35 Burst results for "Passover"

Author Ruth Wisse on Her New Memoir 'Free as a Jew'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:33 min | 1 d ago

Author Ruth Wisse on Her New Memoir 'Free as a Jew'

"Have Sitting with me here in the studio the author of a book funny title. It's free as a jew. A personal memoir of national self liberation ruth weiss. Welcome to this program. Thank you i. I really can't just start talking to you. Because i have to let people know with whom i'm seated and Who is the author of this book. You have an extraordinary life. We're going to talk about your life But you won the national humanities medal. Which is an extraordinary honor. Utah yiddish literature at harvard for a couple of decades. And as you approach your eighty sixth birthday. I too am approaching my eighty six birthday forgiven. I can't see it as clearly as you can. But you've decided to write a book which is a a memoir. But it's called free as a jew. We should start there. Why is it called that. And then i want to get into your story I should have a soundbite. Answer for it but i haven't yet. Maybe this will get me there I love freedom. it's It's a very great value of mine. And i love being a jew and the two things are very much connected in my mind. I think there's a kind. There's an idea of freedom that comes with being a jew and You know this is not a moment when the jews are particularly popular not an american culture as they used to be once and So i i wanted to lead with that. And it's also because writing the memoir. I didn't myself. No what would emerge as being the most important theme or the most important connective through it. So free as it begins for me. You know in childhood with The most important part of our jewish year And that is the celebration of passover and the reading of the passover haggadah every year. Now i didn't grow up in a very religious family but somehow my parents Kept the passover holiday in the way that some people latch onto one thing in their religious lives in their national lives. That is so strong that it almost makes up for everything else. And the passover holiday was like that and it's all about

Ruth Weiss Harvard Utah
Broadway Will Not Disclose Box Office Grosses

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

01:05 min | 6 d ago

Broadway Will Not Disclose Box Office Grosses

"You probably know usually the broadway league releases figures every monday about box office grosses. They're not releasing those this year. They they've said stuff about like well you know plays are staggered is not the same. Also there's There's reduced reduced shows for a lot of shows. Not everybody's doing eight shows a week so we don't know i do know that waitress that the night it opened they did make an announcement that waitress itself had broken All the previous broadway records for single performance ticket sales. They made it almost two hundred thousand dollars in ticket sales But besides that all when i was at passover tusa empty seats When i was at hagerstown. I didn't see a single one and i'm sure that last night i think the odds are very good. That every seat was filled last night. They would have been sold out all the people who wanted to be part of that history. How it will continue that way.

Hagerstown
Former Harvard Professor Ruth Wisse Discusses the Title of Her Memoir "Free as a Jew: A Personal Memoir of National Self-Liberation."

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Former Harvard Professor Ruth Wisse Discusses the Title of Her Memoir "Free as a Jew: A Personal Memoir of National Self-Liberation."

"Decided to write a book. Which is a memoir. But it's called free as a jew. We should start there. Why is it called that. And then i want to get into your story. I should have a sound bite. Answer for it. But i haven't yet. Maybe this will get me there I love freedom It's a it's a very great value of mine. And i love being jew and the two things are very much connected in my mind. I think there's a kind. There's an idea of freedom that comes with being a jew and You know this is not a moment when the jews are particularly popular not an american culture as they used to be once. And so i i wanted to lead with that. And it's also because writing the memoir. I didn't myself. No what would emerge as being the most important theme or the most important connective through it. So free is a jewish. It begins for me. You know in childhood with The most important part of our jewish year And that is the celebration of passover and the reading of the passover haggadah every year. Now i didn't grow up in a very religious family but somehow my parents Kept the passover holiday in the way that some people latch onto one thing in their religious lives or in their national lives. That is so strong that it almost makes up for everything else. And the passover holiday was like that and it's all about freedom the idea of freedom and you what you do during the passover to evenings of the of the seder when the family is gathered together. Is you actually re experience. The exodus from egypt and that whole concept of what it is to be free as a jew that is to say you experience the joy of just breaking out from slavery but mostly it's you experience that freedom only comes when you really begin to assume the responsibility that goes with

Egypt
The Trauma and Grief of Being a Reporter

Bereaved But Still Me

02:58 min | Last month

The Trauma and Grief of Being a Reporter

"I remember being in New York for 9 11 and I was actually down at ground zero when the American Express limited to our building was in danger of collapsing. And again things that you remember orange buckets arriving by the truckload. And I turned to one of the guys who were emergency crews who was next to it says that we're guiding us through the site. And I said what are the buckets for? And he said body parts. I know it. Yeah. And it was just like oh my God. And that's the aim for these people. And again you know you just think about each one of those buckets is a body or a person and it's a family and that's a life. The worst pieces of somebody are part of somebody. Yeah if you're lucky man. And so you take that with you. And then Jerusalem was a really tough geek way for a while. I mean I remember I think there's like 6 or 7 suicide bombings in one month. Right. That was the beginning of a big fan of the second. And unless you've lived through it you don't know what that's like. You can guess and you can try and you can be sympathetic and empathetic. But you don't know what that's like unless you're living there. Well you know I was living there and I am living there but I didn't see it up close. I had I had this tremendous I don't know what streak of luck that a lot of these things went off the day after I had been like right there. Right. It's terrifying. But you saw an Italian from the inside. You were at the tongue do you want to talk about that? For some reason we were the first cruise air and others had taken a long time to follow. And we managed to actually get inside the ballroom with this happen because it was to say to me of a Passover if people remember this and it was at that seaside hotel in natanya. And we were actually doing live shots walking through this ballroom that what had happened is because of the force of the explosion it set off the fire alarms. So the rumored flooded to the extent. And so basically we were sloshing around a mixture of water and blood and brains and flesh and everything that was like that was left over from the suicide bombing. There were bits of people skull still embedded. In the ceiling above us it was always left of it. And what had happened and this is what happens in television is that the producers in New York and D.C. though we saw the live shot that we had done for one of the early morning shows and the producers and donate this wrong way it's just how we talk and that's great TV. And TV horrendous but I know what you mean. Let's do it again. And so I had to do this thing over and over and over again walking through the blood. And like just every hour almost don't stop. And you know you kind of leave that thinking what the hell am I doing? Exactly. What that life I did with titania is that it actually for the first time on live television showed the world

Jerusalem Michael New York 9/11 Grief Bereavement John Vause Netanya Terror Attack American Express Natanya D.C. Titania
Reaching Sales And Marketing Alignment With Brandon Redlinger of RingDNA

MarTech Podcast

02:12 min | 2 months ago

Reaching Sales And Marketing Alignment With Brandon Redlinger of RingDNA

"All right. Here's the second part of my conversation with brendan red. Linger senior director of product marketing at ring dna brandon. Welcome back to the more tech podcast. Thanks for having me back then excited to have you back on the show excited to continue our conversation yesterday we talked about. Abm being strategic about who. You're prioritizing your marketing and your sales efforts and a big part of that is having your sales marketing team being on the same page. Actually driving some alignment. It seems like traditionally. That's not something that was easy to come across. I will quote glengarry glen ross or at least reference it. maybe this isn't a quote. Coffee is for closers. There's your quote but look it's always the marketing leads. That are the problem in. The sales team can't close sales marketing marketing blame sales and we never figure out who's to blame and that's the game that we play when we don't have marketing alignment. So what does it actually look like. When you do have marketing alignment and how the heck do you get there. You see a lot of people still writing about this still talking about it after all these years. But i think it's because it's really freaking hard to do because at the end of the day marketing cares usually. They're held to lead number or pipeline. Number sales is held to a actual revenue number. And i think a lot of the disconnect between cells marketing just stems right there. They're not actually measured in compensated on the same thing so for marketers. I do like to push them to be measured on as down funnel metrics as you can usually that's pipeline and then if you are held to a revenue number as well that's great and then also sales maybe they're compensated or comte a little bit differently not just on clothes one revenue but maybe a metric that it also aligns with marketing. It could be closed. I remember when i was in sales. So i actually started my career option sales for i got into marketing. One more thing. We have in common buddy but i remember the spreadsheet that i use to calculate my comp every month there was this gigantic sophisticated thing that i talked. A bunch of numbers and doing one of them was actually. How many leads that. I close that. We're passover so that actually aligns with marketings objective as well.

Brendan Red Glengarry Glen Ross Brandon
"passover" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

The Dr. Susan Block Show

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"passover" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

"We love you maryland. Mos be we don't know too much about you. Accept your good looking and you have a really good idea here and thank you for following through on it. Yeah so on the other hand just down the road in georgia. Georgia is getting worse. You know georgia's like i say. The counterpunch pieces kind of this epicenter of conflict. Scott to new democratic senators scott stacey abrams. It's got a lot of you know progressive movement but it just had this spa shooting and now governor. Brian kemp is taking away. Georgians voting rights. And he did it in a lock. Dorm meeting surrounded by six white dude's now. Hey some married to a white dude not against white dude so big mushroom seven white guys interlocked rogue taken away voting rights from people of color and poor people base. It right right. That is not right and not only that but representative park. Cannon was out there knocking on the door and just saying i would like to observe this ritual. She didn't say ritual but they said no no you can. We're going to rescue right or did they arrested her at dragged her from the georgia state house. This she was fighting for voting rights. You should. this wasn't in hong kong because the same thing that the communists well you're doing something similar to an exact same thing vote and you can't vote. You can't vote and you can't have a say right and this is a low georgia. Really alarming georgia. You're all very very bright and state everything but really think about it. It's teetering on the edge of progress versus devastation. I mean you got the spa shootings. You got the just ripping away of voting rights. Now very religious. I'd say to. God is getting back at them with tornadoes. Borough tighter ni- hainault malakal bo ray pre goffin slug online. I winning baby all right so more than one is always good. Are we ready to hear wine story because it has sure religion. We're ready first. Of all. I had no idea was passover because am not a good jew at on my cousin. Elliot thank you. Elliott elliott one of my favorite cousins elliott. and diane. Well he told me it was passover and he reminded me of my first passover with big group in a synagogue. When i was five years old and there was like a thousand people. I don't know or five hundred people in this big room with the rabbi. And everybody's praying and eating and i was a little bored but now it was an event for quote unquote that children. Well i was a child. And not only that. I was the youngest child in this room of five hundred people so the rabbi holds me in his arms as we look at this glass of wine and jews might know that. This is the ritual of elijah. Where elijah the prophet and christians know about aliji. Very important profit. He never died actually. He went up to heaven without even dying. He's oh yeah right anyway. The ritual is that you you fill up a glass of wine. You put it on the table and then you sing this song Who on the eddie Who teach be the Who who the Who huggy learn the anyway. You sing this song and elijah is supposed to come into the room and take a sip of the wine. Dan did and of course you don't see him because he's invisible he's like an angel or something so i'm in the rabbis arms and everybody sings the song and we're surrounded by a bunch of other kids and i'm the youngest..

Brian kemp hong kong georgia Elliott Elliot Scott diane Cannon Dan five hundred people scott stacey abrams first passover seven white guys first one five years old jews christians Georgia thousand people
COVID-19: Health Officials Say Best To Celebrate Holidays Virtually

The Ben Shapiro Show

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

COVID-19: Health Officials Say Best To Celebrate Holidays Virtually

"Health officials say that transmission of the virus remains widespread. It's increasing in other states, the CDC reporting on overall average of a 7% jump in the seven day average of new cases. Officials here say it's best to celebrate Easter Passover spring break other holidays virtually or to limit gatherings to members of the same household. Indoor gatherings of up to three separate households are permitted by public health rules provided there's mass wearing in distancing. Your participants aren't fully vaccinated, but officials say such activities still carry a risk. Jim Roop KNBC

CDC Jim Roop
"passover" Discussed on If I Were You

If I Were You

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"passover" Discussed on If I Were You

"Sh-. I drank whiskey out of my shoes still in saint louis fucking grow. That's a shoe you walk around cities in all and then you a drink from it. I believe it's it's on my. It's definitely it's on my instagram urculo losses. From that at the very least you should have gotten some sort of venereal disease from deserved it out of a shoe. Yeah i did issue we. I was pressured into doing a shoe in australia. But you did it too. I did you drink. Yeah i believe you drink whisky out of my shoe. No what i did. I didn't want to go whole hog. So i took a glove. Somebody's driving glove. And i just have some fruit punch out of it. I'm like this is the farthest. But i really don't feel comfortable with the shoe and i think you drink whisky of my shoe. Yeah i mean at certain point we were we were the blackout annoying ones at our own. Live show when when it was in australia shui. Consumption has been really down since covid right. I bet not a lot of shoe is going if you took a lot of. Live event yeah. I remember being in australia and like learning about the shoe because we had like five shows and it was like at the first show. Like the guys that. We're bringing us. All around australia. Told us we had our first show in like adelaide and that was where we like learned about the shoe. That's insane like. Oh my god imagine if i do a off. We had a show in melbourne. We're like somebody else that we started talking. We're like telling the audience we heard of this thing and then like the australians. Were chanting us to do the shoe. And then we started talking about how like. Wow that would probably like be like people with like it because it clearly wanted us and then we got to sydney after finding out about it like four days ago thing. It was most disgusting thing. I was like going on stage. Like i'm gonna fuck do shui. I'm drinking whisky audubon boot. By the time we left we were just like eating full meals. Out of our each other's shoes. I remember you put chili there. You'd have breakfast lunch and dinner. You're eating out of your shoes. I had a flat white guy talk through your sock. I remember that we became so desensitized to it down under. Yeah by the end of it. It was just par for the course at a certain point. You had a cow zone coming off somebody else. You still leto on rye. You're even eating food. You're eating the boot on breads right. Yeah i ate a cat instead of bread very good. That's actually good and quite enough. Thank you really yes. You're starting to show me up. And i appreciate the audience appreciates tread lightly or should i say kid lately. Thoughts on the awards for that or we're sticking with the awards have been given the award for this episode have been doled out they have been received they have been earned and that's quite enough and do a second golden mike for the kid giving up. You're saying there's still available then. There's one bonus mike which actually really appreciate for the head line. Which i'm quite pleased cheesed about i am quite shaft. Nice i appreciate it. Thank you all all right if you have your own theme songs or questions cinnamon down to show. G mail dot com more video content every week on our patriot patriotic dot com slash j. That's right jay and The opening theme song was lorne from toronto. Another great live show city. He did that a dirty little secret. Yacht dirty little secret parity but he sent some other one that. I'm going to play at the end right here. I forget it's another pop punk. You'll love it you'll love okay. Yeah i love it. I love it already. Maybe feeling this my friends over you any of these ring a bell on. Yeah all of them. You love them all thin and read. Yeah we'll get to attach specifically that one building that all right and we'll be back next week. Thanks so much for listening everybody. Stay eight again. That's on her baby. It's fun but you've done by now. All alone i can take bashing out to Was a hit dumb original..

australia sydney melbourne five shows next week first show toronto instagram four days ago lorne G mail dot com one bonus mike eight saint louis jay grow second golden mike dot com one australians
"passover" Discussed on If I Were You

If I Were You

05:57 min | 6 months ago

"passover" Discussed on If I Were You

"I don't even care of calm. I don't care if the airport's closed and we have to quarantine for three weeks before it's worth. What is smoking a hookah. It's where the for the twenty one days in a government-sanctioned motel without any daylight just to get that fucking who moves from old city. Got damn that. I mean international shows are it seems like a ways away. Some countries are still closed. Some countries are still going strong getting their fourth surge. We have to focus. Not even candidate seems like. That's a scary like a dangerous. That's fine because we haven't done a show in america in over a year. Yeah no we don't need to be adventurous just yet we can do. I mean our best shows are what atlanta chicago new york. La's san francisco portland. Seattle league shows big cities. Yeah austin goddamn austin all right. We're we'll pick and choose okay. Here's a quick question about alcohol since we're talking about live shows anyway. I've been casually seeing this guy from tinder for about two months now and we've been doing outdoor activities. Recently we decided to have a dinner date at my place while my roommate was away at her parents house for the weekend it was going really well until suddenly he gifted me a bottle of moonshine which he supposedly makes himself. I was disgusted beyond belief. Considering i rarely drink and i made it clear that it is illegal and very dangerous. He got offended and that. I didn't want to try. The moonshine went on about how much work it takes to produce and how it's a craft. He's very proud of. He's never mentioned this passion of his until now. I'm confused as to why he thought i would drink when he's only ever seen me drink wine shitty for not wanting to this homemade poison or should. I just end things with this guy. Lots of love thinks who. fake name. Female alcohol bartender. Joe joe this is my old favorite bartender perfect. Yeah so have you ever done. Tried had moonshine. Yeah i've definitely had moonshine. I think there is like there's different levels of it. Yeah that's what i was thinking like. I feel like. I've had like li like bought moonshine like legal moonshine. Yeah maybe it's different to have it than it is. To make a elected he make toilet wine or did he just like put gin and vodka in a bottle and let it ferment. With a fake inside so like did he make it in a gross scary legal way. Or did he just make jungle juice. I i mean it's fine to not want to try it. But i think there's a difference between like making moonshine and making meth pictures really like a this. I think this is like a craft thing like brewing your own beer or something and it sounds like that's the way he thinks at least. Yeah when he says he crafted it. Yeah but i mean it's one hundred percent find to not want it and one hundred percent fine to Not respect him for making it but it does at least sound like he thinks of it as a hobby. And not like he's like bootlegging prohibition style snake oil salesman going town to town on a paddy wagon. Yeah so hopefully. He's not a crazy person. Where if you say thanks but no thanks. He gets upset. This is a good early indicator a red flag. If you will to see how mad he gets when you say. I'm okay thank you. Jill actually just made something called wien day orange. Oh interesting was like toothpaste wine. High vodka like a bunch of oranges. I think wine and vodka. Some sort of saying greer something. Yeah and she like mixed it all together with sugar and she put it in a tub but in a shoe in a closet for forty days. She did a month and a half forty days. Jesus okay she emerges what the jar and then you say she. Barbecue bought bottles. She bought little bottles and we had a funnel and we poured them in. And then this is the joe. I've never seen her do anything like this before. She wants to see like a what she bought a corker. I corked the bottles and we made four little bottles of the orange. And i don't know if that's legal or if i should do as citizens you sell it or did you give it away. She was. She offered it to me. And i think i could. I might. I might do a citizens arrest for that. You don't have to arrest your wife for making your gift that's insane. It's totally she. Didn't take it from me. Is the problem which you make it for her new boyfriend okay. So you're just user taking out other demons. Did you try this drink and was it good. I did try. It was pretty good. I think it's very bitter. I couldn't i think. I think that we need to take what she made. And use it to make some to basically mix another cocktail. I don't think it's like out of the bottle drink drink. I think it's too. I think it's got a big kick. I think it's pretty bitter vermouth at this point. You're supposed to sort of use it in an old doesn't feel like an aperitif feels a garnish. Yeah and then was another funny thing about trying to avoid diseases on the road. Did you drink whisky out of somebody else's shoe australia. What's it your own shoe. Did a shoe and i drink whiskey..

forty days america twenty one days Joe joe Jesus australia fourth surge one hundred percent Jill three weeks a month and a half forty days four little bottles over a year san francisco portland about two months new york atlanta chicago love La austin
Los Angeles County Reports 700 New Cases of COVID-19, Warns of Spring Break Travel

SPOTLIGHT ON THE COMMUNITY

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Los Angeles County Reports 700 New Cases of COVID-19, Warns of Spring Break Travel

"Los Angeles County continues to see lower numbers of new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. But health officials are warning about the dangers of travel and mingling with family members. With the approach of spring break and the Easter and Passover holidays, the county is reporting 700 new cases of covert 19, along with 23 deaths and another slight drop in hospitalizations, which are now down to 669.

Los Angeles County
A Modern Day Escape From Egypt

Israel Story

02:23 min | 6 months ago

A Modern Day Escape From Egypt

"When people ask me where my home is I find it quite hard to unser but i originally come from south sudan. That's that's that's where. I know. I come from but i don't really know where my home is. That's christina christina zia. She's tall has bleached cut hair. Dark skin and fierce is. That somehow don't seem to match shyness of her smile. She's nineteen years old but listening to her. You'd think she was much older. Or maybe i should say much more mature. I just feel. I've been so many places and every time they tried to call a. Place my hall. It was snatched away from me. Christina was born a refugee in fact. She's what un agencies call a second generation refugee and as is the case with many other refugees. It's hard to know where exactly to start her story. I could go all the way back to one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. When christina's parents to clean and philip took their three year old first born daughter viola and fled war-torn sudan. Search of a safer future this time might genocide could attorney typically begin in beirut lebanon where the bas wound up and where in two thousand and one christina was born or else i could fast forward a few years and starred in maadi a bustling suburb of cairo where christina spent her early child but instead i'm going to open with a scene which to christina to felt like a true beginning a modern day exodus from egypt. It's june two thousand and seven and wearing the sinai peninsula. It's pitch black night bedouin. Smugglers have just instructed. Six year old christina twelve-year-old viola. Their father they're pregnant mother and a few dozen other sudanese asylum seekers to climb onto the back of rickety pickup truck and they covered us. And they're like don't make any noise and If you do it will be problem to us and t- you of so just don't risk

Christina Christina Zia Christina South Sudan Maadi UN Viola Philip Beirut Lebanon Cairo Sinai Peninsula Egypt
The Hitler Haggadah with Jonnie Schnytzer

Jewish History Matters

09:33 min | 6 months ago

The Hitler Haggadah with Jonnie Schnytzer

"Joined today by johnny schnitzer to talk about the hitler. Haga a nineteen forty-three judeo arabic haggadah. Which tells the story of the holocaust the second world war and the allied landing in north africa through the passover seder. Johnny schnitzer is a phd candidate at bar. Ilan university with a focus on medieval kabbalah. His dissertation is focused on the fourteenth century. Kabul list rabbi. Joseph ben shallow ashkenazi and johnny is also preparing a critical edition of ashkenazis. Commentary on sefer itsy raw. Johnny also edited an english edition of the etc. Which we're going to be talking about today. The hitler etc is such a fascinating text in many ways even just the title is jarring. And you might think how can you use. Hitler's name in the title of this traditional jewish text and it draws you in to a tremendous piece of moroccan jewish history that reworked the traditional passover story to tell us about the experience of north african jews in the holocaust. I hope you enjoyed our conversation. Where we're going to dive into this text and think about how it can broaden our understanding of the holocaust to include the middle east and north africa in that story and also where we think through the important relationship between jewish roots and holidays with history and historical memory. Thanks for tuning in high johnny. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for joining us to talk about your book that you added. Thank you for inviting me. Lovely to be here. Absolute think this is such a fascinating text. Can you maybe tell us a little bit about it in other words like what is it that makes this different from all other hug adults. I think there are sort of two bombs that this text drops upon any re- debt guest that sort of feast there is on the hit laga and the first one of course is the title and this is what got me interested in this from the outset and that is this sort of sporadic this who has the chutzpah to do this at taking a jewish texts calling it the hit laga. That's the sort of bomb number one. Because you're not even sure what this is about. Who wrote this. But you know one thing you know that the author who is anonymous and we'll touch upon them in a moment takes to keywords. That every juneau's today every jew does not need to google almost haggadah writer passover passover eve where we read the haggadah we all come and we eat together and he takes haggadah and he connects to the other. Keyword that we all know about for a very separate horrific connotation. That's hitler and he puts it together. The first bomb is who has the chutzpah to perpetrate a text. And give it the title. Hit laga taking one of the most sacred texts and connecting it to one of the biggest mom's area if you like in jewish history and then you open the text and you realize that author has done something absolutely fascinating he is done with. The sages have asked us to do generation after generation and that is to see ourselves as if we left egypt red. It's to reenact. Redemptions to reenact. God saving the jewish people taking us out. And what does he do. He takes the structure of the storytelling bit of the haggadah. Right on passover. Eve we have the ceremony we have the blessings and then we reached the mortgage section the mugged section to section where we meant to mcgee. We meant to tell the story. That's what is about right. We tell story we tell the story of redemption. This also explains why passovers become right. This trend of everyone bringing own hug dot. Everyone bringing their own stories. Because it's all about bringing together different pieces of the puzzle. Creating this beautifully rich mosaic. So he takes the traditional structure of the haggadah which tells us about how we were taken out of egypt and it tells us about these different characters. Rabbinic figures leaving two thousand years ago. The told us to do this and told us to do that. And he takes out the content and fills it with a new content whereby he tells the story of the holocaust of world war two of the allied victory of the ex pows over nazi germany. And hitler and mussolini's italy he tells us the story of his generation rights yossi who has something to tell us in the traditional said. There's something about how. How would you meant to do something. All of a sudden becomes the speech of the dictator iosif stalin when we told them the haggadah that i god and not an angel. Not anyone else is going to take you. The jewish people out of egypt suddenly becomes. I shall the goal. I not level not the right none of none of the other vichy high commanding general's. I shall the goal which already tells us right. This is what's fascinating in the hitler etc and this is the second bomb if the first bomb is the title. We still don't know what it's about. The second bomb is when you discover that this was written by an anonymous jew living in robots morocco probably towards the end of nineteen forty-three as a result possibly inspired by operation torch. The allied operation led by the us on the shores of casablanca and algiers. And everything changes all of a sudden this jew living in morocco. Who's lived under a regime whether anti jewish laws jews around him have lost their jobs. Jews around you can't get a jewish education you become by night a second-grade citizen and so out author. It almost seems as if he's taking a text which it's time to write it when we don't yet know the ending. He doesn't yet know about the horrific six million who are being murdered. He doesn't know about concentration camps in poland. But he knows he wants to do something horrific any also is living in a time where his life has changed for some years and as a result of the allied victory he suddenly possibly is inspired and sees. I get the exodus. The story i meant to be telling i meant to take the passover haggadah until the story that i see and that's how the allies beat the excess power. And how in fact you know retelling the story of exodus mine new-fangled version. I think that the text itself is amazing in the ways in which it on. The one hand utilizes the story of passover very explicitly very specifically in when he talks. About how hitler. Enslaved the jews but also like you mentioned the way in which some of the characteristic aspects of the traditional aspects are transfigured and transformed new. Whether we're talking about the parable of the four sons the for children or the different rabbis plagues. What are some of the really interesting things that are happening in this text that really are utilizing the passover story itself and also the the characteristic aspects of the passover seder that people who read attritional seder would be familiar with but they give it new meaning in this context. If we take right this this idea of the four sons four daughters any jewish figure that we look at it and we want to understand. What is it the sort of a heart of their teachings you know. One of the tricks is to see if they wrote a commentary on the haggadah. What do they do with these. Four boys of for doors. What do they symbolize. And in the case of the hit da it takes us back in time to a sort of moroccan viewpoint of the the north african campaign. And so who is the wise son now. You know it's going to be an allied power. But you're not sure that england or is it america and you'll told the the wise son is england right. The royal air force acts cleverly. He's clearly impressed he he is probably the razzie stance radio. He knows about the bombings. He knows about montgomery and then we move onto the russia. The russia we know can only be one person. That's clearly hitler. Hitler the evil one. He knows that he's a know he. He's torturing the jewish people and yet it's interesting that if you read through the at that we're not quite sure what's going on in europe right off a thinks that there is a concentration camp in berlin so we're not yet show what's going on in the world and our author doesn't yet. Nobody knows that he clearly is evil that he's plotting against the jews there wearing yellow badges which also is interesting. Because we're not sure. If he's referring to the yellow badges of jews in europe or the yellow badges of jews in certain places in north africa and then who is the tam. The time is interesting. Because tom can both mean in hebrew complete simpleton the thomas america and then shane no. You're dillashaw and who doesn't know how to ask questions. The classic version says the fourth son is the son who doesn't know how to ask questions. The newfangled version is and mussalini. Who isn't with the avowed woods and this is very interesting because when i was speaking to holocaust survivors. Oh you know this. Sort of all degeneration and i spoke to people from algeria from tunisia morocco across the board there was a nickname from cellini mar. He was the donkey he was the s. This resonates with this passage whims lead author decides to change it. And say it's not. He doesn't ask question it's that we don't even wanna talk about

Johnny Schnitzer Ilan University Joseph Ben Shallow Ashkenazi North Africa Egypt Haga Iosif Stalin Kabul Rabbi Morocco Hitler Juneau Johnny Middle East Yossi Mcgee Mussolini Russia
Breathing Lesson with Janice Stieber Rous

Can We Talk?

06:35 min | 6 months ago

Breathing Lesson with Janice Stieber Rous

"We're not only marking a year of the pandemic but also preparing for a second covid passover. It's a holiday that celebrates liberation and rebirth. And right now those things feel and also out of reach. We're all mix of hopeful and deeply exhausted i don't know about you judith. But i could really use some. Tlc let's do something we've never done before on this podcast and frankly we don't do enough in general. Let's spend the next twenty minutes. He can care of ourselves. That sounds great and we invite you our listeners. To take a moment wherever you are whatever. You're in the middle of and just breathe with us to help us do that. We've invited janice. Stephen rouse the founder of body dialogue and my aunt join us. Welcome janice hello honey and judah what a joy to be here today. Thank you so much for being with us. Will your approach to bodywork in great so many different kinds of approaches breathing. Yoga alexander technique centered in the way that our bodies physically. Hold all those stresses. And you. And i have talked a lot about the way our life experiences. Sit in our bodies and we've collectively been through so much in the past year. I mean personally. I'm pretty exhausted depleted. Can you talk about what anxiety and exhaustion does to us specifically to our breath be. I really would be glad to do that whether you're aware of it or not. You're telling your stuff to your body all the time and your body's talking to you. It's a two way street so when you are exhausted and you say to yourself. Wow i'm really exhausted how going to do this. We're already set up for exhaustion right but busy logically the diaphragm literally. Which is your main breathing muscle. The diaphragm literally cannot work properly. When you're tired you're trying to get a breath and you're not getting it so even if you sit down and say wow. I really need a breath. The inclination is to take a breath and actually what we need to do is let out the exhaustion and let out the air so that the air can come in the more we can let air out the more you'll have capacity to let air in so if we wanted to do a practice together it's important to actually feel what it means to exhale. Believe it or not most of us are holding our breath so much of our day and even night. It's not really surprising. I mean you even just think about the phrase holding your breath in all the ways that we use it figuratively right. It's like it's what we do when we're not sure what's coming next. And that i feel like we've just been in that mode all year and i've been thinking about. How covert is is is the virus that affects breath also. So maybe i'm thinking to metaphorically the idea of the shortness of breath being the actual nature of this virus. With that's appoint judas. It isn't a metaphor. And you feel brokenhearted. Your body actually experiences the exhaustion of that so the experience of actually inviting yourself to xl means to really let go which when you're frightened is very hard to do. So that's the double bind of this disease that it it attacks our fear as well as attacking our nervous system. So not that. You're thinking to metaphorically the metaphor actually is the message and it's actually physiologically. Impacting you when you're thinking to yourself. I can't do this. One is going to be over. I cannot keep all these balls in the air and keeping my children healthy and make sure that i get the house cleaned for pessa. You're actually experiencing that in your body. That's not a metaphor. So what i say to you. Sit back and feel the ground i literally talking about. Can you let go enough to exhale all that. Worry to exhale all that anxiety. And i'm being very literal here. I want you to literally think of everything in your body releasing into the ground and noticing as you feel your feet in the ground and you feel your bones going into the chair. And you feel your back being supported. Try to imagine that you're being held so quiet if you can your mind and if you have a lot of judgement right now just let it go because it won't help so just be open hearted an open mind to this moment and feel your feet on the floor and your spine supported in a chair and take a moment if you're driving. Please don't close your eyes if not you can close your eyes and just go internal and just notice. What are you doing. Are you holding your breath but the first pieces to just let it go. And i'm going to suggest you just really site out and i'm going to invite you in this moment you and due to just to yourself you right now and you're going to open your mouth and just literally go as you do that. See if you can imagine some of this worry some of the pressure some of the tension and narrowness that. we've been feeling squeezed. Can you release it in your toes in your throat. In your tongue. Back of your. Is it in your palms. Can you just let all that constriction and tightness go and notice that if you can let it go the air will also come in

Stephen Rouse Janice Hello Honey Judith Janice Judah Alexander
Mamalas: Building Jewish Families

Can We Talk?

04:28 min | 9 months ago

Mamalas: Building Jewish Families

"Ari and we are an interfaith family. Were proud interfaith family. I grew up in my hometown in the town that we live in now and it is a small typical southern town after college. I spent the next twelve years. Saying i'm ephraim move impact affair hope alabama ever again and i met my husband in college and he's a nice jewish boy growing in our relationship. We decided to have a jewish family and have a jewish household. And if anybody knows me. I am Type a throw myself into a commitment personality. And i went in full force converting to a new. Religion is not an easy decision. It's not like changing your hair color. From blonde to brunette it's supposed to be a fulfilment of who you are as a person and a deep desire to fulfill that part of you. And while i respect and love the traditions the values in the jewish religion and the jewish people. I personally my personal connection to judaism. Doesn't i don't have that deep desire to fulfill myself in in that way when you have children you fight for them. And i have been a staunch defender of my children's identity as jews and in the south that can sometimes be hard because it's pretty homogeneous population. But what i've come across is that it's merely mostly a lack of education. And so while i'm educating myself and what the problems that jewish people come into contact with. I'm facing it every day with my children and Being jewish in a nate part of who they are and you know. I become hanukkah every year around this time and he wants me to come in and he wants to do presentations about hanukkah even know. He's the only jewish kid in his class call that why hanukkah lasts eight days soon. It was time to like the minora and say the blessing since it was the eight. What would you say have been some of the biggest challenges lack of education For some people. And you know. I don't mind educating my children's teachers of Their dietary needs certain traditions. Or why they're out on janka poor but it does become cumbersome when you're doing it all time You know. Christmas is a huge holiday down here. And it's celebrated at school and you know last year was the first time i some came home crying. Because he didn't feel represented in his schoolwork or the way. The school was decorated so Me and a couple of jewish moms went up at school way traveled in the fifty mile radius defined every hanukkah decoration at every store that we could find to decorate the school and it would it broke. It made his face light up. The representation matters it matters to children. I don't you know. See myself as a jewish mother. I see myself as a mother to jewish children. You know people joke because they they only see one side of it. They see that i'm the one as typically falls to the to the mothers who is the keeper of tradition. And i'm the one who make sure that you know the shibat candles lit in another the traditions. And i'm the one who prepares for passover cleaning in makes the seder so they always joke that you know you can work jewish than your your husband. But that's that's not the case. It's just the role that i play to ensure that my children are getting the very best jewish education and Husband is definitely the person that they follow for their their judah jewish education and their knowledge about who they are as jews. And why do we eat these two sued or are they special to our hannukah tradition And what was the miracle of the oil.

ARI Ephraim Alabama
Argentines bid final farewell to Maradona as national mourning begins

ESPN FC

21:21 min | 10 months ago

Argentines bid final farewell to Maradona as national mourning begins

"Welcome into this special edition of espn fc as we pay tribute to diego maradonna. Who passed away today at the age of sixty craig burley with me here in the studio you can clinton joining us a little later on in the program to talk about what it was like to play against him. We also welcome to the show gab. Marcatti and argentine colleague from espn deported. Ricardo ortiz is with us rookie. I want to start with you to try out. Some how important. Maradona was for argentina. Hi guys pleasure to be with all of you. Maradona as the most important figure ever in argentina i. It doesn't matter what where when everybody would always talk about madonna. He's a legend. Now the idol and now a legend. I it's just unbelievable the morning and what people on the streets are doing in the middle of a pandemic they don't care if in argentina right now for example in the stadium of book juniors. There's hundreds of thousands of people probably a lot more tonight gathering where he played and won a championship. There's hundreds and thousands of people gathered around out of junior stadium where it all started and there's hundreds and hundreds of people outside of his house in a very poor neighborhood. Outside of one is ours. Quality fiorito the house where he grew up on with dirt floors lighting candles every street every corner every city. Every town people are out on the streets and tomorrow in the funeral it will be in the government's palace. They're expecting over a million people tomorrow in the center of one side is to say goodbye to somebody. Who's the most famous argentinian for us. And the most famous argentinian around the world ever so people are really suffering something that they knew it was going to happen sooner rather than later. What a player was. Yeah i mean multiple world cups. They played on one one obviously in a sex with not the best argentina site but he was amazing went to spain and eighty two and played in the world cup's twenty one year old a way in his shoulders. One so young at that point got himself sent off from the big game against brazil will even lend from the came back was even stronger delivered and one of the things that were thinking about is up until his death today. If he'd gone to any club to visit and the world the moment be the biggest clubs in germany. spain. Italy england every player. Some of these players are superstars. Everyone of these players would have wanted a photo. We've seen some of the pictures videos during the when he did go and visit Clubs over the past few years and an all these guys all the ones to do a photo. Welcome because everybody just know what a superstar boys and it could walk into any club under beg stars would all be over to say please. Can i have a full. Because that's how much people hold them and respect gap markazi with us as well gabe. Obviously we heard how argentina is hurting in particular as naples today. No question about it. People are out there on the streets in naples. Even though of course there is a curfew going on right now The connection that he made with naples obviously his adopted city and some might look some of the darkness in his life and pinpoint. That is the moment when when things started to go wrong for him by you know you. You speak to his teammates former teammates and dal speak of of his generosity. They speak about how he was always front and center always standing up to be counted. Random people on the street and to this day in the streets of naples. You'll find murals tomato. You'll find shrines to montana. He had a hold over a city city. That was when you arrive was was beaten down was was impoverished had never won a title There's a divide between the wealthier north of italy in the poor south of italy and they won two titles while he was their third one. They let slip away at the end. Still rather murky circumstances and he's the guy who changed all that he changed the inevitability of history. I think in the eyes of the united a lot of people and that's why he resonated so much she loved certainly enables but i think beyond that he loved being anti-establishment he loves speaking his mind. And i'll tell you what. Then i throughout his life you know. He had highs and lows he made enemies and then at times but in the end in the last fifteen twenty years whether whether it was pillay whether it was peter shilton he he came back and he made up with with a lot of the people he he fell out with and i was struck by something i read. I read somebody posted an interview. He gave back Back is a nineteen year old where he talked about how we talk about. Favorite actor was right on which i found kind of random but he talked about what is greatest trait was and he said i wanna be friends with my enemies and and i think in many ways that is how much of the world from a distance viewed him as as somebody who had the good fortune before he passed to go back and and and really rebuild all the bridges and all the relationships and and really leave us on on good terms with good terms with with very much. Everybody out there ricky. Take us through your point of view with regards to how you will remember him. Remember him of one of the greatest ever on the feel and also a personality so strong and controversial of it. Not many great athletes have done that that to be so much in spotlight for his entire life since since he was about seven eight years old when in argentina they started talking about him he used to play for the us and the red star is today's roca. Were people will gather out of nowhere. Because they knew there was a new kid that was unreal and this was way before cable internet and social media and he did all that before those times. Which is just incredible. He was just different than everybody else and that will remember him. Also as a great great captain whether you love or you hate him. He loved that. Argentinian jersey. More than anything in more than anybody. He was a great leader. He would push to the end. And that's why how he won a world cup. That's how we made it to the final and the second world cup. He played injured with his right leg in really bad shape his ankle and really bad shape. If you look at through the years he started at the age of sixteen Playing in first division and he never stopped. I think he could've played ten more years if he would've taken care of himself. I also remember him for that for not being able to really take care of his body and his mind. It just went over his heading. Never control himself. He went into politics and a lot of people hating him for that but he always spoke his mind. He didn't care. What where when and all. These things for maradona are just different. From almost every other athlete maybe with except mohammed ali that in and out of a field or boxing ring he just kept being on the front page of every paper and every newspaper that was ever printed. It's just unbelievable coming from argentina that i was listening to be there. You know you think of italian soccer in the eighties. I think he was one of the first ones who made people around the world. Want to watch league. Like the italian league just because maradona was playing he. He won napoli twice where they could have. Never even come closer to that. And i've been there many many times and it's just unreal today yesterday and thirty years ago for every day you can buy and maradona shirt. A lot easier than you canning. Senior member things ham seek e way. Anybody that played after him. It's just incredible. What those people thought and loved about the madonna to go back to you. What ricky said about. you know. it could've played longer. Potentially i looked after these body a little bit longer and his main but then the game didn't look after the maradona's back in those days and for louis people the younger generation watch lino massi. Do all these things and they are great. And i'm not taking that away. But he was doing that on. ploughed fields. right with pitches where the ball would. Something's wouldn't even bums are bubbled hard to control with defenders who were some of the roughest toughest one and literally wanted to snap them. It's not please legs. Because that was the only way to stop him and he had to deal with that every time we went on the field and still perform and some of the most wonderful and great goals. That will ever see you can imagine ho has body with the bean. At the end of a game ho the game was played and refereed and the eighty s is a complete contrast to the modern game and rightly so the way the current players are protected. He did not have the did not have that luxury and yet were still able to do that. Which is quite amazing. We'll say thank you very much to rookie for joining us Of course we just say out pouring of support. And this is what i had to say on twitter. What's sad news. I lost a great friend and the world lost a legend. There is still much to be said but for now make god give strength to family members. One day. I hope we can play pool together in the sky. Welcome to the show. Now someone who knew exactly what it was like to go. Head to head with maradonna international level in a world cup final and obviously on domestic level clinton's men into milan. When diego maradonna was. That is very best for napoli again. Thank you very much for your time. Just your initial reaction about very very very said moment. I think full entire world of football On monday madonna was Was an absolute exception. He was Probably for to take decades. You know the late eighties to the nineties. The most most Amazing play on the planet. He was a A genius he was i. I called him always artist. There's there's they did degrade football player. And then there's maybe one artist and diego maradona's was an artist. He what he did on the field full of creativity full of unbelievable to take knee was just an her off. And i had the pleasure to play many times against him with club team if it was stood guard and you if a cup final was germany world cup finally if it was Into milan the two games against napoli. And you just simple simply admire this guy and to have him. Passover early just sixty sixty years of age is a very very sad to pull unfortunately reality. You can just take us back to to that time. And just how big walls he while he was on his own level in. Oh they were great players obviously in the late eighties. Early nineties in italy Lauder mateos was one of the best players in the world goalie from boston. Right cut curriculum. Ow before i was maybe blood was was was unbelievable. Great players but he was an another level. He was just someone that that always made the difference and figured things out on the field that nobody else could figure out so you could men mock him. You could mock him his own older. You had no no idea how to mock him because he was just so gifted and so there was so much admiration for him and and outside the field he was just a simple very Normal person in a lot of people thought momma donna. All his Issues then drugs and other things. Li laid on was a very complicated person. He was not. Diego was a very down to earth. Very normal guy that just wanted to be with his friends with his families and What he has brought to argentina you will never forget that in what he brought to his especially to is not believer son of naples That people will never forget that. So imagine today You know how people morning in argentina and in napoli in italy and around the world is just a just a very sad moment. you're what was it like the reaction from the crowds when you were up against napoli and maradona's was on the board. I imagine just that sense of expectation must've being palpable even as a player. Yeah i mean i've been. I heard the news i was. I was really shocked as money. And and i posted something on my twitter side and i rarely actually post things but by posted something that i always thought about. Diego was his warmup routine depending on the music in the stadium started to do his routine with jogging and the ball around and that was made him. I think it has seven million hits by now. Life is live music. Dead really is jay. Go on monday madonna. He just wanted to be in rhythm himself if the music with the game and when you watch him then doing his walmart you you phase him actually as an opponent and you kind of have lost the game because you gave him so much respect you give him so much and because he was such a fantastic football player that your and that kind of transfer to the to the to fans in the stadium you know the even away games for him became home games because the people just wanted to see him. You know if you played in milan in front of eighty five thousand which is kind of standing up giving him standing ovations even if you may be lost a game or other games so so he was just a. It was a sustained unique over almost twenty years. And i always put him on the same pay leeann fronts. Bacon bala prior to madonna and then obviously came the next generations with Mac in our analogy. But but donna izzo in his own way. I simply unique. You mentioned the next generation yorgen and a lot of people may be seen. Maradonna play live the younger generation who are watching. Just talk about the fact that was. That was the protection. Was that from the referees. That maybe have now and you're playing on very different surfaces as well well in in in his days Obviously the fields were not good. The reveries didn't give you any protection. Ended defenders has killers. You know they just ditch us. I don't know how many follows a game run on madonna. Try to stop him all over two three defenders at the same time when all over him and he's still find solutions he's still found found a way out in score and scott incredible goals then so he took a lot a lot of hits And obviously his fame than along side in the spotlight living. The spotlight was not really his his wish. His wish was to be a normal guy playing his game. Making the difference on the field off the field he just wanted to be with friends and family but what he what he achieved because of those circumstances doing his playing days is almost impossible to achieve the interest thing as i saw clip from an of. You're on sky sports in the uk from a couple of weeks ago and it was moretz. You'll portrait was on former tottenham manager of course former argentine international news talking and they were talking about maradona. And he said we know we have all these stories about the off-the-field antics of recent years and even when he was playing but behind the scenes privately when he was with you or with. These teammates. Away from the glare of the media. He was a really genuinely warm individuals that wanted to help people the rest of as all a big story true for the newspapers but it was interesting portrait. He spoke so long layover in another thing. I think about because it's a different era to me but playing against the likes of the brazilian ronaldo the world cup and france ninety eight and seen what he can do with three or four plans around. You thought you had time in the corner on the over sudden four people and he was getting strike goal and we know how good he was. Brilliant for the hair would have been laid to play against off. That's where it was like playing against a great player. Light renowned on the other thing was empty before my oktay jokes. Gian-franco franco zola. He was going to be the air at one point. I believe to diego maradona napoli. No zola was a majestic player. But can you imagine having the way and your shoulders of go in there and potentially replace the quality of maradona. so it's unfathomable. Anybody can do that. But but no yet i think everybody of have over the piece of just we know there's lots of stories. We notice milan. But this was really apart from great. Football was a really genuinely warm guy. Last point again you do fail. That will never be anyone like diego maradonna again. I don't think so. Because i think diego maradona was was so unique because the way he emotionally connected with the people of his people and weren't as iowa's in argentina his people in napoli was so deep it was so warm and it was so i- amazing to see i traveled to and obviously go down to two zero so badly wanted to watch book. Juniors weevil played one eight. My life was when my list. And i walked through. Borka the the area around the stadium and almost every second house wall was a was a painting a tribute to jingle maradonna. I mean it's just what he left there with the people they were one they just just melted into each other and the same. He did in napoli for for napoli august. This is a today is very very sad. Sad day because this is this is her almost lifetime hero. I mean throughout generations. You know what he brought to napoli brought to the city of napoli brought hope he brought a smile. He brought excitement. He gave them pride pride. Because you know those years when he joined napoli was a big big Have kind of a disconnection between the south and off in italy and and he wanted to give these people real a real jojoba real pride. And that's what he did through the game of football. He used the tool of football to to bring these people up and and give them give them a quality of life to give them so much more than just his goals on the field. And that's what you see him. That's why i think devil be not a second minor donna coming up anywhere in the world he was. He wasn't one time off like michelangelo or fun. Goal or all these famous autists. He's he's one of them. You can kinsman. Thank very much sheriff supposed to be an outpouring around the world on social media messy writing a very sad day for all argentines and football. He leaves us but does not leave. Because diego is eternal. I'd take all the beautiful moments linked with him and wanted to take the opportunity to send him condolences to all his friends and family. Alrighty

Argentina Maradona Naples Diego Maradona Madonna Craig Burley Marcatti Ricardo Ortiz Fiorito Espn Italy Peter Shilton Spain Italian League Ricky
Jesus The Scapegoat

The Bible Recap

03:05 min | 11 months ago

Jesus The Scapegoat

"As the day breaks. Jesus has been through three religious trials and the rulers declare him guilty the next step. If they want to enact the death penalty is to present him to the roman governor pontius pilot because only the romans can hand down the death penalty so he's taken from his religious trials to a civil trial with pilot. The people accused jesus of claiming to be a king. since that would pose a threat to the roman authorities. In luke's account they even say jesus had forbidden them to pay their taxes to caesar. But we know that's ally based on his response to them in luke twenty pilot questions about being a king and in john's account. Jesus explains that his kingdom is not of this world otherwise his followers would be fighting. And they aren't. He says he's not there to fight but to speak truth in pilot responds with the question. That has always been popular response to the gospel. What is truth. In luke's account pilot jesus to king herod before proceeding with things. It seems like pilot is trying to find a loophole for having to make a judgment because jesus from another jurisdiction even though his alleged crimes have been committed in jerusalem so he sends him off to king. Herod a higher authority. The king and his soldiers tried to wound and shame jesus by putting a purple robe and a crown of thorns on his head mocking his royalty and send him back to pontius pilot so now pile has to make some kind of judgment call but before jesus was ever brought to pilot for the first time while he was still being beaten and mocked at the high priest house overnight. Pilots wife was asleep in her bed. Having a nightmare about jesus it was so upsetting that she sends word to pilot to leave. Jesus alone maybe. This dream is from god as a means of heaping judgment on pilot when he surrenders jesus to be crucified. Or maybe the streets from satan who continues to try to thwart the crucifixion. Because he knows it means his defeat when pilot returns to the people declares jesus innocent but he offers him an option he says typically on passover. We release a prisoner so should be jesus or this guy named barabbas barabbas is a convicted felon who committed multiple crimes including robbery insurrection. And even murder and the people choose to release barabbas. If you with us during the old testament you may remember the story of the sacrificial goat and the scapegoat from vivica sixteen one goat is sacrificed as a sin offering and the other is set free into the wilderness. This is a picture of that story. Actually that was a picture of this story and it's also a picture of us. We are barabbas. Set free because christ was kept as the sin offering. The people demand that jesus be crucified pilot tries to dodge any responsibility by handing jesus over to the people but no matter how dismissive he is and no matter. How many times. He washes his hands. Passivity doesn't equal innocence as the people respond. They accidentally speak a truth. That is anyone's only hope in matthew. Twenty seven twenty five. They say his blood beyond us on our children realize it but that is the only hope for any of us that the blood of a sacrificed would cover. Our sins is willing sacrifice. Paid for the sins of all gods kids

Jesus Pontius Pilot Luke King Herod Barabbas Barabbas Jerusalem John Barabbas Matthew
Saved from Gods Wrath

The Bible Project

05:30 min | 11 months ago

Saved from Gods Wrath

"God's anger doesn't occur nearly as often as readers of the moment. Might, think it occurs less often in the Bible and when it does occur, it's surprising. So God's anger appears first in the Bible with Moses in a conversation that he's having about how he wants Moses Represent Him and Moses refuses five times over. That's the first time goes angry. So that, itself is beginning a pattern that God's anger in the Old Testament is most consistently expressed towards the people that he's calling to represent him and the famous stories like the flood or Sodom and Gomorrah. They are acts of God's Justice Against Evil in neither, one of those stories has got angry in the flood God is overcome with grief and sorrow. So as the story line of the Bible Develops God invest in one particular group of people to be his representatives to the world, and they are the ones with whom God gets most angry most often in the story line of the Bible just like how we tend to get the most angry and frustrated with the people that we are most invested in relational. If you search a concordance new search out all the time God gets angry at Israel. You'll find a few dozen stories and you'll find a pretty consistent response. How does God expresses anger and its most consistently demonstrated with the phrase and God handed them over who gave them over into the hands of their enemies. So God hands Israel over to the consequences that are destructive and ruinous, but it's the choices that they made that got them. There Motza, says it's got hiding his face. And the Prophets as they Jeremiah Zeki Oil, they developed the big way and the bad guys that Israel's handed over to because of their faithlessness to the Covenant is a Syria and Babylon. Syria we didn't talk about this Isaiah calls a Syria the the Rod of God's anger. Does if Syria is the instrument of God's anchor, which is to hand Israel over to their bad decisions. So when Jesus enters the scene, he sees himself in the role of another one of these profits but also as the Covenant, God, of Israel, himself pursuing his people again. Warning them that if they don't accept his way of being Israel among the nations that they are going to yet again, be subject to God's anger, which will be to be handed over to the power of from. Jesus warned that this would happen and when he wrote in to Jerusalem for Passover, he intentionally provoked the rulers of Jerusalem challenging their authority claiming that he was Israel's trump thority and when he began to talk about what he thought was going to happen it becomes clear that he knew that he was going to die. In fact, he went to Jerusalem specifically to poke the bear. To provoke the leaders to a showdown knowing that they would kill him but it's not a tragedy. Jesus is in Jesus, is he is and uses this phrase multiple times in that. Passover week that he's going to drink the Cup of God's anger, which is a key prophetic prophetic image for being Israel being handed over to pagan oppressors to foreign foreign armies say that against him he's going to drink. The. Cup of God's anger. Yes. Which is a very particular testament metaphor for Israel being overwhelmed and conquered by foreign armies and pegeen oppressors. So the put a fine point on it when Jesus uses that phrase you think he specifically thinking about the fact that he's going to be killed by Roman oppressors. Yeah and the and the corrupt leaders of Israel that are in league with them Yes I think that if you just study the scriptural hyperlink, the Jesus making their I, think it's but unavoidably to the conclusion, and that's precisely what he goes to Jerusalem to do, and that's why he stages his protest in the temple courts in full view of the leaders of the temple. But also in view of the Roman governor because the Roman governor had vested interest in keeping the peace in the temple courts. So Jesus is trial the moment of these two Jesus standing on trial an innocent. Jesus son of God and then guilty. Jesus boss, who's The a rebel against Rome and the innocent Jesus who was trying to tell Israel to love their Roman enemies, and then the guilty Jesus who tried to kill the Roman enemies go free and Jesus intentionally goes to his death on behalf of his guilty people and this is what he meant by drinking the Cup of God's anger the anger there is simultaneously the the wrath of Rome and the the wrath of Israel's leaders. Another important strand in here is Jesus as understanding of his death and confrontation as being a cosmic confrontation with. Demonic spiritual powers that have hijacked the kingdoms of this world to be instruments of injustice as opposed to justice, and he believes that he's confronting the powers of

Jesus Israel Jerusalem Moses Syria Isaiah Motza Rome Babylon
Jesus - the one who would drink the cup of God’s wrath

The Bible Project

07:02 min | 1 year ago

Jesus - the one who would drink the cup of God’s wrath

"So. All of this has huge implications for how we should talk and think about how Jesus understood his death. What did Jesus think his death meant how did he talk about it and how does it fit into this will conversation. So remember the meaning of the Cup of God's anger in in the prophets there's an important story in Matthew. Chapter. Twenty. Where two of his disciples their mom comes up to him to Jesus and asks if two of her sons can be Jesus as like special special princes when he becomes the King of Israel helicopter parents. Just, be a good mom. So. Wealth is great. So. Will you know command in your kingdom that my Tucson's will sit on your right and left Jesus answers. Sorry you just simply don't know what you're asking for. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink and the two men said to him? Oh yes we're able and he said to them you know you actually will drink my cup but to sit on my right hand or left sorry, that's not my authority give but to be on my right and my left that is for those whom it has been prepared by my father this is a little hint forward to criminals. Jesus. Yes. But to Jesus thrown in other words when comes in his kingdom, he will have one on his right and one on his left and when in the Gospels is that moment happen? Why did it all the Gospel Authors? Tell us that he had one on his right and one on his left when he was Chris when he's crucified yes. That's right which is a type of upside down and thrown. Yeah. That's right. So already here he's hinting that the cup refers to his coming execution. And many of his disciples will actually lay down their lives for their witness to Jesus I. think that's what it means. You will drink my cup, but his point is that the way I'm going to become king over Israel over the nation's is by drinking the cup and there's only one place. Where that Jesus getting that image from. But the the passages we looked at in a previous episode, which is Isaiah Fifty one Jeremiah twenty-five in Psalm seventy five with three main cup of passages of Gaza. If they were familiar with the Hebrew. Bible would they know exactly what he was saying here? Are you able to what they have understood that? Well, yeah. In the moment in the actual moment of the conversation. Yeah. I don't know Jesus was a ridler he spoke in scriptural language and the riddles all the time the Gospel authors want the reader to pick it up because Jesus is going to use the image again in a couple of chapters. So what is he saying what did authors want us to pick up? Are you able to? Remind me again about drinking the Cup yet drinking the cup is what Jeremiah says will happen to Jerusalem when it surrounded by Babylonian armies because they're king broke a treaty with Babylon and they've been unfaithful to God. So drinking the cup, is another way of saying God handing you over to the consequences of your decisions, which ultimately it seems like our death throughout the biblical story line, not not as in the consequences. Of Sin are death in the trite way we think about it. But in the story line being handed over is kind of simultaneous with and specifically being handed over to be conquered by pagan armies. What would it mean then for Jesus to drink the of? That's exactly right. You gotTa keep on Reading You gotTa let the story. Tell you what she's means because he brings it up again in the garden Africa semi. Well, actually skipping his story at Passover. Right at the last supper when he brings out the cup and he says, This Cup is the new covenant in my blood. So he gives them a cup to drink and they're the this cup imagery is really rich. He's borrowing imagery from Covenant Making Ceremonies and the Old Testament likening his blood, the blood of the animals that would be offered up to God in the making. Of Covenant. Then after that, he goes out to the Garden of Disseminating Matthew Twenty six and in the in the garden, what he's praying is this it's in Verse Thirty Nine in Matthew Twenty. Six He says three times Matthew says, Jesus, prayed my father it's possible May. This Cup be taken from me but not my desire, but your desire be done so Jesus keeps talking about. His coming death as drinking the Cup on behalf of his people. That's his conception of death and drinking the cup in say Isaiah fifty one is image of experiencing the consequences of God turning his face Yup and those consequences are God allowing foreign armies to overtake his Covenant People. That's the concrete expression that it takes in history and so Jesus is using this phrase. We know it's intense. We know he's excited about it. Yeah. So Jesus is going to experience. God turning his face away. Jesus knows that if Israel turns away from his message that they're going to be destroyed. He's been making that crystal clear all throughout his warnings of Judgment. He intentionally goes to Jerusalem for Passover during the feast week when they celebrate their liberation from a pagan oppressor Egypt. And he intentionally goes there and he poked the bear, it doesn't just poke the bear. He likes stabs the bear jabs at for a week. You're. Provoking, the temple leaders, the city leaders I you know he's intentionally creating problem and he keeps saying throughout this week, I'm going to drink the cup. I'm coming here to drink the cup. So Jesus is going to put himself in the place of faithless covenant, breaking Israel and experienced defeat at the hands of pegging armies on their behalf. If, you just think through with all these images mean to drink. The Cup means to be conquered by PAGANO, presser job because of covenant violation Israel here specifically Jerusalem the warning is given. That Rome is going to burn it down and takeover death destruction and. What Jesus is predicting that's going to happen is he's going to experience that he's going to experience what it's like to be. destroyed. By the Roman oppressor. That's right. He's GonNa Drink That Cup

CUP Jesus Matthew Twenty Israel Jerusalem Isaiah Fifty Jeremiah Gaza Tucson Chris Bible Rome Babylon Africa Pagano Egypt
Major formation of historic planes to fly over Riverside, Los Angeles on Memorial Day

Bill Handel

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Major formation of historic planes to fly over Riverside, Los Angeles on Memorial Day

"A crew of historic warbird pilots either so cal flyover will be harder to miss than the Thunderbirds the World War two era planes will be flying low slow and allowed next Monday Memorial Day tribute to veterans as well as health care workers the fatal start over Loma Linda Passover riverside Anaheim Newport beach Long Beach Torrance and LA one of the planes will be carrying veterans of every war from World War two to Iraq

Long Beach Torrance LA Loma Linda Passover Riverside Iraq
Kevin Noble Maillard Discusses Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story''

Unreserved

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Noble Maillard Discusses Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story''

"You already work as a journalist and a law professor. What made you decide to try writing a picture book? Did you have extra time on your hands or I have a lot of different ideas that I like to share with people. I started off as academic Focusing a lot on native issues on identity on mixed racial and cultural identity and then after being a professor for a while I started to branch out into journalism I started writing for The New York Times which I still do now still writing on all the same issues but for a larger audience. 'cause the people that I wanNA reach usually are not reading academic journals and then also with children's books it's the same topic but just a different audience and I like to think it's just like just an audience of short people write children. Parents bad are paying attention to these different ideas that I have Now this book seems perfectly suited to the timer. All living in right now. It's about food. It's about family and he sat identity. What's the story you're telling in? Fry Bread this wonderful food. That comes from a very dark place. In Native Culture and native families lives so fiber would have started out with the DA people the Navajos in the southwest of the United States. Who had their land taken away from them and then they're displaced and they're forced to live in new places ride so all of their land was stolen. People were killed. Families were changed. There was so much darkness behind all of this and not a lot of people that are reading things like Freiberg break for the first time. No about this native families would know about this. Native children would be beginning to learn about what happened in previous generations and fiber. It is a great way to introduce this talk about. What does expropriation mean? What are these lands? And where are the lands where people used to live and why were they taken away so then when people were moved to new places they had to make do with what little they add so old foods that they would have known before like the kind of things that they would hunt The fruits the vegetables that they would eat are all different now so you could take like the seminole people who started off in Florida that had been ancestral lands. Four hundreds thousands of years and that's in Florida Florida's tropical so after the seminole wars removal occurred to Oklahoma so all these people were forced to walk from Florida. All the way to Oklahoma and Oklahoma is a completely different climates than Florida. So imagine you have to you know. Move to the moon. And what are you going to eat while you're on the Moon Right? They don't have whole foods on the moon didn't have supermarkets there. They don't have the same kind of soil air so then. The government gave people commodities. And so what are these commodities that people are given flower fat sugar other kinds of things that are you know that don't expire so fry? Bread was born from the story of survival of resilience of existence continued existence and now when we eat bread. I like to think of it as a communion of sorts. Right when you if you're a Christian and you have communion or maybe even if you are Jewish and you celebrate Passover you are doing these rituals and it reminds you of something that happened previous in time and it's also a way for people to get together. It's all about community so when people eat fry bread because you always have to cook it for like forty people. You can't just make a single serving of FRY bread. It's impossible so it's coming together of loved ones friends new friends. And you're all sharing in this bread together so it's like breaking bread as a unit of people coming together and it's always fun it smells really great and then in a way it reminds us whenever we eat this where we came from and also attest to the fact that we as native people are still here and we haven't gone anywhere.

Florida Florida Bread Professor Oklahoma FRY United States The New York Times Freiberg
Record what makes each day special

Before Breakfast

03:56 min | 1 year ago

Record what makes each day special

"Today's tip is to record what makes each day special one of the most common observations. I've heard from people about this spring's long season of social distancing is that life started to feel like the movie groundhog day. The main character lives the same day over and over again without the usual markers of time days can merge into each other each indistinguishable from the last quarantines are obviously extreme examples of this but even during normal times people can get caught up in the daily grind. Tuesday's commute is indistinguishable from Thursday's commute. And you have to look at the calendar as you wonder. Is it Friday yet but today is not groundhog day? Each day can be its own little jewel noticing and writing down what makes each day. Distinctive helps us value all our days during disjointed or normal times in April Jewish friends celebrated Passover at the Seder. The youngest person traditionally asks. Why is this night different from all other nights? The response focuses on features of the meal that commemorate the deliverance of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. Now of course. Passover is a major holiday and so of course. This night is different from other nights but as I wrote in my book off the clock. I believe this is a worthy question for ordinary days to what distinguishes this day today from all other days of my life even if you happen to be sheltering in place what distinguishes this day from all other days of sheltering in place. We can think of all kinds of distinctions. Today is different because we made s'mores around the firepit. Today is different because uncle rob had a virtual birthday party and every family on the call had made their own chocolate cake which is uncle. Rob's favourite. Today is different because I rearrange the furniture and the guestroom. So it's more conducive to my working from home. Today is different because we hiked a new trail. Today's different because I colored my own hair for the first time. Today is different because I figured out how to edit a video. Today is different because we received our first vegetable delivery from a local farm. Today is different because the kids taught the dog to shake hands. Today's different because the lilacs started blooming. These are not life changing differences but there are enough to make the days special and distinct and worthy of notice if we choose to notice them so set a time each day to record what makes each day special. Maybe as part of your dinner routine you could ask your family to share the days gems or at bedtime. You can jot down these distinctions in a journal. Notice them celebrate them because though all time passes when life is ultimately short. It's a miserable. Bergen to wish time away each morning. We wake up to new possibilities. It behooves us to value each day. We are given

ROB Bergen Egypt
"passover" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Hey there it's Leo. How was your Passover? I hope that despite all the hardship you manage to find just a little bit of light and warmth in this magical holiday. I hope you had a chance to read the God with fresh eyes and find new meaning in this ancient story of ours. I hope you had a chance to hug. Your loved ones in person or over zoom and to feel grateful for all that we still have even or particularly in this difficult time and I hope the rest of the holiday finds all of us even if not yet free to leave our homes and Wander in the wilderness at least mindful of Piss ox perennial reminder. That miracles happen when you least expect them. So while we couldn't come to you yesterday for another Coupla Chabad because of the holiday we wanted to give you just a little bit unorthodox this evening introduce you to a remarkable new novel. That feels very much of the moment and give you our traditional Jewish joke to end the week and welcome the new one on a cheerful note. Have a list. It gives me great pleasure to welcome one of my favorite authors Sharon Cameron. Hello Hello so. I read your incredible new book. The light in hidden places My wife had the pleasure of editing. I don't want to give away too much applaud. You'll tell us a little bit about it soon but thought it really kind of brought to the fore this incredible story and and this incredible protagonists that we haven't heard about and then life as it so often does took this kind of additional turn and made the book even more relevant because the book is in many ways a book about people who are kind of secluded in small stressful pace and have to deal with extraordinary times and circumstances around them so tell us a little bit about this incredible novel the Leiden hidden places based on a true story. It's a story of two Sisters Stefania and Helena Pit Gorski and this is a story that I had become aware of a long time ago back in the nineteen ninety s when I was watching oral histories that had been done by the US Holocaust Museum. Just just for fun to pass the time. Yes as as one does which would be me that is. I've spent a lot of time doing that. And so I listened listened to the story. That's defined you. Pick Gorski was telling about her life and I was just riveted. I couldn't move off my couch while she was telling about life and basically she was a sixteen year old Polish Catholic girl alone in german-occupied country during the war she had sole charge of her six year old sister. No family no parents. They were destitute on their own. When in the middle of the night there came a knock on the door and on the other side of the door was a young Jewish man. Maxium aunt who had just jumped from a moving train taking him to death camp and he was broken and bloody and he said. Please hide me. And Stephanie. And Helena opened the door and eventually they opened that door twelve more times until they had thirteen Jews hidden in a space behind a false wall in their attic and then came the next knock on the door and this time it was too s s officers. Who Said we are requisitioning? Your House for staff quarters for a new hospital this being put in across the street. And you have one hour to leave or be shot and Stefan and Helena who are sixteen years old and six years old chose not to leave and when the officers came back in exactly one hour. They said well. Actually maybe it's great that you didn't leave because I think we've we've housed almost all of our staff so we'll just take one room and you can stay too so the Nazis moved in so now. These two girls have thirteen Jews in hidden space in an attic at four knots as sleeping in the bedroom directly below them and I'm sitting there on my couch listening to her. Tell the story and it is one of the most amazing stories of resourcefulness resilience heroism and humanity. That I had ever ever heard. They never forgot it. I didn't forget it for twenty three years until I became a writer in and looked for her and found her. And that's the next part of the story but But it was just such an incredible journey for me to follow that journey that they took it was really life changing so as a writer. There are a million questions I want to ask. You won't because I don't want to spoil the incredible plot in the incredible ending endings twists. I mean this is really some some serious Hollywood material here but but I want to know about your approach this books when you first started kind of really diving into it to get into this mindset to get into this period to get into this atmospherics that are so wrought with Claustrophobia and tension and anxiety and fear. How do you? How do you get into these characters? Heads how did you go ahead and try to kind of work your way into into the voice of telling the story? Well I was really lucky In that when I when I looked forced to find pet gore iskoe found was her son Edmund. Ski and edge shared with me. His mother's unpublished memoir. So I had an incredible window into Stefan. Yes mind But then added. I also decided to go to Poland together to research his mom's life so during that trip to Poland. We were able to interview children who had been trapped in that attic with the Nazis. Right below them. We were able to interview Helena. The little sister and they gave me such an incredible View into what life was like for those people what it was like to be a child and to be in such a small space. They attic was not large enough for thirteen people You could not actually stand up the space. She described it. They were lying like sardines stacked next to each other. If one person needed to turn over they all had to turn over. And they had to sit and lay there in absolute silence. There could be there was no. Kaufman's SNORE SNEEZE SIGH. No noise of any kind. Everything could be heard three that floor for how long for they were like that for nine months and I think honestly if it had been much longer they would not have been able to survive but it was. It was a horrific situation. She told me what it was like to have to lie. Still while rats ran across your body. But you couldn't move. You couldn't make any noise and you know it just. It takes my shelter in place that I'm doing right now in my comfortable home with my family with everything I need and puts it in really really good perspective right those of us who complained their Manhattan apartments are just too small for kids. Could really use a little refresher here again. Without spoiling the magnificence of the story. Can you tell us a little bit about how it ends? Yeah I think I think I can Because I really think this with the story there's A. There's quite a few people that know about to find you so with the story. It's really all about the how how did do it and I think that is the amazing part. I think the incredible and to find your story that it's okay to share is that she married one at the men. She saved She married Max who jumped off the train and not at her door and so it was their son that I worked with to write the book and so it was really Such a gift of trust that he gave me For both his parents stories to take both of these stories and put them into fiction when it was so personal you know to him and his family. I will never get over being grateful for the trustee placed on me but that Sharon Cameron. The book is so beautiful and again. If you're looking for a novel that is both a tremendously fascinating untold story from the Holocaust and an incredible testament to the strength of the human spirit. One sixteen year old girl who took the ultimate risk For really humanity sake and also a novel that very much remains as deeply relevant in our time of Sheltering in place. I can't think of a better book. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you my name. Is Jeremy Dabur? And I'm the author of Jewish comedy Series History I'm sure by this point of the holiday. Many of you have consumed a great deal of Passover related content And as a result I wanted to go and other way intelligence that has absolutely nothing to do with Passover at all and the joke the way I heard it I was that it is about the president of the United States to White Eisenhower and he takes his first trip to Israel and he meets while he's there the first prime minister of Israel David Ben Gurion and been gory and asks him he says. I know you're military man. And he says you know I wonder whether you'd be interested in seeing the tomb of the unknown. Jewish soldier Eisenhower says of course. I'd be very honored to do that. So then Gordon degrees and they go over and to Heart's on the and they see this grand tomb. You know all granite and it says on it right. A carved into the tombstone Hyman Goldfarb shorter and Eisenhower. Of course is a little bit Confused because it's the tomb of the unknown Jewish soldiers. I thought that was what this was the tomb the soldier and Ben Gurion and says oh. I see what your problem is. No no you see as a soldier. He was unknown. But as a furrier he was fantastic and with that. I wish you all a very happy. Passover I hope you have enjoyed and I hope the week ahead brings all of us. Good News Shiva to France..

White Eisenhower Israel David Ben Gurion Sharon Cameron Helena Poland writer US Holocaust Museum Helena Pit Gorski Pick Gorski Maxium Stefania Stephanie Ski Hyman Goldfarb Hollywood Edmund Stefan Gordon
"passover" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"One word you could use to sum up the scriptures from beginning to end but especially in the Old Testament remember for the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is bright point. It doesn't happen every year but this year did yesterday. Maundy Thursday fell on the first full day of the Jewish Passover. And what makes this an especially? Poignant convergence is that the meal we remember each and every Monday Thursday which the disciple shared with Jesus on the Thursday of Holy week was the Passover Seder the roots of the Christian faith are of course Jewish the God of Abraham Isaac and Jacob is the father of Jesus of course followers of Jesus are no longer bound to the old testament requirement to observe Passover and fact Jesus himself replace the command for God's people to observe Passover with what he called a new command to remember his body broken for us in his blood shed for us. Still there's so much beauty here in the Passover as a Jew Jesus would have celebrated Passover diligently each and every year of his life all Israelites to remember and celebrate. How God delivered the Israelites out of Egyptian slavery. When the angel of death seeing the lamb's blood and their doorpost passed over Israel and plagued the Egyptians four hundred years of bondage came to an end immediately. Even as the original exodus was still unfolding. God instituted its remembrance on the night before God sent the angel of death he commanded Moses. Celebrate this feast. God tells them in Exodus. Twelve and win. Your children asked what you're doing. Tell them what I did for you. One of our worst fault is God. Knows certainly is that we are very forgetful. Creatures are memories are at best selective and at worst untrustworthy. So much of the Old Testament just reads like a bad deja-vu God delivers his people from thirst. Or hunger their enemies and they quickly forget. It's almost like the old testament authors simply copied and pasted this phrase. The people of Israel grumbled against the Lord who brought them out of Egypt over and over again and fact immediately after the exodus. The Israelites proved that they needed reminding to remember. Did you just save us to leave us? In the desert they asked. We were better off in Egypt. How quickly how shamefully we forget. The Passover Gay Flash to the spiritual discipline of remembering the Mishna one of the oldest Jewish tax about Passover observance instructs Jews every generation to regard themselves as being personally freed from Egypt by remembering observers are brought into the pain of slavery so that they can experience more fully the shock and sweetness of their freedom. Passover also points us to a savior who brings that freedom. The lamb shank bone on the Seder Plate as a reminder of the lamb without blemish whose blood the Israelites painted on their as assigned to the angel of death to pass over their houses the first time John the Baptist saw Jesus as an adult he yelled kind of shockingly really behold the lamb of God the Apostle Paul Call Jesus Christ our Passover lamb and I corinthians and Jesus of course new then breaking the Matza and calling in his body and then drinking the cup and calling in a new covenant. He was translating onlookers that he himself is the true. Passover lamb the one without blemish. Whose blood would save all of those. Who painted on the door post of their own lives? We Are Justice. Forgetful was the father of our faith. Were in the desert outside of Egypt especially in times of crisis like these and that's why it's so important we remember intentionally the Times God has delivered us from our spiritual Egypt's and of course from eternal death today. Friday is an especially good day to remember that God's faithfulness isn't just an emotional SAV during our times of distress but by the blood of Christ. Our SIN is forgiven. Our guilt is taken away this week on a special breakpoint podcast. Shane Morrison. I do some remembering in fact. We remember and discuss the very best breakpoint commentaries by Chuck Colson on the topics of Good Friday and.

Egypt Passover Jesus Israel Colson Center Chuck Colson John Stonestreet Shane Morrison Moses Abraham Isaac Jacob
"passover" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Passover also in Israel he also I mean I don't I wouldn't I wouldn't necessarily pin the tail on that timing but it is society resurrected and you know this is what was commemorating and so you know there may be some connections there but regardless it's a certainly trying to be concerned about and and you know the world is going to be different after this is this is like an after World War two that particular crisis is the current text him an act of nineteen forty three that and they see that withholds that was supposed to be a temporary thing to fund the war but it never went away wishful to still with us right okay look at nine one one crisis created TSA restrictions that have become permanent it's not the same the corona virus from a secular perspective at the very least is going to create a nation of America this will probably become more German folks with a lot less handshakes even trump suggested Americans should consider giving up the traditional greeting chill and sex will be more fist pumps available bombs plexiglas with sneakers at the grocery stores there's a whole new consumer mindset with social behaviors spending habits you're talking about this in the last hour of the all wheel online shopping that's gone out with people my god yeah who never even knew how to do that but another kind of forced to I don't think retail will bounce back build towards or were used to be I just don't see it happening and all workstations with other people not learning how to work from home employers will occur because brick and mortar stores are certain the public spoke to go by the wayside retail strip centers I I'm not doing real positive outlook for commercial real estate but you know it's amazing to me Georges the resiliency of the American Strom is tough all.

Israel America Passover Georges
"passover" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Let's turn to some more of the concrete plagues now and see if we can come up with anything interesting about them. So the frogs. I've always been fascinated by the frogs. Essentially all of the other plagues or miracles. Sound Jimmy sort of vaguely plausible large number of locus eating everything that happens sometimes in the world. You know pestilence animals. Dying that happens boils definitely disgusting and that happens. Even the which may be doesn't exactly happen in the way that it's depicted in the biblical texts. You there are clips as you can imagine people extending from that but the inundation of an entire country by frogs is always a little weird outlying. Did you have any insight into that? What'S THE FROGS? I mean I agree with you. That frogs taking over whole country sounds relatively implausible. Even as a once in a millenium sort of event. I'm not an expert on on Ecology on the habitat of frogs. But my understanding is that they're amphibians and don't like to be very far from the water at all so assuming that all of Egypt's didn't become marshland. I'm not sure how frogs could have survived and the city centres all right. Well we'll have to leave frogs then as a as a mystery for the moment what about the plague that in Hebrew is called a rove and which usually gets translated in most English translations as a mixture of wild animals or something to that effect. The word literally means a mixture. If you think of the children's picture books of the plagues he's sort of imagined. Lions and tigers and other things walking around which notably are never mentioned in the biblical text. What is this confusing? Played probably meant to have been in the original context. Yes I mean it's worth pointing out with the question of what it means literally so as you say the route I'm laced bed of this word is something that sometimes has connotations of mixture although that same route other times has different connotations. It's the root of the word West and related Ly- The root associated with With evening and so it has various different meanings that that route and in the case of Of this particular played some of the ancient translations suggest that this was some sort of insect fly perhaps not entirely dissimilar from the plague of what we call lice her coming in Hebrew down. Let's fast forward to as it were the granddaddy of them. All the plague of the death of the first born August may be the most Maybe I don't know if it's the most corona appropriate but it certainly the one that involves the warning that people leave their homes until the day. And so there's a there's a little bit of self-isolation going on at the at the family level and it's also the one of the most embedded in the story of actually children visceral getting up and leaving. Why do you think the firstborn are so much in in play here? Why not just you know play. It kills off all of your offspring. Or maybe it's about farrow being the king at any thoughts on the firstborn aspect. That's a really good question. I think that there is something even more impressive about killing just the firstborn than say killing everyone. And if you're going to kill anyone than killing. The first born is is really devastating. It really is it appropriate as a climactic plague in terms of the the impact. I think that it it at least bills when when I read it like an an and particularly traumatic event part of that might be totally literary that. It's more expensive description where we have say for for frogs or lice. But there's something about both afflicting. Everyone end the proving the power proving that this isn't just a pandemic but something that can only be the hand of God in the fact that it's just the firstborns who are afflicted that really shows who's in charge. I wonder if I could close by asking you a more personal question and this you know you maintain a traditional Jewish practice. You know you go to the synagogue you perform the rituals you keep the sabbath and you're also a brilliant and pathbreaking Bible scholar who engages with the biblical narratives as large when you think about Passover. Do you draw a line. Do you think well at the Passover? Seder all talked like traditionalist or do you think no like this is how I tell the story of the past the rabbi say whoever says more about telling the Passover story deserves praise your view of yourself at least telling more about the story includes the kind of historical analysis that we were just doing for me personally. Does these are the things that I enjoy? I delight in reading the texts critically in thinking about the historical context and you know actual historical events that may or may not be reflected in these texts and traditions. So I grew up like my parents and grandparents doing the Passover Seder every year and extremely important to me in part of my heritage. But I do like to ask questions. And you know that famously is one of the Points of the Passover. Seder is to. Have you know the children ask questions and I haven't grown out of that and and so every year. I do like to think about the problems and the complications and the evolution of the different traditions and the multiplicity of traditions. In fact you know a wonderful thing is that you know one of the elements one of the central elements of B. Passover. Seder is this sort of codified question asking and so to me these layers upon layers of questions the Passover state areas designed to inspire questions and even the questions that are being asked have questions that can be asked about them. And that's my favorite part of the Passover Seder. Well I appreciate it on your giving us a version of the Passover Seder where it is the origin of your engagement with Biblical criticism. So I appreciate that very much. I'm very grateful to Don for joining me for our special Passover episode. I know you're working on some very big things and with any luck When those Republicans? We'll have you back to report on those other projects to thank you very much for joining me. Thank you talking to. Don made me feel ready to try in a limited sort of way to re-engage some of that tradition and some of that ritual in the form of a Passover Seder. I hope it had that effect for you whether you're celebrating. Passover Easter or none of the above until the next time I talked to be careful. Be Safe be well and enjoy. Whatever holidays worked for you? Deep background is brought to you by pushing industries our producer. Lydia Jean Cot with research help from zooey win. Mastering is by Jason Gambro and Martine Gonzalez or showrunner is Sophie mcgibbon. Our theme music is composed by Louis. Garra special thanks to the Pushkin Brass Malcolm glad well Jacob Weisberg and Yellow Bell. I'm Noah Feldman I also had a regular column for Bloomberg opinion which you can find at Bloomberg Dot Com Slash. Feld to discover Bloomberg's original slate of PODCASTS. Go TO BLOOMBERG DOT COM slash podcasts. You can follow me on twitter. At Noah Feldman.

Seder Jimmy sort Bloomberg Noah Feldman Don twitter Egypt Pushkin Brass Malcolm rove Lydia Jean Cot farrow Jacob Weisberg Feld Louis Jason Gambro zooey producer Bible
"passover" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Don Thank you for joining me. I wanted to start by asking you about the biblical story of the plagues usually start by saying there are ten plagues. But you think that that might be a misnomer. Yeah so the idea of ten plagues appears first in Rabbinic Literature and Bay Count Ten events that are described in the biblical text in the book of Exodus. However the decision to count those specific ten events is a matter of interpretation does not at all derive directly from the text. But it's not even clear that the correct classification is plagues at all as opposed to say miracles signs wonders and so on. Well then where would you start if you wanted to tell the story of the signs or wonders because I take it? That signs and wonders are words that the Biblical story uses repeatedly rather than the word play. So where would you start your listen? We now know. They don't have to be ten in your list. But where would you start with signs and wonders in the Exodus Story? I think a good place to start would probably be the story of a competition between Aaron brother of Moses and the Egyptian magicians where Aaron takes staff and cast it upon the ground becomes a ten. Nin is the Hebrew word which may be a crocodile. Some people think that it's that it's a reference to snake but it turns magically into a living creature and then there's a bit of a battle between the magical creature created by Aaron staff and a magical creature created by the magicians but that seems be the beginning of a series of miracle competitions between Moses and Aaron and the Egyptians and so that continues in exactly the same form with the miracle blood in the Nile and another body of Water. The miracle of what? We call the plague of frogs. All of those are told Lyndon exactly the same sort of language and literary structure as that story of errands Steph. You then talked about how the Egyptian magicians also perform others of these miracles. And there's a kind of face off as it were between Moses and Aaron and what they're doing and then what? The Egyptian experts are doing their magicians or doing can ask you seen in the light of ancient near eastern practice or imagination or ideology. Is there a reason to think that there will be some fame associated with the idea of Egypt's magicians? That's a good question. I mean there definitely was a very robust tradition of magic in Egypt and we also know that there were interactions between magicians from different cultures. Sometimes we find cells that are actually transliterated from in antiquity from one language to another so we do know that Egypt had a robust tradition of magicians than we do know that there was contact between those magicians and magicians elsewhere in ancient. Near East. What you're describing by the way it sounds to me is like the practice of what I like all ancient plagiarism. Right that if I had a goody him or poem or story in my civilization and you came for another civilization you heard it. You would just copy that story or translate that story into your own civilization and maybe swap out some of the proper nouns of the Gods or the Kings or the heroes and then boom. You'd have a fresh story grown own. The most famous example of of where stories make their way through different. Ancient civilizations is the flood story which occurs not only in the Bible but in older sources. engineer eastern Mesopotamia versus as well. Do you happen to know off the top of your head whether there are plague stories in other engineers during traditions or as the biblical story sort of one off. You definitely do have stories of plagues in the ancient Near East. In fact there's also traditions of plagues having occurred In each we have ancient Egyptian texts describing things like epidemics the Nile turning to read something that's described in some ancient Egyptian texts. You're saying there is an ancient Egyptian taxed that has the story where the Nile turns red. Yes I'm quite sure that there are Egyptian traditions. That are not entirely dissimilar. So when when here's that there are some engine Egyptian sources that talk about the Nile? Turning red there are two ways to think about that. Roughly speaking one way is the way that a religious traditionalist apologised. Would they would say. Aha You know here. We have some independent evidence that these events might have actually happened. And then there's the way that a historian or a literary scholar would approach it Which is to say. Well this is a trope that existed in the ancient world. And if you've got a good story people like to tell that story to each other and it's not so surprising that story would have turned up in multiple different literary traditions. I suppose that approach might also leave open room for the possibility that there was some natural phenomenon that sometimes occurred in Egypt that led to the reddening of water. But if there is any natural explanation for that it's credible I'm not aware of it right and bear various different phenomena that can lead to the reddening of waters from algae to declared deposits and all sorts of things like that but clearly what's described in part of the biblical account where it says that it was accompanied by the water became undrinkable and all the fish died. I mean that's a sort of very dramatic occurrence that doesn't necessarily align with the presence of algae but but back to your previous question about ancient near eastern texts talking about plagues. I mean we have that even in the Bible moreover you know really interesting text. In that regard I would say is in Deuteronomy Twenty eight where we have a whole series of curses and those curses include a reference to an addiction disease of some sort the night machine meet sign so may the Lord strike you with the Egyptian boils or something like that. And that's in fact one of the plagues described in exodus. So it's not only mentioned in the Bible of a of a plague of some sort but it's even associating this particular one with Egypt and I don't think that it needs to be a reference specifically to plagues as told in the narrative. It could just be a disease that's associated with Egypt. You know some people call. The Corona virus virus is Chinese vires of its era. The Egyptian boils. Yeah we'll be back in just a moment. Let's talk about transfer wives the smartest way to send and receive money internationally. If you've ever had to move money across borders chances are you were hunted haunted by in feats whether you use your bank or another provider. They likely hit an extra via the exchange rate. And you probably paid too much and if you didn't notice well that's the whole point. Transfer wise is different. You always get the real exchange rate when you send money to over seventy countries to pay one super low fee and hold on to more of your money. Transfer wise also offers an easy alternative to opening a bank account in a new country. They're multi-currency currency account that you hold up forty five points. He's at once and convert between them anytime you can even get your own bank details for the US UK euro-zone Australia. Meaning you receive money from those countries for Free. It's great for freelancers or anyone who works internationally. But don't take my word for transfer wise over six million customers who save three million dollars every day bad rates and hidden bank fees. That's over one billion dollars in savings every year. Try them out today. Get your first transfer free by visiting transfer wise dot com slash podcast..

Egypt Nile Aaron Moses Don Kings Nin Lyndon engineer US Mesopotamia Australia UK
"passover" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"From Pushkin Industries. This is deep background show where he explored the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm Noah Feldman for those of you who have been listening in recent weeks. You know that we have been very deep inside corona in fact. Sometimes I think we don't talk about anything else and from an ethical perspective. Maybe that's correct. This is a pressing problem. People are dying. We need to take that all extremely seriously and yet. It's also true that a little while ago when I spoke to Dr Lori Santos of Yale University. She advised me that. Maintaining routine and tradition is a powerful way of managing ourselves under these circumstances. Well for a lot of us. The millions of routine includes the schedule of holidays and with Passover and Easter. Coming with to make a decision whether to ignore those holidays altogether or to celebrate them as appropriately as we can under our current straightened circumstances here. Deep background we don't celebrate holidays as a podcast but we do try to maintain some sense of continuity and so we thought it was appropriate to have an episode that did talk about Passover but Passover with a little bit of a corona twist. And what better way to think about Passover and corona than to talk about the biblical plagues associated with the Exodus story for those of you who need a little bit of a refresher on what exactly does plagues are. The traditional count starts with blood frogs lice and goes on in a list until it culminates with hail darkness and the killing of the first porn. That rings a bell for you. You might enjoy the rest of his episode. I'm joined by Dr Don Dershowitz. He's a junior fellow at Harvard. University's Society of fellows his academic work has appeared in Jbl Vat Zaw. Those are big journals and the Bible world. I promise you not. You mentioned the New York Times his forthcoming book. On the reduction of the Hebrew Bible will be published by more seebeck and he's currently studying the composition. History of the book of Deuteronomy. You Don is one of the most creative scholars thinking about the Bible today and he's also very engaging at.

Dr Don Dershowitz Dr Lori Santos Noah Feldman Pushkin Industries Jbl Vat Zaw New York Times Yale University Society of fellows Bible Harvard
"passover" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Unorthodox

"So I am here at Jackson. Frieda with Dean and Maya Jank Lovett's they are back on the show and we're gonNA talk Passover because as I understand it like the Seder is basically a dinner party and you now own three restaurants. You guys are sort of. You came up through the New York hospitality world. You guys know how to throw a good dinner party. Four tons of people. I G throw sater yourselves or do you go. Do you go to someone else's house a mixed we we have. We've done. Both the show will probably go to somebody else. And so when you're at someone else's house are you like the lighting to write the music too loud are you. Are you judging constantly? And so when? What about the food? Are you guys like judging food or you sort of like chill about that virtual as long as I have everything on the plates? That's important to us says eight airplane rides. That's that's the only place of judgments I would say and then we compare it to. Oh that's not how my mom did it. But otherwise no judgment. We love being invited to any pets over. Let's bring your personal password. You are South African Dean my group in Israel. What are some of the specific memories? You have of the distinctive passovers of your of Your childhoods for me much all the possible. I was the youngest cousin sightseeing every single year forever. Any moment I can imagine traumatic right now. I can see the chorus whenever it was always. Nice when you got to. The first two verses were good the the secondary versus very strange but it was very satisfying to get to the end. But even the memory now of singing Monisha. Wow that's a lot. It is a really long Sean. I mean it's it goes on for a while the whole thing Islam. I remember reading Israel. Just talk about how long a Seder should be and if you were a little more religious or a little more spiritual you would go. You know. There's some people who kind of stop after dinner and then there's the people who actually finish everything and go on and our family went all the way so it was a little bit of that fear that we're going all the way and now it's a it's kind of funny to reflect back on that. So what if you had a really long dinner with your loved? Ones how great. What kind of food are we talking? Because I think this restaurant Jackson who has been described as what is it. South African Israeli Grandma Comfort food which is like the perfect description. I think you have the you have multiple soup. You have the green shocks Ugo which we talked about when you were less on the show and then you have the Peri Peri Chicken. The South African taste. What were some of the foods that were distinctive to your sater's growing up. We wins across the board chopped herring chicken liver. We would call it. Kinkel the little with the sugar on it. That was delicious. Obviously a lot of matter the softball was salt was a big hit with the kids. So I guess everything from the later for entrees which we do. You're also we do Honey Glazed Freda short ribs which is reminiscent great great dish all around but reminiscent of childish would have served in a big family stall over what it will grab in now and Maya Sephardic also. We have rice during the Saito which which we enjoy tremendously with things during a Sega. We during the loss of rice all time and it's so much easier. Raised Royce with hot sauce converted to Sephardic the flannel. Like when we throw the green and we hit our tradition at all his sister married a Persian Jew. Yes and they with the scalise and they start hitting each other to remember the pain. I thank you for you back Egypt which I think we're kind of going through today remembering the suffering or reliving it and they all go absolutely crazy and do that. Don't start hitting each other with scallions and they get a little out of hand. They had rowdy. So what were some of the foods that you guys your had during my mom was Sephardic. So if when we were with her side of the family they would have crime and jeans prime as like spicy fish with the Sephardic food is definitely a lot more tasty and a lot more interested in foods but she married my dad. Who Was Ashkenazi Joe? So it did land up for food like as a as a little girl so just just chicken and braves short grabs and potatoes and pretty oschkenat's. Yeah it was pretty simple for many years when we were at my father's side of the family so the two of you met at bow are the iconic New York City brasserie and. Us have worked at a bunch of different restaurants in New York City threat your careers. I heard a rumor that when you were working Schiller's that you change the lighting every like six and a half minutes to make the ambiance perfect true probably even more often absolutely what were you responding to and how would you change them. You get a feeling and you get a feeling for the room but also change in the lighten would make me cross the room. Get a feel for the room. Touch the lights across the room back over. Look at the lights saying not really satisfied. Cross the room beck again and keep fixing the lights back and forward the same with the music. Same temperature as long as you touching things and you put in things in motion that really adds to the ambiance. Okay so let's say our listeners are hosting a Seder at their house right. They might not have the dimming system they might not have the sounds of some. What are some easy things that people should start thinking about? I think you know. Lots of candles. Which people reboot really go? Overboard with the candles Lots of churches such on the tables have the table. Something that can move around people touching things sharing things explaining things. I think that you engage with whether it's you know stemware or plates or sold the way things are interested in talk about definitely makes for a more conversational meal Light and I would lay low lighting and candles anyway. I understand on on possible. People don't put on music but some ambience music in the background always greets. I just see when people were sharing and share things that have like minded things on the table. So anything that you can share in describe or there's a history as a backbone said on the table definitely opens up conversation for people but lots of candles and lots of things on the table. It's kind of easy because you have You can really you. Can you can go with the Passover Plate? Would you can. I think that you can use that as a foundation that decorate the table and be that is the theme of the night. So have your Harare sets and have have the Mara. Have everything spread out on the table. As as those little centerpieces. I think that's great. So one problem one complaint and you guys have kids. It's a long. It's a long way to go before you eat. How do you what do we? What do we think about snacking adding little things to sort of keep everyone engaged and entertained? Well I think with the kids as long as you hide the Africa. And the mets early evening keeps the excitement until the end of the meal. Hide it early. Hide it Very hard to find and let the kids kind of explore around there for a while but snacks. We do cheat. We have mattered throughout the meal. We broken first piece of matter that matters a free for all from their Ford kids definitely put him at the end of one table a separate table and let them find their own way to enjoy the Passover celebration. They not gonNA engage entirely with where the adults leads but the else can teach him at. This is what we go through with the Haggadah and hopefully they get the snippets and three taking the money so now they they engaged through picking up the finding the matter they engaged. There's actually so many opportunities for them to engage in Passover and I think when I grow up it was so So strict we weren't allowed to eat before we said a man anymore and allowed to touch the food so it was hard and. I think that I'm kind of breaking the pattern. A little by allow like it's all right if they nibble on. Mozza or a hardboiled egg if that's what they need to stay present at the table and then including them in in reading the Haggadah. It's even if they think they don't want you once there on the spot it's so amazing to see the little. Ones engage showoff. Swallow have you. There are eight days of eating just Mozza no bread. What are your? Do you have any hacks? Any foods kids love to eat like. Are Your Mozza Pizza family. What do you have any like recipes? That sounds delicious. We have the recipe for that. I just put tomato sauce like shredded. But that's put in the microwave safe. I'm really hungry. We do a lot better insult right now. I really like Personnel like Muttawa chopped liver and read horseradish. She'll eat that through the week. Yeah I mean I enjoy the week of also feel like it's slim's Dow you stop being a lot of meals hills MSA Brian bryce gates. Yeah we do a big bright sometimes for staff meal at the restaurant. That's fine. Are there any Passover specials that you'll have at the restaurants but we do have multiple soup which is standard which you sell a fortune of June Pacer but also we do a flawless chocolate cake right? So which is a huge hit on the appetizers entrees desserts. Yeah and we certainly have not suffer everybody but yeah the the multiple soup and fritos braids short ribs. We serve all week and The flower chocolate cake is kind of the GO-TO for all the Jews. Who Come in. So what's your Matsubara recipe at home? Here you sweet or Salty. Saute just scrambled eggs and cinnamon cinnamon on now now. I'm thinking cinnamon and cinnamon and Matzos. That's a real Ashkenazi. Sephardi like divide reiver's the salty. See your home has managed to bridge those. Yes where it all happens. Sometimes we forget which is a chicken sandwiches. Safari I actually. I like the whole of the status. I like watching the Ten Commandments on the Charlton. Heston here just the memory. I love the the pace. Can say there's definitely a lot of their childhood memory. You know the will we so separated from families but I remember as a child who was a very big table a very long Seder. Now it's more as talking about more mishmash of what we bring to own Contemporaries that but I miss the days of sitting down the table with granny free and she would cater the entire teen. And Maya Jank. Lovett's thank you so much for sharing your Passover Seder hosing tips and recipes and happy Passover happy Passover sweaty.

Maya Jank Lovett Jackson Israel New York City New York Maya Jank Sega braves beck Africa Frieda Ashkenazi Joe Maya mets Monisha Sean Ugo
"passover" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on Unorthodox

"I am here with mercy. Goldman she's a Master Baker and the author of the NEWISH Jewish Cookbook. She's also the creator of the greatest Passover desert to ever exist. Welcome Marcy Wow. That's quite an interesting and it's lovely to be here so you tell us a bit about the newest Jewish cookbook which is impeccably named. I think captured everything is sort of. Has that kind of upbeat for the field. I thought it would appeal to a few different generations and give the cashier what Newish Jewish is all about which is a little bit of classic things that are respond and brought forward and fresh and mixed with some global influences so chapter eleven is all about Passover and there are so many dishes. I didn't actually realize there could be this many dishes. Passover so let's talk about your Hair Mel Matza crunch which is sort of precedes you on the Internet. A Little Bit Yeah. I HAVE LAWSUIT MUFFINS ICONIC One and my cake with gets a lot of ink and lots of butter. Crunch I did about Nineteen eighty-four so I had a talk in the house that he ate nothing and at that point. Passover was coming up and was he won't eat anything and I used to make. A Little Confession was soda crackers. I probably won't work with much. It would be porous enough because you basically melting butter or unsalted margarine and sugar pouring it over crackers or Matza baking it and indeed it was enough it sort of sponged up all good coffee and that's so much better crunch was born and that I know of course chocolate on each year. You something different myself all white chocolate and smear it with apricot jams. You haven't marb license back but when you find something that is really easy. It's basically three ingredients. And there's no technique involved. You can't really go wrong. So this is your trademark dish. I mean is this something you feel like you have to make at this point every year or you excited to make it excited. It says the holidays to me the idea that so many people collectively were all making it together and people right needs to my website telling you they made four boxes that have already been devoured before Passover or they did it this way or that way or they added large grains of sea salt or bitter chocolate or they've had a little bit of men extract and changed about just seeing people baking with me as always a thrill seeker variations. Sometimes I think of performance you the theme song over and over again. Do they get tired? And you don't get tired of things and people in recipe love since this. Passover is sort of pretty different as they say from all other passovers. Do you have any advice for people who are now cooking much smaller batches? You know we heard from someone in our facebook group who said you know usually make multiple suit for thirty now making it for four. I mean is there a way that people can sort of wrap their minds around cooking smaller meals for this? I don't think you have to do that. I mean when you're making a chicken soup. I don't know any way to make things a little bit chicken leg and coach till Yep Super Too. I think I would go with the Super. Thirty divided into five bundles. And you around in deposit soup on people's doorsteps after the holiday and given then I think the big batch of soup is GonNa find any people that would love it. You just have to distribute it differently. We love that because I was GonNa say oh. It's great you'll have a lot of leftovers but you went with helping other people and giving them a much nicer approach for far as far as we've seen food prepared by people. Even those of us who are in quarantine is fine and it's so heartwarming. And it's the one thing that we certainly can do and I'd sooner you know. Make the extra. I just make it and you never know you pass by a fire station. You visit a neighbor. A friend you remember. The hairdressers always goes the extra distance. It never goes to waste the extra that you have. I love that. That's such a nice idea. So what's the homemade recipe lake in? Basically it's watering flowers. You can put it in a pinch of salt. And then you stretch it out in very thin slabs and goes into a five hundred degree oven until buckles and the bug holes and blisters since it tastes like schmeer among other very religious. Matza that sounds great so if people wanna find your motto butter crunch if people want to find the Jewish cookbook. How do we get a hold of you and your master baking well? My central place is my website better. Baking DOT COM. I've been there for twenty years. Twenty-three passovers and the cookbook is available in. All independent bookstores. You could order it or on Amazon in though Barnes and noble. You can get it as a print book or E book it's linked to my website and also anybody buys any of my books. They get a free whole year of access to my website which includes just twenty five hundred other recipes many of them for the Jewish holidays and I publish newsletter every month and it has yet more Passover recipes which are all free this month including the Passover Greek nut cake to ingredient in that cookie which is amazing and a few other things that are very easy. And I've taken care of that. Not all of us are being able to get our Passover punchy stocked up so it's made with pantry stuff that I think will be perfect for this Passover this very unique Passover Mercy Goldman. Thank you so much. The website is better baking and all of our listeners can get all those recipes as well as the NEWISH Jewish cookbook. Thanks for being with us today. Thank happening.

NEWISH Jewish Cookbook Passover Jewish cookbook Goldman Marcy Wow facebook Mel Matza Amazon Barnes
"passover" Discussed on On This Day Entertainment

On This Day Entertainment

13:00 min | 1 year ago

"passover" Discussed on On This Day Entertainment

"At this point Raza throws water on alley which I thought was very polite because closer to Russia's hand was a glass of ice tea and that ice tea especially with lemon would absolutely burn. The hell out of anybody's is and the fact that Raza's saw the tea and then went and grabbed the water to throw on him. I thought was a courtesy. If you're going to get something thrown on you it. It's best water than anything else. Allie was very cautious. Not to be aggressive back. He had just kind of sat there. Roses pushing him moving. This made me very nervous. Raza was pushing him in. His chair was moving. Back to some decorative fire and I was just so concerned that he was getting closer. And closer to the decorative fire I mean. Smokey bear told me not to mess around forest fires so this was definitely concerning to me. We see destiny the bodyguard. It looked like she should be wearing one of those yellow shirts from the Jerry Springer Show. She was pulling. Raza off of Allie. Gosh that fire. It just had me shook finally Raza calms down for a second just enough to say. Go Fuck yourself walks out. Destiny is pleading with him. Says Raza Palese in apparently destiny doesn't know that please is one syllable because she says please several times and I just want to know what the hell is up with. That destiny. Says I don't want to be involved in this shit. We see Raza call. Mj Pest just hardcore enquiring. What the Hell is going on? He wonders why would MJ share? This information is naked Jenga saga with somebody. I don't trust we see Raza. And he's concerned that everybody knows that Adams cheating except for him and he feels really dumb. Raza hung up on. Mj Not like in a rude way but MJ said I'm going to the hospital. Got Off the phone with her quickly. So then we see Mike's House and it's time for Passover Nima Calls Mike. He says he's around the corner. He mentioned a four hundred dollar tee shirt that he needs to drop off. It was pretty funny. He as Nima standing on my doorstep the four hundred dollars shirt falls on the ground and Nima just picks it up puts it right back on the hanger brings it in. Mike looks at it and can tell it is not been dry cleaned. What an is that man. Has We see destiny. She's talking about the fight. She described it as Kung Fu gloss. Water she was overwhelmed. We see Nima. I can't I can't with Nima in those new teeth. They are so damn distracting but Nima goes ahead and defends destinies intentions with the alley. Saga Nima really truly believes that destiny was just trying to helping get information and wasn't trying to stir anything up but Raza is just kind of all over the place with his emotions right now rightfully so we see. Mj In Shams at the ER. I I'm sorry I have to it. You could tell how small Shams was just by the fact that he was next to. Mj's gigantic breasts and her breast was an amazing scale to see how tiny little baby was tragically. Mj had to have a second emergency surgery after the c-section and that's when she found out she couldn't have any more kids in. It's just the saddest so MJ claimed at this point earlier we heard her say how great that all of her friends had been now. I'm Jay is claiming that resume is a no show. She tried calling him on Wednesday and on Thursday Friday. He never called back never saw her and she said he never saw her ever ever ever again. We then cut to resume and Adam in their garden. Resume is called Adam Dom several times in the very first scene he called dumb and again. He's calling him dumb. Why is my husband so dumb and then in a dumb voice? He says look what he was going to be. My friend in relationship to Allie. And I don't like that behavior from Raza I understand. He's mad. He has every right to be mad but talking to somebody like that doesn't make anything any better. In fact he sunk down maybe not quite to Adams level because well he didn't send any Dick pigs but it's just not respectful and you gotta to treat people the way you want to be treated lovey resume. He asked why you're sending these in depth sexual questions he said again. How stupid is husband is Adams? Excuse is ridiculous. He just kept on saying that. Ooh I also by close personal friends questions like that and Rosa. Shout out to you said either that ends or they get a divorce and Raza on with you absolutely under no circumstances would I be okay if my husband sent a dick pic or any sexual questions. Anything enquiring about anybody sexuality. I would not take out well and if my husband played it off like Oh this is just how I am. We would be in a really really bad place. Adam does admit to being wrong and he does as not to be called stupid despite his actions. What GETS ME IS AT. Adam is wrong here. Adam is the one who fucked up and just that quickly the conversation turned to. Mj And why she was talking to Ali in the first place. I'm not saying not to blame I'm Jay. Mj is one hundred percent part of this blame. But I think Adam got off way too easy. He's looking on my husband. And then my favorite is the end of this scene. Raza demands that Adams. Stop Sexing. Everyone except for him. That should be just a general marriage rule. I think that's part of our marriage contract like when you go get a marriage license. Like they might be a clause or something that needs to be added like no sexting. Unless you're partners on the other end of the sex. Maybe we need to be that explicit. Maybe not all of us need that but some people clearly do. We finally get to pass over at my house and his parents arrived. I the caterers. Their Paulina is there. Mike's Parents are having to hang out for thirty minutes. Waiting for Mike who is getting dressed doing his hair. It was very obnoxious. That might couldn't get it together. But as soon as his friends and the rest of his family arrived Mike comes out and it was a really nice seem because Mike says that he finally feels that his parents are proud of him. That's going to get tough in just a bit but at this point Mike is feeling very very good and beaming with pride at dinner. Raza starts to Grill Mike. Abou this building in fact I didn't mention earlier. But when we had seen Mike's brother when Mike was at the dentist with his brother we had heard about some investment that he's working on. They bought this old apartment complex and are going to renovate make it a twenty four resident apartment area and it looks like it's going to be about ten million dollars to go through the construction. I'm just GONNA say that if they think it's going to cost ten million it's probably GonNa cost fifteen to twenty million well resumes. Grilling Mike about this building in this renovation in front of everybody at the table. Raza is throwing all the shade. He clearly doesn't think Mike is capable of doing it. He says hey you were helping me with this house. The reason I don't think you can do that is because I actually worked with you on that Shady Shady Shady but that's rises truth and maybe that wasn't the venue to have that conversation in front of all those people but he did and it was a conversation that Mike needed to hear so. It's not the message was needed. The delivery was questionable. But at this point. Mike's mom asks Risa if he's against Mike Building and Risa says yeah he explains that he thinks Mike should sell the idea at that point. He doesn't Mike doesn't think Mike's hand should be getting dirty. Looks like they have the good property. They've got a plan for it. Resumes Opinion is that he should sell the idea to sell the project and collect money on that. And let somebody else deal with it because it's going to be a lot of work and it's going to be years and years of hard work at that point mom. Mike's mom agrees with him and says that that was her concern as well and that was her plan and what she thought would be best. So we have Raza. And Mike's mom on the same team. Mike's Brothers who are not only going to be needing to invest all this money but Mike wants a salary while he's doing this giant project which I understand means money to live on. But you're going to be asking brothers for ten million dollars back and a salary that's Ballsy Dude. So might tell everybody. Don't worry don't worry I got this. We see destiny at that point. I wonder why she's not a Passover but I realized that's because she's meeting up with G G when some of the girlfriends at the beach to watch the fish have sex. This is where we learn well not learned but this is when we realize how much we need. Gee-gee must smoke. She's talking about the moon and the Big Bang and how energies are connected that all of us come from the same rock that we all feel the same same energy and that would result in her getting pregnant so we see them there on the beach. They're looking for the GRUNION. These two strangers approach looking for Grunion as well. They start doing this. Grunion call which is driving gee-gee crazy because she thinks you know they're screaming. They've got buckets. The grunion are clearly terrified by these two strangers. Nemo's also there so it's a bunch of girls in NEMA NEMA is a great wing man even for a bunch of girls. The girls were doing a really cute video of them. Walking down the street and Nima was taking all kinds of pride and recording them and doing a really good job recording the video very very cute. He is very clear that he just does not understand what destiny's position is like. Why wouldn't you just mention this whole saga two atom? The whole thing was just weird. How destiny handled it. I liked destiny. But the whole thing was weird. So we learn that alley told Zhijie that. Mj Are you with me. Allie told gee-gee that. Mj Put a lien. Destiny up to the whole naked. Django rumor so alleys defense on this whole thing is that it was MJ's orchestration and that's when it comes for destiny destiny promises that she has never met or how conversation with Mj. About all this G G goes ahead and says she knows exactly what I'm Jay is capable of and that she doesn't trust him Jay. They finally leave the beach after all that drama. Not Knowing if G G got pregnant while waiting for the grunion they left before seeing the grunion and guess what fifteen minutes later the grunion were out we went to commercial and then we came back and this is where it got really rough especially after Mike earlier in the episode said that he was so he felt really good because his parents were very proud of him at this point in his life. This is when we learned that his parents are not confident. Mike and that they're worried about this investment about him tackling this year years long project. They're talking to him like they have like. He has no idea what he's doing and again shadow to the Bravo editors because at this point we get a montage of Mike's failed business ventures from the shoes..

Raza Palese Mike Building Mj Passover Nima Allie Adam Adams GRUNION Jay Jerry Springer Smokey bear Russia Adam Dom Shams Grunion Rosa Django alley
"passover" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"passover" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Day. A Neo day that one love that's the that's on great song. What is the food? You think you miss the most during Passover? Pasta. Green answer. I'm a major pasta eater. But we'll have you ever tried to make for pasta. I haven't now that have, you know, but in our book, actually, this is so this isn't exactly but in our book, we have a recipe for Passover lection. So Luxun means noodles in Yiddish. And the recipe for Passover lection is is kind of it's a noodle made out of eggs and potato starch. And you make it in a pan, and you make kind of omelette and then you slice it like noodles. And is it doesn't have a photo in our book. So nobody makes it, but it's actually really great. And I've made it I always do it at like a cooking class. So like a Passover cooking class because sometimes you don't want Mott's balls, but you wanna have soup and you want to put noodles and vegetables in it. And these are great. Oh my God. And they're take five minutes. I think there's got to be some sort of Instagram story. You guys got to get this get the word. You gotta get the word out. They are great. So that's a Passover noodle. But. It's functions like a noodle. It's close. It's getting there, and that's sort of what Passover is all about. I think that's like a fun thing. Okay. Second last penultimate question. What's your favorite thing to put on Mata? I think you already know the answer to this. It's so Jewish. Salted whipped butter in the container. Soft enough to spread with some extra salt. That is perfect. Yes. Yes. So good. I can taste it right now. Yeah. I do. Our? We do salted with butter tiny bit of Honey yum mix that all week long on so good. All right last question quest to play off the iconic cherry bomb speed round final question, if you could invite any food celebrity to your Seder who would it be? I know I should have prepared for this question. And I didn't I'm gonna say something cheesy here. Which is at I would really like to invite Oprah to my Seder because. Yeah, I'm you know, I'm not even like this total Oprah fan. But there is something about Oprah. That makes me feel like she would be equal parts listener and enthusiastic participant. And equal parts contributor, you know, that she would know how to step back, but she would also like jump in and like drop little bits of wisdom and like hold space for people. And I think in particular, it's exciting to invite people to the Seder who may not be Jewish or have that background because the Seder is this opportunity to have interesting conversations, and do these kind of weird rituals together, which is really bonding an opening to your heart and your mind, and I think someone like Oprah would just be an a very special thoughtful guest in that environment. All right. That's it. Thank you. So much. Thank you. It was a pleasure to be here. A pleasure to interview and have a great Passover. Thank you you too. Bye. Bye. That's it for today show. Thank you to Alana Newhouse and Liz Alpern for stopping by. And thanks to just Seidman and Lauren Goldstein for co hosting today. We also have to thank just for producing

Oprah Seder Instagram Alana Newhouse Mata Mott Seidman Liz Alpern Lauren Goldstein five minutes
"passover" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"passover" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"So I know I sort of have this personal rule I developed where I don't eat mozza that often during Passover because you know, you can't you know, I've always noticed people who don't celebrate Passover are not going to observe the whole holiday love mozza like when I go to school, and my mom give me a box to keep in my locker. And so people would see me eating the Mottes us or to snack in between classes, they'd be like can I have some can I have some like it's like a saltine cracker. If you don't have to eat the bread of affliction for that long. It's delicious. But if you have to if that's what you got it sort of. I mean, you start the feel it as you are obligated do. Yes. Yes. Yes. No. I'm I'm totally with you people people. Who don't observe the holiday totally love. I mean, they so Mott's all year round. I know this official year radio. What is another favourite Passover food of yours? You can't take the fish again. Okay. No. No, no. That we covered. Matsuo soup is obviously very important to me. Has there been a queer soup night multiple soup? There has I made it I made it once and hundred balls was a lot Maas. But I did it, and I did I did a vegetarian multiple soup. It was great. It was it was it definitely made me realize that like I could not make a hundred fluffy Matsumoto's. It was on hundred denser. I'm. Are you a sinker Florida? I'll go for either one I tend toward the sinkers because what I like to do with my Mozzarella's cooked, the chicken soup, and then actually stuff the chicken into the multiples my gosh. Yeah. I love doing that. And like herbs, so I'm very into into those multiples just by by their nature are going to be a bit firmer because you can't have to lose like you can't stuff a super loose. I can see it falling apart in the soup, which is still Alicia, but thing, yeah, it's a different thing. So I tend to go for that. 'cause I love to like make these sort of deluxe mozza balls, which is definitely something. I like to do for Passover. In fact, I tried to push off the soup making to somebody else this Passover, and I was told that that is forbidden and I must make. Yes. Do you have any family specific Passover traditions that you sort of brought with you into your new? I mean, it's still a family Seder. But is there anything specific to you that you cherish love? Well, something that we've always done that. I've always liked that we it's not food related, but we read we do the four questions these these four questions that you ask. And usually the youngest person reads them, and we always do them in a bunch of different languages. Wow. So that was something that became part of our family tradition. Many years ago, you know, we we've had French and Spanish in Russian, and yet addition German, and you know, just all kinds of languages whoever's there. Yeah. That's nice tradition to ask when? Yeah. Any future dishes? Well, we've always had all these vegetable goals. Oh, right. And so it Kogel is is a bit of a casserole. So it's like this. One pot dish that you can eat in slices, and that's always been part of our sater's. I'm like ready to dispense with that tradition. Right. I'm not I I mean, I love Koogle, but I like own eat it. I'm like ready to go. A little more fine dining on my Sater this year cogos like down-home eating which I love, obviously, this is my food. But I'm ready to go for something like slightly fancier. Okay. Are you ready for our Passover speed round? Yes. Okay. What is your favorite color of those like orange slice jelly candies. Read me to me to what is your Harada of choice. We always put a lot of different hug God as on the table. And we've made our own my family. Oh my gosh. Okay. We're speeding on egg Mata regular Matza egg Matza. What is your favorite Passover song?.

Mott Kogel Matsumoto official Florida Mata Alicia
"passover" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"passover" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"We generally referring to oschkenat's e Jewish food, and it's just important to point out that there's a whole global world of Jewish food out there from Morocco to Tunisia to. Dopey to Italy. And so it's when we talk about Jewish food in this country because a majority of Jews are from eastern and central Europe. We talk about oschkenat's e Jewish food or eastern European Jewish food. So we our company is devoted to specifically to oschkenat's e Jewish food. And what does that mean for Passover who'd one of the biggest things about Passover is that people buy all this pre made food. It's like, oh, I'm gonna get this cake mix, and I'm gonna get this like kosher for Passover, you know, lot Gomex. And then I'm gonna get these the canned soups that are kosher for Passover cereals zero have kosher Passover catch up. Yeah. Kosher about because it doesn't have the corn syrup horrible. I have nightmares about it. It's bad tomato jam exists. Why just eat that? Right. So exactly. So the whole thing is that like Passover food is just food. What we've done in the United States as evidence. I by the massive kosher. I'll is we get so nervous that things aren't kosher for Passover that we wanna buy all these processed foods, and guess what? Like just eat normal food and make food from scratch, and you're gonna have beautiful healthy food. And so just like go a little bit more heavy on you know, on the veggies. If you eat meat goal, a little heavier on those beautiful meats fishes make some things from scratch make pickled foods, you know, for mental foods, obviously, there's a whole lot of ingredients out there that are kosher for Passover because they're just unprocessed. And with actually really interesting is I didn't know anything about this. But I went to a friend's house whose Kabad so she's very or ultra orthodox and the Hrbaty community doesn't eat processed foods on Passover everything that they eat is from scratch. So they actually I had no idea I've never learned about this until I went over for Passover, and I found that they were sort of living a little bit more like we would have in the shuttle's right where they're just like cleaning out their kitchen, and then using simple ingredients straight up food. So I am I am hosting girlfriend, and I are hosting the biggest Seder in our apartment is definitely the biggest Seder we could fit apartment because it's all of the families because they're all of our families live in New York. So it's like, my parents, my brother my aunt, my uncle, my cousins, her parents her nieces and nephews her roses are their kids. My sister-in-law's family my God, it's crazy and Elijah at. Yeah. Oh, ally is going to be now there's like babies it's going to be so much. And so we are in the throes of menu planning as you can imagine. And we've. Got lots of vegetate we've got like a whole swath of stuff happening in. We're actually thinking about being inspired by our trip to Mexico last summer and making Moulay. Oh, yeah. We don't eat be. We're not gonna do beans. We're not gonna do green. Like, this is going to be really use. Oh, no. We're not gonna sort you. Don't. Yeah. So it's like like, we're just we're going we're going culturally robust yet. But I will also definitely make filter fish. You have to I'm gonna make smoked whitefish fish and carrot citrus. Horseradish? Yeah. It's gonna be good. Yeah. And so you're throwing this massive Sater your menu planning what's going to be dessert. Well, I have an answer that question, which is that sheera my girlfriend her family is famous for making little chocolates. So they do like all of these beautiful like chocolate barks with caramel and chocolate dipped things and that sort of the traditional Passover desert. So they'll make like a huge array like ten different kinds. So we sort of have this like bar, you know, where you can choose which candy want. So that's what we're doing. And. It's a perfect way to end the Seder because also at the end of the Seder you've been sitting there for hours. You are you've eaten a lot..

oschkenat Europe Italy Morocco Tunisia United States Elijah Kabad Hrbaty New York Mexico Moulay
"passover" Discussed on Exploring My Strange Bible

Exploring My Strange Bible

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"passover" Discussed on Exploring My Strange Bible

"But just like the author hebrews he sees that the animal sacrifices in this ancient temple they were just the couldn't actually deal with the problem between god and humanity they're just reminders of the problem he saw them as pointers foreword to the ultimate sacrifice of jesus on the crowds who does the great barrier between god and an and broken humanity but not just the sacrifices he says is he looks he envisions the cosmic marriage of heaven and earth when jesus returns and and heaven and earth plug their married to each other at least in the imagery of revelation chapter twenty one and twenty two it's like this marriage of of heaven on earth and god's holy presence floods the entire creation and for sun the flooding of god's holy presence throughout throughout all the renewed and restored creation for some that is terrible news but for others that is the best news they have ever heard and so we in asians the great parties in festivals that the temple in he said he'll be like that it'll be like when all the people used to gather a passover in jerusalem and it'll be like this huge party and there's feasting and there's music and so on how many of you been like a part of a passover festival before or something in full of you mr great party there's music there's all always great food and there should be dancing hill his this is a great huge party and so on and so yes his vision of of the sacrificial system and the fed feast in it and then going on at the temple and he says it's like that.

passover
"passover" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"passover" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Thank you and in fact it's interesting that this is taking place on passover because or mental easter that will figure in two rats right it's a yesterday he he di if in tomorrow he rise again right this yet do you want to go through a couple of the objections gelatin through my i just ride i did want to say that as far as i can see though i mean this is even if you dismiss this thought experiment as mental masturbation of some sort or as being obviously wrong because of you know what up for whatever reason i i i it is super important that decision theory arose from this argument at the very least we can say is there might be rocked the there might be wrong things with the details of the the structure of the rewards and what you choose to put in your little table or whatever but the calculation of expected value were you essentially take the odds that something will happen multiplied by the value of that thing is not only still use it is still considered the fundamentally normal the way to arrive at a decision under conditions of uncertainty can you give an example of that yes for instance if you're trying to if you wanna know whether to buy a lottery ticket to dollar lottery ticket is it a rational thing to do to buy the lottery ticket so what you would do is they will how big is the pot and how many people are playing the lottery so if you calculate the odds of you winning the pot there is a cut off point where if there are few enough people playing and the number is big enough the expected value you literally do expectancy times value and you can save the expected value of this lottery ticket is.

passover