21 Burst results for "Pascarella"

"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:54 min | 9 months ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

"Spent an awful lot of time talking about the heart. Today. Let's move up about a foot and a half and spend some time with the brain. That's the topic of today's academic Minnick. What if you could control something by just thinking? I'm Dr Lin Pascarella. President of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, and today on the academic minute been he, professor of biomedical engineering explains. Mind Control is no longer science fiction. He brings computer interface O. B. C is a device that allows the individual to control emerging or computer just by thinking about it. Long invasion BG BASE to B C. I use a brainwave, What e g to record and decode bring intention that is safe and convenient compared to more risky in these methods. They use a brain implant. Generally, they take longer to learn and users ultimately vary in performance. We have looked into mind control but examining the brain side story and hypothesize that meditation or yoga is able to enhance and improve the individual's ability to control a B C. I With recently completed a large scale human study involving a week course in simple, widely practiced meditation techniques to test the effect as a potential training tool for BC. I control Our results show that humans with just eight weeks of lessons in mindful meditation training demonstrates significant advantage compared to those with no prior meditation training. The meditation group performed much better than the control group and learn the mind control skills much faster than the control group. Meditation has been widely practice for well being and improving house..

Lin Pascarella Today eight weeks today Association of American Colleg Minnick about a foot and a half President week yoga
"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:09 min | 9 months ago

"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Non religious people have no spirituality. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute and dunkin associate professor of american studies and religion at gouge. Your college determines that may not be the case. Recent gallup poll showed that for the first time the number of individuals regularly attending religious services dropped below fifty percent this reinforces other recent studies that have shown rapid increase in the number of the so-called religious nuns or individuals unaffiliated with institutional religion though hesitant to affiliate with traditional denominations for a number of reasons. These nuns are not for the most part atheist in the sense of rejecting the existence of god or gods instead many believe in divinity in most desire spiritual life ritual and community my research has centered on the rituals practices and communities that have emerged in the margins spaces outside of institutional religion specifically in relation to one of the most basic and timeless aspects of human existence pregnancy and birth spiritual movements like the sacred living movement infused the rights of passage of pregnancy and birth with ritual and sacred meaning and their retreats and trainings. Women owned businesses. I study intertwine holistic health and spiritual counseling and renewal through offerings from postnatal dula care to vaginal steaming blending the boundaries of spiritual and secular religion and business. The women's spiritual leaders and entrepreneurs at the center of these new movements are attempting to meet needs unmet by conventional medicine and by religion. In doing so they are creating new paradigm for both the result. Is something much different than the secularization suggested. By the gallup poll these communities suggests much spiritual and religious life exists beyond the bounds of institutional religious affiliation and regular attendance. We just need to know where to look and perhaps needs some new language with which to talk about it that was in dunkin of.

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg dunkin
"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh in the future surin might be able to fit on your table. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute rodney yoder associate professor of physics at gouge. Your college determine how making particle accelerators smaller could lower the cost of tech the most famous. Particle accelerators are huge facilities. Many miles long that have enabled fundamental physics discoveries. They work by imparting very high speeds and high energy protons or electrons by using strong electric fields. The particles energy is what makes experiments possible but room sized accelerators producing electrons. That are a million times. Less energetic are actually far more common. They're used in healthcare industry in defense for applications like radiation therapy. An x-ray scanning if electron accelerators could be made ultra small like breadbox or even a computer chip whiter applications and uses could become possible at much lower cost much like computers evolved for massive research installations fifty years ago two laptops and tablets today in my current research project. I show how an unusual kind of material glassy oxide. Compounds called pyro. Electric crystals can provide the necessary electric fields to produce an accelerate electrons to more than half the speed of light in a few centimeters pirate. Electric's have the unusual property that when when heats or cools them. They become electrically polarized which means that they produce very large electric fields at their surfaces. The result is that a carefully chosen. Arrangement of crystals heaters is all that is needed to create a small and simple yet useful accelerator. We can place a sharply tipped metal needle near or within these materials to produce a pinpoint electron beam and use a series of crystals in a row to further increase the electrons energy in the future..

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg rodney yoder surin
"pascarella" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Today we're going to look at the world of family offices which managed the personal and financial needs of wealthy families family offices serve a small and select client base but they're exerting a greater force on wall street and in the investing community for today's podcast. I'm delighted to be joined. By four of my colleagues sarah nissan terrano and meena flynn from our consumer wealth management division tony pascarella from our global markets division and can hirsch our investment banking division. Sarah meena tony and ken. Welcome to the program sarah. Let's start with you. You and your team collaborated with ken. Tony mina and others across the firm to publish new research on family offices called widening. The aperture set the stage for us. One exactly our family offices sure family offices are really unique. Investor base their institutions that manage the wealth of an individual or a group of individuals really with the goal of delivering on that families missions values protecting their wealth today and for generations to come and at a high level they create a whole lot of organization and structure around how families really think about their long-term wealth and what that means in a day to day practice is that they oversight of investment activities. Right so they make investment decisions but they also take care of families trust and estate tax issues distributions governance and a wide range of both investment and non investment responsibilities..

sarah nissan terrano meena flynn tony pascarella global markets division Sarah meena tony Tony mina ken sarah
"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:09 min | 10 months ago

"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Whiter university week. Mergers don't only happen in the business world. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on academic minute paul baker assistant professor of physics explores deep space to find another example somewhere in the universe to galaxies are colliding. Each of these galaxies has a supermassive black hole in its center and over the course of millions of years after the galactic collision those two black holes get closer and closer together eventually merging into one omitting of gravitational waves all the while that Will join a discordant. Symphony of gravitational waves emanating from every galaxy that merged in the recent history of the universe this collection of overlapping gravitational homes from different sources called the decastro gravitational wave background. The north american nanno hurts observatory for gravitational waves or nanno grab. Maybe starting to hear that universal hum nanogram is a collection of about one hundred and twenty scientists including myself. We use large radio. Telescopes to monitor a class of stars called pulsars spread throughout the milky way galaxy has gravitational waves pass through the milky way. The space between the earth and the pulsar's is distorted. Space itself is stretched and squeezed by the gravitational waves. Making some of the pulsar's appear to move closer to the earth and some to move further away. This slight change in distance results in the radio pulses arriving a bit off schedule. Our most recent data release contains more than four hundred thousand pulse time measurements collected from forty seven pulsars gathered over twelve and a half years. Our measurements are showing evidence for a common signal affecting all of the radio pulsars. We monitor we don't yet have enough statistical support to determine whether this common signal is from gravitational waves or some more monday noise process. The only thing to do is keep watching the pulsar's as more data or gathered we hope the significance of the signal will grow and will gain new insight into galaxies and the supermassive black holes in their centers. That was paul.

Whiter university dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg paul baker paul
"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:03 min | 11 months ago

"pascarella" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute reort lennart assistant professor and bio statistician at clemson. university examines. One way to do so as founding member of our universities public health strategy team. I have been applying my research. Expertise to develop an implement public health interventions to mitigate sars cova to spread on university campuses due to the exponential growth of disease spread the key to successful mitigation begins with preventing infectious individuals from arriving to campus and implementing rigorous testing and preventative measures throughout the semester. At the onset of fall twenty twenty. My team created a novel testing strategy to detect and contain cove at nineteen outbreaks. We coined the strategy surveillance based informative testing abbreviated as espy. It this involved. Random surveillance testing to monitor covert nineteen prevalence and residence buildings and upon detection of an outbreak allocating a portion of available test the following day to the entire building where the outbreak occurred targeted testing of these hotspots was twice as likely to detect positive cases. Compared to random testing and significantly drove down disease prevalence over a two week implementation period. We followed up with weekly testing for all on campus students. Further reducing prevalence and preventing outbreaks for the remainder of the semester while weekly testing is considered the gold standard many institutions lack the necessary infrastructure for implementation most institutions provided only voluntary testing leaving many cove in nineteen cases and leaving to large outbreaks on campus and in local communities. My post hoc modeling study found that this strategy would have led to a hundred and fifty four percent increase in covert nineteen cases compared to our espy. It strategy therefore if institutions do not have the infrastructure for weekly testing spic is a viable and effective intervention for disease mitigation that can prevent hundreds to thousands of infections that was.

Pascarella association of american colleg cova clemson
Pawan Dhingra, Amherst College  After-School Academics in an Era of Remote Learning

The Academic Minute

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Pawan Dhingra, Amherst College After-School Academics in an Era of Remote Learning

"After school education is taking hold during online learning at schools. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute ponding gra professor of american studies at amherst. College wondered if it helps or hinders children now. The remote learning has become the norm peres increasingly worried that their children may not be learn as much as they can. This anxiety has fueled an already growing interest in for profit. After school tutoring companies as kumaon math nauseam and others even for children performing well in school visit. Despite many educator says that such learning can limit children that it works as educational inequality what drives parents to invest your time and money after school education. And does it make sense to do so. During my research. I spent time with more than one hundred families who pursue supplemental education for their young children and talk with teachers called emissions officers and others. I found that parents whose children are doing fine in school. Still seek out after school. Academics were to make them competitive often worried about entry to college parents. He neighboring kids in such spaces and so worried that their kids won't be able to keep up. also learned. That tutoring works better under certain conditions and that respect not all companies can provide those conditions. Instructors need to be able to connect the content children's experiences to make the children more interested. For example what's more classes are most effective was smaller tutor student. Ratios parents use outside. Learning centers should ask how those businesses incentivize learning ask for references. If she doesn't prove resistant stop you want to instill lifelong learners. So their interest is essential education landscape is changing and private companies are playing more of a role we to understand their popularity and their effects nor to create the learning environment. We want for all children. That was tallin dhingra of amherst college.

Dr Lynn Pascarella Association Of American Colleg Amherst Tallin Dhingra Amherst College
Brian Schubert, University of Louisiana at Lafayette  Using Fossil Plants to Measure Climate Change

The Academic Minute

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Brian Schubert, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Using Fossil Plants to Measure Climate Change

"What can fossils teach us about. The future of climate change doctor lin pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute. Brian schubert associate professor in the school of geosciences at the university of louisiana digs end. To look ahead. We learn as children that all plants require water and carbon dioxide to grow. The water comes from rain or melted. Snow that infiltrates into the earth and enters the plant through the roots all the carbon dioxide diffuses through pores into the plant's leaves every plant on planet. Earth uses these two ingredients to form new compounds via photosynthesis when the plant dies a fortunate few are buried beneath layers of silt and sand removed from the ravages of oxygen decomposition and preserved in the geologic record as a geochemists. My job is to analyze the chemical remains of these fossilized photosynthesis to answer questions like when was the last time. Carbon dioxide levels were as high as today and how will global warming effect precipitation patterns across the planet to answer these questions. We studied the products of photosynthesis that had been locked away for millions of years. Within fossilized plant remains we do this using a specialized piece of equipment called an ratio mass. Spectrometer this machine has a giant magnet that separates and then counts individual molecules freed from within the fossils by first heating to over one thousand degrees celsius. These liberated molecules contain the exact same carbon oxygen atoms that once made up the carbon dioxide and water that were combined many millions of years ago. by the plant's photosynthetic. Machinery has shown that these compounds provide a chemical fingerprint of the amount of rainfall that fell over the forest and the amount of carbon dioxide available for photosynthesis many eons ago. Our end result is a veritable weather report of changing climate across millions of years of earth. His that implicates changing carbon dioxide concentrations as the primary perpetrator for perturbing earth's climate past and present. That was brian shubert of the university of louisiana.

Lin Pascarella Association Of American Colleg Brian Schubert School Of Geosciences University Of Louisiana Brian Shubert
Brandi Brimmer, Spelman College  Black Union Widows and the Battle for Survivors Benefits in Post-Civil War America

The Academic Minute

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Brandi Brimmer, Spelman College Black Union Widows and the Battle for Survivors Benefits in Post-Civil War America

"In college week black union widows had trouble claiming their benefits after the civil war. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute brandy brimmer associate professor in the department of history discusses their postwar battle after the american civil war. Newly freed black women made up one of the largest groups of union widows across the south yet their struggle for recognition by the federal pension bureau remains an understudy dimension of the war and its aftermath. My research analyzes the processes by which black women in eastern north carolina their views a citizenship in worthiness to the us pincher bureau their petitions for survivors benefits and the first person testimony of those who supported them painting vivid picture of their survival strategies free labor society in claiming the pensions to which they were in principle entitled. These women challenge the bureau's definition of union widowhood and expand the boundaries of us citizenship. The pension bureau distributed monetary resources to widows children and other dependent relatives of soldiers through a legal structure that required proof of marriage in evidence of war related that since marriages of enslaved people were neither authorized nor effectuation through legal routes. It was nearly impossible for formerly enslaved women to secure pension benefits federal lawmakers eventually address this problem through the supplementary pension act of july fourth eighteen sixty four which retroactively recognize the marriages formulates lay people within the pension system still a tedious and complicated application limited economic resources and competing definitions of what constituted. A legal marriage made security pension difficult. Maintaining they're standing on the pension roster could be just as intense scrutiny over how a widow earn wages notions of what constituted a proper family and sexual respectability became central points of contention at the end of the war. Freed women across the south said about filing petitions for survivors benefits with great frequency. They rested their claims on their contributions. To slavery's demise and their loved ones military service shining the light on their struggle for recognition underscores black women's legal acumen and understanding of the pension bureau as an arena of activism and redress. That was brandy bremmer of spelman

Dr Lynn Pascarella Association Of American Colleg Brandy Brimmer Federal Pension Bureau Department Of History North Carolina United States Brandy Bremmer
"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

"Teacher. Retention is a big issue in education. I'm Dr Lin Pascarella, president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. And today on the academic minute, Luis Rodriguez, assistant professor of education leadership looks into how teacher education systems play a role in turn over what's the best way to assess teacher effectiveness. Duncan districts best support or determine whether to replace a teacher who is less effective. These are two questions that have been on the mind of education reformers and others seeking to improve America's education system. Over the past decade, several states implemented systematic changes their teacher evaluation systems. These reforms were largely me to compete for federal aid for the research top grand competition administered under the Obama administration. 2011 Tennessee Changes evaluation system to assess teachers based on a mix of student test results, and Riddick directed classroom observations by certified trained observers. Teachers also received direct feedback, as well as various levels of consequences and incentives based on their overall performance, such as eligibility for tenure, bonus compensation and targeted professional development and coaching. My colleagues and I studied how teacher turnover patterns changed in conjunction with Tennessee's Reformed evaluation system. We found that the rollout of a new statewide evaluation policy was associated with increased turnover. And in most cases, teachers to party schools and sometimes the profession itself, where the lowest performers We also found that the turnover was concentrated in low performing schools and schools in urban areas. This means that a well constructed evaluation system they removed the least effective teachers and schools that are in most need of high quality teaching. Making room for more high performing candidates. But my colleagues and I believe evaluation reform is only part of the solution, as we also recommend states and districts consider policies and programs that support the retention and development of qualified teachers. That was Luis.

Association of American Colleg Dr Lin Pascarella assistant professor of educati Luis Rodriguez Obama administration Tennessee Riddick president America
"pascarella" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A report out this week from the FBI see the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation caught our eye Banks are among other things. Lenders and the FBI. See, says lending volume fell in the most recent quarter. Driven by decreases in commercial and industrial lending marketplaces. Justin Home explains what's going on Cos normally use bank loans to grow their businesses, maybe build a new factory or acquire another business. But Drew Pascarella Cornell University says that kind of activity hasn't fully recovered. Mergers and acquisition volume in the U. S is down 30% year over year. Pascarella says companies also used bank loans to raise cash for a rainy day. That happened a lot of the outside of the pandemic. The companies that had existing relationships with banks. They ran to the banks and tried to borrow as much money as they could in the time since that kind of panic borrowing from banks has calmed down, says Karen Petru, a federal financial analytics. Companies felt more secure that the world wasn't coming to an immediate end. But Petra says the economy is still shaky in the idea of taking on more bank loans doesn't seem prudent for a lot of companies, even with interest rates near record lows, no matter what the interest rate is, if you're a corporate borrower You need to pay it back when bigger companies have needed cash. They've been raising it from investors by issuing bonds. Those have longer pay off periods than bank loans and come with fewer conditions, says Matteo Arena and Marquette University. So as bones, the more attractive right then this less need for going to a bank for a new Lord. But smaller companies don't have the option of issuing bonds. Arena says. Those companies are borrowing less from banks because many of them are going out of business. I'm Justin.

FBI Drew Pascarella Cornell Univer Federal Deposit Insurance Corp Matteo Arena Pascarella Justin Home Karen Petru financial analytics Petra Marquette University
"pascarella" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But a report out this week from the FBI see the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. What are I banks are among other things. Lenders and the FBI. See says lending volume fell in the most recent quarter, driven by decreases in commercial and industrial lending marketplaces. Justin Home explains what's going on. Cos. Normally use bank loans to grow their businesses, maybe build a new factory or acquire another business. But Drew Pascarella Cornell University says that kind of activity hasn't fully recovered. Mergers and acquisitions volume in the U. S is down 30% year over year, Pascarella says. Companies also used bank loans to raise cash for a rainy day. That happened a lot of the outside of the pandemic. The companies that had existing relationships with banks. They ran to the banks and tried to borrow as much money as they could in the time since that kind of panic borrowing from banks has calmed down, says Karen Petru, it Federal Financial analytics. Companies felt more secure that the world wasn't coming to an immediate end. But Petra says the economy is still shaky in the idea of taking on more bank loans doesn't seem prudent for a lot of companies, even with interest rates near record lows, no matter what the interest rate is, if you're a corporate borrower You need to pay it back when bigger companies have needed cash. They've been raising it from investors by issuing bonds. Those have longer pay off periods than bank loans and come with fewer conditions, says Matteo Arena and Marquette University. So I suppose the more attractive right then this less need for going to a bank for a new Lord. But smaller companies don't have the option of issuing bonds. Arena says. Those companies are borrowing less from banks because many of them are going out of business. I'm.

FBI Drew Pascarella Cornell Univer Matteo Arena Federal Deposit Insurance Corp Pascarella Karen Petru Justin Home Federal Financial Petra Marquette University
"pascarella" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Doing. But a report out this week from the FBI see the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. What are I banks are among other things. Lenders and the FBI. See says lending volume fell in the most recent quarter, driven by decreases in commercial and industrial lending marketplaces. Justin Home explains what's going on. Cos. Normally use bank loans to grow their businesses, maybe build a new factory or acquire another business. But Drew Pascarella Cornell University says that kind of activity hasn't fully recovered. Mergers and acquisitions volume in the U. S is down 30% year over year, Pascarella says. Companies also used bank loans to raise cash for a rainy day. That happened a lot of the outside of the pandemic. The companies that had existing relationships with banks. They ran to the banks and tried to borrow as much money as they could in the time since that kind of panic borrowing from banks has calmed down, says Karen Petru, a federal financial analytics. Companies felt more secure that the world wasn't coming to an immediate end. But Petro says the economy is still shaky in the idea of taking on more bank loans doesn't seem prudent for a lot of companies, even with interest rates near record lows, no matter what the interest rate is, if you're a corporate borrower You need to pay it back when bigger companies have needed cash. They've been raising it from investors by issuing bonds. Those have longer pay off periods than bank loans and come with fewer conditions, says Matteo Arena and Marquette University. So as bones a more attractive right then this less need for going to a bank for a new Lord. But smaller companies don't have the option of issuing bonds. Arena says Those companies are borrowing less from banks because many of them are going.

FBI Drew Pascarella Cornell Univer Federal Deposit Insurance Corp Matteo Arena Pascarella Karen Petru Justin Home financial analytics Petro Marquette University
"pascarella" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on KCRW

"A report out this week from the FBI see the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. What are I banks are among other things. Lenders and the FBI. See says lending volume fell in the most recent quarter, driven by decreases in commercial and industrial lending marketplaces. Justin Home explains what's going on. Cos. Normally use bank loans to grow their businesses, maybe build a new factory or acquire another business. But Drew Pascarella Cornell University says that kind of activity hasn't fully recovered. Mergers and acquisitions volume in the U. S is down 30% year over year, Pascarella says. Companies also used bank loans to raise cash for a rainy day. That happened a lot of the outside of the pandemic. The companies that had existing relationships with banks. They ran to the banks and tried to borrow as much money as they could in the time since that kind of panic borrowing from banks has calmed down, says Karen Petru, a federal financial analytics companies felt more secure that the world wasn't coming to an immediate end. Petro says the economy is still shaky in the idea of taking on more bank loans doesn't seem prudent for a lot of companies, even with interest rates near record lows, no matter what the interest rate is, if you're a corporate borrower You need to pay it back when bigger companies have needed cash. They've been raising it from investors by issuing bonds. Those have longer pay off periods than bank loans and come with fewer conditions, says Matteo Arena and Marquette University. So as bones a more attractive right then this less need for going to a bank for a new Lord. But smaller companies don't have the option of issuing bonds. Arena says Those companies are borrowing less from banks because many of them are going out of business. I'm just in hope for marketplace. Give him 7.5 minutes. They will give you the world. David Brancaccio in the gang on the marketplace. Morning report. Check him out. Fetcher, Jay Powell and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. We're back.

FBI Drew Pascarella Cornell Univer Matteo Arena Federal Deposit Insurance Corp David Brancaccio Pascarella Karen Petru Justin Home financial analytics Petro Fetcher Jay Powell Steven Mnuchin Marquette University
George Cunningham, Texas A&M University - Physical Activity and Climate Change Attitudes

The Academic Minute

02:04 min | 1 year ago

George Cunningham, Texas A&M University - Physical Activity and Climate Change Attitudes

"Changing attitudes toward global warming is hard. I'm Dr Lynn Pascarella. President of the Association of American colleges and universities and today on the academic minute George Cunningham professor of graduate and professional studies details one surprising way to do so. Being active as a number of benefits, including better fitness and cognitive functioning reduction, various diseases, and improved, physical and mental health. Our recent research also points to another outcome of being active climate change attitudes. There are certainly exceptions most fiscal activity takes place outdoors. As. A result exercisers are able to enjoy nature and become more connected with their surroundings. At this is the case exercisers might be especially aware the ways in which climate change could hinder their ability to be active. When they arrive this conclusion then might also advocate for new laws and policies that would serve to protect the environment. To examine these possibilities, we analyzed data from over thirty one, hundred counties across the US. And addition to collecting data related to fiscal. And climate change attitudes. We counted further factors that might impact the results. These included the county residents access to physical activity demographics education in voting patterns and the two thousand sixteen presidential election. After, accounting for these factors, we found that his physical activity increased so too did county residents conviction that climate change personally impacted them. Personal Harm believes then related to their preference for stronger climate change policies. based. On these findings, we concluded that activists, scientists and policy makers looking to shape public opinion around climate change should consider this sport and physical activity domain that was George Cunningham of Texas. Am University.

Dr Lynn Pascarella George Cunningham Professor Of George Cunningham Association Of American Colleg United States Am University President Trump Texas
"pascarella" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on 710 WOR

"O R Voice of New York and I heart radio stations. We have 72 degrees and mostly clear skies at four o'clock. Good morning. I'm Steve Green Field. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron spoke during the second night of the Republican National Convention. Cameron is a Republican and the state's first African American attorney general and criticized the recent protests around the country, adding that Republicans do respect the right to free speech. Republicans will never turned a blind eye toe unjust acts, but neither will we accept an all out assault on Western civilization. Meanwhile, a Republican anti Trump Group is running a commercial that shows the border wall made out of 175,000 caskets. The Lincoln Project launched the and Tuesday to attack the way the White House has handled the pandemic. The caskets represent the more than 175,000 American lives lost to Corona virus. The ads started running about an hour before night. Two of the RNC also making headlines following a significant covert 19 uptick in very public schools will now commence learning 100% online in the fall. These wonder reports four days ago, Danbury Public health issued a warning about a new spike in the virus. And Monday, the district decided to pivot away from its original hybrid Learning plan, which was a mixture of in person and remote learning. School Superintendent Sal Pascarella made the decision for the district which has more than 11,000 students. After meeting with Danbury Health and Education leaders, he says they're eager to see kids back in distance learning September 8th, adding they'll revisit the situation October 1st to formulate a plan moving forward Liz Warner W R News. Everyone is all right after a huge tree crashed into a queen's house during a Tuesday storm girls, Reichman knew that something had happened. When he went outside. He saw the tree on top.

Daniel Cameron Reichman Attorney Sal Pascarella New York Danbury Health and Education Danbury Public RNC Steve Green Field Trump Group White House assault Kentucky Superintendent Liz Warner W
"pascarella" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"pascarella" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"70 Tuesday, becoming warmer. We cannot rule out a shower or thunderstorm High 82 Oh, Mac, you weather meteorologist Curb Opinsky. Double D Visi Boston's news Radio. Good morning. I'm Dan Watkins. Here's what's happening. While colleges are preparing for the academic year to get going, a number of schools across the country, including Merrimack College in north and over are charging students returning to campus say. Covad MITIGATION. FEA W B Z Czar Cohen reports. Marry. Max says students taking in person classes will have to pay an additional $475 per semester. Lin Pascarella, president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, says the cost of testing students, faculty and staff on a regular basis, along with decreased revenue from things like room and board are behind the fees. He says. Some students might be able to see agree inverse mint from their health plan. But not all there is another option. There is funding under the carriage back that will cover a majority of the thieves related to testing. And so that's one option. It's for institutions to apply for federal aid, and Pascarella added that these extra fees hit economically disadvantaged students the hardest art Cohen W. B Z Boston's news radio. Meanwhile, in Boston, it's moving weekend at B. You and students are preparing for what will surely be a different type of school year. The BBC TV's Jim Smith reports from comments. Going back to college for the air always produces so many different emotions, and this is a year unlike any other. Here it be you tonight, They're trying to make the best of it. It's college moving day here, it BU as students and families get ready for a year where the unusual is now the new normal classmates are hoping to soak in atleast some of the classic college experience You don't want to miss out on like Four years that everyone promises you are going to be the best in your life, but at the same time, you don't want to endanger anybody. Don't contract have to miss school yourself and then you get to miss out.

Lin Pascarella Merrimack College Boston Visi Boston Association of American Colleg Czar Cohen Covad Mac Dan Watkins Cohen W. B Max BBC president Jim Smith
"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

Z104

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

"About who they are and what young put people need to get ahead. In the end, What is the long lasting effect of somebody who was in this state of disconnection in their twenties once they hit their thirties and forties? It's potentially lifelong. The most tragic case, of course, is if a disconnected young person remains. Disconnected as an adult, never reconnecting to school to work. I spoke to some advocates at a homeless shelter for youth and They say that you know, folks who work in adult homeless shelters recognized that the pipeline to chronic adult homelessness begins. If someone is homeless when they are 20 so that is theme, most dire circumstance that a young person confined themselves. Of a young person who is not connected now does manage to connect in the future. They still pay a lifelong price. Their wages are going to be less. Their likelihood of homeownership is going to be less. The likelihood that they're going to be working for time will be less measure. America calculated that you know it could be a highway $30,000 wage penalty 15 years down the line. For someone who is disconnected in those early years. And when you think about Your own first job, you know, and what you did between the ages of 18 and 24 16 and 24 to get that earlier experience to find those first mentors. First bosses. It really does make a difference. Those connections you make it very hard as a 26 year old to get that first job. You know that That's goingto let you into my past to those early years were so critical. And for too many people there being wasted again. The name of an Kim's new book is abandoned America's lost youth and the Crisis of disconnection. Some of the most successful students don't feel good about their accomplishments. They feel like imposters. That's the topic of today's academic minute. Do you feel like a phony? I'm Dr Lin Pascarella, president, the Association of American Colleges and Universities and today on the academic minute Kevin Coakley, distinguished teaching professor at the University of Texas at Austin, examines why college students often feel like they don't belong. During the academic year, many students will experience heightened and positive feelings in academically competitive and stressful college environments. The impossible nomine on often referred to in the popular press as the Imposter syndrome. Is the sense among high achievers of feeling intellectually phony and fraudulent. While high achievers are typically thought of as individuals who have excelled academically, in many ways, college attendance retention. And graduation make students high achievers, Given that more than 20% of freshmen do not return for a second year, research has found that impostor feelings negatively impact the mental health of college students. Increasing feelings of depression and anxiety. Students who feel like an impostor have difficulty internalizing their accomplishments. They see themselves as incompetent and believe they have fooled others into seeing themselves as intelligent and accomplished. I'm positive feelings have been linked to maladaptive perfectionism or excessive high personal standards and postures and perfectionist are similar in that they are both given to excel. They differ in that perfectionists are given by an internal pressure of having high standards, while impostors are driven by an internal experience of intellectual phoniness and self doubt. My research has found that in positive feelings are especially salient among students of color, However, it is important to keep in mind that students of color are not monolithic. For example, my research has found that agent American students tend to have higher feelings of impossible ism. An African American and let the next student's. Additionally we found a stronger impact of perceived discrimination on the positive feelings among African American and Latino ex students. Professors can address and pasta is, um, among students of color by including books and articles written by scholars of color, discussing the contributions of scholars of color in your field and having meetings with students of color and affirming your belief in their potential and deserve it Nous to be there that was Kevin Cokely of the University of Texas at Austin. You can find this other segments and more information about the professors at academic minute dot org. The academic minute is a production.

University of Texas Austin America Association of American Colleg Dr Lin Pascarella Kevin Cokely Kevin Coakley Kim president professor
"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

Z104

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

"So in addition to cosmic voids, there are a whole lot of tiny planets floating around in space, too, and that's the topic of today's academic minute. Is there a giant planet beyond Neptune? I'm Dr Lynn Pascarella, president of the association of American colleges and universities. And today on the academic minute, Robert Brown associate professor of astronauts at the United States Air Force academy, discuss his weather planet nine is changing our solar system. They're over sixteen hundred known minor planets that exist beyond Neptune's orbit. These small bodies are called trans Neptune. Objects or Tia knows for short over the last few years researchers, including our own group. Discover that six to twelve Tinos that travel farthest from the sun have similar orbits. This is very puzzling. And let one research team to propose that there's a giant undetected planet. Well beyond Neptune, which they called planet. Nine they postulated the gravitational forces from this hypothetical planet have kept six the largest orbits near each other. However, our research, so that does not just the Tino's with very large orvis that are close together. A key characteristic of all, Tino orbits is also clustered together, this was unexpected because small perturbations from the known giant planets, like Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune move. Tina orbits a little these probations are slightly different for each, you know, so over time that orbits should spread apart. We showed the gravitational perturbations from our known planets would cause all the orbits to be spread out evenly and only about three million years, yet, they're still clustered together today. What could explain this, why the orbits of over sixteen hundred Tinos not evenly distributed today, we also determined that the proposed planet. Nine could not explain the clustering of these orbits. Therefore, we concluded that there's no reason to believe this hypothetical planet exists at all. Instead, we possibly the Tino's have only been in the president orbits for less than a few million years. Other recent research. Republish proposed the Tino's recently moved from inside Neptune's orbit, which could explain why elements of the orbits are similar today. They're certainly many more questions that need to be answered regarding these unusual bodies..

Tino Tinos president Dr Lynn Pascarella association of American colleg United States Air Force academ Robert Brown associate professor Tina three million years million years
"pascarella" Discussed on Cafecito Break

Cafecito Break

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Cafecito Break

"We covered a lot of stuff today. And it's important stuff. We did relent there. And, you know, thank you. We appreciate everyone who keeps a supporting us. We feel so blessed to have the community. We have that. Listen at the break. We have so many beautiful intelligent, heart filled soles that are part of this community and all ages nations places, and we just love all of you. Thank you for being a part of our lives and thank you for trusting us. And and infra sharing this seat to break with us. Absolutely, absolutely. I can't thank you guys enough. I love doing this show. It makes my whole week. For me to and, you know, be on the lookout 'cause route the Ron are going to be squeezing in gafa seato break featured interviews since we changed our format in the morning. A Mondays it's not really happening on Mondays anymore. So it'll be on another day in time. And we'll keep you posted. And for everyone. Thank you have an amazing amazing rest of the week. We love you. And we'll see you next Monday morning Ruthie nine vol of young. This is Ron Shamanism the seat the break podcast inviting you to live Monday mornings at eleven AM or route the Roz trendy now reports question of the week, our gut this couple wisdom ima don't forget to like share and subscribe, Monday morning. Spend an hour with Bradley Cooper early on time or late Murli earlier. Before they even got up. Ellen today at three on NBC four New York, then at four twenty minutes of uninterrupted news, plus your exclusive ten day forecast before the first commercial, join Stephan home, Natalie Pascarella, Dave price for news four New York at four PM today on NBC, four New York.

New York Bradley Cooper Ron NBC Natalie Pascarella Ellen Stephan four twenty minutes ten day
"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"pascarella" Discussed on Z104

"What your your stress try forgiveness? I'm Dr Lynn Pascarella, president of the association of American colleges and universities and today on the academic minute Lawrence. Tucson, professor of psychology at Luther college explains. How forgiving yourself and others can lead to a more harmonious life. We are often hurt by other people and Justice frequently. We return the favor forgiveness of others and oneself both involve reducing negative thoughts feelings and behaviors. And instead promoting the positive variety at yourself or another offender this doesn't imply condoning denying or excusing wrongdoing. And it may or may not involve making up with someone or getting Justice, but it is worthwhile forgiveness of others and oneself can have remarkable benefits. For instance, we have found that forgiving others was directly related to less stress and symptoms of mental and physical illness. We also. Found that the most forgiving individuals didn't show the usual association between stress and worse mental health. Similarly in another recent study found that the most self forgiving individuals did not show, the usual association between hostility and worse. Cognitive function. Both types of forgiveness are directly linked to health and buffer the effects of stress on health and both likely help us feel better by helping us cope with common interpersonal stress and conflict when learning of the benefits of forgiving, others oneself, it's common to want to learn how to become a more forgiving person, we've found that prayer, meditation and journaling are good ways of promoting forgiveness. But developing empathy for others and self compassion are also important educational forgiveness programs to are effective in increasing forgiveness of others, and oneself and these programs also have health benefits. It really is true that.

Dr Lynn Pascarella association of American colleg Luther college president Lawrence professor of psychology Tucson