to sell burrell pasta that's what the purpose is to.

barilla burrell pasta ainsley russia
"pasta" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"pasta" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"We'll see assembles beauty pageants a and laws like raquel offered me how pasta give the two folk with me bitch because i will fuck up fuck your fat man he's gonna get booed with you and then move onto the next young pretty blonde and then recalls like but recount offered me her pasta fuck with big bitch nouri says life fog late on my bed no the fuck with my bitch rough up with your man she's getting really really he's galaxy is thorough seized at this point she's getting really really mean to la la answers like i literally said that racket offered her plans uh i had literally said that bracket offered or boston error pasta and then she started like hit me in the balls i was like you need to be reached wrong racket 'cause like to talk about the damn pasta get over it you roads bit of brits thereto and pasta says the you've always saying that because i talked to a aitor pasta honey honey you faulk the fat man okay you've talked about he pays for your reds much pastas your matt eat all i have another for that all the pasta you learn that from your man those batman as eating other people's posture spurred also james your fucking of fat old guy for rent too so let's stop pretending and you could see that brimming behind lalas eyes who's like wait a second so you're mad that i'm fucking of fat rich guy for range rover because you're fucking your fat rich guy for like a mattress on the floor let's not pretend that i can't ruin your entire game right now falker exactly so she's like you know what you can't say whatever you want learn your fucking place mother thukar otherwise you're gonna learn real bass what when you look and i'm not there at all you see is an empty bowl pasta.

raquel nouri la la boston faulk