35 Burst results for "Pasha"

Jen Psaki Uses Misleading Vaccination Rate to Curb COVID Treatment to Texas and Florida

Mark Levin

01:36 min | 2 months ago

Jen Psaki Uses Misleading Vaccination Rate to Curb COVID Treatment to Texas and Florida

"And I read your piece from national Review of all places. Isaac Sure. And he points out. White House press secretary Gen. P. Sake is using a misleading argument about Covid 19 vaccination rates and Florida and Texas to justify the Biden ministrations decision. To curb the supply, monoclonal antibodies and effective treatment option for covid 19 being distributed to these states. Now what he's done. Is all of a sudden without even communicating with these governors. He's cut the amount of mono monoclonal antibodies going to Florida by more than half. By more than half. The federal government has only recently decided to take over the distribution of anti body treatments. Which Florida Governor Ron Dissent is, was an early proponent of Abruptly, the Federal Department of Health and Human Services announced. It would be cutting the supply provided to Florida. The administration did not provide any indication of any upcoming limitation to supply during communications between the State Department the day prior, according to the scientists, as press secretary, Christina Pasha. Now think about that. Think about that. Think about a president of the United States who says he's a uniter. You're not Republicans and Democrats. This is a virus, but obviously This is a vile Appalling, unconscionable political

Isaac Sure Gen. P. Sake Florida Governor Ron Dissent Federal Department Of Health A Biden White House Texas Federal Government Christina Pasha State Department United States
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:41 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"Thanks for listening to dictators next week. We'll begin a new season exploring the lives and careers of the most murderous and corrupt popes of the renaissance among the many sources. We use for today's episode. We found talaat pasha father of modern turkey architect of genocide by hans lukas. Kaiser extremely helpful. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from podcast on spotify. We'll see you next time. Dictators is a spotify original from podcast. It is executive produced by max cutler. Sound design by dick schroeder with production assistance by ron shapiro trent williamson carly madden and freddie beckley. This episode of dictators was written by tony goodman with writing assistance by joe gara- and neuro battelle fact checking by adriana romero and research by bradley klein. Dictators stars kate leonard. Richard rosner. Hi it's carter. From podcast every thursday on conspiracy theories c. I a edition. We are uncovering secrets hidden. Deep within the archives of the central intelligence agency to bring you a special collection of episodes from shows across our network. Follow the news spotify original from podcast conspiracy theories c. I a. edition. Listen free only on spotify..

talaat pasha hans lukas max cutler dick schroeder ron shapiro trent williamson carly madden freddie beckley tony goodman joe gara neuro battelle adriana romero Kaiser bradley klein kate leonard Richard rosner
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

06:43 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"To lot. Took the only other option he could think of. He left even though he may have been forgiven for his failure. Considering his ongoing popularity tallaght had too much hubris and too much shame to faces people or to be held accountable so with his massively bruised ego in tow deloitte abandon his subjects and his empire and fled to germany on november tenth. He arrived in berlin the very next day world war one officially ended and more importantly the defeat of the central powers was official to ironically the same day. Talaat arrived in berlin. Kaiser wilhelm the second of germany one of the principal architects of world. War one left berlin. Somehow talaat was tolerated and even welcomed where the kaiser was not. He was given an apartment and financial support from wealthy german friends and supporters in many ways to lots life in berlin. Wasn't that different from his time. As a political exile in salonika in his twenties he founded an organization of like minded people who clung to the delusion that the ottoman empire would rise again from the ashes and that to lots pursued had been a noble one in fact as postwar negotiations began in earnest. Another turkish nationalist movement formed in opposition to ceding land. Or control to the victorious. Allied forces talaat seems to have supported them from abroad urging them on in their endeavors but one of the first acts that they were unable to stop was the recognition by the allies of the first republic of armenia located in the southern caucasus region. The allies endeavoured to finally let the armenians live in peace tragically. That dream was short lived within a few years. One of the leaders of the nascent. Turkish nationalist movement came all auditor took power of the ottoman empire in the process. He founded the republic of turkey and became its first president. Auditor is often credited as the secular statesman. Who would shepherd the country into the modern era but in many ways he did little to distinguish himself from tallaght especially when it came to his treatment of armenians in nineteen eighteen. Kamala turks instigated a partial blockade of food and other essentials to armenia as a result an estimated two hundred thousand. Armenian civilians died two years later in. Nineteen twenty the soviets occupied armenia which forced the armenians to live under yet another oppressive government until nineteen ninety-one when they finally gained their independence while the armenians managed to persevere. The same cannot be said for talaat pasha though he remained something of a folk hero for the new wave of turkish revolutionaries. He was largely irrelevant. After it became clear that kamal auditor was the true future of the country. Toiling in berlin talaat made no plans to return to turkey instead. He spent most of his time talking about the old days and occasionally communicating with came all auditor that is until the spring of nineteen twenty. One on the morning of tuesday march fifteenth. Talaat left his apartment to buy a new pair of gloves a few steps from his apartment. A young armenian named soga mon taylor aryan pass to lot on the sidewalk abban gazing at him. Tay larry and immediately recognized the former grand vizier. A few moments later taylor. Aryan doubled back and started to follow talaat when he was only steps behind the man who had orchestrated the genocide of the armenian people to larry and grabbed a pistol and shot to lot in the back of the head the forty seven year old talaat ex-leader of the ottoman empire died instantly delirium eventually stood trial in germany where he was ultimately acquitted of all charges among those who followed. The trial was a polish jewish lawyer named rafael lumpkin. The same lampkin who would coined. The term genocide talaat. Pasha wasn't the only pasha to meet his end. At the hands of armenians both ahmed shyamal pasha and is smile and var. Pasha died not long. After the fall of the ottoman empire chia mall was assassinated in july nineteen twenty two and in var was ambushed in battle a few weeks later unfortunately the vast majority of turks who played a hand in the armenian genocide escaped justice in nineteen nineteen. A so-called called tribunal was organized in turkey to examine the atrocity although it was acknowledged that almost a million armenians had been murdered. Only three officials were executed for their hand. In the genocide and by nineteen twenty-three auditor passed a series of laws shielding any ottoman turks from additional prosecution even today. The armenian genocide is not common knowledge in some communities despite the staggering statistics that surround the event. The ottomans decreased the armenian population in the empire. By at least ninety percent and up to one point two million armenians were murdered. It wasn't until recently that joe biden became the first american president to openly acknowledge genocide's existence and given that many may not be familiar with the details of the armenian genocide. It's likely they may not know about the man who orchestrated at all. There are many leaders today. Who can be hard to distinguish from talaat men and women who will do and say whatever it takes to to power and hold on at all costs including scapegoating their so called enemies political or otherwise. The approach didn't work out for talaat lot. In the end. Though which should serve as a lesson that cycles of prejudice oppression scapegoating and violence are.

talaat berlin Talaat armenia salonika germany Kaiser wilhelm talaat pasha turkey soga mon taylor aryan Tay larry Kamala Pasha rafael lumpkin lampkin ahmed shyamal pasha chia mall kamal Aryan pasha
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

07:34 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"Able to convince the ottomans that he had defeated their true enemy within the empire. Furthermore he allowed muslims from the surrounding territories to move into armenian homes and essentially replace them within the empire. An effort to re islam affi- his domain and while muslim civilians may have benefited from new spreads of land. It was high ranking members of the c. u. p. and the military who claimed the most valuable spoils for themselves these included more than ninety million square meters of fertile farmland forty thousand buildings and factories and twenty-six mining concessions in fact the mining and cotton industries which had been the domain of armenians where now completely expropriated by the ottoman government in early nineteen. Seventeen talaat was finally and officially named the grand vizier or supreme leader of the ottoman empire. Though he'd been the defacto leader in the preceding years he was now firmly and inexorably in control. And while this might sound like a major event all it really meant was that the unnamed few who oppose talaat had simply given up and accepted him but even with an iron grip on the empire to lot was still fearful that there were enough armenians remaining to either regroup outside his purview or to attempt an uprising so talaat rededicated himself to figuring out how to rid the empire of its remaining armenians in the process of plotting the final stages of his ethnic cleansing talaat was able to seize on yet another event outside the empire. Fifteen hundred miles north of istanbul in the streets of petrograd russia. The bolsheviks had successfully overthrown the provisional government and established a socialist government within months of taking power. The new bolshevik government signed the treaty of brest-litovsk with the central powers ending world war one for russia. The treaty of brest-litovsk actually helped taught ottoman territory which had been previously seized by the russians was given back to the ottomans for talaat. This was a major symbolic and ideological victory. It demonstrated that his alliance with germany was paying dividends. And that his pledge to reclaim portions of the empire was coming to fruition. All of which led to lot to take another page straight out of the dictators playbook and foment his cult of personality despite a very mixed military performance to lot and the c. up began a coordinated effort to portray talaat as the savior of the empire. He had wrested it from the pernicious influence of the armenians and fended off a british naval invasion at gallipoli with this new identity to lot actually laid out a coherent agenda. This included reforming the autumn in legal system and fixing the economy which he and his acolytes had crippled through their own avarice and incompetence meanwhile he was honored throughout germany and austria n. stowed with the order of the black eagle at the time. This was the highest honor conferred by the german government. Now it seemed even the international community was beginning to take him seriously. But the adulation and respect were extremely short lived during this period. Ottoman troops had been attempting to reclaim land outside what was designated in the treaty of brest-litovsk and closer to the middle east. None of these operations were supported by germany and drove a wedge between talaat and his german friends and a more immediate problem for both sides was the entry of the united states into the war within a year. The tide in europe had shifted in the allies favor and after several brutal and decisive victories it appeared that the central powers were all but defeated by the summer of nineteen. Eighteen talaat was at odds with his german allies and watching in fear as allied troops advanced from nearly all directions toward the ottoman empire as it turned out to lots rain as grand vizier. Supreme omnipotent leader of the ottoman empire would be a brief one coming up to the victors. Go the spoils to the loser. A self imposed exile in berlin. This episode is brought to you by delo. Nothing cares better with fight night than the undisputed king of import beer but dentals been the gold standard since one thousand nine hundred. Five appeals made with only the most premium hops. Giving it a chris golden lager taste. It's a beer that came from small beginnings and never gave up. That's the fighting spirit. That's what makes a line which is why it's no surprise that madonna was the official beer of ufc so next fight night. No matter who's in the octagon mishel you choose the beer. That's always in your corner mondello because it's proved for those with the fighting spirit stock up on model for the next fight night head to delo. Usa dot com to shop delivery and pickup drink responsibly. Beer imported by crown imports chicago illinois. This episode is brought to you by the a v. Eight is the original plan powered drink the one that started it all and it says delicious as ever making choices. You can feel good about that help. You live well like using original for convenience satisfying snack one five. And a half ounce can of beat original has only thirty calories but it has one full serving of vegetables and is a good source of vitamins. Anc it's perfect to carry on the go snack or to have on hand after workout shoes. Va for big plant. Power goodness in one. Small can now back to the story for ten and relentless years the c. u. p. party had ruled over the dying ottoman empire at the top of the ladder was forty four year. Old grand vizier. Talaat pasha though. He rarely brought greatness to the empire. His populist posturing and deadly use of propaganda had allowed him to become the most powerful man in the nation but over the course of a few short months in nineteen eighteen that power came crashing down. Initially it looked like to lot could avoid disaster even though the end of world war one was disastrous for germany and austria hungary. Not that much was different in the ottoman empire. Little if any fighting had occurred within its borders and to lot himself was still remarkably popular but by mid nineteen eighteen. The empire was at a crossroads. Thanks to peace negotiations as part of the central powers they would be forced to see territory and subject to ultimately this meant talaat had to admit that his grand plan to restore. The glory of the ottoman empire was all bluster except he couldn't. The prospect was to humiliating so.

talaat brest affi ottoman government litovsk delo germany german government russia petrograd istanbul chris golden gallipoli mishel mondello austria united states
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

08:37 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"The recapture of dearness set up a series of negotiations between the c. Up and the greek government but talaat was intent on going to war to recover previously lost greek islands during this time see. up leg. Breakers began terrorizing greek orthodox christians also known as room living in the ottoman empire. They ultimately forced nearly one hundred thousand people to flee to greece internationally. This aggression against the room seemed to go largely unnoticed and certainly unpunished. But it set the stage for future ottoman lead pogroms throughout the empire. These pogroms would go largely unnoticed since they just so happen to occur. During the largest and deadliest conflict the world had ever seen world war one after the assassination of austrian archduke. Franz ferdinand in sarajevo on june twenty eighth nineteen fourteen eastern europe's conflict with the ottomans took a back seat to the conflict threatening to envelop the entire continent. I the fear of war decimated the european economy and countries began scrambling to forge alliances against the central powers which included germany and austria hungary but for talaat and the ottomans the outbreak of world war. One wasn't that big a deal. Their country had already been at war with its neighbors for several years and its economy was already in the gutter if anything. Perhaps a war presented an opportunity to lot decided that a global conflagration was the perfect background for making new friends and decided to ally the ottoman empire with a more powerful european country. But it wasn't just talaat making the large scale military decisions there were. Two other pasha's involved is smile and var pasha and ahmed. Shyamal pasha ahmed shyamal. If you recall from last week met lot while the two were in exile in salonika meanwhile ish mile end. Var was an early member of the c. u. p. party prior to the sultan's abdication once the c. Up came into power. He quickly rose through the ranks of the military and became the minister of war together. This military minded triumvirate became known. As the three pasha's and while technically all three were in power it was really talaat. Who masterminded just about everything. They did in their infinite wisdom. The three pashas chose germany to cozy up to despite germany agreeing to oversee the monitoring of christian communities in the empire relations between the two governments. Were actually fairly friendly. So the pasha's figured that fighting alongside the germans was a natural step forward. Of course the ottoman military was hardly a powerhouse capable of helping the central powers takeover europe ottoman forces ultimately numbered. Only around three million while germany had around thirteen million. However the alliance with the ottomans did offer the germans. Several strategic and geographic advantages for one thing they could now move german warships into turkish waters enabling enabling naval attacks on two of their enemies. Russia and greece for the ottomans. Meanwhile the german alliance eventually put an end to germany. Overseeing the ottoman christians now talaat and the c. u. p. were free to oppress and persecute whomever they wished. But i the war represented a real tangible opportunity for talaat and the power hungry see. Up to expand their empire all eyes were on germany no one was paying attention to whatever little invasions the ottomans could pull off. But that didn't mean they could pull off much with very little actual military experience to lot. And the other. Two pasha's bit off. More than they could chew the agenda for the ottomans involved a nebulous poorly planned series of invasions ranging from egypt to the caucuses and in almost each case. The ottoman army got absolutely dominated. There was one shocking victory during this period however orchestrated by ahmed. Pasha the battle of gallipoli beginning in january nineteen fifteen and masterminded by winston churchill. The entente powers sought to sail their warships into the strait of gallipoli. Their ultimate goal was to invade the ottoman capital of istanbul. Somehow a rag tag group of german warships and a contingent of ottoman and german soldiers managed to repel the attempted invasion. After a year of bloodshed and heavy casualties. On both sides the entente powers retreated. The battle of gallipoli would become perhaps the most famous modern ottoman military triumph. It was also a monumental in wildly significant victory. that seemed to give credence to to lots nationalist. Populist promises in the wake of gallipoli tell talaat was no longer viewed as a simple pasha or leader. He was now something closer to a savior. One who had earned his citizens respect and admiration and one who could now act with virtual impunity. The ottoman seemed unable to achieve another military victory. Light gallipoli as they suffered defeat after defeat abroad to lot and the two other pasha's knew that it could bring down morale throughout the empire. What they needed was a distraction. Someone to blame for their defeats as we've seen so often on dictators. Every despot needs a scapegoat whether it's the intellectuals or the uneducated the communists or the bourgeoisie the questions or the jews for talaat lot. The perfect scapegoat was the armenians. It's unclear whether talaat actually believed that. The armenians were the only thing preventing him from making the ottoman empire. Great again but what is clear is that he sought to spread this propaganda far and wide. The armenians represented a perfect target. They were a minority. They had already been the victims of oppression and murder and most importantly they had nowhere to run coming up to lot orchestrates. The armenian genocide the c. i. a. They're the first line of defense for the united states analyzing intelligence to thwart any possible threats and keep a safe. Some of their involvements are made public and others arms. hi it's carter from par cast and in honor of america's birthday. We're uncovering the cases you are never supposed to know about in the new series conspiracy. Theories see i edition from international assassination plots and mind control experiments to catastrophic cover-ups and secret societies fit for film sift through the agency's most questioned in controversial affairs each week conspiracy theories. Cia edition exposes the covert operations intended to protect us from conflicts. But end up creating conspiracies. Where does the truth lie where to the lies end. And how much do we really want to know. Follow the new spotify original from cast conspiracy theories cia edition. Listen every thursday. Free and only on spotify. This episode is brought to you by industrious at industrious. They don't want anything to get between you and your great day. That's why you can enjoy a great day at industrial on them. Just go to industrious office dot com slash spotify and book tour again. That's industrious.

talaat pasha germany greek government var pasha Shyamal pasha ahmed shyamal salonika greece german alliance ahmed Franz ferdinand sarajevo ottoman army europe strait of gallipoli hungary sultan austria Var Pasha
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

07:24 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"Welcome to dictators a spotify original from podcast. I'm richard and i'm kate. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from podcast for free on spotify this season of dictators. We're exploring the lives of three despotic. Monarchs who ruled in the decades leading up to world war. One king leopold the second of belgium. Franz-josef the i of austria hungary. And the three pasha's of the ottoman empire. Last week we explored the rise of mehmet. Talaat pasha we explored how his difficult childhood and his disdain. For the ineffectual ottoman sultan led him to form a political movement designed to return the ottoman empire to its former glory. This week. We'll look at two lots role. In leading the ottoman empire through world war one and his orchestration of the armenian genocide. One of the worst atrocities of the twentieth century will also explore how. This event finally brought his ignominious rain and life to an abrupt end. Coming up will return to the failing ottoman empire. This episode is brought to you by castrol edge. Become a legend when you unlock maximum performance. Castrol edge. It's three times stronger than the leading full synthetic so you can enjoy performance. That's totally epic. An oil change. That feels like upgrading from open mic night to sold out stadium tour castrol edge in garage swagger on learn more at casual dot com castrol edge. It's three times stronger. Viscosity breakdown leading full. Synthetic based on kurt open test results. This episode is brought to you. Bomb delo medella was the official bureau of ufc which means is also the official bureau fans with the fighting spirit. That means never giving up even when the odds are against so. You're watching the next big. Ufc fight shore and have a christmas. Delo especially al within reach but delo through those with the fighting spirit heads modesto. Usa dot com to shop delivery and pickup drink responsibly. Beer imported by crown imports chicago illinois. This episode is brought to you by. Va the aid. Is the original plant powered drink. The one that started it all. It has electrolytes and antioxidants but no added sugar. And only thirty calories the five and a half ounce can is a perfect post workout replenishment or satisfying snack. Choose v. eight for big clam power goodness and once small camp for over six hundred years. The ottoman empire was ruled by a single figurehead known as the sultan but after a centuries long decay and a final nineteen thirteen putsch. The once vast ottoman empire was being led by a group of young populists the committee of union and progress or c. u. p. the most powerful and influential of the young populists was a radical named talaat pasha pasha wasn't his actual surname but the designation of a high ranking turkish leader or officer after leading the nineteen. Thirteen pooch talaat became the minister of the interior. This role put his rank. Second to one person. The grand vizier in reality. However the grand vizier was little more than a figurehead. Each and every important decision required to lots knowledge and at least his tacit approval. The key to thirty nine year old to lots approval was simple. Everything had to fall in line with his main focus restoring the former glory of the ottoman empire for talaat and the rest of the c. Up that agenda wasn't the least bit practical. Their military was archaic and disorganized. There was little confidence in the government. Among the ottoman populace and many minority groups were seizing upon the chaos within the halls of government and planning their own independence movements in fact during the political turmoil plaguing the empire. Ethnic armenians and other christians actively sought out help from several european governments. They wanted these powerful nations to step in and negotiate on their behalf with talaat and the c. u. p. Most christians within the empire had been ottoman subjects for hundreds of years but as a minority population in a majority muslim empire. They often experienced prejudice and felt like second class citizens not to mention. They had no representation in the new government after international pressure from europe. Eventually the ottoman government agreed that representatives from germany could outline plan to monitor the treatment of christians in the ottoman empire. Inspectors from neutral countries would be selected to ensure that the ottoman christians were not subject to any kind of undo oppression. They would also help find ways to incorporate armenians into local politics and into ottoman society. Overall armenians were hopeful. The plan seem decent in theory. But it remained to be seen if this agreement would or could actually work in the meantime talaat and the c. u. p. set out to bring back the glory of the empire to do so they relied on. What historian hans lukas. Kaiser has described as a turco muslim definition of the ottoman nation. That was steeped in the idea. That betrayal by non. Muslims had caused the late autumn problems and losses. This nationalist ideology was at the heart of the new regime's policy though. It still wasn't clear what exactly that policy would look like. And then an unexpected opportunity presented itself one which allowed to lot and the c. u. p. to show what they were about in late. June of nineteen thirteen bulgaria invaded. Both greece and serbia. The attack was in retaliation for not receiving enough ottoman territory after their shared victory in the balkan wars a year earlier throughout nineteen twelve four recently independent bulkin nations rose up to claim ottoman land and a year later. Bulgaria wanted more. Tell us this nineteen thirteen invasion as a pretext for an ottoman invasion of his own specifically. He wanted to reclaim the city of his birth adina which had fallen into bulgarian hands likely because the bulgarian military was spread too thin. The ottomans prevailed but in doing so they spent desperately needed funds. That further crippled the already flailing economy money that was specifically designated and earmarked for infrastructure projects at home. But the ottomans had a deer back. So into lots is.

talaat Talaat pasha Bomb delo medella delo king leopold committee of union and progres talaat pasha pasha mehmet pasha josef Castrol Franz sultan hungary austria belgium kate modesto
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"Growing up in poland in the early nineteen hundreds raphael lampkin would witness numerous massacres and systematic expulsions of russian jews. A practice known as a pogrom observing these horrific events was likely what led lampkin to pursue a career as a lawyer specifically one who represented and spoke up for marginalized groups throughout the world. His mission was to hold accountable governments or despots who perpetrated ethnic cleansing or mass murderer as young man lumpkin attempted to alert world leaders to the rabbit anti-semitism sweeping through western europe. Unfortunately he was mostly ignored and when people finally did start taking notice. It was too late by that time. The nazis had murdered six million jews hundreds of thousands of roma and untold numbers of other so called undesirables. It was lumpkin who in his nineteen forty four book coined the term this atrocity is known by today genocide. He wrote by genocide we mean the destruction of a nation or of an ethnic group to denote an old practice in its modern development. It is made from the ancient greek word guinness race tribe and the latin side killing while lumpkin coined the term genocide in an analysis of the nazi regime. His understanding of genocide came much earlier when as a teenager. He learned about another atrocity. The genocide perpetrated by pasha.

raphael lampkin lampkin lumpkin poland europe pasha
"pasha" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

03:11 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"Just came up. Yeah it kind of makes sense. We had fake teeth career. Was the other thing appalachian. Kinda hillbilly style. Yeah it was. It wasn't saying. I really enjoy what you know. What and then i feel. Okay now this one. Will you a cowboy in this one. Those another one. Yeah look i can't remember the title now. I remember it. I'd like i'm pronouncing does to you please. Car tests that. I saw alive on so multi layered right Do i mean. I guess like oh he could do that. Pasha voice but like we get our scripts. What would parts are you. Do you access to tap into these rules. It's honestly it's just it's just you can't put too much forethought into it's a it's more emotional less logic more motion And it's the the logic comes from again going back to what i said earlier. Learning your lines know what you're saying. It's it's as simple as that for good acting. I think i think over thinking is when you get really ham me you know and i hope i haven't done that over the years. I mean not see you. His name is very subject. It's yeah it's just a matter of you know sure. There are instances where you need to understand the more complex character. Maybe you're not familiar with them you. You haven't personally gone through those things that the character is gone through. And in that case of course A little bit of research to To make it authentic again with With issues of ptsd for example You know you don't just show up on the day and it'd be like well. This is what. I think it's going to be like You know out of respect for for the people who have actually gone through it And and it's it's one of those things where each role is unique And i mean it's cliche to say but it Short day player rolls. You know you can learn your lines. It's like hey. I have these files for you now. The plot can progress. okay. I have to go. And that's it that's all you're doing okay. No or require. He landed on his mark. Set his life out of here. Okay okay okay. Okay but like Do you have to love this task..

Pasha
"pasha" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

04:54 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"I didn't realize how much i enjoyed it until i started doing it more. And more and you know you get in front of an audience Theater audiences. It's completely different. Beast film Because it's live and the right there in the room with you And the energy changes every night. So yeah it's That's when i started thinking about. Hey maybe i could do this and get paid to than other people thought so too actually. So like did you. What was it first before film. I like after he got out of school. I was actually. I started working While i was in school Fortunate that way despite my professors prostate But yet no a And a t to their credit. I was horror show to to deal with when i was in how. Oh just you know how it is again. When i was eighteen. Hundred joined the french foreign legion. I come back. i'm like i knew everything. I just just an idiot like just been contrary for the sake of being. Oh yeah and thankfully. I grew out of that and i happen. Like was there something particularly happen to make you grow at or was just time. it was time it was. You know you you deal with a lot like growing up more. When i did when i was a kid and and this is not excuse. But it's just you know you you. It affects you mentally and spiritually and And then living the life of an emigrant dealing with racism all of that stuff it kind of it. mulcher psyche so I was always very defensive. And i had a temper problem when i was younger. So i like because you felt you always to prove something or absolutely absolutely. It's it's one of the reasons that you know i am. Linguistics is is what i fell into an. I love doing different dialects. It's like you know. I got to the point again. This is something. I say when i was younger it was Because people couldn't pronounce my name properly. It's pasha and these pasha wash head. I again would get defensive. And i'd be like listen. If i learned to speak your entire language you can learn to pronounce my would. Let's try.

pasha
"pasha" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Pod 4 Good

06:35 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

"The training night as anyone can be a doctor exactly got so you mentioned you enjoy sports so i'm curious from your perspective when you're watching sports say do watch football so when you see like the collisions and the injuries and stuff like that. I'm just curious. Is it different from your perspective. Where i see it. I'm like ooh that's bad. I mean do you sit there trying to diagnose a decent sit there wondering what's i mean. Thankfully okay thank you. Probably because i was a sports fan. Well before i was in madison. I'm a huge kansas city chiefs fan. And so when. I when i watched the chiefs game. I'm jumping off the couch Brahma hands up there yelling dogs running into the other room. My wife's leaving the room as well. I mean it's that's all in thankfully. I don't have to worry about all that stuff goes also i. I'm not in sports medicine. I'm not an orthopedist. I'm not a neurologist. And so some of that stuff is is just not within my wheelhouse. So that kind of well. What is your specialty rather away. So my is internal medicine. It's the the specialty without specialty of you will. It's it's a good way to put it as an adult medicine specialist so I don't see pregnant women. I don't see children I don't do surgery on but if someone comes to. I'm in the hospital so i don't have an outpatient clinic so when someone comes to the hospital i say happened to monja or their heart failure. My had a heart attack or have an infection somewhere. Chances are you're going to be seen an internal medicine so actually talking about football makes me think that recently the nfl had to real reveal their own implicit bias with how they were Dealing with c. t. actually had Lower cognitive baselines for their african american players and actually that came out and had to change. And it just seems like. That's another pretty big example of implicit bias in medicine where they actually had set lower baselines for different people to determine whether or not they had the medical condition of ct and that was mind blowing. Yeah that one were willing to reveal that but more so that was actually going on in two thousand and twenty one was mind blowing to me. I think they're going to an that. They're going to pay for. It really takes me back to that. Whole idea of stereotype threat And the fact that you know as a black man. Black women up some of us battle with that expectation that we aren't as smart and actually makes me think of this really interesting study if we have a minute Talk about this study. I think it was at the university of michigan and it was about stereotype threat. If you don't know what it is. I think to study. Will shed some light on it. So the researchers set up a miniature golf course and e participants were a group of white students and a group of black students so when the group of white students or to complete the miniature golf course they were told that this miniature golf course was a measure of athletic ability and they found that the for the white guys that attack this course just hearing that it was a measure of athletic ability dropped their scores because of that. Stereotype that white. Men are athletic for the black men. That did that when they were told that it was a measure of athletic ability didn't affect their scores. I at anyway. On the flip side they also told individuals at it was a measure of intellectual ability. And so when they told white guys that hey this is a measure of intellectual ability. It didn't impact their score at all era completed Without any issues when they told the black participants that it was a measure of intellectual ability it did impact their scores. And so i'm what the study reveals is that one stereotype threat is real and so just living with an expectation that argue if you're white man and you're not supposed to be athletic that can affect your athletic performance. You're a black person and you're expected to be Less intelligent back in effect. Into oh your intellect and so stereotype. Threat is something that we talk about a lot in madison because people of color who are in medicine base this every day and we know even if they walk in with identical gpa's and identical. I'm test scores. Their performance doesn't match up. I'm with whites who had similar. Gpa's similar test scores. So disown me clear. So when and that's teddy. When the those black men were told it was a test of their intelligence their scores went down at it. They had internalized. Was territory that pressure. That means that talking about gpa and test scores. They're even if they're the same numbers they're not equal because the the black man black woman had to work even to get that score to work through their own both societal communal and personal biases built in and they achieved those despite those sorts of. Yeah we we've talked about it a lot on our podcast but we try to tell our listeners. That white privilege is a real thing. Doesn't mean that you're a bad person. It doesn't mean you didn't work hard for what you have. It just means that the struggles you had weren't because the color of your skin at you may have had struggles but it wasn't because it may not have been because of your gender or your religion or your sexual identity and somebody else in the same situation would have had to go through the same struggles. You did clus additional ones on top of it. Yeah completely agree in another little pearl last year with the young minds at booker. T. as graduating was that everyone has a window of opportunity. That is hundred percent true. But everybody's window looks different right for some of us. It's big window right obey window. You can walk right through it for others. It is a window that's closing. You gotta crawl through it and some people they'd have to pry it open and crawl through it and so just understanding that privilege again just like i say we have to de stigmatize implicit bias. We need to stick matai what it means to have privilege. We all have privileges right snot. Anything we need to fill ashamed about. This is something we need to recognize and recognized that. Not everyone else.

monja football madison golf chiefs kansas city heart failure heart attack university of michigan nfl booker
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

02:30 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"Still had a few large problems looming ahead of them. They still had no real agenda worse yet. Their final claim on power coincided with an event that would up end the entire globe the following year would witness the first shots of world war one but as ever to lot was determined to turn whatever chaos was heading his way to his advantage even if it came at a very high price like nearly wiping out an entire ethnic group all the false pretense of ottoman muslim superiority and their destiny to make the.

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

06:46 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"The c. u. p. banner even though they hadn't actually done anything besides state of populist ideology and pander to the grievances of ottoman citizens particularly muslim ottoman citizens the nascent nationals grew in number and confidence however they weren't the only people disgruntled by the sultan in the eastern provinces of the empire around macedonia. Ethnic armenians were pretty unhappy with their own state of affairs. The armenians had formed their own organization. That was almost analogous to the c. u. p. called the armenian revolutionary federation or a r f. Except of course that they were christian even though the c. u. p. was predominantly muslim. Talaat believe that an alliance between the two would be valuable and before long. The two groups did form an uneasy alliance with the air of hoping that if the c. u. p. came to power it would grant armenia autonomy as the alliance blossomed. Talaat truly distinguished himself as a leader using his charisma and populist rhetoric he was able to connect with a myriad of military members and low ranking government officials across present day macedonia and albania all of whom were amenable to his ideology. Membership spread like wildfire and c. u. P. branches opened throughout the region by late nineteen seven. The group had even begun to receive international attention especially from europe as we mentioned earlier the ottoman financial sector was controlled by a group of european bankers bureaucrats a group that was growing increasingly worried about the escalating tension within the kingdom so much so that they floated the idea of simply giving the macedonian region autonomy. The idea was faddish at best. But the notion was particularly odious to the high ranking members of the c. u. p. organization. They didn't want europeans deciding what went on in the empire especially if that decision resulted in the loss of more territory. A high ranking c. U. p. member in turkey summed up the sentiment in a letter to talaat writing since the macedonian question is the question of the existence of the turks. We presume that for a sincere government. It should be preferable to take the chance of a great war instead of losing macedonia though. This had only been a suggestion from european powers. One that hadn't been approved let alone adopted by the sultan. The simple idea aroused fury and indignation lot and the rest of the c. Up knew it needed to put a stop to such an idea before it got out of hand. So the c. u. p. breasts fired off a memorandum to the european bureaucrats explaining their opposition to its meddling in ottoman affairs. They also for one of the first times started dispersing something of an actual mandate this included the demand for a constitutional government and the end of the sultans autocratic rule if these demands were ignored. They were prepared to go to war with the ottoman government. The mandate shockingly did not lead to a new government but it did get the c. up categorized as a real threat. The sultans people began monitoring c. u. p. members even more closely but this only strengthened the group's resolve as a result of this crackdown. Talaat decided to go on the offensive. He hatched a plan to assassinate a high level ottoman military commander in salonika which was carried out by a loyal foot soldier on june eleventh. Nine thousand nine hundred eight emboldened by the success of this mission the c. Up decided it was now or never there was no turning back. They began training guerrilla fighters across the empire in preparation for an eventual conflict with the sultans troops less than a month after their first assassination. The group killed a military general senta macedonia to nip any nascent revolt in the bud for the sultan and his government. The murder of the general represented a clear and present threat. Not only that. After the generals murder many disgruntled ottoman soldiers began defecting to the c. u. p. with momentum on their side to lot and the c. u. p. leaders decided to go all in they sent telegrams to the highest ranking officials demanding that the sultan reinstate the constitution of eighteen seventy six thereby relinquishing his complete control of the government and forming a democratically elected body if he failed to comply by july twenty third see. Up troupes would march on the capital. The salton didn't really have much of a choice. his empire was crumbling. And no one not even. Non revolutionaries liked or supported him up. A fight was futile so the next day sultan abdulhamid the second acquiesced for a dwindling empire that had been under the strict control of an autocrat. It appeared to ottoman citizens that things might finally be looking up for the first time in decades people had reason to be hopeful one citizen describing the event years later wrote greeks bulgarians turks. Jews armenians albanians had literally fallen in each other's arms and with tears of joy had embraced and call each other brother but the joy they all shared would be short lived within the next few years. Talaat and the c. u. p. would assume increasing authority they would adopt a hardline xenophobic nationalism. That would herald even stricter oppression and when problems mounted c. u. p. leaders among other government officials and leaders would scapegoat one marginalized group over and over again..

Talaat Nine thousand two groups turkey july twenty third june eleventh macedonia Jews two european first time late nineteen seven greeks salonika sultan europe one citizen abdulhamid muslim armenian
"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

08:36 min | 5 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on Dictators

"From podcast. I'm richard and i'm kate. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from park cast for free on spotify this season we're following the despot monarch who rain just before or during world war one. We've talked about. King leopold the second of belgium. Emperor franz josef of austria hungary. And now we're looking at the three pasha's of the ottoman empire. This week we begin our look at memet talaat pasha who sought to return the declining ottoman empire to its former glory will explore to what's political indoctrination as a disgruntled young man and how he and the young turks overthrew the sultan mixed week. We'll explore how to lot used world war one to secure his grip on power and how he used the raging violence as a pretext to murder approximately one point five million innocent citizens coming up we head to the ottoman empire high listeners just a quick reminder that starting in august dictators is moving exclusively to spotify. Being part of the spotify family means that we're able to bring you more indepth than exciting content than ever before and we can't wait for you to join us. Power read murder. Don't miss any of it. All you have to do is download the spotify app for free and search dictators. Give it a follow and start enjoying. That's it we can't thank you enough for listening to dictators and we look forward to seeing you exclusively on spotify in august. This episode is brought to you by progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget. These days drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars on average and customers can qualify for an average of six discounts. When they sign up a little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today. At progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customer survey in two thousand twenty. Potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations episode is brought to you by. Cvs health if someone you love is at risk of a fall. The symphony medical alert system by cvs. Health can help support their safety at home. With twenty four seven emergency response monitoring. It helps keep an eye on their wellbeing when you can't be there. Terms and conditions apply learn more about symphony at cvs dot com slash sympathy or. Find it at your nearest cvs. Health hub truly understand the ottoman empire of the early twentieth century and the milieu of top pasha's rise. To power is essential to understand the history of the empire and what it used to represent. When rome fell in the fifth century the eastern portion of the empire survived and became known as the byzantine empire encompassing land in greece asia minor north africa and the middle east the byzantine saw themselves as the heirs of mighty rome and in the middle ages. They were the most powerful nation in the world that is until the rise of islam in the seventh century and the birth of the caliphate. For the next five hundred years various arab caliphates in groups throughout north africa. And the middle east began seizing lands from the byzantine by the late thirteenth century. The byzantine also lost control of asia minor. Soon the region became dominated by a patchwork of towns and cities most of whom were adherents of sunni islam until the reign of us man the first around the late twelve eighties. The territories in asia minor began to coalesce into one empire with one true religion under one leader the sultan the sultan existed as the principal religious and political authority and it was under sultan ahmed direction. That the ottomans began conquering significant portions of the decaying byzantine empire. While osman the i was essentially the founding father of the ottoman empire the empire expanded its holdings even more rapidly under his successors murad the first for example conquered huge portions of eastern europe and the balkans. These conquests continued in earnest until what was arguably the crowning achievement of the ottomans. The fall of constantinople orchestrated by sultan mehmud. The second constantinople had been the capital of the eastern section of the roman empire since three thirty see but after a series of corrupt and incompetent emperors as as the devastation of the black death constantinople was on its last legs for fifty three days. Mad the second and the ottomans lay siege to the once. Great city finally on may twenty nine. Th fourteen fifty three. The city fell. It became the capital of the ottoman domain and eventually would be renamed. Istanbul with that the byzantine empire was gone. And the ottomans were indisputably the most fearsome powerful and respected in existence. The next hundred years perhaps the most distinguished in the history of the empire especially under the rule of sultan suleiman the magnificent from fifteen twenty to fifteen sixty six. By the end of sulaiman's reign the ottomans controlled large swathes of land which spanned three continents. Shoe lehman also turned the ottomans into an economic powerhouse. Not only did the empire forge alliances with a number of european kingdoms it also controlled a myriad of trade routes including the silk road which connected asia with europe. It was a true golden age but every ascendant civilization must experience a decline after suleiman's passing the momentum of the empire reversed by the early seventeenth century. The once booming ottoman economy was stagnating. Much of this was due to the fact that european traders discovered new routes and could now circumvent the ottomans and avoid their taxes and fees at the same time wildly expensive naval wars against the spanish and venetians decimated the ottoman treasury. And although there were some victories the cost was much greater in terms of money and blood. There was however a brief moment when it looked as if the decline might be turned around from sixteen twenty three to sixteen fifty six during this period. A unique phenomenon occurred in the empire. The sultanate of women for three decades several of the sultans wives essentially lead the country. This occurred primarily because they were two successive adults sultans who died after only a short time in power and were succeeded by their sons. Who are too young to rule on their own. Their mother's then helped rule on their behalf and once the trend started some of these women also became de facto leaders at home when the grown sultans were engaged in battle the most notable accomplishments from this period besides enormous empire being run by women was the investment in infrastructure and public work projects throughout the realm. The empires defenses were also strengthened with fortress fortifications but the sultanate of women and it's productive rain came to an end in the late seventeenth century after one. Ill fated endeavor. The empire's decline started accelerating rapidly once again in the summer of sixteen eighty. Three ottoman troops attempted to seize vienna from the habsburgs and didn't go particularly well. In fact the siege led to a series of protracted battles that came to be known as the great turkish war. but for the ottomans. There was nothing great about it. The great turkish.

richard fifty three days early seventeenth century Three early twentieth century fifth century world war one late thirteenth century eastern europe today two thousand europe seventh century islam kate progressive dot com Istanbul This week six discounts late seventeenth century
"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Both of us are women of color. And you know we had our own struggles. We were fortunate. Run a newsroom. We were able to have mentors people that were willing to work with us. So what we want to do through on. Pj pj school on through in publishing side of Project is to provide that mature and be able to help give those skill sets and them to hone their the writing skills a little bit. Better take it to the next level. We see ourselves launching pad. The ultimate goal is for our writers to be trained enough that they can get there stuff published in mainstream publications. And we've already been really fortunate. A number of our contributing writers have been published in the washington poster san francisco public presser wash projects. We have a really great group. That's already starting to benefit from the of doing inside..

Pj pj school washington san francisco
"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

05:31 min | 7 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"And you both much. Those answers are really great. And it's cool to hear about how you sort of came from different but similar starting places and then found each other with prison journalism project at san quentin news And i am really interested particularly in the development of the curriculum and sort of the nitty gritty behind the scenes of prison journalism project. Because obviously you know if you go to your website you see the great stories that you publish journalism but also poetry sort of other things. But i'm curious about the other side how you provide incarcerated writers with this training. So i'd love to hear you talk a little bit about how you develop an carry out the training and how you also sort of tailored this teaching to the particular difficulties of Writing in prison both of us are actually still teaching behind bars and you the pandemic hit everything. Shut down but we are still doing it. Yukari is with north western operas in education progresses. She's doing correspondence course. I'm teaching via zoom inside the loop one of the local county jails here in pennsylvania when we think about education. We realized that we're working with. The population has buried on backgrounds in terms of educational attainment. So we try to do is Really sort of keep it straightforward. We're the process of creating Will be called pj. Jay school is a correspondent. Space course that relies on modules that. Break down the different elements of on journalism from lead writing to observational skills..

pennsylvania Yukari both san quentin news . Jay school pj one north western
"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

04:42 min | 7 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"While we're not sitting there and deliberately advocating one thing or another. We believe the work that we do allows our men and women to advocate themselves. And i think that's where the power lines give them the tools give them the ability to write their stories to learn how to get it published in mainstream publication. We're they're going to be up against people that don't believe them or don't believe in them and yet they're able to do it with such strength and truth and power that people aren't interested in that and that's where change happens with over two point three million individuals behind bars the size of a small country and fewer than ten prison news publications. The united states is incarceration. System is an information desert exorbitant. Censorship practices and lack of internet access. Constrict the free flow of information through the walls leaving correctional facilities vulnerable to the spread of fake news and conspiracy theories and without the power to attract public attention for human rights issues in prison. Furthermore incarcerated writers often encounter significant roadblocks to developing their own internal news sources by and four people in this system. The field of journalism is an endangered run. Its decline only exacerbated by the covid nineteen pandemic as cova spread rapidly and devastatingly through the country. Much about its course behind bars. Deaths infection rate safety measures at cetera was kept hidden from the public. The pandemic has emphasized the need for credible journalists imprison who can provide communities with news about what is happening behind bars. Prison journalism has forced accountability from the system itself yukari kane and shaheen pasha founded the prison journalism project at the onset of the pandemic to help revive educate this car social media desert from the inside out providing incarcerated writers with the tools training and pathways to publication. They need to establish themselves as credible journalists both pasha and began their careers as journalists eventually expanding into higher education when they met. Cain was teaching at san quentin news. The only newspaper in the country fully operated by incarcerated writers pasha had launched various immersive and collaborative journalism courses behind bars. And this works of justice. Podcast interview pasha and kane speak about their respective paths to co founding. The prison journalism project at a critical moment in the covid nineteen crisis. I'm francis cohen pen. America's prison justice writing fellow and. Thank you for listening. I of course. I just wanna thank you both for taking the time to speak with me today. I'm really excited to hear about your work through and beyond Prison journalism project. So my first question. I wanna know if you can speak a bit about your respective paths to getting involved you know. I in journalism and then journalism behind bars and eventually to founding Prison journalism project amac and go. I see car if you for me. I've wanted to be a journalist. My whole life because i love telling stories so it was something that i've been planning for since i was five years old to be but When i started out my career I started out in business journalism and legal news so i covered a lot of court cases and You know corporate fraud things like that. Nothing really to do with criminal justice in the non white collar. Since i worked for places like no dow jones wall street journal and cnn. But for me. Even though i covered these court cases i covered the supreme court. I actually really became involved in this world when it actually touched by became one of the millions of people who actually has a loved one who is incarcerated in my case..

kane Cain today san quentin news first question yukari kane millions three million shaheen pasha America both pasha five years old one francis cohen pen over two point four people jones wall street ten prison fewer
"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

03:34 min | 7 months ago

"pasha" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"While we're not sitting there and deliberately advocating one thing or another. We believe the work that we do allows our men and women to advocate themselves. And i think that's where the power lines give them the tools give them the ability to write their stories to learn how to get it published in mainstream publication. We're they're going to be up against people that don't believe them or don't believe in them and yet they're able to do it with such strength and truth and power that people aren't interested in that and that's where change happens with over two point three million individuals behind bars the size of a small country and fewer than ten prison news publications. The united states is incarceration. System is an information desert exorbitant. Censorship practices and lack of internet access. Constrict the free flow of information through the walls leaving correctional facilities vulnerable to the spread of fake news and conspiracy theories and without the power to attract public attention for human rights issues in prison. Furthermore incarcerated writers often encounter significant roadblocks to developing their own internal news sources by and for people in this system. The field of journalism is an endangered run. Its decline only exacerbated by the cova nineteen pandemic as cova spread rapidly and devastatingly through the country. Much about its course behind bars. Deaths infection rates safety measures etcetera. It was kept hidden from the public. The pandemic has emphasized the need for credible journalists in prison who can provide outside communities with news about what is happening behind bars. Prison journalism helps force accountability from the system itself. Yukari kane and shaheen pasha co-founded the prison journalism project at the onset of the pandemic to help re vegetate this car social media desert from the inside out providing incarcerated writers with the tools training and pathways to publication. They need to establish themselves as credible journalists. Both pasha and kane began their careers as journalists eventually expanding into higher education when they met. Cain was teaching at san quentin news. The only newspaper in the country fully operated by incarcerated writers pasha had launched various immersive and collaborative journalism courses behind bars. And this works of justice. Podcast interview pasha and kane speak about their respective paths to co founding. The prison journalism project at a critical moment in the kovic nineteen crisis. I'm francis cohen pen. America's prison justice writing fellow and. Thank you for listening. I of course. I just wanna thank you both for taking the time to speak with me today. I'm really excited to hear about your work through and beyond Prison journalism project. So my first question. I wanna know if you can speak a bit about your respective paths to getting involved you know. I in journalism and then journalism behind bars and eventually to founding Prison journalism project amac and go. I see car if you for me. I've wanted to be a journalist. My whole life because i love telling stories so it was something that i've been planning for since i was five years old to be but When i started out my career I started out in business journalism and legal news so i covered a lot of court cases and You know corporate fraud things like that. Nothing really to do with criminal justice in the non white collar. Since i worked for places like no dow jones wall street journal and cnn. But for me. Even though i covered these court cases i covered the supreme court. I actually really became involved in this world. When it actually touched home..

pasha Yukari kane shaheen pasha co kane America francis cohen san quentin Cain dow jones wall street journal cnn supreme court
Who Laps Whom on the Walking Track, Tyrannosaurus Rex or You?

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 7 months ago

Who Laps Whom on the Walking Track, Tyrannosaurus Rex or You?

"One has ever seen tarinah source walk. Still movies like jurassic park have guessed how fast it would have done that now. Scientists have used the skeleton of t. Rex to model the bio mechanics of the animals stride and they've estimated its dreaded at a leisurely pace on par with humans. Ostriches elephants and giraffes. And it's not just limited to those animals. Horses gazelles news. Turns out that actually. Most animals don't tend to walk. Superfast pasha von beyeler is a movement. Scientists had variety university in amsterdam. His team studied the skeleton of not. Rex housed in a dutch museum. The specimen nicknamed tricks is exceptionally well preserved. So they were able to. How ligaments would have attached to and linked to the animal's tail bones. Those ligaments they would've acted like rubber bands and the researchers used mathematical modeling to study. How they would have given the tail bounce as the t. rex. The animal could have taken advantage of that natural bouncy rhythm to save energy as it moved that is basically resonance you get more movement for less effort if you choose to correct rhythm at which you do things so that helped estimate the beat which t rex would have pounded its feet but to determine speed. They still needed to know how far each step was and to do that. We found fossilized track way of a slightly smaller through sword. Skilled it up to the size of our t. rex and that gives you a step length. Multiple is step length by step rhythm and you get a speed of one point two eight meters per second or about two point nine miles per hour. The results were published by the royal society. Von bildt says he's seen a lot of headlines stating that humans could have outpaced t rex. Not so he says. Once the animal started running. I guess we should be glad that there's a lot of time between us and t-rex

Superfast Pasha Von Beyeler REX Jurassic Park Amsterdam Von Bildt Royal Society
Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies to meet at Citizens Bank Park

Atlanta's Morning News

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies to meet at Citizens Bank Park

"Shortened 60 game season last year. Baseball returns to the full slate of 162 games. The Braves Open in Philly today is W S. B. J Black reports. There's unfinished business. Atlanta's rebuild its rotation with the additions of Drew Smiley and Charlie Morton, who quickly see the Braves formula. So good dudes that just buy into what's going on. It's very rare professional sport where you have so many different guys that they all like each other. And Freddie Freeman anchors and elite line up with Ronald Akunyili, while Max Freed gets his first opening day start, was excited. Something that you dream about something that you work for top prospect. Christian Pasha is also rookie of the Year candidate. But the division is much tougher first pitch just after three around 9000 fans will be in the stands in Philadelphia today. The brace will allow about 13,000 for next week's home opener.

Braves Drew Smiley Charlie Morton Freddie Freeman Ronald Akunyili Max Freed Philly Baseball Atlanta Christian Pasha Philadelphia
The Delicate Rebellion's Hannah Taylor on supporting her community's creative passions

Media Voices

06:06 min | 9 months ago

The Delicate Rebellion's Hannah Taylor on supporting her community's creative passions

"Hello everybody welcomes. This week's episode of media voices with the media focus podcast. It takes a look at all the news of the views from the medial past week. I must've thought that you just had was for my view. West hannah tila phone for the delicate mobile. A biannual independent print magazine creators collective focused on sharing experiences. How to get on independent field we spoke of how uninspired teachers land hana eventually stop own magazine carnage and women to all of it creative pasha. I love it. I love it. The best motivation to do anything is spite pop to begin with. We're going to do the news roundup. I want the two of you to pitch me. That's because while behind in principle. I don't see how it's going to practice. So twitter has announced paid super follows which are going gonna let you charge for extra content on its platform so follows that acquisition of new south platform review of ago. Which have said press going into this kind of subscription mentality and it's effectively. One of us are hit atrium but linked to your twitter account. That was going to say. That's my quick. What form is this actually going to take. Then it's not. Just it's not just gated access to tweets is it. I know i think it's i think it's about the freeth i've seen used a law is bonus content right so i think it's accessed other stuff. Additional stuff basically patron. Yes but with tegas or literally just like. Hey if you subscribe to this one-size-fits-all subscription thing then you'll get access to are the no drafts of things on writing or exclusive blood. Can you match access to earn released any details yet. Because i'm not really got time for launch. They just kind of floated the idea and at the end. This is what i call on the horizon. It's i think it's at the moment that said it's bonus tweets access like community groups and also announced like a community feature get the interest and policy usual. Twitter reaction was like the r.i.p to a hashtag that has been i swear to god. That's been going every time to has noticed any change for the past decade deb. When they went to two hundred eight character like this just the through twitter. Yeah so this is more. This is more tackle than just a new feature. This effectively away of i suppose helping people monetize twitter. There's also this that. I didn't onto as policy policy. You can also access to a newsletter subscription which is where the your view acquisition comes in. So that kind of trying to tie on. And if you're somebody like i suppose. Casey newton for water better example you can follow case in the entree to subscribed his news hour to get bonus connecticut community around his newsletter and because they will own the a platform loan a great new set. Apart for ill then be a way to kind of tile together around individuals. Yeah i think the the the package i spent to this is what's important not. That's what the twitter reaction seemed to be. People thinking that was going to make people pay for tweets say okay. Yeah that would kill the so. This is not the point now. Never feel competence websites free. And it's like well. It doesn't have any after you can help support. Your favorite creator is everything was moving. that way. anyway wasn't it. People are always looking for new ways to multistorey in hard heart created content. And this if it's tying into review an is offering bonuses. This seems to me something. That's some certain the southern people could potentially use well. I don't think it's for everybody. Yeah definitely so for instance. I do because everything i do is what's is garbage. I was thinking it depends on how you to the way we used to Typically is to respond to the people. See this is good. This is pod chip something other people that know. They've got phuong. Twenty tweet threads the half go insane value. Yes certainly and you know. This is a bunch of different tools. The people to round. But this the unroll feature where you can up great moments out sort of one long article almost so in a way if you can switch gate some of that behind the pay-cut not make sense for those people. As he said. I just at the the idea of paying for tweets. I'm reading up behind. But i think the community group that needs to subscription that i can see working. I mean is is one of these things where we're we're in. The bubble suit doesn't help people are looking at this from such bubbles perspective that i'd like to know what like a normal since the event normally. Yeah one of filthy moguls saviour exactly. Yeah some. I don't think that's what the twitter trenches day after day after day we go we go on about newsletters and actually most people. Most people don't get newsletters. I think you've got to see this as a beggar. Twitter play. I think twitter is collecting. Just is face because tunnel. War is collecting the best but all those pupils social media platforms you know this the newsletter pot of it and then those the audio part of the over and then they've also was it spaces so that that's that's the version club has a composting. Yeah and then if this community idea so it's a bunch of stuff coming together here that if no timeframe on any of that stuff but if you look twelve months or eighteen months the facts create interesting.

Twitter West Hannah Tila Casey Newton Pasha DEB Connecticut
Aus Open Day 6 - Silent, subdued, but intriguing

The Tennis Podcast

04:19 min | 10 months ago

Aus Open Day 6 - Silent, subdued, but intriguing

"Think today day six over the twenty twenty one australian open the first fully crowd list day. I think today was the new year's eve house party that you feel you have to gauge new year's eve show up. You do the rounds for a couple of hours and then you sneak off to a bedroom and go to sleep or it's just the hangover the day after we sit there and just drink cups of tea and no answer any calls the hanger day off to the the banging nights out the ends in where you're just gonna sort of pick up pieces and clear mass. Yes i came. That may be works better. And wait for your next party in a day's time it's the regroup day. It's fresh as week when you when in my case you have one thing and you're saying that's it you can just have a normal week and then you gotta do again the next night but so what you do. Is you just insert little arrests days. Yeah don't understand human beings. The enjoyed fresh week genuinely look back and say i enjoyed freshers week. I didn't understand human level so they walk among us. Catherine apparently say it's not but i didn't enjoy today i just dino it it just i mean there were no crowds. We need the. We're going to be crowds that that was a shame How how much. How much was the fact that there were no quarrel to contributing factor. To the fact that today was a was a bit of a dump squib. I mean this has been the dump squib hof of proceedings burnett. We've we've we've made to conceal that on the podcast. You know there have been highlights will will big those up as best we can on today's pod but how. How much was it the crowd. I think it was definitely parts of it in that. You know we're all. I did feel a bit of a downer just because yesterday was so exhilarating and and it has been such a lovely failing to have crowd noise again. Because we've we've been went out and delivered this last week so that that was in the back of mind. I mean there were moments. I compensated in the way that i would've done with the crowd and then there was silence and i had to say oh i forgot. There's nobody here quite open because it's you might as well just be honest and admit it's weird. It is weird at the same time. I feel like for people like us certainly me anyway. I shouldn't speak few too. But i just i'm so i love watching sport so much when it's when it's tied and when the stakes are high the not having the crowd gives me something else and we. We definitely tapped into that at the us open and through some of the other events because kind of we. We didn't have any choice. It's either embrace that or be down about it all and if you actually listen and watch especially today as this was the first match i've ever seen of nadal at a grand slam. We had the two but at a grand slam especially with the little question marks about the back and all that sort of thing and being being pushed as hard as come pasha possibly push him. I loved just watching dow compete in this role style without any cut-away as to the crowd or anything just so pule to be out to. I felt like a like a sneaked into private match and could just watch. And and so i got something from that and i was intrigued by some of the matches exhilerated. Not really and it is. It is more pure than other slam tennis or any tennis that we've seen without crowds because they weren't prepared for this. There's no attempt to conceal the empty seats. There's no crowd noise track on standby it is exposed before your eyes and is

House Party Dino Burnett Catherine Pasha United States Tennis
P.E. Teacher Becomes Full-Time Sports Gear Reseller

Side Hustle School

05:36 min | 10 months ago

P.E. Teacher Becomes Full-Time Sports Gear Reseller

"Today in our latest feature will hear from a teacher who buys and resells sports gear. I love to look at stories of simple reselling. Because as i said simple. These are very simple projects. That are important to highlight. Because it's something that most people can do if you're out there and you're like totally new to the whole world. This is a great thing to jump into. I think The guy we're going to hear from. Today matt his total startup cost with something like one hundred dollars actually makes his first profit by selling his own stuff like his own. Jerseys kind of reminds me how. I was selling my own items from around my apartment more than twenty years ago when i got into this kind of thing and eventually for him. He ends up going all in with. This action retires from teaching to focus on his re-selling dig his businesses. Going really. well he's doing up to eight thousand dollars a month or so. He's managed this all throughout the pandemic of course so he's got some good lessons about time management etc. Now we. I heard from matt nearly two years ago in the original story Let's now hear directly from him. And i'll come back at the end. Perhaps share a story or two from my own re-selling years little quick trip down memory lane along with some advice for you. If you'd like to get into this to no matter how much you sell ship station makes it super easy to manage ship your orders from all your sales channels faster cheaper and more efficiently. They have been helping many of our listeners. For four years now ship station you'll spend a lot less time on shipping a lot more time growing your business in no matter where you sell amazon oetzi. You're on website. They can funnel all your orders into one simple interface service from a great company. That as i said i know has helped a lot of our listeners. You can ship more or less time with the offer code hustle. Get your sixty day free trial. That is two months free of no hassle stress free shipping. All you gotta do is go to ship. Station dot com. Click the microphone at the top and type in hustle that is ship station com offer code hustle. Make shit happen. My name's matthew myers. We are located in indianapolis indiana on the north side of town. My side hustle from seven. Twenty seven was kevin's lockouts instill as epa clubhouse side. Hustle is a resale sports in store. So i essentially. I had goodwill's stores scrap sales markets and then essentially resell gently used sports fan gear. And it's pretty much anything ranging from palace pros From both ear to cycling ear to winter jackets could be anything from maki North face to to the old nineteen ninety a starter jacket. Everybody has the chicago bulls one that we all grew up more so i always try to find the brand. The brand names let everyone tries to buy but off discount and then obviously compared to larger with nike and medicine and things like that. So essentially i just i go to stores deal mainly for stores buy low sell high and try to offer big products to people and it seems to save to be working where people are always gonna be wearing that either to a game and obviously you really go into games right out. During a pandemic people like wearing that stuff going on their favorite team. I started this back in two thousand seventeen of between teaching jobs. I left my previous school for a new teaching opportunity. But i was also unemployed needed cash so i kinda just sold things on the side that i wasn't using it like an old jersey so i sold an old chicago cubs jersey for seventy bucks tonight. Said well you know. Maybe maybe something to this. So i'm going to sell an i. I probably had thirty forty jerseys. I want i sold them. Georgia this cycle a mortgage. And i was like okay. Well they sold pretty quick. You know maybe maybe this is something. I can actually take off and run with and actually create business but you know between north korea and mainly will be clothes. I've been able to manage to make profit enough where i can officially retired from teaching. And make this slimane hustle. I before i left. I needed to see the numbers on my end of a meghan. You know five six thousand a month okay. You know sales growth sales. So i knew that i was it. Was it was a good enough jump to to try to make this full-time gig. And i'm lucky to last year's at it has even with my biggest challenge right now is that now. It's time time time though is going to be a challenge. I think i think a lot of people will tell you that My my i love working at night. And i'm kind of like a night out precise so i'll let you everything done late at night. Then as morning hits you know it's hard to get up at seven eight o'clock and try to figure out you know. Hey i need to get all this stuff done before. I don't know four and get my orders out so just trying to be more productive trying to be better on my time. Let's old spent my biggest challenge and going into this year. I wanted to really make make that my project per se of like you know what it's time to get up. It's time to be productive. It's time to get to the stores. The fun part about all this is that you can go on thrift and you can go and find all the stuff. The hard part is get it all up getting listed getting measured and then getting shipped out with someone. That's that's always the nasa art so just trying to balance both has been tough but again realizing that this is my full time job like there is no teaching job anymore. They're in snow. Kindergarteners coming in for p. Like just to be completely focused on everything. I think so far it's only been seven days of twenty-three one pasha thank you so much matt really appreciate that update So glad to know what's going so well you've been able to make it your full-time gig check out. Matt's shop it's kevin's clubhouse dot

Matthew Myers Matt Maki North Chicago Bulls Indianapolis Amazon EPA Indiana Kevin Palace Chicago Cubs Nike Meghan North Korea Georgia Nasa Pasha
St. John's shuts down No. 3 Villanova in 70-59 upset

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

St. John's shuts down No. 3 Villanova in 70-59 upset

"Pasha Alexander scored sixteen points in St John's help third ranked Villanova to thirty two percent shooting in a seventy fifty nine upset of the Wildcats Julia champion he scored all fourteen of his points in the second half as coach Mike Anderson's team won its fifth in a row D. backs nobody knows we get rid of Facebook say this is it's a great challenge it's a great opportunity we took the challenge on them now during the week we made it work the owner of a committed seventeen turnovers in ending a nine game winning streak the Wildcats fell behind fifty eight forty one with about six forty five left and we're held twelve points below their previous season low Caleb Daniel scored sixteen points for Villanova and Jeremiah Robinson Earl had fourteen I'm Dave Ferrie

Pasha Alexander Wildcats Villanova St John Mike Anderson Julia Facebook Caleb Daniel Jeremiah Robinson Earl Dave Ferrie
As COVID-Safe Becomes Table Stakes In Hotels, Real Wellness Can Be Your USP

Trent365

03:22 min | 1 year ago

As COVID-Safe Becomes Table Stakes In Hotels, Real Wellness Can Be Your USP

"A property. Covid safe is something that just about. Every hotel is focused on right now and rightly soy and a big part of that of course focuses on the cleanliness and the hygiene speaks which is great. Because it's something we should have probably been lot more focused on in the past anyway. But as i mentioned that's table stakes. That gets you into the game. It's not enough for you to be able to stand out. You need to take it a step further. And that's where. I genuinely believe in spoken about this a few times but i generally believe that real authentic wellness in a hotel is something that he's going to allow those hotels that have it to differentiate themselves it is potentially going to become a major us p. for these hotels now over the last probably five years or so there's been a number of hotels that have dabbled in this idea number of hotels that have created different wellness concepts most of them. Frankly haven't really been that great that i've seen the haven't really addressed. I guess the broader picture of wellness. They eat the bean sort of product late. And they've been a little bit gimmicky or they've been program lead and they've been fairly superficial now spoiler alert and a little bit of full disquiet not full disclosure. Actually pasha disclosure. Because i can't tell you all about it yet. Because i haven't actually launched but i have heard about a new concept that is coming online very very soon hopefully in the next few weeks or so i think they're gonna launch which i think as done a great job of marrying those two concept's partially product partially program and on a lot more comprehensive and holistic level than i think has been done before so that's a big saudi news. I'll let you know about that in a couple of weeks once these guys launch. But i do believe that there is an opportunity for hotels that do it right that do it authentically and genuinely that really capture the essence of wellness in a hotel room. And it's all the elements the air. It's the water. It's the materials it's the sound it's the light. It's the the heat all of those things in a room that make up a living spice plus the water of course in the bathroom. All of those things become become part of your wellness experience. If it's done right. And i actually think two thousand and twenty one and twenty two especially a probably going to be a bit of a boom time for these hotel. Wellness concept's if they don reid. I also think the consumer consumers now smart enough to know the ones that are doing it right and not so. I think those that have tried the gimmicky stuff in the past will probably be found out those that are genuine and authentic and comprehensive and holistic in what they put in place. I think you'll find that is going to be a massive. Us p. for pretty much every hotel not just the high end hotels but all hotels resorts city all hotel levels and brands probably more so in the higher end brand i guess the higher end bracket i mean sort of the full five star hotels but i do think it's a big opportunity. What are you reckon. A let me know in the comments below. Be really interested to hear your thoughts on what you've seen in the past way you think it's going and if you think like i do a real wellness concept inside a hotel not just in the spa but the whole hotel is actually a good idea and actually going to become a us pay. Let me

Pasha Don Reid United States
Over 4,300 Doctors and Nurses Sign a Letter to Patients on Climate Change

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Over 4,300 Doctors and Nurses Sign a Letter to Patients on Climate Change

"This week more than forty three, hundred health experts from Colorado. In all fifty states published an open letter urging people to demand that elected leaders act on the Climate Crisis Sabrina. Pasha. With healthy air and Water Colorado says, healthcare workers are seeing the damage firsthand and points to research showing that women of color are bearing the brunt of negative reproductive health impacts linked to climate change because they're so disproportionately exposed to poor air quality and higher temperatures. These women are experiencing lower birth weights, more stillbirths and more premature birth. When the topic of climate change comes up most Americans. Think about melting glaciers and polar bears. They don't see it as a health

Colorado
Fostering A Culture In Talon - With Sean Zhang - CEO & Cofounder at Talon Esports

BIG Esports Podcast

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Fostering A Culture In Talon - With Sean Zhang - CEO & Cofounder at Talon Esports

"Really true. So what other question then see said that you're operating seven different teams is that will under the banner or multiple different brands. It's all under the talent umbrella. The only one that's slightly finished the PSG talent league of legends team in Taiwan but they're all under the talent umbrella we have. The same consistent approach when it comes to remain performance management approaching. The second half of this year has actually been incredible. The games that we're in we're close to being I or delivering championships super excited by. But yeah, it's all under the talent umbrella consistent sort of performance management. and. That's why we've been able to have good results across all titles verses like. Other teams might sponsor teams where they basically have existing teams and just whack the logos onto it but we're not believe is that because we feel like you know the culture that you drive the value that you drive and the ideas around the philosophy. I think us to be controlled by us because that's the value that we provide. Right. So for example, we have the play come in I. Want Him to be able to think all the team I want him to be able to take feedback I want him to be somewhat humble and I want him to have the good work ethic because if you don't have those things as know as well like you know doing a lot of sport, Jiu Jitsu and weightlifting if you don't have those basic things in sport and the same in East sports. Impossible to be successful, and so for us, it's like we want to control that and also having we've made the mistake before just sponsoring teams then just like we can't control likes. How often their training? What time they waking up other following systems because often they're not and then you get really mixed results since we found that doing it ourselves, controlling it ourselves without coaches are sort of systems that we have in place to control things. Is actually a lot better because it reads a lot more consistency just one of the main thing. Interesting yeah I mean it you know it's obviously worked for guys pretty well in illegal agents and I guess like. I think it's good study for anyone to look at like the golden five and six one point six with like Mayo and Cuban and lauded and pags era. You know these guys will except for Pasha. Those guys were together for the best part of Ten Years Hall Unin Pasture I think for maybe six or through everything through when there with A. Box when was vote as pro with whatever I say came from says one point six into sky and to retain like that you could say that a Lotta this strategy because they're attained wasted a lot when I was a semi pro player, their strategy was to make it a three v three situation always win because I been together for so long they synergy was so great. So in the clutches in the trays fully foles they in advantage when it comes to the situation, they are pips boot machine because otherwise like. It with my team Sammy pertain that I had in Australia without reaching those hots we always had trouble getting a fifth plan for exactly the same reason you talking about we had full people who are very on the same wavelength we were all massive nodes is in we used to study the game like mad more. So than anyone else in that Thomas especially and we very tight knit but we always had trouble finding that fifth and when we finally found that right fee who had skill to were able to qualify for a life whatever that we played, but it's interesting to say you're saying that you know it's the. It's definitely not the way that most teams attacking it. If if at all, they'll build it around one stop Playa saw an article come out from Tame sacred say saying if you were to do it again, would you do it the same way? He said Yep the way that I did it in the why do it again was? One of the best players in the world or the best poppy, and then it'd be able to tame around him and that's what we saying value right now you know they'll pick up. Ace Blitz Organization will announce the new roster, which is actually is one. Inside they're going to build around that I. Did. You know anyone else in the market doing what you guys are doing in that respect. In our region. I know I know like, for example, like the the Korean teams have very much orientated towards like. They find their own talent. In, talent out I think there's a good academy system. They're both fully legends and overwatch. I think within like Hong Kong Taiwan. In some but I think honestly, this sort of our our speed, let's say we take an example right? We got into that game November of last year. We got a first championship in the first six months we won the MSS which like a an event between Vietnam. We lost the final this time, which was a little bit disappointed qualified for well. If I, compared to some of the other teams should talk them a little bit but like. They've been around for like five seven years and never got a championship within the LMS or within the region, which is l. combined to become the yes and so i WanNa say think that what we're doing in. Like. It makes a difference because it shows that we're able to speed up very quickly and we were able to basically bring together a bunch of guys like the guys that we have with illegal. Of course, they gripe plays individually. Bebel meshed together into something that. They've been at previous teams like our juggler. Midland is we're at previous teams in the lms that never won championships, but they came here and they won championships and even overwatch team yesterday Korean contenders. Top of Group A we went through trials we came from Pacific where no nineteen bunch of players that people thought these guys will as bins and they played a big success. But came to us, and then we've been put our approach to coaching into it. Now, they like really would play collectively as an individual. So I think like for us one of the biggest things I think which is on his all the coaches that we hire like we get guys like want to die basically full the team and work incredibly hard. Also WanNa be like fathers. Because in the end, it's like if you look at it top coach, it makes everything difference and if we have the same philosophy around. Work work ethic ability to take feedback being humble. All those things just add up and I think. A lot of emphasis on that I think we've put a lot more emphasis than any other team at least within our. Region saying, Korea, a lot of teams are doing a really good job when it comes to Kademi building talent. Yeah I feel like. Just sponsoring the team. It's just like kids. Yeah. It's hot. You know this too much room for lock and in our business it's like we want to be able to deliver championship because right now at this stage when all the biggest sports team in the world where like to small to medium size one, one of the best. Methodologies is to deliver championship. Boca, seeing a lot more on that

Taiwan Ten Years Hall Ace Blitz Organization Hong Kong Taiwan Vietnam Mayo Sammy Boca Bebel Thomas Korea Midland Australia Kademi
5 Washington DC summer camps canceled, leaving families confused

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:21 min | 1 year ago

5 Washington DC summer camps canceled, leaving families confused

"Summer camp. It's one of the few things still happening during the pandemic with restrictions, of course. But last week, D C leaders denied waivers for five camps to operate and didn't give a clear reason why it was one of the things to look forward to ing around with wires. And then there's not much really happening, but 10 year olds on specialities excitement deflated after her dad got an email Friday evening from her FC Barcelona soccer camp, saying Camp R. F K fields with cancelled Monday. This has been Of the few highlights of the year. We were still looking forward to when we were really excited that this was still going to happen. Staff at FC Barcelona say they trimmed the camp down to 60 kids had a safety plan in place and we're ready to go when the city denied their waiver to operate Friday, W GOP obtained the letter that went out to atleast five other sport camp, citing exceeded the mass gathering limit of 50 people. But Dad David Pasha, He got a different reason in his cancellation. Email selling us. The campus canceled because events DC, says there's a spike in covert 19 cases. Chris Rodriguez, who runs DCs, Homeland Security and Emergency Management Department, says any camp of the sport with medium to high contact between campers was denied a waiver. It's just they called it last minute and I was all ready to go on everything so it was really sad read more w GOP dot com Meghan Cloherty W

GOP Barcelona Camp R. F K David Pasha Chris Rodriguez Meghan Cloherty W DC Emergency Management Departmen
The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
Don't Call it a Brain in a Dish!

a16z

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Don't Call it a Brain in a Dish!

"Hi and welcome to the as Sixteen Z. Podcast I'm Hannah and in this episode general partner. Vj Pond Day. And I talk with says you. Pasha professor of Behavioral Science at Stanford all about a new technology we have for Understanding Brain Disorders. The Wild and Very sci-fi new frontier of brain organizes so what our brain organizes were they developed. And how can we use them? The conversation starts with the essential problem that we've never had real access to the tissue and actions of the developing brain or even living normal brain and the problems with all of our existing models for understanding it from genetic studies to autopsies to primates. We look at those models we've relied on in the past and what this new model of brain organizes now brings us allowing us to study the human brain both how it develops and what goes wrong in certain disorders with living human brain cells in a dish for the very first time we talk about what these organizations can do and can't what they're good for understanding and where that understanding becomes limited and. Wi calling these mini brains or brains in dish. Isn't the right terminology at all and finally how far this new tool model might be taken now and in the future and how it will lead us closer towards one day even perhaps understanding psychology itself on a molecular level. We're here today to talk about understanding brain disorders and some of the new tools were developing for how to do so. So let's start where we actually are in that. Are we actually anywhere significantly? More advanced than we were in the days of hysteria. You know thinking about things like labeling these sort of conditions idol conditions that we had no clue. Where are we actually right now? Psychiatric disorders are still behaviorally defined and there are very few biomarkers. That are considered reliable diagnosis. The truth is that our understanding of psychiatric disorders is actually quite limited. I often like to joke that I suffer from an Oncology Syndrome which essentially this deep frustration that you feel as you see just like how fast cancer research has has gone in the few decades from really like no treatment whatsoever to almost completely curing certain forms of cancers. And if you look carefully. Did you realize that one of the reasons for this? Incredible progress is that on college has really made use of the revolution molecular biology and it has done so because it actually has access to tissue to the tissue of interest we know almost nothing about how the human brain develops. Because it's it's completely inaccessible. And so again we are defining psychiatric disorders based on combinations of behaviors presence or absence or certain patterns behavior. We've made a lot of progress into classifying disorders and reclassifying them. But the truth is that our molecular understanding of psychiatric disorders of brain disorders more. Broadly is very limited And probably behind any other branch of medicine which I think is reflected in the therapeutics that we have And the complexity. I mean. It's fun to think about like you know in the eighties molecular biology. Was this hot new term. I mean you're talking about something. Almost like molecular psychology raking this big sort of emergent phenotype that is a behavioral and then trying to connect it noxious at the tissue level. Not just at the cellular level but all the way from molecular level. That is a hard thing to do. It's hard to imagine someone has schizophrenia or severe depression. What's the target to hit? You said something really interesting about just never being held back by not really having the tissue and you by that you know that we the first time we get to look at the tissue is after somebody who has suffered from a psychiatric disorder has died right that is our primary obstacle helmet. Yes and there are a number of challenges associated with studying postmortem tissue from patients. Of course the obvious one is the fact that the tissue is not a life. Yeah for me as a neuroscientist is really important to be able to record. Electrical signals from sells really look at hard communicating with each other. But at the same time another limitations actually the availability of tissue. I mean if you were to just think for instance evolved autism spectrum disorders which is very common one in sixty or so individuals and there is even an autism brain back but the number of brains that we have in a brain bank is really in the hundreds not thousands for disorder that is still and it's probably for adults to read it's right and other limitations actually age of this individual but very often also the cause of death because in most of the cases actually traumatic yes and most of psychiatric patients will take many many medications and other goal various therapeutic interventions across their lifespan. We don't know for instance. What is how is that influencing what we're seeing in postmortem tissue so you're getting a very small amount of information that may not even be accurate or very anecdotal. Yes and that's the only tool that you have at the moment besides behavior. Well I think of course are imaging studies that you could use. Mri and functional. Emory's problem with those studies is that you don't really get the molecular resolution. You don't get to really study. The tissue an alternative which has been using the last decade or so has been to model many of the disorders with animals. That has been quite an exciting field that was primarily accelerated by identifying genes associated with psychiatric disorders of. But I think we always have to be aware of the differences between Between species right even in how the brain the structure of the brain the fact that there are millions of years that separates us in evolution and the behavioral repertoire is very different across seas now. Of course they're the behavioral repertoire is much closer to that of humans but as you can imagine again the limitation there is. How scalable isn't that? How many primates can we really use this type of studies and who can afford to do this experiments on our scale? The truth is that most of the psychiatric those have a very complex genetics. It is very rare like one single gene or one single variant but often a combination of this. And it's not just obviously about the jeans but what are the cells and the circuits that are affected by this and I think that only once we start to understand some of the molecular machinery behind the psychiatric disorders. Can we as it happened in the cancer? Fueled Star thinking about therapies. That have been designed for specific disorders rather than identified by chance. Because many of the drugs that we have for psychiatric disorders today have actually been identified by chance

Pasha Professor Of Behavioral Vj Pond Day Hannah Stanford General Partner WI Cancer Oncology Syndrome Schizophrenia Emory
Pam Shriver - US Open finalist aged 16, winning Olympic Gold, and partnering Martina Navratilova

The Tennis Podcast

09:52 min | 1 year ago

Pam Shriver - US Open finalist aged 16, winning Olympic Gold, and partnering Martina Navratilova

"Thank you so much for doing. This is an absolute treat to have you come and yeah in very strange circumstances obviously for everybody in the world not just the tennis world. You're joining us from California. I believe how how things over there. How has lockdown? How you coping the situation and the lack of tennis in La Lives. Well I would say over all I'm really proud of my three teenagers at a time. When teenagers want to distance themselves from their parents. They've accepted what has to be done. I feel like California in the mayor of Los Angeles I live. We live in Los Angeles. So we've had some leadership both at the state level and and at the city level that has been really strong very consistent and I think that's one of the reasons why Are Part of the United States is actually done much better than expected in pleased that the generation who the order to stay at home. It's really counterintuitive to what they want but There's been a lot of acceptance in I can tell you as a homeowner sixteen years ago bought up property with a private tennis court. Tennis court is one of the reasons why a couple of us in the family have kept better sanity. How much you missing professional tennis right now? Well you know I missed Indian. Wells would have been an easy drive. I missed that one. The most I will tell you because of the business of my home life regardless of a pandemic or even if I'm just driving my three kids around and The the level of detail that I would follow the tour from week to week is not as detailed as it would be like when I worked for ESPN at Melbourne and maybe look the weeks leading up to Melbourne. I knew what was going on in the lead up tournament so for me personally. I haven't missed it that much but we haven't yet gone past one of the tournaments. I think would impact us the most which would be say for for me. Roland. Garros Wimbledon. I mean I thought the tennis will did a great job of I mean it was tough call for Indian Wells. I remember that Sunday night when it was called It took everybody by little bit by surprise but it just started the domino effect of what this virus in the effects on the world sports It just started a series of closures around the world yet studying to look like a very pristine cooled by by that tournament. Looking at your Your social media. You look like you've taken the opportunity during lockdown to have the most neatly and cleanly arranged trophy show in all of Iraq in Pam. Yeah one of my first during lockdown one of the first things I was thinking. Well little things can I post What content would be interesting and I thought all right well. My mantle pretentious fans would be interesting to see The the major championship doubles trophies. Most support try one with Martina. There was a US Open with a net. Pashas vary of there was some Fed Cup stuff. There was recognition of our Grand Slam doubles year as well as the year. I got the finals of US. Open in singles at Sixteen. So I thought it was kind of a fun tour and I guess most of the stuff I posted that one had the most views in. I think it just shows you how much people want to see one way or another or or touch any way major tennis. He absolutely in all of these things that that you just mentioned there. I I really want to talk about. I in first and foremost your your partnership with Martina Navratilova. Seventy four doubles titles together including Twenty Grand Slams. You're you're still the most successful women's doubles partnership of all time. What what made you such a great partnership the too well. I think there are a lot of things I think when you look at how we played our singles The style of play with serve volley back in the eighties. That was kind of. That's how you play doubles back then too so it was really Our our singles games translated into being great doubles players. Naturally the lefty righty combination. If you look in tennis history whether it's nukem Roach whether it's the Brian twins whether it's McEnroe Fleming There's a lot of great Lefty righty doubles teams. I just think you know the choice of who serves the sun's tougher righty. There's just a lot of things that are beneficial to having a lefty righty Our personalities you don't have a partnership that long if your personalities don't gel well We enjoyed each other Our senses of humor clicked in. There are a lot of those matches through the years where we would play after. Martina was the featured match at night So we played and we had to wait late night tennis So if you didn't enjoy each other and our coaches got along. Well obviously we had teams. That were much smaller back then. My team was generally just one Martino. It's one of the first that brought in teams of more than one But our team's got along well and so it just led to who knew that January eighty-one with lead to what it ended up leading to it was I think ultimately nineteen eighty that Martina. Kool G to US could be your your partner partner. What do you remember about that? Phone call was at Deer Creek Country Club in Deerfield Beach Florida having a late practice and I'm a member. Lee Jackson longtime referee for the tour and She came out and You know years and years before anyone has self owner yet said Martinez on the phone and I mean whoever is practicing with the it was the practice was abandoned Iran in got it got on the phone. And W T tour office and You know she asked me. She doesn't mix her words. She didn't learn a lot of pleasantries. Just asked me if I had that commitment to doubles partner for the next year and I said no I did not. I had just the. Us Open just a month prior. I'd gotten into the finals with Betty Stove in Betty Stove his last tournament. And we lost Billie Jean King and Martinez. I think it was six six or five and five and I think that was probably the last indicator. Martina needed that. She she she was looking for. A younger partner was starting. Her career could play for a period of time and so it was obvious it. I didn't even have to break commitment. Thank God because if I'd had a commitment to somebody I mean that would have been a tough a tough one to pass on playing doubles with Martina. So I'm glad it worked out that I didn't have a commitment to a partner confessed to a tip off from for Mary Carillo but she has suggested that that I ask you about asking Martina to sign a cocktail Napkin to seal to seal team together forever. Yeah well we had already been together a long time because we we. We went through a stage at think Springtime of eighty four. We lost in the tournament of Champions in Orlando. We didn't lose again for over two years so I think it was. One hundred nine straight matches When we hit a one hundred wins and it was in Eastbourne so the tournament director George. Tendon threw a party for us that night. And we were celebrating To to the history of tennis no one can remember doubles team ever hitting one hundred wins in a row so A I decided to take that moment. I wrote a contract on a on a peeper. Napping it says I'M MARTINA NAVRATILOVA. Promise always to play doubles with Pam. Shriver and I had a witness line. The George Hendon was signed in as I stood up to give the toast and give the contract Martinez in my head ended up in a lamp shade so it was kind of like it was funny and it was. I have that I have. I still have that cocktail napkins somewhere. But it's back in Baltimore. My hometown Collecting dust but will not be thrown out. One hundred nine matches is is truly extraordinary April nine hundred ninety three to July one thousand nine hundred five did you did you feel. Invincible is a team. Well a lot of those matches we went into the matches knowing we were going to win them. But there was a handful that were incredibly dicey and I remember one in particular that was Right in the middle while it was about win number seventy five and it was in Madison Square Garden against our longtime rival. They were generally the number two team behind us. For many of those years Souckova Elena Sakaba Claudia. Coda kill and we came down to a tiebreak in the final set and I remember it was five. All it was late in the tie-break whenever I was returning and Martina just said return it low and I'm going to go and I'm like yes ma'am you know like you WanNa. That was great. It was like a plan now. Of course then you still have to execute but I remember as soon as I hit the return like that's going to be a low. It was a good return. Sheet timed or poach perfectly. Put It away and then we won the next point on serve so that was the hairiest moments that was when we came within two points of losing. But other than that. I don't remember match where we were like. Matchpoints down we. We won a lot of those matches during that streak in

Martina Navratilova Tennis United States Partner Martinez California Los Angeles Betty Stove La Lives Souckova Elena Sakaba Claudia Wells Garros Espn Melbourne Roland Iraq Orlando Billie Jean King
U.S. signs peace agreement with Taliban

BBC World Service

07:02 min | 1 year ago

U.S. signs peace agreement with Taliban

"Well you're listening to weekend on the BBC world service let's change gears now too at an event that's been making headlines this weekend and that's what happened yesterday when the United States and the Taliban signed a historic agreement in Doha the capital Qatar which could bring closer an end to the fighting in America's longest ever war the deal follows a weeklong reduction in violence in Afghanistan with the Taliban the Afghan army and U. S. led forces promising not to carry out major attacks against each other president Donald Trump welcome the agreement but warned the US would go back on its decision to take troops out of Afghanistan the Taliban didn't uphold its side of the deal I really believe the Taliban wants to do something to show that we're not all wasting time if bad things happen will go back and let the people know we'll go back we'll go back so fast it will go back with a force like nobody's ever seen well joining us now from our studio in Oxford is Lucy Morgan Edwards she's an expert and author on Afghanistan one of her books is called the Afghan solution she's also worked as a political adviser on the country to the European Union Lucy what do you make of the agreement signed yesterday good morning as I'm I mean essentially the agreement seems like it's a it's a bit of political fix and it's that where it's a little bit early to be trumpeting this as a major success story it looks like a win win for the Taliban because they get to have five thousand prisoners released R. and they've agreed to scale down violence I mean at the moment it's the winter season this is less violence anyway the Americans have agreed that they're going to remove about for eyes well they're going to go down from from twelve thousand to eight thousand troops but this is going to be over time and since they're not actually withdrawing all of that troops I mean certainly not before the US election so it's starting to look a little bit like it's a bit of a bit of a the background sort of deal going on between trump and the Taliban but can you argue that that most agreements are political fix there's going to be a win win on both sides for it for anyone to be interested in signing something of course but I mean I'm fortunate with this deal they haven't included a wrong which is a major use regional player it's absolutely essential that Iran has to be included the Afghan government have pretty much been precluded from the agreement as well awestruck Ghani the that the president that the president off honest on has unfortunately I mean I understand he's not getting on well with on my father's side who is is leading the talks for the US but gonna himself has actually broken the high peacock high peace council which was the structure that that that had relative credibility to to partner in the talks and so is is as essentially left himself without without a structured to represent his own side in this so you know unfortunately we're leaving a country if if if if the west does move out and I certainly don't believe that the the Americans have any intention of leaving Afghanistan then with with such leaving behind in all K. state and everything that that that the doctor the doctor that implies and I understand that provincial council street those seats in in Kabul trade for something like five hundred thousand to five million US dollars because there is so many benefits attached to them so there was very very embedded corruption the the reconstruction efforts as if if one goes to the special inspector general the cigar and look out to the the the failure zone on the re construction side and on the corruption when you look at some of the reports its ups absolutely horrifying what's what's been going on and of course the massive increases in poppy and violent civilian casualties I mean the Taliban last year the Taliban there any hundred ninety five metric tons of poppy produced as it said the that's blossomed to to mmhm something like twenty five times note that for many many months many many multiples of these it's it's two thousand eight hundred times now okay Sir what yes I'm we leaving behind in all K. state if if we do indeed go Julie Norman yeah and this year is it fair to say that what we saw yesterday was really just I'm kind of a stepping stone to unlock the real part of the peace process in terms of being trapped any talks that will hopefully start later this spring and is is that a fair way to look at the absolutely yes it's very much a sort of announcement before any of the meat has been had decided I mean it's it's a sort of structure a framework which needs to be filled in you want to write to me and what do you think it will take to effect change in Afghanistan political changes stable change I mean in my opinion the problem is is that the Pentagon and the CIA are up to the next in the drug trade as our other intelligence agencies this is like our America all over again that we had in in the far east in the sixties and seventies of the Vietnam War so if you talk about women's rights and democracy if you could get the framework right which is the international engagement is completely I mean Afghanistan is it's really the sort of cash cow for CIA black operations around the world with with that with the puppy trade and this is all this is all being the sort of hidden side of this intervention on which the media not reporting properly and but not those of us who what's the or wearables and we were you know when I was working for the European Union ambassador in the the E. U. plus cliff as we were we were getting information about drug tools that will going through different borders and so on and and we were trying to convey them to to to the US to to the government and so on we were basically being asked to to stop talking about this I'm white and Lucy why do you why do you think that is simply because because you say it's so lucrative that's why this is really been one not discussed very widely it's one of the most lucrative trades in in the entire world and of course it's very easy it's very easy to hide poppies easily tradable it sits on the black market it's it's I mean that's why they brought back the warlords in two thousand one there were many other alternatives I mean one of that which I would write about in my book about up to hawk who had made deals with with senior Taliban and with with the tribal leaders and even warlords to to fold the Taliban regime through an indigenous peace process an indigenous Pasha and of course that wasn't wanted it it's much more it's it's this is hard to geopolitics this is you know because I was born in his family of a close relations with the CIA he's you know who's his education in India and is of course important regional player in this but term you know that the very sad story about Afghanistan is really the complicity in corruption

United States Taliban Qatar America BBC
Tall Stories Presents Eleftheria Square, Nicosia

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

06:12 min | 2 years ago

Tall Stories Presents Eleftheria Square, Nicosia

"Eleftheriou Square was never square it was actually a breach not connected the Old City with the modern city although if they ask where were never actually square biki events happened there air during the twentieth century some of these events had their significant historical and political importance there were protests there were also oh police got rallies and most recently became an area for people to gather and make facilities and sports events so you to it's important position in the center of the Old City of Cyprus you've got people every now and then to celebrate the bridge something so in the conscious of most of the people and mainly the people living in Nicosia was a square the fact that the there is a lack of public space in every scene Cyprus and this is also the case for Nicosia I think that this led the authorities to who consider the redesign of this bridge as a square in order to provide an important public space which has a significant importance for the people and I think they still this competition as an opportunity to provide the public space where didn't exist before the competition took place in two thousand five it was the first international architectural competition for Cyprus until then all copetition uh-huh were for local architects this was the first time that an international competition took place and this fact signifies thing that the local authorities thought that this product 'cause one year earlier Cyprus joined the EU so there was this notion in the atmosphere sphere that we're now joining the European Union family we want to proceed to words that direction so we want to do let's say promote more modern and the more Western let's say profile have been was still alive when care of his won the competition Titian back in two thousand five and what the report of the jury mentioned about her proposal is that the proposal stunts out for storage analogy it's contemporary style as well as for the successful creation of an uninterrupted flow between the areas within and outside the Old City this project pays also respect to the Venetian walls because the design from Zaka architects was that the square somehow it's form echoes the form of the bus John Davila which is next tweet when the proposals to the competition where displayed publicly weekly I saw that there was a public debate started about if this project is what we need a displease in February two thousand twelve the construction started sh and it was supposed to finish two years later now we're seven years later rates are in two thousand thirteen a major financial crises she'd Konami of the country this hut caused also some delays relates the project but at the same time everyone realized this project done by a prestigious office based in London an international office many technical challenges and technologies that were never before tested in Cyprus so this has caused of course a delay there were many delays because all the financial crises close the lack of money because of the technical complications and now we're at the final stage maybe we are some months before its final completion s crystal Pasha's said in a recent interview crystals push east from Zaha Hadid architects the project manager from the office you salsa recently said in an interview that this project was the longest executing projects he has done in the office and they have done many many project so far much more complex much bigger but although he said that it was a very tough procedure the long procedure he's feeling very optimistic that this project has also so brought a new era in Cyprus and your way of constructing thinks in Cyprus his confident that when he called the public people will embraced if God didn't want the project if another artistic project with another project I'm more or less sure that similar debatable be around it if it's the right thing to do if we need the square there or if it's forum it's okay if the material it's fine like we see similar cases in many cities in Europe where you have strong historical presence in the city and he's he's trying to do something new rednecks tweets in my opinion we have seen in many cases in history many projects that hug significant importance phones in the local societies although there were criticised lots during construction the final outcome and the final conclusion was made after after people and the local society starts to using so I guess that this also goes for three years square it doesn't matter so much to talk talk about the statistics about materiality about design about history as long as the project still not functioning to I guess wait for the project to finish and then start using it and then let it become part of our life and then we can make our own

Eleftheriou Square Seven Years Three Years Two Years One Year
Everything You Need to Repair Summer Hair, Skin and Nails

Art Beauty

12:06 min | 2 years ago

Everything You Need to Repair Summer Hair, Skin and Nails

"Remember your Selfie Bockel with the bless when you stayed at my house yes so I was trying to do a random act of kindness risk because one of the girls of the salon wanted to try as Makka Macho tea with Mac much so she was like all Gung Ho she wanted to try. Try was like all. I Have Amazon prime. I'll get it for you forgetting. You need a minimum order of Lake for free delivery. I'm like looking you like it depends on the item true. It was four ninety nine. I'll maybe what is it. What is the minimum. I feel like I think it's it's like this team. Maybe it's fifteen. You're right that sounds about right so I jumped and got some scrubs. Somebody's GRUBS and I found by accident at at whole foods these they're called Pasha soap company and its creamy whipped soap with calming arniko extract. That's as the calming one. It's it's whipped soap with exfoliating minute wait so you got it at on Amazon Prime at whole whole foods I was thinking trader. Joe's I was confused. Got It. Yes you got it through Amazon prime from whole foods totally get it at whole foods. You don't have to be a primary known to you know we love him. Okay but is one hundred percent knockoff of wet. You loved in my bathroom is while the lemongrass one. which is the charcoal clarifying sort here? Oh Dog Nas smelling right. Now is cucumber seaweeds taking feel so it's a little too little ready but when water hits it at ladders like unbelievable. Oh this charcoal lemon grass magic bliss Heiferman. Why would they call it charcoal lemongrass. Lemon Grass peppermint now lemongrass definitely Jessica Simpson moment like his lemongrass pepper may thing you dyed my hair brown otherwise people would know the truth okay so you can get this on at whole foods or Amazon Private Pacha so company and it's the we're we're smelling all they have to clarify one. which is charcoal lemongrass Intikhab more though the best was like six other sense six other? There's a law in the line this one Dead Sea mud smelling Dead Sea man. I'm excited because I think that was going to take my spray. Spray Tan off how you like that one. I think so I think I will because I think like this like I'm on the last Hurrah of the Spray Tan at the little blotch so it's time for me to a hack it off. Isn't it just like tumor. lovie immerse over so is this summer by youth by the way. Oh no forty four 401 happy birthday so great in fact by the time all listening to this I will be gallivanting somewhere between Mykonos in Florence so don't cry from Argentina. Yeah no looking so bad but forty so anyway. I'm going to talk about my shelf which I found from my other travels this summer approved by Ryan and I want you to know I really go to Ryan all the time and my can I use this this on my hair so I was traveling and I needed a curling iron but when you travel internationally even if you have a converter you need to have have hot tools that can take to the dual voltage so t to twenty volt or two forty volt depending on where you are my good old T. three curling. You're not one ten I already blew one of those out once and it was like one hundred and fifty bucks to replace. Oh Mama wasn't making that mistake again so I found this also so on Amazon it is by Medina M. A. D. E. N. I A. to one hair. Straighten are and curler travel curling flat iron duo voltage. It has the ceramic plates tormo lean. I was worried that it might find my hair Ryan. You gave me the okay yes but I said be careful when it all turned on by accident. If you turn a curling iron on in you go to use it as a flat iron and you touch the outside you you're we're. GonNa bring a so so I want to say that to basically it's not to areas that you turn you turn this thing on and probably if you had a more expensive one it would be but this was twenty nine at third 29.99 great by it gets my seal of approval so you turn this on the whole barrel heats up and there's like a little little switch on the side that you push one way if you want it to be a crawling arm with like the clip that locks and it locks it so that you can clip it and then if you push it the other way the curling rolling aren't splits down the middle and opens up and then is your flat iron. It's brilliant. I don't I didn't understand why they don't make all of them like this but I'll tell you girls else. You need to flat iron your hair from the very top. This is not going to be for you because if you think about a curled barrel when you open it up you have to leave a little space because the outside of that curling iron we'll bring you right so now for your hands they do make protecting gloves they usually come with the wands and they come with a crawling but you can get those on Amazon to Lampton voles glove coverage. I just got a silly wand at Costco on the go and it had like these cute little like finger gloves. I was like okay. I'm still going to burn my pinky when I'm looking at the at the pictures that they have is their display the grow with curly hair you can totally do that and I did that this girl with the straight hair you can't get straight from like an inch away from your head down because crime yeah but but it's great but a mini thought iron could still do routes it could but let's let's be honest when you're traveling or at least when. I'm traveling internationally now. I need all the space I can get either so this is a godsend. It's two in one and if you need your hair that straight like you pull it back in a ponytail out. Oh you sat your hair like an abundance for the first half of the days that it's straight at the root yeah also the the Carribean Express that you did for me. Yes die you love it really glad it's so great and it's part of the reason I wanted to talk about all of the stuff that we did over the summer yeah all of the negative if things to our hair to our skin all of the abuse it's not that it's negative all the abuse that her hair skin now body takes will. I will tell you I make so so much money sep- September because every single client now we jumped because of your birthday. We really did the Shebang on your hair so you don't till that way right now but everyone else comes in semi charon goes my hair feels like crap yep rights so oh. I have this like this overhaul hair thing and I think everybody needs at least two inches off yeah cut it cut it off two inches and then lowlights lowlights or rich in the tone a little bit and lowlights as a reaction to the highlights the brassiness talking about also your hair gets really bleached out from the Sun yes it. I don't care if you're a Brunette. I don't care if you're a redhead. I don't care if you're blonde it. Everything's light so laureen marine and or the saltwater exactly so runs ten foils of lowlights evenly spurs her head or just paint a few piece paint a few to pieces of lowlights through your hair and then conditioning treatments and continuing it at home for like two weeks and your hair will be back to normal. No we had done the Ola plaques yeah about that in an old episode I actually had it as one of my shelf is because I liked it. You bought it at Sephora. I think it was like thirty thirty bucks but they do an insulin treatment with that they do so. It's an oil base treatment. It goes in your color. Okay 'cause then you bleed. Chuck is if you're getting into the low lights is at the request of possible. Shore can absolutely request. Olo Plex in your lowlights and you can apps now. They have some take home treatments as well that are bomb right so they're a little heavy. They are a little bit goes a long way. I like to number three which is the number six which is like a new. They've come out with a seven yeah because six was not great. Well it was heavy wasn't good for you. Good for some okay. So what do we think about carrot and I was surprised when I came to you. Midsummer was like I want to. Redo the carrots and again and you're like girl. You were living your best life. If you're in the saltwater you're in the pool. That's not good for the Carrington at all what strips at the salt it yeah it. It's it's a coating on your hair. That's going to take the coating off faster. Is something that we might WanNa do again in the fall or is it like give it a rest. Give it a rest. You have a definite you have two coats on your hair the lousy personally but I'm saying like for other people do care to normally and you can do you can do a full cartoon treatment and you can follow it up with expressed. Don't don't do it again. Come fall chill out. You'RE GONNA break your hair off of it. You're like other people can do it amber back away from the Carrington model. Oh okay so while we're on the topic of hair. I do want to address hair removal because the fall the fall is the best first time to start your hair removal. How ever you have to make sure that your summer Tan has completely faded. Yes because when you're going link to do any sort of laser treatment the laser is attracted towards that dark pigment and if your Tan it's not going to be able to tell the difference between your skin and the unwanted pigment and you're going with Burns but we do know that it takes ten full months to have a full six treatment cycle of hair removal because you're going every six weeks except this is a good time to book for. Let's say act HCT one or if you're really really good and you didn't get any sun on you can start it now but if there's even a little bit and I know that because listen I wore SPF. I slapped it on. I was at fifty and seventy being in sunny locations. It doesn't matter it really doesn't so okay. Let's actually talking about the skin and the skin damage image. You actually look good though thank you. We're really careful. I am I yes. I'm I'm insane I I don't Tan I burn pink or get read and then so my tan is always sprayed onto always say I say here all the time so for me you turned on me onto super groups. Vail love it the invisible the invisible so I always do I do that that I do a little makeup that I spray the supergroup supergroup like makeup setting spray with SPF again. You told me that won't listen. I believe in layering SPF because when I went to Aruba I was using the super goop full disclosure. It says that you need to reapply it and I how reapply when you have makeup on so that's why did the spray because you know what the Super Group is. Invisible commands. You can put it on her makeup but I'm talking about over. I don't work to the beach to the ball. I had a hat on and larynx. SPF never about idea but if you are going to be in a sunny place you also need to make sure to

Amazon Spray Tan Ryan Selfie Bockel Dead Sea Jessica Simpson Costco Gung Ho Carribean MAC JOE Argentina Carrington Sephora Medina M. A. D. E. N. I Mykonos Chuck Lampton Burns Florence
"pasha" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"pasha" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

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Muslims gather in Mecca as hajj pilgrimage begins

Clark Howard

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Muslims gather in Mecca as hajj pilgrimage begins

"More than two million Muslims have, started the hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia Muslim pilgrims greet each other and chant prayers as they circle the Kaaba smells down. Building in the court of the great mosque it MAC, tens of thousands of security personnel have been deployed for the pilgrimage which in years past has been marred by stampedes fires details. Such incidents this year have launched a smart Pasha with apps to help pilgrims with everything. From class medical care tell her CBS

Saudi Arabia CBS