35 Burst results for "Parliament"

India records world's highest increase in new COVID-19 cases

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:08 min | 1 d ago

India records world's highest increase in new COVID-19 cases

"Now, where another record rise in daily Corona virus infections has brought the country's total case count to above five million it's adding more new cases a day than any other country in the world fueling concerns about how the economy will continue to cope with the pandemic official forecasts predict a ten percent contraction this year the government has allocated tens of billions of dollars to help battle the economic crisis but there's some head-scratching today over a new multi million dollar contract that's been awarded to Indian conglomerate Totta the BBC's around Mukherjee. What we're looking at is one hundred, seventeen million dollars to refurbish the existing parliament complex. But this is part of a larger two point seven billion dollar government project to give a face lift and modernized old colonial era government buildings in the heart of Delhi even when this plan was initially announced, which was in October last year many questioned the need to spend so much at a time when India is just coming out of its lockdown batting, a rising number of one thousand cases growing at an alarming rate, the economy has contracted by the worst in decades. Where does the government going to get this money from as you say why? Hasn't the government put this plan on ice of the government says that look this parliament complex dates way back to the nineteen twenties now since then various parliament constituencies have increased and therefore so have the number of parliamentarians and the staff there simple argument is this complex isn't big enough. The also interestingly want to build despite twenty, twenty two so that it can coincide with India celebrating seventy five years of its independence, and where's the government GonNa get the money to fund this project that is million dollar question in the same week on Monday. The government asked for parliamentary approval of to infuse nearly two point seven, two, billion dollars to. Help the ailing banking sector here in India deal with the prospects of bad loans which are likely to rise. So the message that the government has given is that we are cash strapped, but the question is, where are you going to get this money from for this kind of luxurious project at a time when India is battling a national crisis, more questions than answers then the BBC's democracy in new. Delhi. Thank you. Thank you.

India Parliament Delhi BBC Official
 Pope Francis: our health depends on health of others, not exploiting

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Pope Francis: our health depends on health of others, not exploiting

"Before pope Francis he got to Japan's says top the corona government virus job officially pandemic Yoshiki has shown Daisuke there's a link all between was known people's as health a shadow and prime the state minister of the environment on the right hand today man for many the his vita long serving predecessor Shona into Cornish when Shinzo Francis abeka speaks nonce about last the interconnectedness month he would resign due of to people ill health on the planet his chief cabinet during his secretary general sugo audience said he held would come in a Vatican forward court to pursue yard a with base the unfinished faithful spaced work out now to limit the self contagion made politician he tells is elected the crowd by parliament abusing as the ecosystems Japan's new prime that god minister created two is days a grave after sin he succeeded and Ave we can't expect as leader of to the continue ruling to grow liberal on the material Democratic level Party without sued taking us low care key image of the coming from home government briefings but welcomes us contrasts from with his his ads behind the exploiting scenes work nature admonishing ultimately bureaucrats means exploiting and pushing other policies people I'm I'm Charles Charles the the Ledesma last month

Pope Francis Japan Daisuke Shinzo Francis Abeka Charles Charles Ledesma Shona
Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:30 min | 2 d ago

Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

"Earlier today. European Commission President Ursula von Delaying gave her first State of the Union address to the European. Parliament. It's fair to say that it has been and will be more closely scrutinized than the setpiece usually is the EU is beset like the rest of the world by an ongoing pandemic and associated economic turbulence, and also attempting to ease the United Kingdom out of the block with as little damage to the fixtures and fittings as possible and the UK's latest history on x over the last week or so demonstrate that this remains an unsolved problem while joined with more Bite Niamey Leery Europe correspondent at the Irish Times. Niamey before we talk about the details of what Slovan delay and had to say, did it strike you? There was an overall theme or tone she was swinging for I. Think it was quite striking. Future focused. She talked about how can we get out of the Democrats economic repercussions in a way that says. The continent for the future. So it was very much to do with tying together the various different goals whether that's a climate and economic development where increasing digitalization on. Also a one section of her speech, which I thought was particularly strong was on discrimination and efforts at kind of acknowledging the reality in the block of racism and discrimination. Based on sexual orientation or religious beliefs. So it was quite wide ranging and then the other aspect of it was. She proposed making it easier for the EU to come up with common policy when it comes to international relations particularly on matters relating to human rights sanctions. So just as a liberation on that idea of general tone this being her first state of the Union as as commission president does it does it seem that we understand what her idea of the European Union is. I think she Saturday as being. A sort of an unfinished project what it ought to be somewhere where people can have a quality of life get paid fairly for work have social protections that you're does better on that than other parts of the world, and that's part of the reason why able better able to weather the pandemic but that it's not enough and she said that there would be a new framework introduced to. Member states to set minimum wages in order to make work pay property. Then an in addition to that there was the The section on discrimination which I think was unusual in acknowledged the struggles in the block in terms of she mentioned a particular discrimination against Rome people on also the LGBTQ I free zones in. Poland or she called out as inhumane. And so I think she's she was quite strong meticulous division of the block as being a place where people and live more freely with rights and have a better quality of life in general but I think that she also you know it's it's. It's quite telling that she. She had. Many. Difficulties take me in terms of international relations they were for her to talk about it was difficult relationship with Russia difficult relationship with China difficult relationship with the United States difficult relationship Britain as well. Well, let's talk about some of those difficult relationships and because we are here broadcasting from London let's talk about the difficult relationship. The now has with the UK did brexit get much of a mention? She did mention us. So she said that with every day that passes it becomes more difficult for deal to be reached and she also said that. The EU would stand by with the agreement would never at go back on its the an agreement that had been passed by the European Parliament Anheuser Commons and that had been jointly agreed by the UK Andy you to Protect citizen's rights but also she said first and foremost the Good Friday Agreement on the department and it was quite interesting as well to know that she she also quote the late John Hume, the Nobel laureate. And former SDLP leader from dairy and she said that she described him as one of the Great Europeans. And mentioned that he he recently passed away on us used a quote from him to kind of talk about the strength of diversity which I thought was quite. An interesting use of quotes. It was notable high. She was sort of writing in that story, which is I suppose a Northern Irish story really into this story of the European Union. You mentioned the difficulty of the relationship with Russia and obviously the country of which us live underlying walls defense minister. Germany has found itself once again. On the front line over that relationship having taken in the apparently poisoned opposition politician Alexei Navalny did she took you light any kind of? Way of how the e you can live alongside Russia. She was quite I thought her words were quite firm on Russia's so she said. That the poison she mentioned the poisoner Nevada and said that it wasn't a one sauce and she said, no. Number of gas, pipelines is GONNA. Is GonNa fix that relationship she also am I thought spoke quite in quite heartfelt way in solidarity with the people of Belarus Moore she said that they'd be brave and gone out on the streets and they should have the they shouldn't be pieces on someone else's chessboard what she said, but they should have the ability to determine their own future. You said at the top of this item that she attempted to link the recovery. Well, hopeful eventual recovery from the pandemic the associated economic problems to broader themes of climate in the future on climate in particular. Did she have anything of note to say. So. What? What under nine has proposed that the target for the block to reduce emissions should be increased fifty five percent by twenty thirty, that's compared to a previous commitment to forty percent. This is compared to nine thousand, nine, hundred levels of emissions, and she said that this would be vital in order for the block to reach its Paris Agreement commitments on also its goal of becoming climate neutral by twenty fifty on the way she she described the landmark agreement of the e you to join me borrow seven, hundred, fifty, billion, euro. As an opportunity to do this by directing at least thirty percent or thirty seven percent of the investment towards green initiatives. So things like development of green hydrogen. Renovating homes with. Forty percent of emissions and also. Increasing the car charging network electric vehicle charging that things like that an while this could go in. With kind of digital developments there. For example, at fast broadband were available continent wide including in rural areas that would both alive for rural development but also for things like you know people to work from home more easily and things like that. So she she s she she argued that these things could go hand in hand essentially. But Green groups have been quick to come out and say that fifty five percent of the target isn't enough now some of them had themselves called for that in the. In the past but I guess with the scale of the disaster that they say we're facing, you know they're always going to want to push for more and more ambitious targets

European Union Poland President Trump European Commission United Kingdom Ursula Von Delaying Slovan UK Sdlp Alexei Navalny European Parliament Anheuser C London The Irish Times Germany Rome Nevada Russia
Yoshihide Suga named Japan's prime minister, succeeding Abe

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Yoshihide Suga named Japan's prime minister, succeeding Abe

"Before he got to Japan's top government job officially Yoshiki Daisuke all was known as a shadow prime minister on the right hand man the his long serving predecessor when Shinzo abeka nonce last month he would resign due to ill health his chief cabinet secretary sugo said he would come forward to pursue a base unfinished work now the self made politician is elected by parliament as Japan's new prime minister two days after he succeeded Ave as leader of the ruling liberal Democratic Party sued us low key image from government briefings contrasts with his behind the scenes work admonishing bureaucrats and pushing policies I'm Charles the Ledesma

Japan Yoshiki Daisuke Prime Minister Sugo Charles The Ledesma Secretary Democratic Party
Yoshihide Suga named Japan's prime minister, succeeding Abe

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Yoshihide Suga named Japan's prime minister, succeeding Abe

"Before he got to Japan's top government job officially Yoshiki Daisuke all was known as a shadow prime minister on the right hand man the his long serving predecessor when Shinzo abeka nonce last month he would resign due to ill health his chief cabinet secretary sugo said he would come forward to pursue a base unfinished work now the self made politician is elected by parliament as Japan's new prime minister two days after he succeeded Ave as leader of the ruling liberal Democratic Party sued us low key image from government briefings contrasts with his behind the scenes work admonishing bureaucrats and pushing policies I'm Charles the Ledesma

Japan Yoshiki Daisuke Prime Minister Sugo Charles The Ledesma Secretary Democratic Party
Yoshihide Suga confirmed as Japan prime minister

BBC World Service

01:01 min | 2 d ago

Yoshihide Suga confirmed as Japan prime minister

"House of Parliament has appointed you Shahid, a saga is the country's new prime minister. He takes over from Shinzo are they after easily securing the governing Liberal Democratic Party leadership on Monday, Mr Sieger, the former Cabinet secretary, is known as a tough fixer rather than a charismatic leader. From Tokyo. He's our correspondent Rupert Wingfield Hayes. So when he gets back from the palace, he will hold a press conference as the new prime minister, and he will announce his new Cabinet that hasn't formally being done yet. But there's been loads of speculation in the media already about It's makeup. Mr Seeger claims that he is goingto have a cabinet that will really work for the Japanese people. But what we've seen already, if this cabinet turns out to be true that it is a careful balance. Representing all of the major factions in the LDP, who supported the vote for him to become prime minister. And that's already leading to speculation here that Mr Sieger is really going to be controlled by the faction leaders in the LDP who got together in a back room to make him the new prime minister.

Prime Minister Rupert Wingfield Hayes Mr Sieger Cabinet Mr Seeger Shahid LDP Liberal Democratic Party Parliament Secretary Tokyo Shinzo
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe officially resigns

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 2 d ago

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe officially resigns

"The new leader of Japan's ruling party, is now the country's first new prime minister in eight years. NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul that outgoing Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has resigned. Citing poor health. Lawmakers voted in Yoshihide Suga in Parliament, where his Liberal Democratic Party has a majority. Suba has pledged to continue the policies of his former boss, Shinzo Abe. Asuka has a reputation as an uncharismatic but effective behind the scenes political operator. As absurd. Chief Cabinet secretary. He held the government's ministries in check, and his spokesman, He kept journalists in check while Abby was a political blue blood saga is the son of strawberry farmers. Before I be Japan had a string of prime ministers who only lasted a year each so many Japanese air hoping Sogo will bring stability and continuity. Anthony Kun, NPR news

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Prime Minister NPR Japan Liberal Democratic Party Anthony Koon Anthony Kun Abby Seoul Suba Yoshihide Suga Sogo Cabinet Secretary Strawberry
Yoshihide Suga elected as Japan's new prime minister succeeding Shinzo Abe

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

Yoshihide Suga elected as Japan's new prime minister succeeding Shinzo Abe

"News Parliament in Japan has appointed Yoshihide Asuka as the new prime minister. The former Cabinet secretary who takes over from the long serving Shinzo Abe faces an economic slump the ongoing pandemic on increasing rivalry with China. From Tokyo, his Rupert Winfield Hayes as he faced reporters for the last time as prime minister. Mr Abby said he was proud of his achievements and had worked every day to revive Japan's economy and protect Japan's interests. 71 year old Yoshihide Suga. Now has to convince a skeptical public that he is a worthy successor. His election was a backroom deal done between powerful faction leaders inside the ruling LDP. Is to Sergei is known as a tough fixer rather than charismatic leader. He has one year before he must call a general election, but a challenge to his leadership could come well before

Rupert Winfield Hayes Prime Minister Japan Yoshihide Asuka Shinzo Abe Parliament Mr Abby Yoshihide Suga Cabinet Sergei LDP Secretary Tokyo China
Boris Johnson faces Brexit revolt in parliament.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:41 min | 2 d ago

Boris Johnson faces Brexit revolt in parliament.

"I'm Anthony Davis. The European Union on Monday ramped up pressure on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to step back from breaking the brexit divorce treaty. Delaying a key decision on London's euro clearing justice. He faces a rebellion in the British parliament. The European Union says Johnson's plan would wreck trade talks and propelled the United Kingdom toward a messy brexit while former British leaders have warned that breaking the law is a step too far that will tarnish the country's image. The House of Commons will vote on moving the internal market bill which the EU has demanded London scrap by the end of the month two, its next amendment stage after a debate that Johnson will introduce. As Johnson prepared to try to persuade lawmakers that he's planned to explicitly break international law was worth supporting a derivatives industry source said the European Commission had delayed a decision on euro clearing. Johnson who has a majority of eighty in the lower house of parliament faces a growing revolt. All of Britain's living former prime ministers have expressed concern about his plan as have many senior figures in his Conservative Party. The leader of the opposition Labor party kissed Obama who is self isolating due to the corona virus said, he would oppose a bill that broke international law. Johnson's plan to explicitly break INS National Law has plunged brexit back into crisis less than four months before Britain is finally due to

Boris Johnson European Union Prime Minister Anthony Davis United Kingdom Britain House Of Commons Ins National Law London Labor Party Conservative Party Barack Obama European Commission
Brexit: Boris Johnson says powers will ensure UK cannot be broken up

Not Too Shabby

00:57 sec | 3 d ago

Brexit: Boris Johnson says powers will ensure UK cannot be broken up

"Johnson, has been defending proposed legislation that would breach the Brexit treaty that Britain signed with the you some MPs within the governing Conservative Party and five former British prime ministers. Voiced serious misgivings about it. But our political correspondent Rob Watson says Mr Johnson is showing no signs of giving in he completely double down on the sort of standoff with the European Union. And I pick out a couple of the words. He accused you of being willing to go to what he called extreme and unreasonable lengths to use. Northern Ireland, if you like, is a sort of a leverage tool, and it's discussions with the U. K about the future trade deals. Absolutely no effort whatsoever to reach out to the European Union. And I guess the other criticism that will be made as well. If you didn't think this agreement with the U the withdrawal agreement was a smart one. Why on earth did you sign it and get Parliament to pass it and go to the country on it? World News

Mr Johnson European Union Conservative Party Rob Watson Northern Ireland Britain
Yoshihide Suga picked by Japan's governing party to succeed Shinzo Abe

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

Yoshihide Suga picked by Japan's governing party to succeed Shinzo Abe

"Japan's LDP party is going to vote today on a successor to lead the party? Let's get to it. Baxter in San Francisco with all the global news, Ed. Yeah, exactly right. Juliet. Prime Minister Shinzo Obvious chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga is poised to win bloomers community more in Tokyo. The LDP has decided on a scaled down version of the election due to the surprise resignation of OB And that boat is being held today. So 394 lawmakers are eligible to vote to choose their new party leader and local chapters have 141 for a total of 535 contested votes, then goes to Parliament for the obvious term fulfillment, and there's always the possibility that a snap election as well.

LDP Prime Minister Japan Juliet Baxter Yoshihide Suga Parliament San Francisco Secretary ED Tokyo
UK plans to break Brexit law 'hugely problematic'

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:48 min | 6 d ago

UK plans to break Brexit law 'hugely problematic'

"A furious row has erupted between the UK and the European Union Prime Minister Boris Johnson is trying to change part of the brexit agreement after the much fought over deeply argued about seemingly interminable brexit debate billions of dollars worth of British, trade with the EU and potentially with the United States hangs in the balance here is Steven with the update Brexit is a two stage affair the first age last year was the exit deal on the which if no trade agreement was reached with the EU A Hog Boorda would be imposed between northern, Ireland and the rest of the UK. This was meant to avoid a hard border with the Irish Republic, which remains part of the e you many Brits were unhappy with it, but the deal was agreed and turned into a treaty under the second stage. Britain's had a transition period of the year in which to negotiate a new trade deal with the block that period is drawing to a close negotiations of gone well, and the British government. This week tried to change its commitment on Northern Ireland in parliament, the Northern Ireland, Secretary Brandon Lewis made a startling. Yes does break intellectual law in a very specific limited white. Yes. That was British cabinet minister admitting that his government's planning to break the law provoking outrage in both houses of parliament former Justice Secretary Lord Charlie. Folk ner didn't mince his words. This stinking hypocrisy chokes our country's reputation and destroys our government's ability to lead at home and make agreements abroad and with the E. U threatening to. Sue The agreement that now looks in deadly peril his that free trade deal the UK's negotiating with the EU its largest trading partner Fiona sing. Carter. Of Forex trading firm city index says it's not surprising. The pound has fallen sharply. What's he doing here is adding to this picture of uncertainty I think it's just adding to the sense of does anyone actually know what's going to be happening? In what's going to be happening in just a few months at the end of this year without a new deal forty-three percent of UK exports could face European tariffs and other barriers. Charles Grant of the Centre for European reform says, it's not a pretty picture. The huge prospect chaos at the borders lack of ability to travel easily from one part of Europe to another the impact on financial. Markets which react very nicely. The European Union is demanding. The Brits stopped trying to renege on the exit deal and it has a powerful ally Washington, which brokered the peace deal in Northern Ireland in the nineteen ninety s Nancy. Pelosi Speaker of the House of Representatives says, if the Brits continue on this course, they can kiss goodbye to any hope of a trade deal with the US as well.

Ireland Northern Ireland European Union Justice Secretary Lord Charlie United States European Union Prime Secretary Brandon Lewis Boris Johnson British Government Centre For European Reform Irish Republic UK Britain House Of Representatives Steven Europe Carter Pelosi
Bare-chested women lock themselves to UK parliament in climate protest

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | Last week

Bare-chested women lock themselves to UK parliament in climate protest

"To the railings outside British Parliament today while carrying a banner which said, can't bear the truth. It was part of an extinction. Rebellion protests demanding action on climate change. Women also had messages painted on their bodies representing what could happen as a result of a climate crisis. They include war, famine, drought, starvation. Extinction. Rebellion restarted protests across Britain last week UK is home secretary describes them as ICO crusaders turned criminals whose guerrilla tactics must be stopped. Get two months

ICO Secretary Britain UK
Treasury Dept. sanctions Russian, Ukrainian individuals for election interference

Rush Limbaugh

00:23 sec | Last week

Treasury Dept. sanctions Russian, Ukrainian individuals for election interference

"The US Treasury Department just announcing that four individuals linked to Russia Are being punished for trying to influence the U. S elections. One is a member of Ukraine's parliament. Three others are Russian nationals who work for the Internet Research agency as the same entity cited by intelligence officials before for sewing disinformation in the 2016 election.

Us Treasury Department Ukraine Internet Research Russia U. S
Russia says West trying to victimize Moscow over Navalny

BBC Newshour

01:50 min | Last week

Russia says West trying to victimize Moscow over Navalny

"Russia is continuing to deny any suggestions that it was complicity in the poisoning. Last month, the Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny, as pressure mounts for the country to be sanctioned. Mr Navalny is still being treated in a hospital in Germany, where scientists say it's beyond doubt that he was poisoned with the Nova Chuck nerve agent he fellow on an internal flight in Russia. Seafarers driven tensions between Russia and the west to new heights, with some Western governments believing Mr Navalny was poisoned by Russian agents with top level backing the US secretary of state Mike Pompeo has now set a CZ much that there was a substantial chance His poisoning was ordered by senior Russian officials, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov. Called the accusation unacceptable. So is that also the view of Vitaly Mill enough, a member of Parliament of the United Russia Party, we cannot accept or decline. This statement by Mr Compel, because all the research is that have been made since he left Russia. They've been performed not in the presence ofthe Russian official doctors. Or specialist. So now we can guess the presence ofthe navy. Chuck is in his trousers were somewhere we can't prove this information. Unfortunately, no, we can guess that that the statement off from Pel is just a play with the political games in case they would find appropriate that, uh, appropriate that Navalny should be victim ofthe so called Russian regime. OK, He cannot be this victim even without any poison in his blood because they can write on the paper. Whatever they weren't

Russia Alexei Navalny United Russia Party Mr Compel Dmitry Peskov Mike Pompeo Vitaly Mill Nerve Agent Chuck Kremlin Germany United States Official
Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | Last week

Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Monica. Today's activist was a major proponent of prison reform in Britain. She's known as the Angel of prisons. Let's talk about Elizabeth Fry. Elizabeth Gurney was born in Norwich Norfolk in seventeen eighty to a wealthy quaker family. Her Father John was a successful banker and her mother Catherine was a member of the family that founded Barclays Bank which still operates is one of the largest banks in the world. Elizabeth was the odd one out amongst her siblings. She experienced mood swings and had difficulty learning which biographers attribute to her dyslexia. Elizabeth once said I was thought and called very stupid and obstinate I certainly did not like learning nor did I believe attend my lessons when Elizabeth was twelve years old her mother passed away and Elizabeth was left to care for her younger sisters and brothers. Eighteen hundred at the age of twenty. Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry London banker and quaker together. They had many children most sources say eleven, five sons and six daughters though some sources suggest that had even more kids. Elizabeth was an observant quaker and frequently worshipped at the Friends Meeting House. It was there the she heard Williams savory preach about the importance of altruism and philanthropy. His words inspired Elizabeth to help those in need. In eighteen thirteen elizabeth visited newgate prison, which was notorious for its filthy state and its dismal treatment of its prisoners. Elizabeth was appalled to see such harsh conditions. Women and children were tightly packed in small spaces with little room to wash themselves or cleaned their clothes, and while many of the newgate prisoners had committed severe crimes, some of them had not. And others hadn't even received a trial. Elizabeth was determined to act the next day she returned to the prison with fresh loaves of bread and clean clothes, but she had sewn herself. She distributed them to the prisoners and encourage them to keep their cells clean and find ways to be hygienic in the oppressive environment. Elizabeth didn't come back to newgate until eighteen sixteen due to financial difficulties within her family. But upon her return, she dove back into the Work Elizabeth educated the children of Newgate who were imprisoned with their parents teaching them practical skills like reading and selling. In eighteen seventeen, Elizabeth founded the Association for the improvement of female prisoners along with twelve other women she worked to advance prison reform and to provide female prisoners with education and tools for employment Elizabeth fought for the idea that prison should be based round rehabilitation rather than punishment she wrote it must indeed be acknowledged that many of our own penal provisions as they produced no effect appear to have no other end the punishment of the guilty. Eighteen nineteen Elizabeth wrote prisons and Scotland in the north of England and encouraged her society friends to visit newgate themselves. At. That time Britain was in the practice of sending prisoners to penal colonies in. North. America Australia and India. At newgate. Prisoners en route to be transferred to convict ships, rebound by chains and unable to move around and tiny carts people in the streets pelted them with garbage. Elizabeth convinced the governor of new gate to carry the women enclosed carriages rather than open ones and to ensure that all the women and children had enough food to eat on their voyage. Elizabeth also gave the prisoner sewing tools, bibles and other necessities to accompany them on their long journeys. With the help of her efforts, the act of transporting criminals so far away lands was prohibited in eighteen, thirty seven. Prior to that change in policy Elizabeth visited every convict ship bound for Australia for more than twenty five years. Throughout the eighteen twenties, Elizabeth inspected prison conditions and continued to advocate for the rights of prisoners. She presented her findings to the House of Commons committee in doing. So she became the first woman to present evidence to parliament. Elizabeth's ideas influenced the eighteen twenty three jails act which introduced a series of prison

Elizabeth Elizabeth Fry Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry Work Elizabeth Newgate Britain Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network House Of Commons Committee Norwich Norfolk London Friends Meeting House Barclays Bank Australia Scotland England America John Williams Catherine
Norwegian lawmaker nominates Trump for Nobel Peace Prize

War Room

00:26 sec | Last week

Norwegian lawmaker nominates Trump for Nobel Peace Prize

"Norwegian lawmaker says he has nominated President Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts in the Middle East. Norwegian parliament member Christian T bring Jetty says Mr Trump should be considered because of his work for a peace agreement between the United Arab Emirates in Israel. The region was one of two Norwegian lawmakers and nominated Mr Trump for the peace prize in 2018. That nomination was for his efforts to bring reconciliation between North and South Korea.

President Trump United Arab Emirates Middle East South Korea Israel Christian T
Norwegian lawmaker nominates Trump for Nobel Peace Prize

Sean Hannity

00:28 sec | Last week

Norwegian lawmaker nominates Trump for Nobel Peace Prize

"A Norwegian lawmaker says he has nominated President Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts in the Middle East. Norwegian parliament member Christian T Bring Jetty says Mr Trump should be considered because of his work for a peace agreement between the United Arab Emirates in Israel. The region was one of two Norwegian lawmakers and nominated Mr Trump for the peace prize in 2018. That nomination was for his efforts to bring reconciliation between North and South Korea. Correspondent

President Trump United Arab Emirates Middle East South Korea Israel Christian T
"parliament" Discussed on Party Lines

Party Lines

10:22 min | 8 months ago

"parliament" Discussed on Party Lines

"I missed you so eh every Thursday. We're now going to take you through the biggest political stories of the week. Here's the thing we've been gone for a minute. So those kind of piled up a little a little bit load like just a few things like Oh. I don't know a throne speech. A Cabinet Shuffle Andrew. Scheer said he's going to step down as leader from conservatives whole bunches happen and that's just twenty one thousand nine. It doesn't even cover the the last few weeks. I don't know what we were thinking to any time off at all. That is entirely bad. However we're going to fix it now let's catch up because we're gonNA start with what's going to happen? This problem is back is Justin Trudeau's first real go at this whole minority government thing kicking off everything with the new math all right. Let's get into it do it. Okay so if parliament did reconvene Before the Christmas break break But it was very brief and not much was able to be accomplished. This is now a big long run for this first minority government for Justin Trudeau to try and get some things done to test itself a little bit to see what kind of leader Justin Trudeau is in a minority parliament situation and the the first piece of legislation is perhaps not surprisingly a move to ratify. The new NAFTA Does that I guess that sort of makes sense right right. I mean if you're going to start minority government situation. You're going to start with sort of an easy win in this case so the US government is already ratified the new Nafta which we haven't settled on what we're going to call it who smoke or or the ties that bind us all or whatever the name we have for suggestion. I with new NAFTA I can't I can't stand that other one right. Yeah no I can't handle it either. But whatever the new Nafta is they just has to get it through parliament here and it's not like most of the parties are terribly opposed everything that's in it so password. They're starting with their starting with something that they see is sort of an easy political victory back. Yeah and and there is some pressure to get it done given that Donald Trump signed the US west version of this this week so we are the last country to do it and as you say we need to do it. It doesn't seem like the opposition is putting up much of a faucet the end EP. He has some issues around Labor provisions. And just the fact that they don't feel like they've studied it enough. The block has some issues around particularly Aluminum aluminum workers given that. That industry is concentrated in Quebec but the Conservatives have made it pretty clear that they are trading a a free trade party. They want to support this and they want to get it through so I think it's just a matter of time rather than whether or not it happens right. I mean I guess just from a practical level opposition's GONNA opposition thing they're going to do is say org. Well hold on a minute. We need to look at this in committee and have a bunch of conversations. But I don't think there's a real worry that the NAFTA's not going to be ratified at any point. However we've seen a few groups are Canadian Chamber of Commerce grain? Growers Lowers the Cattleman Association. which I don't know why they're not called the Cattleman Cattle Women Association saying that they push through as quickly as possible I have? I mentioned that I missed you. I'm glad you're back. No one talks like that here. I gotta say it's very yeah anyway. Anyway I'm I'm relieved to be filling this role okay. Good Yeah So. It's all going to get done. That peace will get done but there has been of late some questions in the media and by pundits about what really else the government is going to do. I think some of the criticism. Frankly has been a little unfair For a couple of reasons first of all I think minority governments always have to tread a little slower than a majority. Can't just sort of run roughshod with your legislative slative policy agenda because you have to you know see where you can get compromised and negotiate and that of course there have been some outside events that have have sort of slowed things down. We'll get to those in a moment moment right. I mean the thing that sticks out for me. Is that the throne speech which is where where the government outlined their priorities. I was back in December fifth. That was eight or nine weeks ago. they were elected a month before that. So yeah. The Christmas break happened but They still appear to be kind of low gear. The House might might be in low gear over the Christmas break. But that doesn't mean the government is like when I try to think back to when they won in two thousand fifteen liberals in two thousand fifteen like in the month after he got elected they got going on bringing back the the census they got going on resettling the Syrian refugees in the country. But we're three months after election and they're just moving very very slowly. Yeah and I think that that an and correct me if you if you think I'm wrong but I don't think I think there is a recognition and that that being a blazing fire after a minority mandate maybe wouldn't work like wouldn't work well for the many many Canadians who didn't vote for them. Wouldn't work well for the opposition parties. Who are going to as as you say opposition? I like we should get that on a t shirt and they have to do do things with all those things in mind and I do think and much smarter people than I have written about it but I do think that the prime minister is trying to be a different different kind of leader. This time round doing you say that. But I think he's just trying to be less of the centerpiece of the one thing that sticks except for the Liberal Safaris. It'd be a lot more a lot less rather a lot less trudeau centric but what happens when your entire sort of center Andrew is gone is like everyone was like well. Where is the government would have they been up to I mean there are other things that they will have to do. within the next Month or two they will have have to respond to the court decision on medically assisted dying because the court has basically said. You're not really you haven't really gone far enough. In order order to you. Know protect everybody and make sure that they all have access to this. So they're now looking at expanding it to include things like mature minors Advanced I request so saying that you want to die before even get near there and people who have mental illness those are all parameters around medically-assisted dine that may now be expanded in in this new legislation. So it's not as though there's there's nothing there I think it's just a different pace and a different approach. And when you've seen government in action for four and a half years or whatever and they changed fairly dramatically I think that can be disconcerting. And people probably still trying to figure that out are certainly expected. Awesome to be like Brash. Yes pushing forward things but you know I actually would've expected that they'd move a little bit quicker on certain topic topic areas like for example farmers. NDP saying that they're just going to table legislation to push through Pharma care as quickly as possible and that's because the liberals at the moment don't have a timetable for when they're going to introduce it I think they are also waiting to see how conversations with the provinces were expecting a meeting with them I Dunno sometime in February or March Because the provinces have have put down some clear lines as well which is sort of what happens in minority governments. Right people. Start to Feel you like to have a little more leverage to get what they want. But but can I turn us to the other things that have happened as well. That that mean that the government has had to not just focus on a legislative agenda that you know people can quibble about how Substan- of it is but to govern to to make decisions for Canadians in in difficult. Oh places so whether that be the downing of PS seven fifty two in Iran whether that be corona virus. There's a lot going on that. These people have to manage manage right. I mean especially with the Ukrainian plane. I would say that very few people have been criticizing the way that true handled that and in fact he was sort sort of a steady handling that led Iran. Do sort of make that stunning admission that yes in fact they did shoot down the plane. Very few people expected such an admission to come and I saw at least a few opinion pieces in the globe mentioning credited Trudeau's diplomacy with with with getting that admission and I think that Corona Virus Novel Corona Virus. I think is the name that we're using for it. has has now added another sort of dimension two things they have to handle title in the immediate and when sort of extreme threats or disasters or or what have you happen. The whole of government sort of focuses. It's attention on how they can help with those things whether it be you know getting Canadians out of China treating cases here figuring out how how they coordinate with the rest of the world. Those are all really complex issues. That many many different departments of dealing with so it's not an excuse per se but it is I think thinking explanation for why people are are busy just busy doing other things so when I think about that and then I think about sort of this week opening with the new Nafta data that gets you good headlines gets you good conversations right away but there isn't really anything coming up in the pipeline after it so I I'm surprised they're not anxious to look like they're doing a lot at least in terms of like brokering compromises or advancing a bunch of legislations that a bunch of parties agree on. What do you think? Yeah I think maybe they're testing the water to right if if you as you said Nafta sort of an easier Piece of legislation to put in the pipeline. Knowing in that it will go okay. They're probably WANNA see how that unfolds and and you know. The even parliamentary committees. Were a lot of this work gets done. They're only getting started started this week. So there's a lot of the mechanics inside parliament that haven't really been put in place that are needed in order for legislation to go ahead so this might not the pace that we're used to seeing from the liberal government but maybe this is the way they've chosen to operate in a minority government. Maybe they've decided to take.

Justin Trudeau NAFTA Iran Scheer US Donald Trump US west Cattleman Association. Canadian Chamber of Commerce prime minister Cattleman Cattle Women Associa Liberal Safaris Quebec NDP Substan Andrew China
"parliament" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:51 min | 10 months ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Current

"How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell him that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark net the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police ace who hunt down online predators. The environment. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made it hunting. MOORHEAD subscribe wherever you get at your podcasts. This is a CBC DC podcast. Hi I'm Laura Lynch. This is a podcast from the December fifth edition of the current. But we're looking for in this throne. Speech is some clear indication that Mr Trudeau wants to really make a difference in people's lives and invest in healthcare invest. In Pharma Care Make It. Public and universal stopped taking editions kids to court tackle the climate crisis. Like we actually want to win it. We are more than willing to work together but we will not vote for something. That doesn't align with what Canadians need. That's n DP leader. Meet zing laying out what he hopes to hear later today when the Liberal government kicks off the forty third Canadian parliament with a speech from the throne for more on what to expect. I'm joined by Chris Hull. He's the CDC's National Affairs Editor and host of the House and he joins me from our Ottawa Studio. Hi Chris Good Morning. What do you think we'll be the headline from today's throne speech it's I hope that it's brief. We're expecting it to be about twenty minutes which is kind of a surprise Laura. You've worked here. If it's a big broad mandate type of letter that you're expecting from the from the government This I don't think will be it in. This is the reason Since Justin Trudeau has decided to make public of the mandate letters that he gives his cabinet minister in other words the marching marching orders. He sends to each and every cabinet minister. That has been a better clue. And we'll be a better clue as to what the priorities of the government will be so. This is more about the broad strokes. There'd there'd be three I think basic themes around the importance of collaboration. Not just with them. the other parties in in the Commons. We just heard from Jagmeet Singh but also with the premier's climate change will clearly be one of the key Measures that they WANNA talk about. If not begin to kind of detail that Jagmeet Singh like and the last one of course is affordability. It was a big I've seen during the campaign for almost all the parts making life easier for particularly middle class Canadians. But as you said broad themes where are the mandate letters well. We had expected them tomorrow on Friday They may be Monday. But they're coming shortly. I think the the schedule is a bit Knocked off by the NATO. visit that the prime minister just-concluded so either tomorrow tomorrow or Monday. We'll get a real sense of what the priorities for each of those cabinet ministers will be and of course the other dynamic here which is highlighted by what Doug Singh had to say that this is a minority government so liberals need to play Nice affect any concessions to to the DP's priorities or other parties priorities. I don't know there will be a nod to them. A concession may be too strong a word the the message that I was getting in talking to various people yesterday as the importance of collaboration to signal to Canadians that liberals got the message in the last election campaign way by being reduced to minority government by being blanked in in Saskatchewan and Alberta that they need to work and to listen to members of the opposition and to those premier so so I think there will be a collaborative collaborative sort of tone. I think for example under the heading of affordability will see a reference to Pharma care if if fall short of an absolute commitment to introduce universal single payer system. There'll be a talk about the importance of dealing with those costs. We heard from the PREMER's earlier this week that they want to see the the transfer is for healthcare to be increased. Not for new measures like Pharma Care but to deal with the growing problem of recruiting and retaining doctors of trying to reduce waiting times at hospitals. This sort of thing so I think that they do need to send a note that they have listened and that they are prepared to work with those parties to get things done would you. Would you expect any other. Bold initiatives lives in the throne speech about regionally nation. No I don't think so. I think there's an acknowledgement here that the government You know we'll have heard the message and they we'll talk about Some of the big issues that they have confronted but to your point. I asked a number of people yesterday. For example would the government considers signaling rolling in the throne speech a willingness to open regional offices for example the Ministry of Natural Resources Might Open an office in Edmonton where after all is sort of the headquarters of Jason Kenny's government but also a big part of the oil patch the energy sector. Maybe open a a a a minister's Office for Western economic development as an SASCHA tuner. Sooner Regina just to show that you're listening and you have a footprint in the area even if you didn't elect any MP's I don't know if that will be there but that was certainly one of the signals that a number of MP's he's told they would like the throne speech to include so as again with with a minority government. There's there's the issue of possible confidence votes. There's the potential for The other opposition parties to band together and pulled the government down throne speech could become a confidence vote or spending Initiative could become a confidence. Vote these they're facing these early on. Is Anyone angling to take the government down. No I don't think so and talking to both the MVP and Black Quebecois. which are the two one of those to the government would need to be able able to stay in power? There's enough MP from one or other of the parties to do that. The block recognizes. It has a A new foothold in Quebec in his willing and wants to show quebeckers. Becker at that vote wasn't wasted that they can get things done for Quebec. So they'll be looking on the climate change file. For example around pipelines what is the signal on pipelines and my understanding he is the Liberals are alive to that issue that they need to show they are aware of the block and the Quebec has a different kind of set of needs and desires in this the MVP quite frankly doesn't have the money to run a campaign again. And I think that they are also after being reduced from forty four to twenty seats. They need to show that they can get things done. Even even with the smaller membership and to give Jagmeet Singh an opportunity to prove that what we saw of him during the campaign his ability to strike the right chord can continue in the House of Commons. One last last quick point on that We are looking as you mentioned Laura for a number of bills to be introduced fairly quickly. This is only supposed to be a week or ten days that we have the parliament sitting before Christmas I think we're GONNA see legislation. That would introduce that middle class tax. Cut sometime next week to ensure that Canadian see that they are beginning to deliver on that. Promise I I think we'll see legislation to ban assault weapons After all this was a huge wedge issue for the Liberals Every single M. P.. I talked to said that the one big vote vote driver particularly no suburbs around. Toronto was harder stand. They're taking on firearms and gun control and lastly potentially a fiscal update to give Canadians a sense of where the books are. It may be in the context of supply bill because the government needs money to continue to operate. So these are the sorts of things will get an early indication of what Lisa legislative the initial shall legislative priorities will be twenty seconds. Chris and we gotTA talk about President Prime Minister Trudeau's hot mic comments at the NATO meeting in. US President trump calling him two faced. How big a deal is this? I don't think it's a big deal and Kennedy. US relations might be a bigger deal here. We heard both Jagmeet Singh and Andrew Scheer the Conservative leader talking about the misstep in very important international setting Justin Trudeau shoot over. Frankly should have known better. Instead of having a focus on the throne speech we spent a large part yesterday talking about whether he's hurt Kennedy relation all right Chris. Thank you very much okay. Laura thanks six. Chris Hall is a C._B._S.'s national affairs editor and host of the hosts he was in our Ottawa. Studio for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

government Jagmeet Singh Laura Lynch Prime Minister Trudeau Pharma Care Chris Hull Justin Trudeau MOORHEAD Chris Good US Quebec CDC Commons parliament
"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

05:36 min | 10 months ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay so let's say hypothetically that you succeed seed in this plan to have your intelligence operative elected to Australian parliament. Once they're inside. What is it that y'all looking for from them like what? What kind of information do they then have access to? That is really valuable to you as a foreign power internally within the party they be able to learn a lot more about factions and stuffing and this would actually help a fun intelligence agency buildup and even large number of operatives within within parliament and there are so many rumors going around Parliament House for example. Some of these could be quite valuable to a political party. If they turn up turn out to be true. In terms of being able to compromise someone through blackmail for example and then get them to become an agent that way. That kind of reminds me of like house of cards odds right like there. I remember there being a couple of plots where they would find out some sort of rumor about that person's personal life I don't know maybe they're closeted or maybe they having an affair air or something like that that they don't WanNa come out publicly. Is that the kind of rumor that you're talking about that. Would they be used against say Stafa. Or maybe even another elected politician to to then get them to do what you want. Absolutely on there have been allegations for example of cabinet ministers. Yeah having affairs with with members of this stuff and these are the kinds of things that you know of course valuable to other political parties and of great interest to the media which seeks to uncover and report on them. They're also just as interesting to intelligence agencies because of the power that they have if they have that information. That really isn't something that I thought of. Yeah neither so that is one extremely dramatic option manipulating stuff politicians using blackmail as well as fading dating back General Information About how the government all the potty is thinking and working and then there's influence on the actual political prices we talking votes on the floor of parliament. Committee is you can talk to my own onto especially anything to do with intelligence security foreign affairs in the West we have a picture of spies as a people who steal information whereas I think in in in Chinese history spies if they really look up to and a praise of people who specialized in political influence of people who could format mutiny in enemy on these people who could gain the trust of enemy leaders and push them towards a peace treaty with the Communist Party in China for example what is some of the big policy areas that China would be interested potentially to influence. I think certainly China would try to make life Ephesia by the repeal for interference laws ensure that they are enforced by not giving resourcing political backing to the agencies involved but in that and that would be the Attorney General's department the Department of Public Prosecution Prosecution in Asia they will be having significant foreign foreign policy objectives so that would mean for example seeking to change Australia's position on a territorial dispute that countries engaged in Signing up tomorrow trade deals that that gives the other country more leverage and more channels for influence into country. It feels like kind of new frontier though. I mean actually seeking to have an operative installed as an elective an elected member of parliament element in another in another government or at least if not in opposition. Do we see this anywhere else in in history or or in countries similar to Australia. I I honestly can't off the top of my head. Think of something so agree GIS in history may have happened by. This is clearly a sort of much a high level and much much more disturbing level of interference. Then we've heard about in Australia previously. So Alex sees. This is uncharted territory and so does the political editor the Sydney Morning Herald. Peter Hart show. Who's written a lot about Chinese influence? Most recently for the CY win the CY. I quite the full ahead of Isaiah Duncan Lewis. Who told me that? The Chinese government wants us to cover Hundley take over the political system as well as the economic and social systems of a strident and operate them in in China's interests and that it might take Dick is for the full effect to happen by one day we would wake up in Dunkin Lewis's woods and find out government making decisions which were not in Australia's interests what what do you think when you hear that warning accords with sort of the standard thinking among people who are looking at Chinese Communist Party and authoritarian Tehran influence operations. which is that quite often? They're not necessarily seeking just to break down to Moxie. They're also seeing seeking to repurpose repurpose them and manipulate them. It's not about exporting for example an authoritarian government. It's being able to call up the players in a democratic system so that it superficially democratic you still got to vote as people just did in Hong Kong but your elected leaders don't actually reflect flex your views so it's definitely not an exaggerated concern. I don't think so. And by the very nature of these activities we we will probably probably on the the the tip of the iceberg.

Australia China Parliament House Chinese Communist Party Communist Party Isaiah Duncan Lewis Hong Kong Chinese government Sydney Morning Herald Asia Peter Hart Alex Tehran Department of Public Dunkin Lewis Ephesia
"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:23 min | 10 months ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. stridency that it's political system. It's very repower and hasn't been infiltrated or sabotage by Chinese operatives. I can assure strains that under the resources have never been stronger. The laws does have never been tougher and the government has never been more determined to Cape Australians free and safe from foreign interference. Thank you very much is Jio is investigating a Chinese government to get one of its spies elected to parliament and if that sounds far fetched you should know. It's an easier job than you think I'm Stephen Stockwell and and I'm Angelov Weipa and today on the signal. We explained step by step. How like that would come off and ask what kind of damage quota foreign spy do from inside inside parliament as an investigative reporter? There are very few times. I've received message this important. It's late October. And One of my sources tells me I spy for the Chinese Communist Party wants to blow his his cover out of the spawn Happening in Melbourne with Impunity. So this story broke on sixty minutes over the weekend and and likely blimpy Andrew Hastie was saying it kind of does sound like a spy novel. Yea It really does and the center of it all is a luxury car dealer. Name Nick Zhao. Now the story is that he was approached by the Chinese Communist Party and offered a million bucks to run as a liberal candidate for federal parliament. He reportedly then with Australia's by agency is zero and in March was found dead in a moment hotel room and so obviously there are a lot of questions everyone has about that case including zero which is currently in the middle title of an investigation. But we also have questions about the toss that Nick Gel was reportedly asked to complete specifically how foreign government any foreign government might go about making this happen in Australia and what might happen if they pulled it off. I think there are a couple of governments that might be engage in these kinds kinds of activities Russia for example. But I don't think there's any country that engages in such high levels Australia apart from China Alex Jones ski is an analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute and he specializes in monitoring. The Chinese Communist. Party's foreign influence efforts so we asked him to talk us through how light these smart rotten beginning with step on finding the right candidate. You're looking for someone. Who could plausibly present themselves you know in political circles someone someone who speaks the local language Has At least a couple of us in the country is relatively intelligent but also as has has been hinted in the case of Nick Jal someone who you could also find ways to compromise and his case. That's that's through financial means. Are you also looking for someone. Who has I guess you know a clean record in terms of norges surname links to the foreign government in question differently the Preferable but in some cases I think a lot of politicians to have ties to foreign countries. Some of them quite strong but nonetheless on the list legal and acceptable within our society. So it's not necessarily an issue as long as it's at least appears to be a normal levels. I I think when you hear this story in the first place we'll hear about this scenario immediately. Sounds so far fetched right like you naturally assume I think as an USTRALIAN Woida that there would be some checks and balances in place in you know some just some background in security checks that would prevent someone who was a I guess a spy from another country being elected to hold high office. What kind of checks are there along the way frankly? There aren't many checks currently in place that could pick up this kind of activity easily Political parties do run checks on potential candidates. It's but I don't think they'd have much luck if they're looking at someone who's being successfully recruited by foreign intelligence agency and I'm not sure what level of involvement as you're heading that vetting process early stages it probably has involvement right so the kind of involvement that would be what like a basic police check may be calling a couple of referees. What are we talking about here? You're looking employers. I'm not sure exactly but potentially potentially looking at their financial information potential conflicts of interest to get them getting them to disclose these kinds of things before the public has a chance to to to find it out themselves so asking the person directly basically saying Oh you buy it works in some cases where you'd be looking get people's background facebook and finding they've been involved in questionable organizations or something but it's quite difficult to to expect a political party to suit to this entirely on their own. I think political parties if they haven't already should be finding ways to cooperate more closely with government government security agencies on bidding so maybe getting involved at a much earlier stage is what you're saying potentially I think it's a discussion that the parties have to with the government. So let's say you clean the bidding process of your chosen political party. Then there's the small matter of winning an election and at this point it's money that really helps. The most fundraising is a really important aspect of Australian politics and that would be a relatively easy way for a foreign intelligence agency to build up the status of someone. They were hoping to get into parliament by funneling donations to them through said potties rights. I just throwing a ton of money at that campaign and you try to diversify the source of the funds as much as possible muscle. None of it would have caused directly. Come from a foreign intelligence agency would be through businessmen they bribed or or organizations that they somehow compromise. So after all that if you are elected somewhat shockingly. It's pretty much a clear run to Canberra. There's no for example security clearance process for members of parliament and as far as I know becoming a member of parliament or cabinet. Minister is the only way that you can actually access classified material without so having a security clearance is that in and of itself why that is an attractive course of action for foreign power as opposed to say trying to plice and operative at some stage in the political power structure absolutely I think they recognize it is it is a weakness and And even now when accusations of this come out it benefits them in the sense that it helps questions the legitimacy of some of democratic institutions the potential that someone could be in parliament as a representative of these people but as a representative of hostile foreign power..

Chinese Communist Party Australia Chinese government ABC Andrew Hastie Nick Zhao Jio Nick Jal Nick Gel Angelov Weipa Russia Canberra Stephen Stockwell Melbourne facebook Australian Strategic Policy In Alex Jones
"parliament" Discussed on FT News

FT News

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on FT News

"This Financial Times podcast is supported by capital. One capital one is building a better bank one that feels and acts nothing like typical bank. It's why they're reimagining banking making and building something completely different they offer accounts with no fiercer minimums the also offer one of the best savings rates in America and you can open a capital one account from anywhere in in five minutes capital one. This is banking reimagined open an account today. Inexperience banking reimagined for yourself capital one. What's in your wallet capital a hello from the Financial Times in London. I'm Shona Jenkins and this is news in focus where we offer our insights into the stories that matter we have seen a historic day for British politics today as the Supreme Court will Boris Johnson's decision corrode parliament for five weeks unlawful. I'm here in the studio with Jane. Croft our law courts correspondent and NEO PUCK leader writer to discuss the ruling and what it means looking forward. I let's hear the moment when Lady Hale President of the British Supreme Court reads out the the unanimous verdict. The court is bound to conclude therefore that the decision to advise Her Majesty to Perot Parliament was unlawful because it had the effect of frustrating or preventing the ability of parliament to carry out its constitutional functions and without reasonable justification and let's hear the reaction of leading legal petitioner in today's Supreme Court case. What's the last few weeks seen an extraordinary series of attacks on our democracy. Parliament elected from forty six million of us was unlawfully suspended by Prime Minister elected from one hundred sixty thousand judges have been threatened by a number ten source and those of us who have sought saw protect the only institution in our Constitution with the U K Y democratic mandate have been subject to death threats and some of us have had our home addresses published. I am delighted today that the Supreme Court is protected the foundational principle of any democracy which is the right of Kabamba Parliament to do the jobs for which they were elected. There is much to be done to protect democracy for myself. I am very grateful rightful to the exceptional legal team and to the almost eight thousand small diagnose able this case to go ahead the victory so Jane can you tell us the specifics of what's been ruled against and what this means for parliament will the prorogation just be rendered void. Yep So basically the Supreme Court had to consider to cook aces one from Scotland Highschool Wom- from the High Court in London and both about the same issue about whether or not the Perot gang was local the first thing that caught to consider was whether or not justiciable so whether the colts could actually review this under Britain's partially coded unwritten constitution and they did decide it was just ish until then they had to decide whether Renault it was motivated by improper purpose of stymying parliamentary scrutiny of the government and they did decide that it was motivated by that purpose purpose so it prevented parliament from doing its job of scrutinising the executive and therefore was unlawful and this is being called a historic moment. Neil has has parliament ever seen anything like this before well to have been a succession of key moments in the history of palm and the British constitution where the powers of parliament and the crown and so on have been defined in the past but I think he's safe to say there's been nothing like this in the modern era in parliament where a court has taken a decision that directly impinges on the Prime Minister's powers to Perot Parliament and this is of course why the courts were so reluctant Alexa to get involved and why those low sensitivity vertical getting involved but the court ruled that although normally the exercise of proactive power to Perot Parliament and wouldn't be a matter for the courts here there was an important issue at stake on whether that power was being used allusively and exceeded now there have been calls for Boris Johnson to step down. How is he reacted. And what do you think the impact will be on his foothold in parliament he has this made clear that he intends to carry on. He said that he disagrees with the ruling and the expectation is I think he will try and tough this out as he is tough out the number of things that have gone against him recently in parliament and earlier in his career but I think he's going to get more more difficult for him. In parliament that must be a very big likelihood now that he will face some kind of no confidence votes in the coming weeks a nights could well trigger an election certainly will be a lot more difficult who for him to fulfill the strategy that he'd been intending to do of using the threat of a no deal brexit to negotiate with a you know if if an election is called and if he makes fall then we'll see what voters make of his behavior on the various different parties positions on Brexit so parliament is going back into action as of tomorrow Wednesday and in the run-up to the crucial October thirty Brexit Day as you mentioned this ruling could have a significant impact on brexit negotiations could you elaborate on that it will be a lot more difficult thing now for Boris Johnson to credibly probably threatened or have the implicit threaten the background of our no deal brexit if he's not able to reach an agreement with the EU and therefore I think the pressure on him will greatly increase to try and get some kind of a deal if he can do that and get it through parliament then he could in theory at least go into an election and say I delivered on my promise to ensure brings. It was achieved by October thirty first. But of course we're very short time. It's very very difficult for him to get agreement in the short time that's now available so the likelihood is we'll have another extension either. He will have to do that as he's he's being mandated by the law passed in parliament or parliament will seek to take matters into its own hands with some kind of vote of no confidence or even some kind of addressed addressed you leaders themselves somehow bypasses the Prime Minister Jane what does the ruling mean for UK democracy in politics in general. Do you think the decision opens the gate to further judicial interventions in the government's decisions. I think is possible. It certainly strengthens parliamentary sovereignty not and it also shines a light on the British constitution as I say we've gotTa Kinda partially coded largely unwritten constitution which consists of things like common law legislation it consists of works authority and it also consists of political conventions and prorogation is school convention and the whole point about political conventions in the past is that politicians new standards of behavior and ways of behaving around the conventions and you know the whole constitution worked quite well but but I think the problem is that also MP's now saying that some of these political conventions like prorogation perhaps needs to be put on a statutory footing so that you know they can't then be potentially abused by politicians in the future so neil. Do you think Boras can survive. That's a very difficult question to answer. I think I think as I said before I think it's very likely that there will be some kind of no confidence vote in him which will lead to are you an election but I think he's making clear at the moment is intention is to hang on and to try and deliver deal Vegan or sunny to fight an election. What we don't know is whether other senior Tories may now be starting to conclude the Boris Johnson has become a liability ability that his position is becoming untenable and whether there might be some pressure put on him before an election them stand down. I think a lot depends on whether he he can pull a rabbit out of the hat and miraculously get a deal in the next couple of weeks. Thanks Jane Thank you. Neil and thank you for listening. Don't forget forget if you missed our episodes on Edward snowden 's new memoir China's role in tackling climate change or the breakdown of talks between the US and the Afghan Taliban. You can find them all the usual podcast platforms..

Parliament Supreme Court Boris Johnson Jane Kabamba Parliament Prime Minister Financial Times British Supreme Court London Neil Perot America Lady Hale High Court Shona Jenkins NEO Afghan Taliban Alexa leader writer US
"parliament" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"This is politics weekly. I'm really mason vice given by the government to Her Majesty. The Queen to Parliament from Ninth September Fourteenth Tober it was unlawful and therefore appropriation itself is unlawful after losing six votes in six days. Boris Johnson was dealt yet another blow yesterday. A Scottish judges declared his decision to prorogue parliament was unbelievable and then another as the government was forced to publish it secret no deal plan operation yellowhammer hulme which predicts public disorder rising prices and disruptions to food and medicine but the possibility parliament being unproved no deal of the table for now a new immediate chance general election the prime minister is running out of options could a Northern Ireland only faxed up his only way out also this week we talked to protesters outside parliament about whether the wounds opened up by Brexit can ever be healed and the Economics Author Grace Blakely about how to save the world from `financialisation. That's all at this week's politics weekly but I the House of Commons witnessed unprecedented scenes on Monday night as MP's MP's protested against the suspension of parliament with signs saying silenced or shouting shame on you at Torrey MP's that was even about of singing but not so fast I yesterday Scottish judges found unanimously that the prime minister effectively misled the queen by advising had to suspend parliament and that prorogation was unlawful awful. The government will appeal against the ruling at the Supreme Court next week what this means is anyone's guess but after also forcing him to publish yesterday's Operation Yellowhammer Hamad Documents Parliament is certainly looking more formidable opponent than Johnson kind of expected a fortnight ago. The narrowing of his options even signaled a change of governmental tone this week with Boris Johnson calling a no deal brexit failure of statecraft which we would all be responsible so what options are now left open to him. Well I am joined to discuss this Bhai Rafael bath from the Guardian cables from the spectator and grace blakely from the New Statesman. Hello everybody so what does yesterday's decision Asian by Scottish judges mean and could parliament be recalled next week. He wants to have a go walking. There's a very fiddly tactical also technical point. Reyes which is recalling parliament is not that easy wants his paroled so you have to so actually the mechanisms do that isn't entirely obvious but now the bigger point I think is that in Lourdes has been established more or less that Boris Johnson was lying when he said that the reason for proroguing parliament was because you needed queen's speech and the parliamentary session going a bit too long when there were some agenda other than breaks it that really needed a new session of the Commons. No one really believe if that any way. I don't think I mean the ministers and supporters of the government will really struggling to even remember that was the line was supposed to be giving when the announcement was I made about a prorogation. Everyone plainly understood that it was because the woman's was noticed the cool potentially to Nigel Brexit the prime minister wanted to get out of the way now what's interesting about the ruling from the Scottish Appeal Court is that they accept essentially the argument that Boris Johnson kind of weaponized weaponized a crown power for partisan agenda but decided that that was unconstitutional and therefore against the principles of the Constitution and and also really disrespectful to the Queen if you care about that sort of thing and therefore the prorogation shouldn't stand but at the same time there's been a separate ruling in the English High Court which chose not to judge whether or not a Johnson had an ulterior motive in other words they didn't do the judges not stint sort of say. He wasn't lying. They thought his entire entirely possible. He was lying but what they said. Is that a political opinion and not justiciable by the call in other words. Actually you can Kinda Pirogue for political prowess. Let's go and it's not very nice. It's still route to the queen but it's not illegal so now the supreme court basically has to decide between the kind of scots law interpretation of of whether or not the likely invalidate the per radiation or the English Lord interpretation which is year was ally but that doesn't make it unconstitutional. We all kind of something of a tipping point in terms of how how the British constitution actually works. I mean obviously historically you. Have you know a set of norms and a set of legal and political norms that suggests there's a particular balance of power how between the legislative the executive and the judiciary with parliamentary sovereignty meaning that the legislature is supposed to be in charge but like looking back back to like this is really naughty but referencing the way badge thought of the English constitution saying that actually power does lie with the executive in the UK and actually we have one of the most powerful executives in the developed world so I think this is kind of very metastable constitution and is not a tool Klay. Eh Who's GonNa come out on top. There's no I mean ultimately I was kind of discussing this last night on news like what happens next and if Johnson does try and kind of defy the courts what's defy defy parliament and go to the EU to say we'll go to the union say anything and then goes to them and says we want an extension. There's a question about who speaks for the British state who will civil servants who will officials of the state obey and that's like a really deep seated heated like constitutional question with quite profound implications so with Boris Johnson testing these the boundaries of the Constitution here it is certainly possible that the supreme court rule in the Scottish see prem- court could rule in the Scottish touches favor next week and if they do that Katie what are the ramifications of that going to be and and could the government in fact make a sneaky move to bring back parliament exactly on the eve of Labor Conference and try to ruin it. I think there's ramifications and wherever the Supreme Court the first one which I think is probably the horry even get the consequence for the Tory government if they lose this case in supreme core is what they win. It and I think say if they say the Scottish cool is wrong that does not stand in relation to the English cool. You're playing very easily into the hands of the SMP and you're gonNA quite quickly see scenic Stanford and and her MP's who make this point that look we told you a different than England told you this. Tory government doesn't represent you and now the judiciary is the judges on even taken seriously so I think if problems for both parties whatever happens if she says that it was the parliament does in fact talked to be ridiculed what happens then we begin to see conferences cancelled and which are money spinners for the parties involved with an election. What would the government do at that point. I think if they say that this has been a part of it has to be returned then yes it is problematic for conferences but I think that he look at this rebel alliance of MP's the talk over the summer. They wanted to cancel conference recess anyway. I think that these political point of view if this is deemed unlawful awful is very much the conservative government now you might have a smaller version of conference go on you have confidence with politicians few politicians because they all had they have to sit in the chamber and the rebel. Alliance wants to take control of the paper and de various things but the the the biggest headache is for Boris Johnson and his team now they wanted to Peru parliament for a few reasons. I think we can all agree the political native there at one of the things I would say they had time to negotiate eight without people trying to tie their hands. Now the fact that you've already had law passed to extend article fifty try and force Boris Johnson to get breakfast makes it more difficult difficult for them to have those negotiations but the thing they did want to do is a few weeks ago. The government was looking fairly smooth at least compared had to now and you had the situation where because parliament wasn't sitting they use the August recess asked to really take control intense the gender and terms of pushing the domestic priorities taes. I think they had hoped this five week. Period would be a time where they scan early general election campaign and if parliament returns. I think that we sold the past couple of the days. I was almost like a prime minister who is being taught shit on a daily basis. Whether it's extending no deal I think that this group of opposition parties he's plus some former conservative. He's had the whip patrol category and a few more things you've had the humble dress.

Parliament Boris Johnson Supreme Court prime minister Grace Blakely Nigel Brexit Scottish Appeal Court yellowhammer hulme Torrey MP Northern Ireland Bhai Rafael House of Commons English High Court Stanford EU Reyes executive England
"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

"All are busy. That's why listeners tune into the daily so they don't miss out on the most important news and when it comes to hiring employers turned to Ziprecruiter so they don't miss out on the most qualified candidates edits ziprecruiter's powerful technology finds the right people for your job and actively invites them to apply. That's why four to five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day and today our listeners can try ziprecruiter for free at Ziprecruiter DOT com slash daily. Here's what else you need to the trump administration said it was calling off for now the year long negotiations between the US and the Talbot I want to end the war in Afghanistan after the Taliban took credit for a car bombing in Kabul that killed twelve people including a a US soldier. We're GONNA walk away from a deal if others tried to use violence to achieve better ends not right it's not appropriate killed an American and it made no sense the Taliban to be rewarded for that kind of bad behavior the negotiations appear to be on the verge of a peace deal so much so that leaders of the Taliban the man and the Afghan government on their way to Camp David for a secret meeting with trump a meeting secretary of state might pomp hail defended on on Sunday and interviews with CNN NBC then anybody bring up a weather was appropriate to have the Taliban set foot on Camp David. There were lots lots of discussions around that <hes> Camp David has a long history and important history and also had an important role in complex peace negotiation sometimes with some pretty bad actors as you well know check doc the Taliban had not agreed to stop attacking Americans in advance of a peace deal but in a tweet trump quote quote if they cannot agree to a ceasefire during these very important peace talks and would even kill twelve innocent people then they probably don't have the power to negotiate a meaningful agreement anyway and the leader of a prestigious lab at MIT has resigned from from the university and from the Board of the New York Times over revelations that he solicited far greater donations from Jeffrey Epstein than previously no bill and tried to hide the source of the money. The New Yorker magazine reported that the lab's director Joey Ito instructed staff took conceal epsteins donations as anonymous to avoid scrutiny of his record as a sex offender who had solicited minors..

Taliban Ziprecruiter Camp David US Jeffrey Epstein The New Yorker magazine Joey Ito Kabul Afghanistan New York Times Afghan government director CNN MIT NBC
"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

"Episode is supported by Capital Group home of American funds an investment firm that has helped change your clients can I into I can visit capital group DOT com today. Talk to your adviser or consultant Alton for Investment Risks and information so more Boris Johnson calls for a special election but it turns out. He needs a two-thirds vote from parliament to make that happen so what actually happens. Opposition leaders have roundly rejected his call for a general election next month. He doesn't get his two-thirds majority for an election. It's Johnson had never known an opposition in the history of democracy. That's refused to have an election so in effect he stuck he's boxed in on his big goal of pulling Britain out of the EU and he's not able to move ahead with the election. The thing he was hoping would break the logjam ugh jam would give him the mandate so basically this all backfires it all backfires he loses more votes than any incoming prime minister in recent in British history and he finds himself in far worse shape than he was before all this started and that leaves the brexit situation where where exactly well it leaves frankly everything in a state of paralysis and confusion by the end of the week and London one of the questions on people's minds were would Boris Johnson simply have to resign really well. If you take the prime minister at his word word. Can you make a promise today to the British public that you will not go back to Brussels and ask for another delay Brexit and so average. I'd rather be dead ditch but hate by Brexit he has said he would rather die in a ditch then have to go to Brussels and and ask for an extension of Britain's departure yet as things stand today. That's exactly what Boris Johnson will have to do. Who and if all of this were not enough this week of back to back defeats? Boris Johnson had to endure the indignity of his own brother Joe uh-huh Johnson who is also a member of parliament and a minister in the government <hes> announcing that he too was going to resign because as he put it he he was torn between family loyalty and the national interest when you planning to resign for comment to say it's been an honor to be roping minister under the three governments but it's time to move on sorry. This is a very tight knit family so the fact that Joe Johnson felt obliged to take this step really says something about the depth of his concern about a no deal brexit about the course that his brother Boris Johnson has the country going on right. If your own kin a member Conservative Party your brother quits then. What does that say? That's right so just to be clear. Those people opposed to Johnson right now in parliament they are insisting on going back to the European Union to negotiate some kind of an accent and so if Johnson is unwilling to do that he might might be out of office but I guess the question is is the EU willing to actually enter these kinds of negotiations. Aren't they pretty fed up with Britain. At this point. The is completely fed up with Britain at this point. They believe that they had months of good faith negotiations associations with Boris Johnson's predecessor Theresa May. They offered her an agreement. She brought that agreement back to parliament it was overwhelmingly defeated defeated not once but several times and there's absolutely no indication from European officials that Boris Johnson is going to get a better or different outcome than Theresa may did and whether or not he holds an election is being largely dismissed in Europe. Their view is we have have given Britain the best deal it's going to get and if Britain doesn't want that deal. It's time for them to simply leave. <hes> what do you make of this remarkable remarkable sequence of events your your first full week as London bureau chief well. There's a couple of ways to look at it. One is is that this is just a situation of overwhelming chaos confusion paralysis finger-pointing so on one level level. It looks like dysfunction you know on a on a grand scale but if you dig beyond that if you sort of look a little closer what you see is that this this was really a week in which the checks and balances in the British political system really worked you have the prime minister coming in with this this hard line even reckless approach to brexit embodied in his decision to suspend debate in parliament to sort of circumvent <hes> the normal functioning of parliament by sending the MP's home and then you've got this coalition of members of his own party and the opposition coming coming together to put a brake on the prime minister to head off some of these most extreme outcomes and that's kind of what makes British democracy so unique that there is this set of conventions of folk ways that impose a level of of moderation on these proceedings and we really did see a victory for that in parliament victory that was not at all clear when the House House of Commons convened at the beginning of the week so mark you're saying that even though this all looked especially chaotic that actually what we just saw was is democratic institutions holding functioning and succeeding but of course the other way of looking at this and the way Boris Johnson I assume looks at it is that the will of the people has just been subverted that they want brexit with or without a deal and that parliament what what you described as the kind of assertive functioning of democracy in Britain just stood in their way yeah that's right Boris. Johnson's argument will be I want to go to the people to to put this to the people and these. MP's Britain's politically elite is standing in the way of popular sentiment and and that will be the core of the message that he brings to the British public as he attempts to turn this situation around and how are the British system is holding up compared to the American system that you know so well if we put these two democracies side-by-side. How does it stack up well. One thing that is very striking to me in covering this rebellion in the Conservative Party is to compare it to the Republican Party in the United United States and they're of course UC barely a handful of Republicans who have stood up to president trump. This is a Republican publican party. That is one hundred percent under his control. He has engineered a total takeover of the Republican Party. I think Boris Johnson tried ride in the past two weeks to do the same thing over here. I think this rebellion shows that the party wasn't going to stand for it. I think it's also fair to say that Boris Johnson's having a tougher time in his populist crusade paid than Donald Trump is in the United States.

Boris Johnson Britain prime minister Republican Party Conservative Party European Union London Capital Group Theresa May United States Brussels Brexit consultant Alton Donald Trump DOT Europe House House of Commons
"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

"<music>. Hello Mark Hi Hi Michael. Hey there so you're in the you're in the London bureau right. Now I am am. You're on a landline I am. I think this office is pretty quiet. I closed the door and I don't think anyone's GonNa Bother me. Oh Oh you have an office now. I got a corner office. I got two windows. Does I'm sitting here looking at double decker buses living the dream okay. We're GONNA get started. Are you recording okay up. I'm recording okay <hes> so mark you just became the London bureau chief after several years covering the trump administration being a White House reporter. This is quite a moment to make that leap. I guess you could say it's a little bit like the frying pan to the fire metaphor. There's probably more newsy situations you could parachute into but it's Kinda hard to imagine imagine there are political fireworks in Britain this morning over a surprise move today by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to suspend parliament parliament's now. Here's what it will do. <hes> parliament was supposed to sit again on Monday for a number of weeks but instead this will suspend parliament the week of September tenth and it won't resume until October fourteenth just as Britain is to leave the EU at the end of Tober you'll say insulted Lorcy and deny the MP's and toilet need to today's possibly Voto brexit done that is completely untrue. UTICA what we're doing what bringing forward they knew legislative program talk in our <music> so in our last episode about Brexit. We spoke for for colleague. Catherine bent hold just after Boris Johnson had suspended parliament and basically cut them out of the decision making process about how brexit would move forward and counter and talked talked about how that had set up this question about what version of democracy would prevail in Britain should be the version that prioritizes the popular will of the British British people who voted for Brexit with or without a deal with the EU which is what Boris Johnson wants or should the version of democracy be allowing parliament element the People's representatives to play a major role in what leaving the e looks like so. How has this all unfolded in the days since Boris Johnson made that move well. I think the answer is that it unfolded resoundingly in favour of parliament as parliament reconvened gene on Tuesday because remember Boris Johnson's suspension of parliament doesn't again for another week or so there was an atmosphere of high-drama NBA's takes the Duchy that when he turns up but our children's school as it was apparent. He's very well behaved fellow. He wouldn't dare behave like that in front with MP's going on TV on the radio the one nation this is not one dogmas complaining about Boris Johnson having committed a constitutional outrage is a constitutional outrage this extraordinarily he needs to be held to account by power but not shutting Dan Parliament and all of this emotion climax of course one of the most remarkable things took place during the statement was to see the member for Bracknell crossed the floor prime minister. You've lost your majority with a member of Boris Johnson's own Conservative Party crossing the aisle in front of the prime administer to sit with members of the Liberal Democratic Party and act which deprive Johnson in one stroke of his majority in parliament. He is it winning friends in Europe. He's losing friends at home his government with no mandate no morals and as of today no majority. Dr Thing so after this very stormy start the next thing that happens is tonight. The United Kingdom has been plunged into even deeper political. Oh chaos the opposition joined by twenty one members of the Conservative Party vote in favor of advancing this legislation that would effectively Saito Boris Johnson. You can't go to Brussels and pull Britain out of the European Union unless you make a deal with the European Union first the majority of British lawmakers including some members of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's own party voted to stop Johnson's plan to leave the European Union without without a withdrawal agreement good stuff the is to the right three hundred twenty eight the nose to the left three hundred one. The is the is heavy. I love so that's the first major defeat. He suffers in his term as prime minister and it's a big one. There is no consensus in this house to leave the European Union without a deal there is no majority see for no deal in the country because it goes straight to the heart of what Boris Johnson said he would do as prime minister <hes> and that is to withdraw withdraw on October thirty first dealer no deal regardless of this situation so when that one conservative lawmaker theatrically flipped on on the floor of parliament it turned out that was a signal of a bigger growing uprising within Boris Johnson's party over this approach he was taking to Brexit. Try to cut Hutt parliament out and just kind of crashed this thing through that's right and it's really very unprecedented. I mean the Conservative Party. British parties in general have iron discipline so to see twenty-one lawmakers peel off and vote against the prime minister and the government is really a wholly unprecedented development in British politics so from the very first session of parliament the British people understood that what they were witnessing with something entirely new in their modern political history and what exactly is underlying these defections affections and rejection of Boris Johnson's plan. I mean why is this so unwanted that even members of his own party are rising up against him. Well the basic fear is that if Britain withdraws from the European Union with no agreement in place overnight overnight it will cause a multitude of major problems you could imagine trucks that transport food and medicine from Europe into Britain being stuck at the border in Calais France. You could imagine chaos at the airports as people who are used to travelling back and forth without passports suddenly suddenly face the prospect of having to show identification you risk in short havoc havoc that could really hurt the economy but could also further polarize the debate over brexit so I think that even within Boris Johnson's party which remember is a party that wholeheartedly supports the goal of pulling out of Europe where e idea of pulling out in this disorderly abrupt way just scared a lot of the members of Johnson's own own party and that fear is what motivated this rebellious so this is not opposition to brexit per se it's opposition to a brexit brexit that creates no predictable trade scenarios ordeals that could suddenly just blow up the function of the British economy. That's that's right many of the rebels if not most of the rebels are on record as saying they think Britain should leave. It's just the way you do it that that is so important and for these twenty one pulling out in a chaotic sudden way is simply too big a risk and that's what they're pushing against or didn't the entire Conservative Party and presumably these rebels who voted against him didn't they know just a couple of weeks back when they elected poorest. Johnson is our prime minister that this is the manner in which he planned to proceed to crash out of the EU without a negotiated deal with the European Union. I mean isn't that understood. Stood that is understood. Yes Boris. Johnson never made any secret of his intentions here but remember. It's not just these twenty-one anyone people who elected Boris Johnson the leader of the Tory party and hence the prime minister he was elected by a slightly broader group of people and so Boris Johnson is tapping into a legitimate view on the part of many members of his party that the time for negotiation the time for for compromise is over and Britain really just needs to pull the Plug uh-huh but to these twenty one rebels he's setting Britain on a horse that they feel ultimately will be economically and politically destructive so they view their role as saying. Hey wait a minute. We want to deliver brexit but we want to do it. In a responsible way in this is not the responsible way to do it. So how did the Prime Minster respond to this rebellion to this smooth in parliament force Johnson does two things. The ruling conservatives are in turmoil. Boys Johnson has kicked hot twenty-one members of his own party after they voted against same disease control of the parliamentary agenda the first thing he does is he carries out what you almost have to call us. Stalinist purge of these rebels rebels. He kicks them out of the Party while I would have to say. Boris Johnson really had the worst week. I mean here he is. He's new. He lost everyone of of his first votes. In parliament which is unprecedented. He purged twenty-one people in his own party because they didn't support him. I mean I think it's kind of dunning and it leads to this extraordinary tableau of these conservative. MP Some of whom have served for decades some of whom are elders of the party giving these emotional farewell speeches in the House of Commons you have the grandson grandson of Winston Churchill Nicholas Soames the speak. I'm not standing of the next section. I'm bus approaching the end a thirty seven years service to this hice of which I've been proud. I'm honored beyond words to be. I'm not I'm showed a very sad that it should end in this way speaking very emotionally nationally about all the years he spent in parliament who have titans of British politics Kenneth Clarke who's known as the father of the house a former Chancellor Chancellor of the exchequer a man who might well have been prime minister himself party tonight. It's been taken over by a Roman knockabout. uh-huh so character.

Saito Boris Johnson prime minister Conservative Party Britain European Union Brexit parliament People Boys Johnson Liberal Democratic Party Dan Parliament London Europe Dr Thing United Kingdom NBA Kenneth Clarke House of Commons
"parliament" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

10:01 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Is the political seen a weekly conversation with new yorker writers and guests about politics. It's friday september sixth. I'm dorothy wickham executive editor of the the new yorker this week. The prime minister and the house of commons engaged in one of the most vicious political battles in british history. The revolt nope began after boris johnson who has been in office for only six weeks received the queen's approval to suspend parliament between september eleventh at october fourteenth that gave m._p.'s virtually no time to pass legislation that could stop the united kingdom from leaving the european union without a deal deal on october thirty first twenty-one members of johnson's conservative party dubbed. The rebel alliance were prominently among those who fought back. They passed a bill that would block a no deal exit from the e._u. And denied johnson's call for a general election johnson banned the mall from the the party and threatened to call an election in october and that was only the star on thursday a press conference at a police training center in yorkshire. You're johnson answered questions about brexit. Can you make to miss a day to the british public. You will not get back to brussels and ask for another delay to tobacco yes and and which gave ditch to give it design fast prime minister than going. Also that glad i had stayed. I i really cost two billion filed them on it. Achieves absolute auto what on earth is the point of a further delay same night. A new yorker staff writer joins me from london to discuss johnson's rise to power and what this week's dramas signal about the future of brexit and and the potential damage to british democracy sam welcome back. Hello hello very nice to be back. He had quite a week yeah yeah very much so we spoke last in march. When theresa may was still prime minister and she was experiencing her own parliamentary humiliations over brexit. She stepped down in june. Boris johnson could not be more different. <hes> she was known for her very sober kind of grinding brexit strategy johnson who is convinced that the british public is sick of this seemingly endless departure process and i'm sure he's right about that but he prides himself on his opportunistic kind of come what may approach to politics tell us a little bit about his journey from journalism awesome to ten downing street you completely right johnson. Theresa may couldn't be more different as has political creatures. Johnson is more like a celebrity. You know johnson razor a famous person in the u._k. Since the late ninety s firstly as a as a journalist to the daily telegraph russell's yes. I think you know within sort of political circles. He's really license his mid twenties when he was a really responsible for if you like creating a new genre of british journalism which started to see the european in union as something almost hilarious this kind of overreaching bureaucratic monster that wanted to get rid of bendy bananas and create uniform foam condoms sizes and all sorts of things johnson who had the kind of a taste for the absurd and for humor sort of started extremely successful career in right of british political commentary and so his gift are for you know some of this will sound familiar saying unstable is payable things coming up with something on the spur of the moment grabbing all the attention successfully but also we shouldn't underestimate johnson. He has a feel feel-good factor. Most people around the world probably know the image of johnson sagging on a zip wire during the twenty twelve olympic games games in london. When he was the mayor of london which are the politician could turn that to their advantage and yet everyone sort of lofts and says that goes along with his gaffes and his his lies and the rest of it and you know i think i think things are changing fast at the moment but that certainly the finger that that arrived in downing street this summer a completely different character to resume but inheriting exactly the same article situation and political challenge so you wrote yesterday for the new yorker dot com about the good chap theory of british government which i i loved. I'd never heard of that before. What is that and is it now gone forever. The theory of government coined by distinguished british touring coupe <hes> pity hennessy and it describes the way the british constitution works and the british constitution is is it was a kind of tricky phrase. The truth is that britain has a constitution. That's written down in literally thousands of different places in terms of parliamentary tree procedure in terms of court cases. It's this kind of pilot zest of processes that have kind of gone into the way that britain has been sort of more-or-less last democratically governed for the last five or six hundred years on the good chap theory of government is that people observe tradition. They stay within precedent. I think probably the kind of the best single example of this is the idea of commanding the confidence of the house of commons. When you've lost the confidence the ability to function and exert authority you are supposed to resign and that really is down to people ah in moments of extreme crisis intention sort of knowing that the game is up did know when the game was up yeah. I mean isn't black and white. Nothing's kind of black and white in this process resume certainly took advantage of certain situations according to parliamentary procedure but nonetheless in her showdowns sounds with parliament she basically played straight back and that is not johnson's way at all so give a sense of the mad scene this week and parliament parliament you know over here were so accustomed to cravenly compliant republicans in the house and the senate so it was just stunning to see the the audacity of the rebel alliance in action yeah so i think i'll take a step back and sort of say you know what was johnson awesome trying to achieve this week and sort of how did it go so wrong. Yes okay so he's sort of goal is to try and get britain out of the e see you on october thirty first and the play that he comes up with is to suspend parliament shut down both houses entirely full this critical period when m._p.'s could be passing motions. Oh passing thing laws trying to sort of get in his way. I'm johnson misjudged several things here. He misjudged how furious the house komo he misjudged how organized they would be and he misjudged the as you describe it the audacity acidy of really long-serving mainstream in many cases fairly unremarkable absolutely loyal conservative m._p.'s to go against him including nicholas soames churchill's seventy one year old grandson churchill churchill. I gather as a great hero figure to johnson. I mean it's remarkable. Nicholas soames former defense secretary grandson of of of of winston churchill. He goes door to door in his constituency during elections on horseback. He's almost a character he sort of embodies this kind of one one nation moderate conservatism he rebelled against the government three times in thirty seven years and once was enough for the johnson administration to to throw him out of the party <hes> and and i think to sort of add to these miscalculations the chilton miscalculated the public sympathy that would be on the side of of some of these longstanding m._p.'s w._n._y._c. studios is supported supported by i._f._c. films presenting offical secrets from the director of eye in the sky based on the untold true story here nightly stars as katharine gun a british spy with evidence evidence. Her government is lying to take the country to war with iraq. When she goes public. The administration tries to sweep it under the rug and she must risk a death sentence and the deportation of her family you to ensure the people know the truth. Also starring ray fines matt smith and matthew good now playing in select theaters visit official secrets dot movie for details. Hello podcast listeners. If you're a woman and you've ever considered making your own podcast or if you do make podcasts or if you think about podcasts hod casts or if you're starting podcast you should come to work it. W._n._y._c.'s podcast festival for women the smartest women in podcasting. We'll be sharing how they come. It was story ideas how they make money podcasting and how you can do it too. It's all happening on october. Third and fourth in los angeles register now at work. Get festival dot com. That's w. e. R. k. it festival dot com okay.

boris johnson prime minister johnson administration london Theresa britain dorothy wickham european union m._p. brussels Nicholas soames executive editor winston churchill churchill churchill nicholas soames churchill W._n._y._c. russell hennessy
"parliament" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

boris johnson britain m._p. european union Brexit prime minister ruth davidson Tom pete briggs john berko brussels biarritz theresa nato akers president editor oscar nigel rogers ireland berlin
"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"So I think the resort of the election for this European parliament will give a very, very pick. I mean impact on French politics in future, and also toured the Italian politics on this yearbook. No, we know that for quite a long time. The European politics had a fairly stable, alignment, is two or three major parties holding sway, but how much? They rake configuration of party, alignments and party system. Are we going to get coming out of this election? I don't want to speculate what's going to happen. But indeed, the rise of these so-called, far-right populace has been a theme over the last few years in all national elections across a number of countries. And it's worth to talk about that, and why I want to stay clearly did I don't endorse some of their especially anti-foreign rhetorics and the way they talk politics. I think I'm not as worried as some commenters in Europe are, and the reason for that. I recall a few years back, there was is congress between people like the builders marine lapenne foul Kapit of German, French Dutch, and other far-right populist leaders and I found that a huge change for the better because if we think just one hundred years ago, these. Right wing parties from France, Germany. They would call for war against each other to defend their culture against the other culture. Now, these countries sent their right-wing people to a congress together in order to debate how they can protect their common culture. Of course, again it's against foreign influences against Islam against the Africans against Middle Eastern immigrants cetera. But still it just gives me the sense that even the right wing parties to the vast majority. They're not trying to dissolve the European Union, and then end up in a state of pre e-. You -times of independent countries or even longer before Europe has been at war for centuries. Most of history of Europe is small countries fighting against each other. And I don't see any of these new populist parties one. Wanting to go back to that. And the second statement, I want to make is about this term populism, which I'm very unhappy with because. Populism comes from the word populace, which is people, right? And the biggest part is the European People's Party, which is ironic because it refers to the same route of people and the Greek term for people then is demos, and from that re is, is the word democracies. So it's about the rule of the people, and populism takes this majority rule, and turns it negative, which I find risky, because it just gives a very, very strong opening for these parties to say, yes, we are populous. That's a good thing because we stand for the majority of the people, which don't but that's what they're claiming. So I'm very careful with this term populist. Well, Mr Perry, how'd you look at this, this issue this rise of populism or nationalism on a continent? Do think they have perhaps become softer compared with one hundred years ago. Well, it's very very definite the'd as you be airing. And. Is absolutely corrected far better to how have the past all far better? But it is a great concern for those who are in power that we are seeing an issue, where in Hungary, for example goal band, and, you know, Farrar Britain, the Brexit party. We're going to staying a issue, where policies driven by parties of extremes. And they want to be the EU influences anyway, they won't tend to laugh intend to write, but they want far-right fall, and they say she populism, which appears to be and. There are different variations across Europe, but it appears to be sweeping across the year. We have kids builders in Holland. We have all we have Faraj. So it is to conceal low, historically, much better than it has in the past in relation to what is happen. But it is also concern for those people in power, the these parties such as for our break the party, we should likely to hold sway, and we'll top the poll in Britain holding sway. Have a love influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern. Well, Dr Trifon..

Europe Brexit party European People's Party European Union congress France Dr Trifon Mr Perry Hungary Britain Farrar Britain Holland Germany one hundred years
"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Will the votes change the makeup of the European parliament? Are we going to see an explosion of populism in these elections? How good a predictor will be to the national politics in each Member State, and where is a you heading in terms of his role on the world stage for these questions? And more. We are joined by doctors who Jen, head of European studies department was China Institute of international studies, and her ought boop man, from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international studies and Phil Perry editor of the eye and investigative news, Beppe side in wells UK, welcome to work today. Day. Well, I think before we move on to our discussion on the European elections. There's breaking news this afternoon. Theresa May is stepping done as British Prime minister she anals to quit as conservative leader of on the seventh of June. So Mr. Paracha, study was the could you bring us more on the latest of this? Yeah. Basically, Theresa May lost control of the cabinet. In fact, there was a very major resignation leader. The palm tree party in the Commons, unrelenting them few days ago, and she's out, she had no where to go. She has tried and failed on several occasions to get he withdrawal, they'll through pollen. And now she's been told he has to go and she has plying resigned after one of the shelties ten years post second World War as prime minister in Britain, so Mr. power, we know UK was supposed to have deft the by now because the government has failed to reach the old that satisfies either the British parliament or the EU. They're now holding the elections as usual will cost more than one hundred million pounds. To choose the MVP is to take up seizing apartment that you're not into part of. So how many Brits are actually going to vote this time? That's very good question. I mean. Theresa May really didn't want these elections. They are distinctly old in Britain because, frankly, any Ps will be lactate, possibly Rhodia few weeks to take this before Britain comes out of the EU, and he didn't quite conceivable and the poll suggests that the tower is could come behind, for example, the glean, and that election result, which will compete. They election wall yesterday Britain, but the results coming on some day would be absolute anathema for the Tories and one of the reasons why she I think why he decided she had to go. And I think she decided she wanted to go now before the results come in on Sunday, which would be bad for labor after the polling poll, the toys. Yes. And if we believe in the pools, Mr. bug. C'mon. The pools actually suggest the candidates in the UK, that's most likely to be seated in a European parliament are actually those school are most determined. That Britain was leave the issue with the Brexit party that by Nigel Farraj expanded to come up on tops. Are you surprised by that? Well nine away. Yes. Great good come pain. I think. Yes. Mr. Volkmann was her take. From looking maybe from a bit more a far away from the UK. It's I wouldn't say surprising, in that many European elections have always shown that parties on the fringes get elected, much easier much more because voters may not fear so much that they're more extreme election. Choices have any tangible consequences. The parliament is very far away. It's actual powers limited, and national government have remained very strong autonomy above the European Union parliamentary decisions. So people may feel free to vent anger at their own, national government by voting some extreme parties into the European parliament. And I think that's something that's also happening in the UK with the special case, of course. That this Brexit has been going on for so long, and from all I hear is people are really fed up. I mean half, maybe half the Brits would like to have a revote and not leave at all the other half is saying, we should have left two years ago, and people are really fed up and they want to really show their government that they're really not happy..

European parliament Theresa May Britain EU Mr. Paracha UK Prime minister British parliament Jen China Institute of internation Phil Perry Switzerland MVP Rhodia Mr. Volkmann editor Nigel Farraj Mr. power
"parliament" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"So Jason we are speaking shortly after the vote on Tuesday night, your time and negotiations were happening overnight. But it seemed like the writing was on the wall hereafter two groups of lawmakers that may need it on her side said they'd vote against the plan. She did manage to secure concessions from the European Union. Tell us more about what happened heading into the final hours before this vote. Will it's roads. Theresa May did some last minute shuttle diplomacy or to Strasbourg to see the head of the European Commission in an attempt to ring a couple of concessions that would get some of these revolu makers in our own party. And then some refer opponents in the Democratic Unionist Party on board to try and get this deal over the line and short it wasn't enough her the opponents, and to her Brexit plan that particular concerns are on whether whether or not the UK can unilaterally exit sort of the us economical orbit. In the event that they can't reach a broader trade deal. The fact is that the legal assurances she brought back were insufficient for these guys. And so it became clear during the day that they were going to vote against the hammer really fell actually fell. I guess whenever the attorney general the UK sort of the most senior lawyer published his own legal advice. It said pretty much what what the Brexit tears the very hard line. Brexit guys had thought on the long this wasn't going to work. So by middle of the afternoon. It was pretty clear she was going to lose this vote tonight. Of course, marks another huge blow for Theresa May a second defeat after lawmakers voted down her plan in January. What else did we hear from may following the vote on Tuesday was heard the clip she didn't? I mean, she'd sort of lost their voices quite different here. Whatever she said. But what happens next is there'll be a vote Wednesday on whether or not the UK should leave the European without any sort of withdrawal agreement a toll, and this is a no deal exit that most people most economists policymakers think the would be very damaging for the UK economy. It is something that is in favor amongst very small group of hardcore Brexit tears, so it looks like parliament will vote against that. What happens after that? Then is there will be yet another vote on Thursday where parliament will be asked whether or not it wants to extend the article fifty process. This is the part in this is this sort of the formal name for the negotiations between London and Brussels whether it wants to extend that forbid try and figure out some way through all this. So what she warned parliament was that, you know, every possible lock in here is kind of still on the table that could be not la- told it could be no Brexit atoll. There could be some other deal on people really try and make their minds up now about what it is. They actually want as we've been reporting this is likely to lead to a delay in that March twenty ninth date, which was when the United Kingdom was set to depart from the European Union. Yes, that's right. The question now is quite long that extension will be at does seem very likely. We will get an extension with the votes in the next couple of days. It's really up to the Europeans beside how long an extension to offer all twenty-seven Member States of the European Union to first of all agree and extension, and then they can basically offer the UK a certain period of time. Now, the thinking for a longtime walls that they would only really offer a very short extension. Maybe a few months to take us into the summer. The reason for that is there are some European parliament elections in the summer, and they sort of figured that. You can't have a departing Member State electing you MP..

Brexit United Kingdom European Union Theresa May Democratic Unionist Party European Commission Jason Brexit atoll Strasbourg Member States attorney London Brussels
"parliament" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Parliament. The White House is trying to draw rank and file Democrats from their party's leadership to pick up votes for President Trump's proposed border wall. But no Democrats showed up yesterday. What was supposed to be a bipartisan luncheon hosted by Mr. Trump? Here's New York. Democratic congressman Hakeem Jeffries. Always simply asking for is Republicans to undertake their article one responsibility as a separate and Coequal branch of government and stop acting like wholly owned subsidiaries of the Trump administration. Meanwhile, since the enactment of the Taft Hartley act in nineteen forty-seven, federal employees have been legally prohibited from striking but lawmakers who approve that measure back then likely did not envision a scenario where the government would require its employees to work without paying them. As is the case. Now, another angle of the shutdown. From Russell Berman staff writer at the Atlantic. Russell explain this, central employees. These are PS agencies are corrections. Officers bureau of prisons either air traffic controllers, these are the secret service, and they have to go to work. Anyway, even though they are not currently being paid. That's putting a lot of financial strain on them. But they're not allowed to walk out. Because even though they're not being paid federal law. Prohibits federal employees going on strike or or staging any kind of mass walkout, and why is that why is that law in place? Has been in place since the Taft Hartley act in nineteen forty seven. And you know, of course, that was designed in the era of, you know, big labor unions to prevent, you know, federal employees from using the leverage of of a strike to demand higher pay more benefits, better working conditions where they would clearly have the power to shut down the government themselves or operations or the government in this case. However, the, you know, this.

Mr. Trump Russell Berman congressman Hakeem Jeffries New York President Coequal White House Parliament. Atlantic staff writer
"parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Look. It is unlikely all things considered that US President Donald Trump, ever spares much thought for the domestic political travails of his Iranian counterpart president Hassan Ronnie. So I believe in meeting I would certainly meet with Iran if they wanted to meet. I don't know that they're ready to have a hard time right now. Don't sheet Mr.. Trump do not play with the lion's tail. This will only regret, you'll regret it. And while Trump is probably and quite rightly be lost person to whom Ronnie would turn for advice. Both men do have something in common, the lapping around their knees of political quicksand related to the mishaps of their associates. In the last month, two of Ronnie's cabinet, labor Minister Ali Rabea and economy minister, Masoud combustion have been impeached and removed from office by Iran's parliament. Some reports suggest that industry minister Mohammad, Sherry mattress may be next earlier this week. Ronnie himself was summoned by parliament in order to explain himself. Not allow a bunch of anti Rainiers who've gathered in the White House to try to conspire against us. What is really going on here is that Iran's economy is tanking and Iran's parliamentarians would rather not wear the responsibility for this. They are correct to be nervous. Demonstrations have been occurring across Iran in recent weeks, expressing dissatisfaction with shortages of basic stuff like mortar, electricity and opportunity. It is no small thing for Iranians to express dissent in public, and he arraigning who remembers as far back as two thousand nine when dozens of those who protested against the alleged fixing that us presidential election were killed by security services understands the risk. Beyond that, it will not have escaped the notice of Iran's politicians, inheritors of the revolution. They are that many of the people attending these protests have been members of the urban middle classes. Traditionally, the demographic who's angry eventually does oppressive regimes which cannot deliver the security. They promise in exchange for the freedoms. They take Ronnie's appearance before Iran's parliament, the Islam, consultative assembly did not go brilliantly in fairness to the president. The nature of the inquiry would have been more honestly illustrated if literal kangaroos had been sitting in judgment of him. Fishing. To Ronnie argued plausibly that many of Iran's current economic woes due to the reimposition of brutal sanctions which has followed the United States petulant and pointless exit from the Iran nuclear deal. The parliament has now referred Ruhani to Iran's judiciary while this does not in itself necessarily open a path leading to Ronnie's own impeachment. It does mean that he's status may be formally upgraded from mealy embattled to downright beleaguered. Various as there always is base and grubby politics in play. The Ronnie has twice being convincingly elected president, though his supporters control parliament. He is widely disliked by Iran's hardliners and Iran's hardliners are about as hotline is hotline has get and count among their number. The country's actual alternate decision, elderly supreme leader, totally alley Hemi who has never been any great fan of Ruhani who many regards as disconcertingly moderate. At which point the popular depiction of Ruhani as a moderate does need to be addressed. Moderate is a relative term which in the context of Iran can be applied to and in Ronnie's case is a dog theocrat who has never expressed any serious objection to, for example, the flogging or execution of gay people for being gay or the imposition of address code on all women under threat of arrest and or arbitrary violence. But Ronnie does appear to understand well how many can't or won't that Iran in two thousand eighteen is increasingly comparable with the Soviet Union circa nineteen eighty eight. I e is a country which simply has no excuse for its failures. Iran is as the US was a potentially mighty nation, rich in natural resources and human capital pointlessly shackled by the graying zealots of an obviously impractical ideology that AMI that damn during this time of revolutionary epic. Jihadi Islamic spirit will not let you. Comfort for a single moment. Nations have awakened. They know who the enemies. Never had unit on it. There is no good reason non at all. Why Iran is not a wealthy orderly and functional country at peace and in partnership with the world. It is easier. However, for Iran's parliament, its president and its leadership to blame each other for this rather than consider the reasons why. From article twenty four amount dream.

Iran president parliament Hassan Ronnie Donald Trump US Minister Ali Rabea White House Mohammad Ruhani Rainiers Sherry Soviet Union
"parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"School because then i think anyone could relate to it but at the time so celebrate in your womanhood i can see that my mom is really happy in guyana it's lovely to say but it also makes me feel very guilty i know that the sacrifices she made for me and my sister once she'd had children she wanted us to have a better life even if that meant she couldn't return high i don't think i ever fully appreciated that don't wanna ever said i regret because i have two children leah regret but i think i would have liked the opportunity to grow up in the country i was born here because there's a lot i think my life would have been so different this sort of freedom of the country and the life started i mean when i'm here feels like home my is now left in the u k much longer than she lifting ghana so the idea that she felt so away from home all these years is quite upsetting to me while on the trip i spent a couple of days working on a tv piece for the bbc on the high rate of female suicide in guyana i went to interview the health minister voter lawrence while i was in the parliament building my nanny waited outside in all her years she never been inside it wasn't something she could ever imagine doing so i asked the minister if my nanny could come in and so happy for her to take you inside you can get a picture she took ninety into the chamber to meet the minister of public infrastructure david paterson she was desperate to tell him about her grandchildren are the you i am so happy to be here to see my grandma his ear worked for the bbc the kids like wait all would have done the grandchildren i might six and two for sentencing my worse if no so we just went into parliament the ministry of health took me and my grandma unhappy into parliament to stay during budget week the busiest weekend you met the ministers yeah oh my god my never so proud i never come here and i live in the anna and never come to parliament and we the my my granddad so i'm real new england for me being in parliament that day made me proud of my grandma she told me that she believes.

guyana ghana bbc david paterson parliament