35 Burst results for "Past Century"

Bill Cosby lawyers cry foul as civil sex assault trial looms

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

Bill Cosby lawyers cry foul as civil sex assault trial looms

"Don't don't don't don't look look look look now now now now but but but but there's there's there's there's another another another another Bill Bill Bill Bill Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby sex sex sex sex assault assault assault assault trial trial trial trial on on on on the the the the horizon horizon horizon horizon this this this this one one one one in in in in California California California California jury jury jury selection selection selection begins begins begins next next next week week week in in in a a a case case case in in in which which which the the the comedian comedian comedian is is is accused accused accused of of of sexually sexually sexually assaulting assaulting assaulting a a a teenager teenager teenager at at at the the the playboy playboy playboy mansion mansion mansion in in in Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles nearly nearly nearly a a a half half half century century century ago ago ago Bill Bill Bill Cosby Cosby Cosby is is is not not not expected expected expected to to to attend attend attend the the the proceedings proceedings proceedings but but but his his his lawyers lawyers lawyers will will will be be be there there there and and and they're they're they're already already already trying trying trying to to to get get get the the the case case case thrown thrown thrown out out out before before before it it it starts starts starts the the the issue issue issue is is is a a a recent recent recent filing filing filing by by by plaintiff plaintiff plaintiff Judy Judy Judy Huff Huff Huff she she she said said said she she she now now now believes believes believes the the the assault assault assault was was was in in in nineteen nineteen nineteen seventy seventy seventy five five five when when when she she she was was was sixteen sixteen sixteen and and and not not not seventy seventy seventy four four four when when when she she she was was was fifteen fifteen fifteen Cosby's Cosby's Cosby's lawyers lawyers lawyers say say say that that that to to to torpedo torpedo torpedo the the the case case case entirely entirely entirely the the the judge judge judge seems seems seems inclined inclined inclined to to to disagree disagree disagree the the the trial trial trial is is is set set set to to to begin begin begin Monday Monday Monday I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

California Bill Bill Bill Bill Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Bill Bill Bill Cosby Cosby Cos Judy Judy Judy Huff Huff Huff Cosby Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel
Congress dives into UFOs, but no signs of extraterrestrials

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 4 d ago

Congress dives into UFOs, but no signs of extraterrestrials

"Congresses congresses congresses congresses held held held held its its its its first first first first hearing hearing hearing hearing in in in in half half half half a a a a century century century century on on on on unidentified unidentified unidentified unidentified flying flying flying flying objects objects objects objects I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with what what what what the the the the Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon is is is is saying saying saying saying reports reports reports reports of of of of sightings sightings sightings sightings are are are are frequent frequent frequent frequent and and and and continuing continuing continuing continuing but but but but deputy deputy deputy deputy director director director director of of of of naval naval naval naval intelligence intelligence intelligence intelligence Scott Scott Scott Scott Bray Bray Bray Bray did did did did not not not not suggest suggest suggest suggest there there there there evidence evidence evidence evidence of of of of extraterrestrial extraterrestrial extraterrestrial extraterrestrial life life life life but but but but rather rather rather rather the the the the result result result result of of of of quad quad quad quad copters copters copters copters and and and and unmanned unmanned unmanned unmanned aerial aerial aerial aerial systems systems systems systems that that that that are are are are in in in in our our our our airspace airspace airspace airspace identification identification identification identification of of of of what what what what we we we we can can can can classify classify classify classify as as as as clutter clutter clutter clutter mylar mylar mylar mylar balloons balloons balloons balloons and and and and other other other other types types types types of of of of of of of of your your your your trash trash trash trash and and and and improvements improvements improvements improvements in in in in the the the the capabilities capabilities capabilities capabilities of of of of our our our our various various various various sensors sensors sensors sensors to to to to detect detect detect detect things things things things in in in in our our our our airspace airspace airspace airspace the the the the Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon has has has has picked picked picked picked a a a a director director director director for for for for a a a a task task task task force force force force on on on on what what what what it it it it calls calls calls calls unidentified unidentified unidentified unidentified aerial aerial aerial aerial phenomena phenomena phenomena phenomena lawmakers lawmakers lawmakers lawmakers from from from from both both both both parties parties parties parties say say say say UFOs UFOs UFOs UFOs are are are are a a a a national national national national security security security security concern concern concern concern in in in in which which which which case case case case brace brace brace brace says says says says much much much much needs needs needs needs to to to to remain remain remain remain classified classified classified classified we we we we do do do do not not not not want want want want potential potential potential potential adversaries adversaries adversaries adversaries to to to to know know know know exactly exactly exactly exactly what what what what we're we're we're we're able able able able to to to to see see see see or or or or understand understand understand understand or or or or how how how how we we we we come come come come to to to to the the the the conclusions conclusions conclusions conclusions we we we we make make make make Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas Washington Washington Washington Washington

Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pen Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Naval Naval Naval Naval Intell Scott Scott Scott Scott Bray B Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Washington
What Happens Now With Roe v Wade? Ken Klukowski Weighs In

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | Last week

What Happens Now With Roe v Wade? Ken Klukowski Weighs In

"We are back with Ken kowalski, a man who we rely upon for our legal advice here in America first. We're talking about the Supreme Court decision. What happens now? I've heard a lot of theories that the left screwed up here. They sort of wait until June and then the nuclear bomb effect of this dropping in June, closer to the elections would have been more useful to them. I've heard theories today that now nobody can back down the 5 justices can not back down because then it would make them look as if they were weak and gave into the mob. You've been watching the Supreme Court for years now. This is truly unprecedented in the modern age. So what kind of scenarios are we looking at until June and the official vote? Well, for one thing, Seb, I'll be putting an article up today, urging the justices to get the opinion out as quickly as possible. I mean, the draft that we saw was from February 10 that they would have continued to polish it and edit it since that time. So I think the opinion could be could be in good condition to actually be issued as is right now as in like this week. Now if there are other justices who are still writing concurring opinions or dissenting opinions, none of those have the force of law and they can just issue that whenever they're ready to do so. But the justices in the majority have the authority whenever they vote to do it, to just go ahead and release the opinion. And I would recommend doing so as quickly as possible. So that we can all move forward. So this is an official opinion. It's on the clock. It's in the books. And let me segue straight from that to another point you mentioned. And that is that, yes, I believe that every day, every additional day that transpires. Between this decision becoming official in November's election day is that tens of millions of Americans are going to realize that the left has lied to them for half a century about what the effect of overruling road would

Ken Kowalski Supreme Court SEB America
Sebastian Chats With Ken Klukowski About the Impending Roe Decision

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:25 min | Last week

Sebastian Chats With Ken Klukowski About the Impending Roe Decision

"We have somebody who I trust for legal advice who's worked in the Trump administration at the DoJ practicing lawyer breitbart contributor, you've got to read his latest pieces at breitbart dot com. His can clockhouse can. Welcome back to America first. Great to be with you. Thanks for having me. All right, I'm going to just say what I think about the Supreme Court draft decision. Because I'm not a lawyer, but I read all 70 pages recently. And you know what shocked me and maybe I should read more of these documents, it was a fabulous historic tour de rizon. It was a treatise. It wasn't full of mumbo jumbo that a layman couldn't understand. First it was this amazing historic review of how the law treated abortion in western civilization going back to the 17th century in the UK, the concept of quickening. And then basically this conclusion that until roe V wade, it was illegal in America, and then it was a segment by segment dismantling of both roe and Casey saying it's just bad law and analyzing started decisis in other concepts. So Ken, give me your illegal professional opinion, is this an unusually good pre decisional draft, or is this because it's a Leto who's riding it? Well, first of all, justice alita was a brilliant justice. His opinions are uniformly wonderful. But what you just described in as I read it as well, it reminds me of the late justice Scalia's opinion in District of Columbia versus hello. Yeah. Which held that the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms is an individual right from 2008. That opinion was also almost exactly the same page length. That was a little over 60 pages. And what you saw there is what a well written Supreme Court opinion is supposed to look like. This is an original list decision. One that looks to the text, structure, and history of the constitution, and in this case, in terms of looking at the history of a purported right to abortion, showing why. This is in fact not a right found in the U.S.

Trump Administration Roe V Wade Breitbart DOJ U.S. Supreme Court ROE Alita Casey KEN UK Scalia District Of Columbia
The Plot to Subvert the Western Judeo-Christian Tradition of the US

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | Last week

The Plot to Subvert the Western Judeo-Christian Tradition of the US

"Folks, welcome back. We're talking to the authors of battle for the American mind uprooting a century of miseducation, Pete hegseth and David Goodwin. So we're talking about what amounts to a conspiracy to subvert the western judeo Christian tradition baked into the heart of the United States of America. And there's no denying it. People like Dewey, they were on a crusade, and they have up till now, succeeded. Yes, they have. And you know what? They didn't know what the destination would be, per se. They just knew where the destination was away from. So it was always progress away from the western Christian paideia, the biblical roots of our and free thinking roots of the nexus of Athens and Jerusalem. They wanted to move away from that. That was progress. So you say conspiracy, that's not a wrong term. We use plot or heist because they passed it off to the next group of radical thinkers who carried the ball down the field based on how much God and other basic values have been stripped away. So enter the Frankfurt school, enter critical theory, which where did it land? A hundred blocks from here at Columbia University at the teacher's college. And these are marxists who fled Hitler while our boys are fighting over in Europe and World War II. And they are greeted with open arms with their radical views soon to infuse into the teacher's college. And within a couple of decades, one third of teachers in America at elite schools had been taught by the critical theorists of the Frankfurt school. So how do you get critical race theory in your zoom classroom? It is in the curriculum and the pedagogy of how the entire educational industrial complex works. And when you unravel it all, it goes back to those early efforts and each step which we lay out the unions, which used to be conservative teacher associations that ended up scripture to teachers to use in the classroom, captured by the unions. Well, then the unions create the Department of Education in a giveaway to Jimmy

Pete Hegseth David Goodwin Frankfurt School Dewey America Athens Jerusalem Columbia University Hitler Europe Department Of Education Jimmy
How Fox's Pete Hegseth Got Involved With 'Battle for the American Mind'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:23 min | Last week

How Fox's Pete Hegseth Got Involved With 'Battle for the American Mind'

"Hey, welcome back folks. We're talking about American education, battle for the American mind, is the book uprooting a century of miseducation, David Goodwin has written it with Pete hegseth in that David. You're the head of the association of classical Christian schools. So you're like a brainy guy. Pete is just like a talking hit on Fox and Friends. We know he has nothing to say if it's not on a teleprompter. Pete, how did you get involved in this? I've always learned to join forces with people smarter than me. That's the key. Andy's humble, which makes me hate him even more. You went to Princeton, you went to the Harvard Kennedy school of government. What did you major in at Princeton? Politics. You did. I did. Political philosophy. As sort of a degree of that. But I'll tell you what I've learned in this project, how much I didn't learn. I didn't learn any of this stuff. My kids are in classical Christian schools and all I say every day is, why can't I go back to school and learn these things? Okay, you're singing my song. I have said this over and over in the last couple of decades. I learned something. I wrote a book called if you can keep it Franklin's famous line. And because of Oz Guinness, whose book I had read, I understood things, and all I could think of is how did I not get this? I didn't get any of this. So you obviously going through this elite schools, which like, Yale, they don't teach you this stuff. They teach you John Dewey on steroids, I guess. And they teach you now the latest manifestations of the Frankfurt school and critical theory, which is now we now see as critical race theory, and we talk about every day. But it was just the water in which we swam. I took social studies. We all took social studies who invented social studies. Yeah, why is it not history? Why is it social studies? We can't get into that. We can't get into that, don't talk about it. I didn't know where that all came from. David had done the research and then I was able to lay it upon the environment in which we live right now and realize we all got a progressive education. Yeah. Almost everyone watching guaranteed. Right. Got a progressive education that was started by atheist advanced by marxists who had their own agenda and it all happened subtly, and a lot of us think we aren't infected, but we are. And so you have to dig under the ruins of what used to exist. And that's what David did in this project. This is the way education our founders were educated, how free people and republics actually perpetuate themselves. Why don't we do

David Goodwin Pete Hegseth Association Of Classical Chris Harvard Kennedy School Of Gove Pete Princeton Oz Guinness David FOX Andy John Dewey Franklin Frankfurt
When Did Public Ed. Go Crazy? Pete Hegseth and David Goodwin Explain

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:27 min | Last week

When Did Public Ed. Go Crazy? Pete Hegseth and David Goodwin Explain

"In America, we're free. So we say, we're going to educate our kids. We're going to have a one room schoolhouse. I've got to plow the fields. My wife's got stuff to do. So we're going to hire a school teacher and we're going to get them to teach the kids in the neighborhood. And they're going to teach exactly what we want them to teach obviously. They're the experts, but we're not going to let them teach things that we think are wrong. And that's how we got public education quote unquote. When did that go crazy and wrong? Well, certainly you mentioned some of the star players, John Dewey, early part of the 20th century. That was the epiphany I had is I researched the book originally, was that this doesn't date back to the 1960s, which most of us think. That's when you see the manifestation of it. It dates to an earlier time, right? Between 1915 and 1930, when the progressives actually built the school system that we now know in America. Okay, and that is true of everything. Now, there's not just education. Like, we think, oh, the 60s. Well, the 60s is when it bore fruit, but you can trace all of these things back. Most of the things that we know are wrong, which end up being anti American and cultural Marxism. They did begin originally in that time, whether you're talking about progressivism in the Protestant churches or whatever. All of this stuff, the seeds were planted then by some key

America John Dewey
Why Pete Hegseth and David Goodwin Decided to Write a Book Together

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:22 min | Last week

Why Pete Hegseth and David Goodwin Decided to Write a Book Together

"Folks, I am really excited right now because we're talking about something in this hour and I hope in the next hour as well that's at the heart of my concerns for the nation for the culture for the world. Something called education. I have in front of me, a brand new book called battle for the American mind, uprooting a century of miseducation, the authors are in the studio Pete hegseth and David Goodwin welcome. Thank you, Eric. Now I know both of you sort of because but from different worlds, you're mister Fox and Friends on the weekends or my confusing you with another Pete hegseth. No, you're right, you're right. And we met in multiple iterations. Here and there. But the problem is when you see somebody on TV, you don't remember, did I actually meet them or did I just saw that see them on YouTube or something like that? But David Goodwin, you are the head of the association of classical Christian schools. Yes. Devotee and fan of classical Christian education and of homeschooling and I am thrilled to see you again. And thank you for writing a book because we need to talk about this. So where do we start? First of all, I think most people want to know, hey, how did Pete hegseth meet David Goodwin? How did you come to write a book together? Well, I met David Goodwin. You mentioned Fox and Friends. It happenstance to that. I was at a diner in rural North Carolina talking about the news of the day as we do on the morning show. And a family approached me too cute little girls in uniforms and a woman pulled me aside and said, you know, what do you know about classical Christian education? Because we were talking about it. And we got to talk in and she said, you got to meet this guy, David Goodwin, and she put us in touch. And I had kids that had been in classical questions, so I was familiar with it, but I didn't understand the larger movement. And we just got to know each other and he shared some early manuscripts that he was working on of research that he had done. And I kept reading it and saying, this is amazing. Everybody's got to know this. This is the key right here. And over months and then years, we kind of joined forces and swap notes, and then we decided to embark on a Fox nation film called miseducation of America, which is where, and then this book also came out of that project as well. So it is a genuine partnership

David Goodwin Pete Hegseth Mister Fox Association Of Classical Chris Eric Youtube FOX North Carolina America
Marjorie Taylor Greene and Dinesh Discuss the SCOTUS Leak

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:58 min | Last week

Marjorie Taylor Greene and Dinesh Discuss the SCOTUS Leak

"You mentioned at the end of the last segment this remarkable, well, the leaking of a forthcoming Supreme Court decision, but a decision to overturn roe versus wade. I have to say that this is, you know, to me, the leak is a little bit secondary. Obviously I think it probably came from the left. They were trying to maybe motivate some activists to put pressure on the court. It doesn't seem to have worked. And I think the big news is that this giant catastrophe of a decision roe V wade, which has been standing for half a century, this big tower of madness has finally going to be pulled down. It is so exciting to think about it. You know, I cried when I first heard the news. I just, it was so overwhelming. The emotion to think that roe versus wade could be overturned and it's always been wrong. That was a decision that was wrong when it happened, and it's been wrong for 49 years. So I'm very excited. I know many people all over the country are very excited. And sending this back to the states is the right place to put it, where states can begin to make their own abortion laws and many already have. Me personally, I would love to see abortion end altogether. I would love to see Congress pass the life at conception act because I truly believe life starts at conception. But yes, what we have seen with the leak coming out of the Supreme Court is shocking. This is an investigation that must be done when Republicans take back the house. We can not allow our Supreme Court to be under attack like this. And just as we were talking a few minutes ago, dinesh, our courts are under attack. The left wants nothing more than to pack the Supreme Court. They want to elect elect radical progressive judges all over the country in all levels of the courtrooms because they know that's where they can ultimately

Wade Supreme Court Congress Dinesh
Biden's Two Reasons Why We're Suffering: COVID & Putin

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:39 min | Last week

Biden's Two Reasons Why We're Suffering: COVID & Putin

"COVID and Putin, COVID and Putin. Here's Biden yesterday. The two reasons that we are suffering from epic, historic inflation. The two reasons you can't afford to fill up your gas tank. The two reasons you can't get baby formula moms, the two reason two reasons you're worried about how to pay the mortgage, or the rent. The two boogeymen for grandpa Joe are COVID and Putin. The first cause of inflation is a once in a century pandemic. Not only did it shut down our global economy, and through the supply chains and demand completely out of whack. Especially in countries where more effective recovery responses weren't available. Especially in those sectors that rely on semiconductors. These supply challenges have been further hampered by the onset of Delta and omicron viruses. And you've all seen it. You all felt it. And this year we have a second cause. A second cause. Mister Putin's war in Ukraine. I mean, is anybody buying that? Do Democrats sit around and say, oh, he's right. Oh, he's so right. If it weren't for the omicron variant, we'd be able to fill up our gas tank. It's all, I mean, they can't think we're that stupid. Can they?

Covid Putin Grandpa Joe Biden Mister Putin Ukraine
How Would AG Garland React to Protests Against Justices if He Was One?

Mark Levin

01:00 min | Last week

How Would AG Garland React to Protests Against Justices if He Was One?

"Remember who is nominated to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court America If he had gotten that position would he appreciate the fact that the attorney general of the United States doesn't lift in arthritic finger To defend the justices then Now of course conservatives those who are pro life they're not even today marching on the homes Of the pro abortion justices They weren't marching on the homes of the pro abortion justices for the last half century Nobody's bringing this up David marched on the homes of Supreme Court Justices Who supported roe V wade and Casey Not once

America Supreme Court David Roe V Wade Casey
There's a Sense of Deep Frustration on the Left...

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:19 min | Last week

There's a Sense of Deep Frustration on the Left...

"Sense of deep, frustration that is growing on the left. I think many of those guys thought, listen, we might lose things at the midterms, but in the meantime, we've got the house. We've got the Senate. We've got the presidency. We're going to be able to ram through a whole bunch of stuff. And not only has all that failed. No build back better or no second infrastructure Bill. No attempt to no successful attempt to overturn the filibuster. Ideas of packing the court pretty much down in flames. And so then the left was like, well, okay, but at least we're going to be able to hold the line and then boom. The leak, the dismaying information for them that roe versus wade is going to go down. I mean, this is huge. The implications of this are far reaching. We're talking about something that is overturning a decision that has sat as a kind of anchor of American cultural policy for, well, half a century. So this is the same significance as overturning segregation, which lasted a little more than half a century. And I think that the left realizes that not much is going to be, they can't stop this.

Senate Bill Wade
Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

"I I I I know know know know I I I I kind kind kind kind of of of of painting painting painting painting has has has has set set set set a a a a record record record record for for for for the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece of of of of art art art art by by by by an an an an American American American American ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold at at at at auction auction auction auction it's it's it's it's a a a a piece piece piece piece of of of of artwork artwork artwork artwork you you you you have have have have probably probably probably probably seen seen seen seen many many many many times times times times before before before before Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's portrait portrait portrait portrait of of of of Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four so so so so screen screen screen screen features features features features the the the the actress actress actress actress in in in in a a a a vibrant vibrant vibrant vibrant close close close close up up up up yellow yellow yellow yellow hair hair hair hair blue blue blue blue eye eye eye eye shadow shadow shadow shadow ruby ruby ruby ruby red red red red lipstick lipstick lipstick lipstick on on on on a a a a blue blue blue blue background background background background yeah yeah yeah yeah that that that that one one one one well well well well it's it's it's it's officially officially officially officially known known known known as as as as shot shot shot shot sage sage sage sage blue blue blue blue marlin marlin marlin marlin and and and and it it it it has has has has sold sold sold sold four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred and and and and ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars Christie's Christie's Christie's Christie's of of of of New New New New York York York York says says says says not not not not only only only only is is is is it it it it the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by an an an an American American American American artist artist artist artist ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold it it it it is is is is also also also also the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece from from from from the the the the twentieth twentieth twentieth twentieth century century century century ever ever ever ever auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned off off off off the the the the buyer buyer buyer buyer was was was was not not not not identified identified identified identified I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Times Times Times Times Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol Warhol Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marily Ruby Ruby Christie's Christie's Christie New New New New York York York Christie Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
Josh Hammer on This Week's Unprecedented Events Surrounding SCOTUS

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | Last week

Josh Hammer on This Week's Unprecedented Events Surrounding SCOTUS

"I have the privilege now of welcoming the next guest to the show. Josh hammer, the opinion editor for newsweek, Josh, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Andrew, good to see you, my Friends. Always a pleasure. I likewise, likewise. You are, in my opinion, one of the most prescient legal minds on the conservative side. I think you're very fair. I think you try and play it very fair, but you write extensively about the constitution, you are very well versed on the Supreme Court. Obviously you're the opinion editor at newsweek, so you have a very powerful platform. From a legal mind such as yours, looking at what's been going on over the past week and really accelerated over the last couple of days over the weekend, trying to paint a picture for the audience listening just how unprecedented this is and just how truly radical it is in your estimation. Yeah, no, Andrew, there's so much to unpack here, obviously. But before we get into the constitution and the Dobbs case and all of that, just any pro life perspective, someone who personally, you know, I cofounded law students for life, the pro life student group back when I was in law school at the University of Chicago. I have marched in sub zero temperatures in Chicago, back when I was in law school there on four life, it is really, really, really terrible that the culmination of now a half century of pro life efforts to speak on behalf of unborn children for the sacredness of all innocent human life has now been sullied by this unprecedented and really just disgusting alinsky eyed at all cost tactics that we are now seeing. And, you know, it's easy to call things unprecedented, but in this particular case, Andrew, they're literally is zero precedent for what we are seeing right now. This kind of thing simply does not happen. The Supreme Court literally can only get by when the justice is the clerks know that their emails are not going to be leaked because if the entire notion of a government of laws and not of men to kind of borrow the famous quip from John Adams back from the 1780s, if that phrase means anything at all, it means that the judicial branch and the Supreme Court in particular can not possibly be swayed or cowed by public mob

Josh Hammer Charlie Kirk Newsweek Andrew Supreme Court Josh Dobbs University Of Chicago Alinsky Chicago John Adams
Is Overturning Roe v Wade a Radical or Conservative Choice?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:20 min | Last week

Is Overturning Roe v Wade a Radical or Conservative Choice?

"This is Tina. Tina says, quote, Charlie, I read a column of one of my conservative Friends shared on Twitter. That was written by someone on the right apparently said overturning roe versus wade wasn't conservative. Okay, so this is a column by Brett Stevens, who used to be a really smart person and he's just become almost unreadable in recent years. And this Brett Stevens now writes for The New York Times. And Brett Stevens wrote this for The New York Times. Overturning roe is a radical, not conservative choice. Now he calls himself a conservative, he's just about the same type of conservative as Bill kristol. That should tell you everything you need to know. Dear chief justice Roberts, justice Barrett Gorsuch Kavanaugh and Thomas, as you'll no doubt agree roe versus wade was an ill judged decision one was handed down January 22nd, 1973. It continues by saying, roe versus wade diminished the standing on the court by turning it into an even more political branch of government. But a half century is a long time. America is a different place, with a most of its population born after Rowe was decided. After a decision to overturn roe, which the court seemed poised to do, according to the leak of a draft of a majority opinion by justice Samuel Alito, would do more to replicate gross damage than to reverse it. He says it would be a radical, not conservative choice. So Brett Stevens, who I assume is very highly educated. I would like him to tell me what is the definition of radical. It means to the root to the core. To the basis. Brett Stevens asks the question in The New York Times. What is conservative, he says? It is above all, the conviction that abrupt and profound changes to established laws and common expectations are utterly destructive to respect for their law and institutions established to uphold it. And especially when those changes are instigated from above with neither Democrat consent, nor broad consensus. Okay, that is not what a conservative is, okay? If there is an immoral or destructive law, a conservative has a moral obligation to try to repeal it and get rid of it quickly.

Brett Stevens Tina ROE The New York Times Barrett Gorsuch Kavanaugh Wade Roe Versus Wade Bill Kristol Justice Roberts Justice Samuel Alito Charlie Twitter Rowe Thomas America
US hiring was likely strong again in April despite inflation

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

US hiring was likely strong again in April despite inflation

"The the the the nation's nation's nation's nation's jobs jobs jobs jobs boom boom boom boom continues continues continues continues with with with with employers employers employers employers adding adding adding adding another another another another four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred twenty twenty twenty twenty eight eight eight eight thousand thousand thousand thousand jobs jobs jobs jobs in in in in April April April April this this this this streak streak streak streak of of of of robust robust robust robust hiring hiring hiring hiring in in in in the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. continues continues continues continues the the the the labor labor labor labor department department department department has has has has reported reported reported reported another another another another four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred twenty twenty twenty twenty eight eight eight eight thousand thousand thousand thousand jobs jobs jobs jobs were were were were added added added added despite despite despite despite the the the the harsh harsh harsh harsh inflation inflation inflation inflation numbers numbers numbers numbers chronic chronic chronic chronic supply supply supply supply shortages shortages shortages shortages the the the the war war war war in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine and and and and higher higher higher higher borrowing borrowing borrowing borrowing costs costs costs costs the the the the numbers numbers numbers numbers keep keep keep keep the the the the unemployment unemployment unemployment unemployment rate rate rate rate at at at at three three three three point point point point six six six six percent percent percent percent just just just just above above above above the the the the lowest lowest lowest lowest level level level level in in in in half half half half a a a a century century century century but but but but it's it's it's it's unclear unclear unclear unclear how how how how long long long long this this this this jobs jobs jobs jobs boom boom boom boom will will will will last last last last with with with with the the the the fed fed fed fed raising raising raising raising its its its its key key key key lending lending lending lending rate rate rate rate making making making making it it it it costlier costlier costlier costlier for for for for consumers consumers consumers consumers and and and and companies companies companies companies to to to to borrow borrow borrow borrow spend spend spend spend and and and and higher higher higher higher hi hi hi hi Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

Ukraine U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Labor Labor Labor Labor Depart FED Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Qu
Harvard, Slavery, and the Confusion of It All

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Harvard, Slavery, and the Confusion of It All

"I'm not quite clear. They were Harvard faculty 65 members, I think you said, who had slaves, obviously in the 19th century. They were sorry, just to interrupt. You just to correct, they said that they didn't specify the number of faculties that they said that between them 70 slaves. 70 slaves. There are 70 slaves on nuts, slave owners, right? I should probably much fewer slave owners because many had more than one. Okay. What on God's earth does that have to do with Harvard and blacks today? I know. No, no. Sorry. Well, you know what? The way you responded? Nothing. It's exactly right. Nothing. Don't make me laugh, Dennis. I have a cough. Right. It's a problem. Excuse me. Sorry to the listeners. This is real. My cough. Enjoy. Right, everything about this is real. No, I want to analyze it. Obviously it was partially rhetorical question. But what would they answer? I don't understand. So in the course of all of Harvard's history and Harvard goes back to the 18th century, so it's one of the first 17. Does that right? It was the 1600s. 16, 36, I think. That's astonishing. I don't even know anything was happening then. Okay, be that as it may, fine. So Harvard goes back all that time and in the entire time it had 70 slaves. It, I mean, members of the faculty or whomever or administration. So I'm not I'm still not understanding what is their argument. We owe the descendants of those slaves, or all blacks, what is their thinking? I don't know, Dennis, that's very interesting. They never really specified what their goal is or what they're thinking here is. The opening of the video that I mentioned, again, there's so much to unpack in that video. But they talk about how Harvard is seen as this perfect place in this ivory tower. The best of the best. And yet, there's an ugly history hidden in the walls. And we must confront this history. I guess that's the closest I can get to what their goal is.

Harvard Cough Dennis
Why Joseph Pearce Wrote 'Defender of the Faith' on Pope Benedict XVI

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Joseph Pearce Wrote 'Defender of the Faith' on Pope Benedict XVI

"Decidedly literary person and a man of great faith. His name is Joseph pierce. He's been on the program before talking about many books. His books on Chesterton and souls and eats it in so many others. He has a new book out about someone you may have heard of, Benedict the 16th. I think you can tell from the name that he was Pope. Remember, Benedict the 16th, a biography titled defender of the faith by our friend Joseph pierce, Joseph pierce, welcome back. Great to see you. The greatest year again, Eric, it's been some time. Good to see you again. It has. And I just have to say, congratulations on the book. It's a beautiful book. I may not be a Catholic, but I am a Christian and I have been a huge admirer of so many Catholic Christians through the years. Obviously, Chesterton at the top of the list. But Benedict the 16th. Always, in awe of him, his leadership, his intellectual abilities, his fierceness as a defender of the faith. So it seems appropriate to me that you titled the book defender of the faith. What was it that led you, Joseph, to write this biography? Well, like you, Eric, I've been an admire of Benedict XVI for many years since time when he was cardinal ratzinger prior to that. We need to remember that as well as the relatively few years he was poked. He was St. John Paul the second's white hand man for a quarter of a century prior to that. So this man was basically the most powerful man in the church apart from St. John Paul the second for a period of a third of the century. And he's a time I think of a restoration for the church after what we might call the madness and miasma of the modernism of the 1970s where the world where the church or at least certain members of the church were seduced into trying to become like the world to sort of follow the world and you and I both had my chance to turn and Chesterton said we don't want a church that will move with the world. We want to charge that will move the world. And I think this St. John Paul the second and Benedict the 16th moved the world rather than moving with it. And there's a crucial difference. I think you're quite right. And I

Joseph Pierce Chesterton Benedict Cardinal Ratzinger Eric St. John Paul John Paul Joseph
"past century" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"That we've been able to build but then also making sure that You know it's a fine balance to to be able to to fish were. Those fish are and have content across all of the channels that College football fans are are present on but then also doing so in a way that resonates in cuts through The scroll and makes them stop either thinker engage or or spark some sort of emotion there so is definitely a balance. It's something that we're still trying to Really get our thumb. On if i have the magic here. I think maybe that'll be. My next job is to try to find a way to monetize that but But it's but it's something that we've been able to in our in our for seven years just just trying to find ways to get the college football playoff out there as much as we possibly can again to that point about just being Really education based and making sure that we're making people aware of what's happening In the college football spaces is important for us. And then we've really done in the last couple of years. Find a way to to take that to the next level is and it's a released engagement in in having a fun unique voice because it's really important to to resonate with fans and not be just a logo talking to folks. I know that sounds like social one. Oh one But to really celebrate with college football is and the excitement around it and the camaraderie that it brings Sometimes the rivalry that it brings if if the college football voice can reflect that college football playoff pathways can reflect that as well. I think that that's a win for us also just returns in in more engaged audiences. I can't agree more with that. There is nothing like college football. And there's nothing like playoffs or bowls For for for college football. I'm gonna go somewhere with the mottola story. That's going somewhere with us question. Katie but two days ago my wife who's an archivist and a professor of film purchased this huge one hundred. Dvd box the last one hundred years of the olympics. And it's all the greatest moments of the olympics for the past century is absolutely phenomenal. And i started thinking about that. And i started thinking about that. We were gonna be recording this show and thought a dvd player points may say the dvd feel like austin powers. When he puts the on the record player. I remember that. Anyway i digress. Nfl has nfl films. That is documenting. The moments i'm sure. Espn is captured..

Katie Nfl one hundred two days ago seven years olympics nfl austin last couple of years past century years Espn
"past century" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

"Thank you next up. We have a poet. Visual artist publisher and translator roger. Hicken many of you know him through cold hub press. Today he'll be talking to us about the recently published work a town trod by poets. Please join me in welcoming. Br dunedin appropriately for new zealand city of literature. Same to crop up in poetry more frequently and more vividly than any other new zealand city or town. It has a temporal symbolic santer of many of the poems of janet frame james k baxter and peter alds. It's charles brash. Home ground city. That floats on the edge past century beat of breakers beyond white island last stiffened nothing it has baxter's southern town a hands breadth from antarctica. It has peter houses deep southern freeze. Montgomery avenue not thinks is tonight with the tampa. Expect to see icebergs floating harbour after this city of literature publication town trod by poets which features photographs and poetry by peter. All of a poem by mexican halio address to peter began as a paper presented. Two thousand sixteen center for the book symposium book and plice sauntering around the city trailing a string of quotations i meant to offer an impressionistic account of dunedin's presence in poetry with an emphasis on the poetry payrolls more than any other writer whose mapped the stories dunedin straits subtitled. Search for truth. Underneath and streets grew from a phrase in a poem of mine grim satori on dunedin streets dunedin having been the locus of my misspent youth. Not all of which i care to remember a backdrop to the adventure of suffering to paraphrase in loni for whom the city was an tip in mount third tory hill tree and tower by sunlight or stylized assembled into a sitting for something to take place in so what follows snippets from town by poets. The old wise journey on foot robert mcfarland right. The compact between riding and walking almost as old as literature award is only a step away from a story. Many of the dunedin poems of peter alds stories of or footnotes to his walks street after salt win street as good an example as any as bell. Now's park or two thousand eight in which he steps into a story in the imagined company of some local literary four years. Charles brash risk dallas. Ah read james k baxter and an ex-lover as he walks up high gaze towards the town belt nor west wind at my back stopped at bell. Now's park for a p and a clump of bush. Got sniffed out by a black dog took a seat on an antiquated bench to take in the view the ground hollowed at my feet by those. Who'd been before me watching. The surf roll into clear. Poets charles and ruth comparing peninsula visions. I am sky sharing egg and possibly sandwiches. Young couples shooting just starting out on life's moonlit journey..

peter alds new zealand james k baxter antarctica tonight Today four years janet frame robert mcfarland loni two thousand Montgomery avenue new zealand city peter charles brash mexican past century Charles brash couples roger
"past century" Discussed on Faffing with Friends

Faffing with Friends

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Faffing with Friends

"You know it right so joe. It's your turn right all right so i'm bored with it. That's it that's it. I'm category world leader. Oh okay okay. Yes yes who. It's someone who was in politics for a long time and is perhaps controversial and very well-known character in the past century he also was very instrumental in to at. It's just them at on his deathbed like he had a pretty luster. Slide prolific writer. He you know very controversial because he had Sunday's not everyone agrees with other people. Praise is other achievements. It has to be a winston churchill. That's thank you. That category gave me the clue. I mean. obviously much on the nose in my case. But you know i. I'm going to say madman again So yet i mean we all think like his political career after world war two started going worse than he law. Austin yea like you have the quote it's very fitting how it ended up being in the later accu point agents as well. I don't think at that age can be struggling with. He did he. Did you make it to like nine or something like that. Imagine him him on is dire of whisky and cigars literally literally gardening. I guess it goes to show that like if you're made to survive your make to survive. It doesn't matter what you do. So i believe it's five four correct. Yes okay okay. He's catching up. Scanned catching outright joe. This one to even the odds right now. She's on speaking speaking with gins the odds Relax this won't hurt. Ooh sounds like someone did a signs experiment. But it's this wasn't writing. It was not said it was in ohio. It was in writing. Okay that's my hand any other any other. Oh that's the only gonna give said speaking of whisky and cigars gaas but oh okay oh okay so i know so. Could you give me category too much much..

ohio world war two Sunday nine Austin past century winston five four
"past century" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"A and i'm not. I'm not suggesting at all that. There aren't racial inequalities and and and need to be addressed and dealt with. I understand that. I think any commonsense person would understand that and we've slowly but surely been doing that over the past century or so slowly but surely actually ever since the athens greece. Ancient greece slowly. But surely we've trudged along and we and we've made significant significant gains but this is just old school marxism and they've just changed the proletariat struggle to the racial struggle and i agree with you and this goes back to augusta to. They want you to have an emotional reaction not a reasonable reaction to anything so when we turn that into ourselves and look for truth we have to realize that it's not purely emotional and it's not purely reasonable that if we're going to respect each other as moral individuals as people dignified people every every human is we should respect the dignity of their humanity. We have to use reason and critical theory will not stand up. A lot of people think that they have these nuanced arguments. Their arguments are baseless. they won't stand up under any reasonable scrutiny. They just Either you're a racist or you're an anti-racist candy that's his that's basically his thesis. That's a false dilemma. That's a false choice right. There he started out with a logical fallacy and you found your entire argument on a logical fallacy. It can't stand that you're right. They're they're not. Were working on reason. They're working on fear. If you don't agree with me you're a racist you have to be called a name or whatever they're going to call you. I mean i might have already said this. Possibly but i think it's worth reiterating that it sort of reminds me of the salem witch trials that you were either a witch. You'd confessed to being a witch in which case you'd be executed or if you denied being a witch they would throw you.

past century Ancient every athens greece
"past century" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

Video Marketing Value Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

"I think i've really zeroed in on being able to apply a lot of things. I knew but in a really practical way on in you know. There's this sort of like a formula to content in into growing community and you know you're constantly on it but It's it's really been exciting to sort of evolve that formula for myself like really zero in on like these. Are the insights that were for me in. These are the insights that can trigger my audience in get them engaged and stuff Yeah so in interviews lately and on your blog you've been talking a lot about tiktok of course and then lesser known apps like trailer clash and original. Why do you think there is so much growth in short form video right now. And how is that driving. Change across social video and video marketing in general. For sure you know. I think the wise sort of like it's it's the only a tiktok really open the floodgates the only platform in recent years. That was sort of not immediately squashed or acquired or replicated by one of the bigger players in near. The reason that didn't happen was because it came via bytedance. Which is its own massive conglomerate in so i think they kind of were able to breakthrough and in a way that a lot of other platforms previously hadn't been able to. They opened up Everyone's is not to just the fact that there's different formats but also that there's more to there's more social opportunity than just sort of the you know facebook youtube duopoly right right and so you also talk about sometimes on your blog about the evolution of social video in comparison with you know media over the past century things that we sort of grew up thinking about and i think about these two you know sort of like when radio started it did all sorts of content and then after tv came on radio switched to become like just music news and sports network tv was once about sitcoms and dramas now it does re reality television..

facebook youtube two one past century
"past century" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"He was talking in terms of in terms of culture in terms of you. Civilizational norms in terms of In terms of just like social social values and so in a way kinda in ways the kind of beneficiary or outgrowth of atwater atler southern strategy but he does want immigration to be discussed explicitly. iphone term. I think one way they mesh is that He wants to add immigration to the list of the things that atwater says are preferable You know to the n. Word like like he wants to inch immigration as you know in addition to cutting taxes and all this stuff include immigration reform as as one of those things that you can do without having to explicitly Racist you are There's a lot more to the book. And i don't want to just give people the feeling they can. Just listen to this interview not having to read the book so there's a lot of stuff i deliberately wanted to leave You know on the table on undiscussed. But i wanted to close out to ask. You does anything that you feel like. You do want to talk about that. We haven't discussed discussed from the book that that you think is Or just any final thoughts or any final plugs. That that you wanna give well. I guess i'll just. I mean one of the things that i do that i would be curious to hear. Hear your thoughts on Is that our conversation. This far has really focused on on stanton and gave may and the kind of Ruling class apparatus is that developed over the course of the past century to regulate in adjust Flows of immigration. And all of that. But you know a large part of the book is about more contemporary far right organizing That in the kind of resonance and relationship between these sort of elite policy oriented people and the rank and file Proud boys and bigalow boys and and like and you know. I spent a lot of time in the book. On vantage part. Of what i think is sort of different about this book is that i'm trying to figure out. Like what is the relationship between Between these different groups in how how do they relate to each other. So i don't know. I'm curious what you what your takeaway from from those parts of the book. Were sure. sure i'll tell you. I'll tell you this about the proud boy Stuff on this is. There is a lot of connection to the proud boys that i found pretty interesting and I guess one reason. Why focused much on be Older historical stuff..

one reason iphone one past century atwater atler
"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"It's a another and actually to my way of thinking a more substantial move towards continuing bitcoins rise as a as a legitimate something whether you think of it as a security or a currency or or some other store of value this is trying to promote that and interesting that they they are targeting both india and african countries because as you mentioned cryptocurrencies well in several african countries. Not just nigeria and kenya but being somewhat opposed in india. So this trust again not to be run by jay z and jack dorsey but to be endowed. So they're going to set it up and then it'll run itself. After that that's the idea of a blind irrevocable trust just to try to promote its use so to make its use better in the places where it's already active in africa and to try to get it to be accepted by working with the government of india. I think it's pretty cool in given that has the backing of jack dorsey and jay z. I feel like this is a very very. It has the potential to be very successful in these these countries especially since they do have this economic value for bitcoin. Arty kind of implemented in those areas Even though like you said What was it india. Kind of iffy about it. Yeah india's. Internet economy is a little more advanced. The government Metals a little more in things as of late over the past couple years. I know that the pandemic is sort of messing. Everyone's trajectories up but nigeria and kenya. particularly Were shaping up to be the next place where we would see a lot of internet and tech related innovation. Just like china and southeast asia. Were that in the nineties. And we were seeing a lot of even still in india So this is another way to try to continue that to try to boost that innovation along and and yeah i think this is overall a good project an and one that i'm going to pay attention to see. See what comes of it. I have no idea of jay z. And jack dorsey are already do. Business together are just buds. Or both i see where a company like square. This makes a lotta sense You know in in the future square will spare square will be completely involved in the development of bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general jay z. A little less a clear about. But i know that for a variety of reasons especially just in the last month plus A lot of folks who have a lot of money and have money to play around with money making moves are more and more interested in this type of thing and you know titled titled be involved. Somehow i feel like the the idea behind. This is like what kenya's doing with with using bitcoin as a reserve is to encourage that becomes a stable store of value that's transnational The doll the dollar has kind of been that in the world economy for the past century or so and i could see bitcoin be kind of smoothing. The transfer of of value across lines Transmitting of money and exchange of money Smoother and and.

jay z. jay z southeast asia africa jack dorsey china both square nineties india past century nigeria last month african past couple years kenya of india one
"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"It's a another and actually to my way of thinking a more substantial move towards continuing bitcoins rise as a as a legitimate something whether you think of it as a security or a currency or or some other store of value this is trying to promote that and interesting that they they are targeting both india and african countries because as you mentioned Cryptocurrencies doing well in several african countries. Not just nigeria and kenya but being somewhat opposed in india. So this trust again not to be run by jay z and jack dorsey but to be endowed. So they're going to set it up and then it'll run itself. After that that's the idea of a blind irrevocable trust just to try to promote its use so to make its use better in the places where it's already active in africa and to try to get it to be accepted by working with the government of india. I think it's pretty cool in given that has the backing of jack dorsey and jay z. I feel like this is a very very. It has the potential to be very successful in these these countries especially since they do have this economic value for bitcoin. Arty kind of implemented in those areas Even though like you said What was it india. Kind of iffy about it. Yeah india's. Internet economy is a little more advanced. The government Metals a little more in things as of late over the past couple years. I know that the pandemic is sort of messing. Everyone's trajectories up but nigeria and kenya. particularly Were shaping up to be the next place where we would see a lot of internet and tech related innovation china and southeast asia. Were that in the nineties. And we were seeing a lot of even still in india So this is another way to try to continue that to try to boost that innovation along and and yeah i think this is overall a good project an and one that i'm going to pay attention to see. See what comes of it. I have no idea of jay z. And jack dorsey are already do. Business together are just buds. Or both i see where a company like square. This makes a lotta sense You know in in the future square will spare square will be completely involved in the development of bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general jay z. A little less a clear about. But i know that for a variety of reasons especially just in the last month plus A lot of folks who have a lot of money and have money to play around with money making moves are more and more interested in this type of thing and you know titled titled be involved. Somehow i feel like the the idea behind. This is like what kenya's doing with with using bitcoin as a reserve is to encourage that becomes a stable store of value that's transnational The doll the dollar has kind of been that in the world economy for the past century or so and i could see bitcoin be kind of smoothing The transfer of of value across lines Transmitting of money and exchange of money Smoother and and.

jay z africa jay z. southeast asia jack dorsey china both india nineties nigeria square past century last month african past couple years one kenya
"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"It's a another and actually to my way of thinking a more substantial move towards continuing bitcoins rise as a as a legitimate something whether you think of it as a security or a currency or or some other store of value this is trying to promote that and interesting that they they are targeting both india and african countries because as you mentioned Cryptocurrencies tell in several african countries. Not just nigeria and kenya but being somewhat opposed in india. So this trust again not to be run by jay z and jack dorsey but to be endowed so going to set it up and then it'll run itself. After that that's the idea of a blind irrevocable trust just to try to promote its use so to make its use better in the places where it's already active in africa and to try to get it to be accepted by working with the government of india. I think it's pretty cool in given that has the backing of jack dorsey and jay z. I feel like this is a very very. It has the potential to be very successful in these these countries especially since they do have this economic value for bitcoin. Arty kind of implemented in those areas Even though like you said What was it india. Kind of iffy about it. Yeah india's. Internet economy is a little more advanced. The government Metals a little more in things as of late over the past couple years. I know that the pandemic is sort of messing. Everyone's trajectories up but nigeria and kenya. particularly Were shaping up to be the next place where we would see a lot of internet and tech related innovation. Just like china and southeast asia. Were that in the nineties. And we were seeing a lot of even still in india So this is another way to try to continue that to try to boost that innovation along and and yeah i think this is overall a good project an and one that i'm going to pay attention to see. See what comes of it. I have no idea of jay z. And jack dorsey are already do. Business together are just buds. Or both i see where a company like square. This makes a lotta sense You know in in the future square will spare square will be completely involved in the development of bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general jay z. A little less a clear about. But i know that for a variety of reasons especially just in the last month plus A lot of folks who have a lot of money and have money to play around with money. Making moves are more and more interested in this type of thing and You know titled titled be involved. somehow. I feel like the the idea behind. This is like what kenya's doing with with using bitcoin as a reserve is to encourage that becomes a stable store of value that's transnational The doll the dollar has kind of been that in the world economy for the past century or so. And i could see bitcoin be kind of smoothing the transfer of of value across lines Making making transmitting of money and exchange of money smoother and and.

jay z. jay z africa southeast asia jack dorsey china nineties both india nigeria square last month past century african past couple years kenya one
"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"It's a another and actually to my way of thinking a more substantial move towards continuing bitcoins rise as a as a legitimate something whether you think of it as a security or a currency or or some other store of value this is trying to promote that and interesting that they they are targeting both india and african countries because as you mentioned cryptocurrencies well in several african countries. Not just nigeria and kenya but being somewhat opposed in india. So this trust again not to be run by jay z and jack dorsey but to be endowed. So they're going to set it up and then it'll run itself. After that that's the idea of a blind irrevocable trust just to try to promote its use so to make its use better in the places where it's already active in africa and to try to get it to be accepted by working with the government of india. I think it's pretty cool in given that has the backing of jack dorsey and jay z. I feel like this is a very very. It has the potential to be very successful in these these countries especially since they do have this economic value for bitcoin. Arty kind of implemented in those areas Even though like you said What was it india. Kind of iffy about it. Yeah india's. Internet economy is a little more advanced. The government Metals a little more in things as of late over the past couple years. I know that the pandemic is sort of messing. Everyone's trajectories up but nigeria and kenya. particularly Were shaping up to be the next place where we would see a lot of internet and tech related innovation china and southeast asia. Were that in the nineties. And we were seeing a lot of even still in india So this is another way to try to continue that to try to boost that innovation along and and yeah i think this is overall a good project an and one that i'm going to pay attention to see. See what comes of it. I have no idea of jay z. And jack dorsey are already do. Business together are just buds. Or both i see where a company like square. This makes a lotta sense You know in in the future square will spare square will be completely involved in the development of bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general jay z. A little less a clear about. But i know that for a variety of reasons especially just in the last month plus A lot of folks who have a lot of money and have money to play around with money. Making moves are more and more interested in this type of thing and You know titled titled be involved. somehow. I feel like the the idea behind. This is like what kenya's doing with with using bitcoin as a reserve is to encourage that bitcoin a stable store of value. That's trans-national The doll the dollar has kind of been that in the world economy for the past century or so and i could see bitcoin be kind of smoothing The transfer of of value across lines Transmitting of money and exchange of money Smoother and and.

jay z. jay z africa jack dorsey southeast asia china both nineties india last month square nigeria african past century past couple years kenya one of india
"past century" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"He was talking in terms of in terms of culture in terms of you. Civilizational norms in terms of In terms of just like social like social values and so in a way kinda in ways the kind of beneficiary or outgrowth of atwater atler southern strategy but he does want immigration to be discussed explicitly. I'd term. I think one way they mesh is that He wants to add immigration to the list of the things that atwater says are preferable You know to the n. Word like like he wants to inch immigration as you know in addition to cutting taxes and all this stuff include immigration reform as as one of those things that you can do without having to explicitly Racist you are There's a lot more to the book. And i don't want to just give people the feeling they can. Just listen to this interview not having to read the book so there's a lot of stuff i deliberately wanted to leave You know on the table on undiscussed. But i wanted to close out to ask. You does anything that you feel like. You do want to talk about that. We haven't discussed discussed from the book that that you think is Or just any final thoughts or any final plugs that you wanna give well. I guess i'll just. I mean one of the things that i do that i would be curious to hear. Hear your thoughts on Is that our conversation. This far has really focused on on panton and gave may and the kind of Ruling class apparatus is that developed over the course of the past century to regulate in adjust. flows of immigration. And all of that but you know a large part of the book is about more contemporary far right organizing That in the kind of resonance and relationship between these sort of elite policy oriented people and the rank and file Proud boys and bigalow boys and and like and you know..

one one way atwater one of those things past century atler
"past century" Discussed on Ghosts on a Train

Ghosts on a Train

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"past century" Discussed on Ghosts on a Train

"In the romance novel. That i've not allowed to look at. Oh well it doesn't hear that a the spark in one's heart it's a ooh holiday human. Yeah thirteen how greg is having this time of his life into this is a kindness has not been done on to me. The likes of which. I have not seen in. Perhaps this past century at sucks. It's all right. It's been a blur i can keep bringing stuff by companions have also offered its. I feel i feel very care for it. It's nice well that's good. Do you on anything other. You know i want for many things likes of which are in no position to give me have been positioned to give you something. I have a apprentice of sorts to channel. Call them in a way. They are likely sheils of my in a way that i cannot explain to the if you should see them please. Nobody has been able to catch them or nobody has returned. She told me that they have spoken to them. On my behalf. I do not know where one would find them. But do you have any hints. Anything about might identify them. You would know them name useless as would likely have changed it but if you could explain my situation for i do believe they think dead if you have find an individual with is the symbol of felines. Okay that is perhaps the most simple thing everything else. They may cover up anyways. I'm gonna go read this romance novel. Get outta here. You're bruce heald's try them out if you'd like out what all right cool we just got a call that guy back to wash. We can absolutely find that guy okay. This is loses. Fine. it's fine. We're good it's fine. it's fine you got student plot ma here on and would like to take a moment to discuss this malays. I've been feeling it sounds like you could use a little glee hannah from ghost on a train. How did you get into like old. Timey radio play second. You have no power over here. greg. And i'm not just had from goes on train. I'm also had from the glee lodge the glee wash that podcast were hosts salmon. Hannah discussed the television series glee episode by episode examining. Its place in. The cultural moment was released as well as our modern day. You're that hannah. Almost halfway through gleason nothing. Great time to listen. We'll sounds great. I can use a lot of li. Nobody actually means not much but just.

hannah bruce heald Hannah greg thirteen second past century lodge
"past century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"past century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"But even more has changed in the past century here are some major headlines from nineteen ninety a hundred years ago Americans had a hard time bringing in the new year with a glass of champagne in nineteen nineteen because of the passage of the eighteenth amendment the pro version of alcohol in the USA no booze women across the country cast their votes for the first time that year after Congress approved the nineteenth amendment guaranteeing suffrage all females in America Europe was repairing to enjoy a period of prosperity after signing the treaty of Versailles officially ending World War one unfortunately that peace did not last very long the same year nineteen nineteen so the formation of the German workers party which would morph into the **** party at the same time Benito Mussolini formed the fascist party in Italy in Ireland militant national organization shin Fein created its own parliament in Dublin and declared Ireland independent of Great Britain sparking the Irish war of independence in October nineteen nineteen president Woodrow Wilson suffered a series of strokes that rendered him blind in one eye and aren't able to use his left hand Wilson his wife and the White House doctor successfully hid the the condition from the press and the public until he left office months later on December twenty six nineteen ninety Babe Ruth sold by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for a hundred and twenty five thousand dollars an enormous sum at the time I DO many believe cursed the red Sox for decades and led to the rise of the most successful sports franchise in history the Yankees so the world has changed a lot in one hundred years and it's incredible to think what the next hundred years will hold for ourselves I have a very happy and safe new year from the Riley update crew we'll be back after this in business if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business companies that don't have a clear picture of their finances often fail.

Britain White House president shin Fein Ireland New York Yankees Boston Red Sox Ruth Woodrow Wilson USA Dublin Italy Benito Mussolini Versailles Europe America Congress
"past century" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"past century" Discussed on KGO 810

"Tell me but I've never forgotten listen I appreciate the call not very optimistic what do you think but what the trump administration acknowledges the arctic is warming more rapidly than other regions for example well first average temperature has increased by one degree Fahrenheit over the past century at temperatures in Greenland they've increased about seven degrees Fahrenheit since nineteen ninety one and because warming is more rapid in the arctic the impacts are much more pronounced remember Greenland is the world's largest island it sits between the arctic the Atlantic oceans it is almost entirely covered with ice the I. she in green lantern eighty percent of the land surface and more and more of that ice is melting by god I hope the president goes to Denmark and I hope from Denmark he takes a trip to Graceland any hopes I hope that he sees the impact it do you understand swarming climate means that overall green land loses more ice than it gains each year the amount of ice melt during the summer as we've already indicated to you is huge angry lands excel reading rate of ice melt is going to have an impact on all of us four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten we'll take more of your calls when we come back after these words on KGO eight ten one for yes the Southern Poverty Law Center is I hate based scam that nearly caused me to be murdered they're always quoted as who's a hate group and who's not maybe they are yeah what people are catching on that's coming up tomorrow five AM to ten AM on KGO restrictions may apply plans glass coverage may call project my car for details in these hard economic times you've got to do whatever you can to save money one of our biggest expenses can be our cars especially when unexpected repair bills it not anymore if you do own a car truck or SUV made from nineteen ninety nine or higher you could stop paying for car repairs that's right you might not have to pay a penny to have repaired just dial star star one one four nine on your mobile phone now to see if you qualify you must have an automobile made from nineteen ninety nine or higher and all repairs for your engine transmission and much more can become a thing of the past dial star star one one four nine on your mobile phone today and get your car protected before your next repairable hits that's right total protection for your car and no more repair bills just dial star star one one four night on your mobile phone now to see if your car qualifies that star star one one four nine never pay for car repairs again just dial star star one one four night on your mobile phone now dial star star one one four nine finding great candidates to hire can be.

seven degrees Fahrenheit eighty percent one degree
"past century" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"past century" Discussed on WJR 760

"The when do better to speak with our old friend around love them and there he is on the other end of our line right now good morning Sharon good morning Paul how are you I am excellent Sir we didn't get a chance to talk about the passing of Lee Iacocca whose services he'll be laid to rest of today and then the lost two of the colorful self made the Texas billionaire who rose from a childhood of depression era poverty and twice mounted outsider campaigns for president to Val dying at the age of eighty nine H. Ross Perot you know Ross Perot is a guy who was not that well known nationally I guess in general he sold his company EDS and GM in any game some celebrity but of course what really made unknown where she has to run for president of the United States and many people still think that he helped get Bill Clinton elected over George Bush and George H. W. bush in the second term even though many political scientists say that's kind of unclear well nineteen percent of the vote it was a big deal and in fact Mr Perot's nineteen percent is that one of America's great newspapers Toledo blade says Mr Perot's nineteen percent of the vote in the nineteen ninety two presidential election stands among the best showings by an independent candidate in the past century so he did well he did very well in Detroit we're always going to remember him as the man who opposed Roger Smith ultimately and argued with Roger publicly over the direction of General Motors motors and ended up being very prophetic in terms of what ultimately happened with General Motors I think it's fair to say that looking back over what Ross Perot had to say about the pace at which GM was changing in the eighties and nineties which was not sufficient he really in in many ways his advance foreshadowed the bankruptcy in two thousand nine and he'll be missed if the thing about General Motors what you love General Motors she really wasn't anti General Motors he he thought General Motors was an American institution that really had to be saved and I never really got a chance to talk to him about the the reorganization of General Motors but I'm I'm quite sure that he would have approved in your writings in the past you did spend some time with H. Ross Perot then I spent a lot of time with the my visit them often in Dallas and it all started when I when I came to Detroit not expecting to stay as a correspondent for the Wall Street journal and found myself on the telephone with him one day and we got into a long conversation about General Motors and it was punctuated by invitation to come down to Dallas and talk to him in his office and I did and that led to a series of stories in the Wall Street journal's a nomination for all kinds of prizes at that and a lot of attention because of what he was saying about what was then the most successful car company in the history of the world did you ever get to his place in Bermuda that I rip yeah I remember that story they had to cut out a piece of coral reef so that his yacht could pull up to his house in Bermuda and he got into a whole whole lot of trouble but that you learn the expression ask for forgiveness not permission yeah he was he was something of a character but I think in many ways his public life outwardly what was new was pretty modest yes of course he was a billionaire yes of course you had planes and yachts and and and all kinds of houses and so forth but you want that stuff whenever I went down to see him at his office it was a nice office but nothing too elaborate and whenever we drove around Dallas he was always drive the three year old York so up he wasn't trying to rob anybody knows that the bottom used because that was the best way I guess for him eggs here we're in northwest Ohio he never made it to northwest Ohio when he was running for president but people loved him if they love them they love them they were called the Perot keys and in my local area here the Perot geese from northwest Ohio would pass out bumper stickers and fires even though he never came here they were they were pushing form he was a special character that's for sure H. Ross Perot gone I guess who say they happen in threes Lee Iacocca and locally we could say Peter Walt Meier Pete the colonists son who is a city councilman for a very long time and very active in the politics and other things around us the wrong you're very active two we appreciate you taking time to speak to is this morning thanks thanks for calling appreciate Paul good luck with it offered thank you much seven thirteen.

nineteen percent three year one day
"past century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:20 min | 3 years ago

"past century" Discussed on KTOK

"Number is eight hundred nine four one Sean you want to be a part of the program. The president is in Great Britain. He is to meet with the British Prime minister may on a mess. Brexit has become over there. And why because you have a bunch of politicians that want to circumvent the will of the people of Britain, because and she can't get the deal done. I don't think she's long for the political world. There. President having a back and forth with those, you know, wacky mayor of London, Sadique Khan, and a direct tack attack on him. And the president took to Twitter as it was landing in the UK and anyway, the president, you know, appeared to make them ALI'S flying over British hair space, but using Air Force One anyway, the mayor Kahn wrote for the British newspapers, which is like the best known old left wing Sunday, paper, the day before the state visit and con compared Trump to most fascist and authoritarian leaders of the past century, and well, in-kind President Trump pointed out the cons, poor record as mayor where crime, particularly violent crime and murder has been soaring and suggested the is labor party politicians spend more time doing their job properly than attacking. The leaders of key, British allies and then roasted con is the terrible attempt at leading London and president also said that Khan had been foolish was a stone cold loser and very much very dumb and incompetent like the mayor of New York, comrade build the Blasi, oh, which kind of made me chuckle a little bit. And. The news is making a lot of big deal Trump's hairstyle church changed. Okay. As big news for everybody. President change this air style. Go. There's a lot happening on the deep. State was really fascinating is all the nuance new information we're going to get to in a second here. The president's attorney jaysekulow chief counsel for the American Center for law and Justice stops by Senator Lieberman on the state of the Democratic Party. It's really not a pretty picture in any way, shape manner, or form it's actually very ugly for the Democrats, and they don't know what to do at this point. So I think they're just as a belief among Democrats that they've got a double down on the most radical the most extreme ideas, if they if they want a shot at getting the party's nomination and maybe historically, it's been shown wisdom, if you kind of appeal more to the base of your party, and then you kind of go a little bit to the middle in the general election. The problem is, is the positions that these candidates are taking a so far. Radical left, if they ultimately get the nomination and I guess somebody will at some point emerge. I'm not feeling it for Joe Biden. I don't see that this guy has what it's gonna take to campaign, not only in against Donald Trump. And even in the primary guy takes off every other day he can't get crowds. He can't stop from putting his foot in his mouth, every other second. He's got a history now emerging that is extraordinarily ugly, one when you view, his speeches through the prism of where we are. Today is a society, and he's going to have to answer all of those questions. One way or the other all the left wing of kind of United and said, no. We don't want any part of crazy creepy sleepy uncle Joe. And so he's being attacked by everybody else that is in this field of extreme candidates. And he is extreme, and then he also has Russia happened on his watch. Add that to the msrb. List of failure of the Biden, Obama years, and, you know, one of the main questions people ask themselves every four years, are you better off than you are for years ago? Well, when we have the best to Konami we've had since nineteen sixty nine or setting record low unemployment for every single demographic group in the country, especially groups that would disproportionately negatively impacted under Biden Obama policies, and you got record low unemployment for African Americans, Spanich Americans Asian Americans women in the workplace youth unemployment. And you have nearly two million more jobs available than we have people on available to fill the slots, that was not a problem ever for the about for the Biden. Obama ticket ever, their numbers were trophyless, the only problem was, they had a media compliant in their back hip, and they did cover for them every step of the way and you know, what do people want to vote for peace and prosperity? Are we more prosperous is there more opportunity? Are we more secure as a country? You know, you can start with the democratic. Position. What why they would ever take on not, not even the abortion issue, but I will deliver the baby. I'll tell you what will happen. And then, you know, we'll make sure the baby's comfortable and, and then the mother will decide whether or not the baby's ever given any medical attention. Okay. That is now we're not talking about a fetus anymore. We're talking about a full term baby person. Born reading alone, independent of the mother, and that means a human being is right in front of you. And you have to be pretty darn callous to just say, we're gonna let the mother decide if that baby lives or dies as the baby is alive, right there in front of you, or when the when the remember when it was being sold in the house of Commons. It was the question went out there. So you're saying under your Bill that, that a woman can have an abortion, even during. During the birthing process in normal, terminal, full nine months. And the answer was, yes. Even if for example, a woman is in labor and a woman has dilated, and is about to give birth to a child that child fully capable of living independently outside of the mothers womb. Abortion. This is murder. This is infanticide. This is. But that's what the twenty twenty candidates are doing Alantic had a good piece on this twenty twenty candidates are going all in on abortion rights. That's not about a right to choose at this particular point. I love what e- asked liberals anytime you want the government to have any say in whether they, you must carry a baby to term what a woman can and cannot do with their buddy, all say. No. All right. Is that for the first three months, maybe where there's no viability is a factor at that point. Is it for six months for nine months after the baby's born? And this is where they've gone. And this is how extreme they become. Interesting to watch out in California over the weekend, democratic presidential hopefuls, you know. Well crazy creepy sleepy uncle. Joe was absent at the California state party gathering on Saturday, as you know, his opponents took a chance to make some digs at the former vice president, some save. We just come down the Republicans will come to their senses, Elizabeth Warren said in a clear reference to Biden's comments that the GOP may have an piffle after Donald Trump has gone, but our country is in a crisis, but, you know, then they go then they just go hardcore left. You know, most of these Democrats have adopted economic policies that guarantee this economy tanks, you know, Elizabeth Warren wants a wealth tax on top of the proposal that we have a seventy percent top marginal rate in all based on. Myth that the rich don't pay their fair share. It's, it's just not true. When when you have ten percent, paying seventy five percent of the federal income tax Bill. You have complete and full redistribution. When, when you have such a small percentage of people contributing, and then the rest of your. For business. All right. We've had great business investment in this country. And we've really only just begun people worried that might be slow an economic slowdown based on some of the trade issues with China and Mexico that are ongoing with the president, with, by the way, that would be a hiccup in my view. We want if we want to raise the standard of living of every single solitary American, we've got to do the exact opposite of what these twenty twenty candidates are proposing oil and gas is the lifeblood of every economy in the world, we happen to as a country be blessed with vast amounts of resources and the ability to extract it.

president Joe Biden Donald Trump Biden Obama London Sadique Khan murder Elizabeth Warren Trump Democratic Party Prime minister Brexit Sean Britain Twitter Great Britain UK California vice president Konami
"past century" Discussed on The Food Disruptors

The Food Disruptors

13:22 min | 3 years ago

"past century" Discussed on The Food Disruptors

"And welcome to the food. Disruptors, the podcast, where capitalism meets America's food culture. I'm teary sobriety on and together with my co host Rettig Lawrence. We delve into the stories of the big personalities who have shaved fit system. And what why and how we eat today for better and for worse. And we look to the future through interviews with today's disruptors who even as we speak for determining everybody's nourishment in health as well as the health of the planet in years to come. Most US consumers recognized that the past century and a half of industrial agriculture has damaged vital ecosystems, including major watersheds, grasslands fisheries and arable land. We're losing top soil at an alarming rate. But still we keep on farming in the bad old way. We till the soil for excessive yields of commodities like corn, wheat soybeans rice and peanuts season after season. Why can't we push a reset button on this destructive scenario? One big reason is federal farm subsidies. Cool Turkey removal of subsidies might not work in the too big to fail industrial accident we've designed but New Zealand facing dire budgetary problems in the early nineteen eighties. Did. Just that removal of subsidies did 'cause really painful dislocations for farms at that time. But now thirty five years later New Zealand's agriculture industry is diversified and thriving are there lessons here for the United States. Let's listen to Yohannes Oleyinik who specializes in agricultural technology and food systems in his studies at Stanford graduate school of business and the Emmett interdisciplinary program in environment and resources. Johann is is a student soon to graduate right at the end of this year fan Stanford graduate school of business, but interestingly he is a joint degree student in Stanford in a disciplinary program in environment and resources, you is what is that program? So it's a program that runs with the business school and law school and this program isn't really a degree in itself. So you can't graduate from the it's called itself. It's just a joint degree program that's offered as to as and JD's about thirty people year and people can choose between nine different tracks tracks focus on energy on clean energy on sustainable design. And I'm in the land use in agricultural track. So there is a land years in agriculture. You're getting a master of science in check. So what do you study in that? So. So it's basically a combination of classes, and it's pretty flexible, I've taken classes at the design school, for example, where we were working with Stanford athletes and the dining halls to promote plan forward diets, I've taken classes at the earth system school engineering school and just sort of trying to get a broader sense of agriculture and land use. I I wanna get you on another podcast in for forward diets that. And we have a very big subject to talk about today, which is going to be agricultural subsidies and government policies supporting agriculture. But before we do that you hunt as tell disrupt listeners how you got interested in the food sector because your background is both in agriculture technology and funding and really in rural agricultural systems globally. So how did you get from Germany to there? So I was born in Germany burn raise their went to college there. And then had the opportunity got connected through Stanford opportunity to go to a for profit social enterprise in. Rhonda, there's working with small to farmers trying to build a mushroom industry in Africa. And there were at that point, no mushroom fresh mushroom producers in sub Saharan Africa. So they're really trying to build this industry from scratch dimensions grey naturally. They do not on a commercial scale. So they were introducing ice mushrooms. I ice mushrooms now button mushrooms to is Africa these climate with the amenable, Josh gyms. Yeah. Definitely they're pretty they're pretty flexible. They don't there's not a lot of requirements for mushrooms in terms of climate. So people were doing this in Kigali as capital in their backyards, really since pivoted and gone into a little larger scale farmers working with a couple of hundred farmers at the border with the Congo. And producing button mushrooms for large hotel chains in east Africa. So like as a cooperative, more or less? It's a for profit company, and they are sort of outsourcing the growing purchasing the mushrooms plant, critiquing, basic. Basically. So through dad for more through the social impact lands got interested in or got I touch with food and agriculture, and then had the opportunity do something somewhat similar but much larger scale in in the Himalayas Mouton and was working with hazelnuts there, which work I talk that. And another fate is this epithet, stay tuned. So was working heads there. And at that point really realized how impactful food and agriculture 's really focusing on how many people get in touch with food products every single day, and especially how impactful it is in the developing world where really fifty to eighty percent of people still working culture in the US. It's now about two percent. So not not as many people as it used to be. And it's the cleaning pretty rapidly even twenty years ago. It was still five percent of the us. So but still it's very impactful area to be in. And I also just happen to like food allowed. So yes, they'd in that space, and then came to Sanford and last summer worked with fallen capital invest in. In I in farms across the US and invest in academic. So investing in farms across the US was that in farms doing unique innovations in their farming. So it's mostly Roku up farms. Mostly corn soy a little bit of read a little bit of rice. It is all the big five commodities yet. And we're mostly looking for founds either undervalued at this point because the farmers happened to not be super productive or where we think we can convert grazing land into into row crop farms. So that was one of the pros and also drawing on the experience of climate lose one of the co founders who happens to be a generation confirm, and as one of the most productive confirm in the Quan belt, then this is this is going to make our coming discussion set richer because the big five commodities this. You said are for the most part the biggest recipients of agricultural subsidies are or government support in one way or another in the US, but that's not the case, globally and. So you now you have experience or of researched the agricultural sector in New Zealand. Tell us how you came to do that first of all so Stanford as a program for second year students to lead study trips across the world for twenty five first year students and few of my classmates, and I were setting up a trip to New Zealand. And we all interested in food and agriculture, and so chose that chose New Zealand deliberately as as the destination because we thought they have such an interesting approach to agriculture in particular. And as we're talking about subsidies, they happen to be the only developed country in the world that doesn't have any subsidies. For agriculture wits. Folks is more amazing than that might sound. And there's a long and and almost tortuous story behind that. So how did new-zealand well first of all do, you know, win subsidies started in New Zealand, not quite a Wedneday started. I know when they were bowlers, let's let's start in there. Tell us the story of getting rid of farm subsidies in New Zealand. But before you do what is the agriculture sector like in New Zealand? So it's very aids very big. It's a very very important part of the economy still about thirty to forty percent of GDP. By comparison. What is it in the US below five percent so much much more important and really the only developed country in the world that has that high over share for culture as part of the DP, really? And it also happens to be extremely export-focused soda exporting about ninety five percent of their produce the producing their at four point six million people producing food for forty million people. Wow. And for Tara and Frontera. So the big mill producer in New Zealand heavens to expert thirty percent of the global milk export. So as one company, okay as we should probably talk about the dairy industry. But let's talk about Eggen general there. So it's a huge part of the economy, and I imagined. Well, let me ask are there is a large portion of the. Relation working in agriculture. They're a pretty big push. And yet, I mean, definitely Melot more people than as a percentage of population. A lot more people than here again about twenty five to forty percent of the population. So well it sets it it is sets. I've only ever seen pictures. I've never been bed. It looks like such an amazing geographical plays that just lends itself to to lush production. Absolutely. Yeah. I bet it's not all probably easily era ball. I mean, there's a lot of sheep there. Right. So that's that's an interesting thing in the eighties. Just before agricultural subsidies were abolished they had about a twenty five to one ratio of sheep to human. Well. And now it's dropped to seventy one still a lot of sheep but significantly less in terms of relationship with people, let's say, how are sheep in terms of their impact on the land. And the pretty pretty decent. Generally, both cattle and sheep tend to be a lot better than row crops in terms of soya hall, and and emissions. By aso. The drive y less sheep today is mostly driven by a lack of demand cell is this she Pittock should mainly for meat or is it also will both. Okay. Because sheep I've been looking into regenerative agriculture, and we did a couple of episodes on Pompeo ranch out here in Pesca Darrow. And we're going to be doing more on sustainable, meet growing pros and cons at cetera. Mander standing is that sheep don't have the bodily heft to really break up the soil and stirred their manure back into the soil. No as far as grazing goes. Did they do they practice way you move this sheep from pasture to pasture paying attention to that sort of thing in New Zealand? So the V visited when we were down there. They all were definitely practicing. That just because it's the most sustainable approach and defining visited we're all owned by the person, that's also farming which sentence are lined at that point. Whereas where you have what you have in the us, very often. We're more than fifty percent

US New Zealand Stanford Africa Stanford graduate school of bu Rettig Lawrence America Roku Saharan Africa Kigali Germany Yohannes Oleyinik Himalayas Mouton