18 Burst results for "Parliament Party"

"parliament party" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

08:11 min | 7 months ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Just. Yesterday we heard from Eugene Volokh a professor at Ucla School of law. Today, we're going to hear from another staunch defender of freedom of speech, but one who is coming at the issue from almost the opposite place on the political spectrum Nadine. Strossen was the president of the American Civil Liberties Union for almost two decades up until two thousand eight she was the first woman and the youngest person ever to lead the organization. She's now a professor at New York Law School. I spoke to Nadine back in October when the world was very different and yet we were wrestling with a lot of the same. And I want to start with hate speech because after a long career of focusing on all aspects of freedom of expression, you wrote a book recently called hate why we should resist it with free speech not censorship, which is I think. Appropriately, provocative and controversial titles. So what do you mean when you say hate speech there are lots of different definitions out there. The core of the concept is speech that conveys hateful discriminatory stereotyped ideas particularly on basis such as race religion at Smith City Sexual Orientation groups that have traditionally been marginalized or excluded. But if you look at how we use the term in everyday parlance in the United States, you will see that people are using that term absolutely profligately to describe and decry and often try to censor any speech. That conveys any idea that they hate and some of this has been well publicized for example, on some college campuses T. R. U. M. E. Chalk on sidewalks or he worn on t shirts her caps has been attacked as hate speech politicians have denounced black lives matter activism and protests as hate speech most chilling late me although I understand where it's coming from on some campuses and other venues the phrase free speech has been attacked as hate speech and the reason why I say I know where that's coming from said, lay. No is that so often white supremacists and white nationalist and hate mongers have had the right to express their repulsive ideas because of free speech principles and unfortunately that means in the minds of too many people racist speech and other hate mongering speech has become equated with free speech. So I really had to right felt absolutely compelled to write the book because I have been a proud social justice warrior my entire life I consider that a compliment not an insult as some people use the term and I am absolutely committed. To Freedom of speech and I am absolutely convinced that both goals are inextricable that we cannot advance equality dignity diversity inclusivity especially, groups that have traditionally been discriminated against without having really robust free speech robust enough to stand even to so-called hate speech. So let's focus then Nadine if we can on what I would consider the hard case, the kind of speech that almost every country the considers itself roughly being civilized in the world does sanction or outlaw to some degree. Let's call a dehumanizing speech that is directed at traditionally marginalized groups. And I WANNA ask you in that to my mind somewhat hard case of hate speech. What you think about the main rationales that are usually used to justify regulation. So the first is that such speech has a tendency to lead to real world concrete physical harm against people from marginalized groups that it's not to only prohibit speech that immediately threatens imminent violence. But that ultimately we need to also think about the downstream fact when Hitler starts talking, he's not got crowds in front of him immediately. About to Lynch people. But over time he builds up support through a steady diet of hate and so goes the argument we need to nip that in the bud it'll be too late if we wait until the point that there's an angry crowd with to worry about the structural development of dehumanization because we know having lived after the terrible twentieth century and we know in the twenty first century we're still encountering. and. So the argument goes we need to limit hate speech to prevent that kind of disaster. What's your primary answer to that charge? These four I answered the question now I have distressed because you asked about dehumanizing speech that's targeted at particular groups and as you adverted to later in your excellent question certain speech that meets that criterion ten and should be punished consistent with first. Amendment Principles. So if the speech is targeting a an individual or small group of individuals and if it constitutes intentional incitement of imminent violence that's likely to happen that cannon should be punished if it's targeted harassment or bullying that cannon should be punished if it means to instill a reasonable fear that the audience that's targeted is going to be subject to harm. That is a punishable so-called. True. Threat So in general I and others summarized this principle under US law and by the way also under international human rights law as the emergency principal when the speech presents a direct threat of serious incident, specific harm than it can and should be punished but I completely agree with you that speech does 'cause arm even if it does not satisfy that strict definition of or at least. It certainly can potentially cause harm more indirectly and remotely as you as you ask in your question, and my reason for opposing censorship is not because I dispute the potential harmful impact of non-punishable hate speech. But rather because I think that censorship is at best an ineffective way to counter the potential harm and at worst a counterproductive about want. So let's let's push on that needy and so. Let's talk about mitigation we're not talking about curing the harm. So imagine you have a country, we have a lot of European countries that fit this description today where they're far right politicians who were getting more and more votes in each election and their rhetoric is getting more and more radical and this time it's not Jews that they are primarily biased against. Now it's Muslims still an immigrant group, it's silly goop that's being labeled criminal and and other parallels to Europe in the nineteen twenties and thirties are obvious. Let's say we want to say you know maybe we won't ban all of that speech, but we'RE NOT GONNA? Let you be elected to the parliament party. If you advocate expressly racist abuse and some European countries have rules like that, and again, this isn't meant to eliminate all. It's meant to mitigate the real world effects especially when organized political parties realize that they can gain more votes by using forms of hate speech I'm assuming that's not okay with you either even though that's something short of a pure ban because it's it is a technique of medication though the fact that you sight now I actually support my point because the fact is that those European countries have extremely strict anti hate speech laws that are very strictly.

Nadine professor United States Eugene Volokh Ucla School of law New York Law School American Civil Liberties Union Strossen wrestling Europe Smith City Sexual Orientation president T. R. U. M. E. Chalk parliament party harassment Hitler Lynch t
"parliament party" Discussed on Who Invited Her?

Who Invited Her?

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Who Invited Her?

"Marion's popular adderall. They're all drinking drinking vodka and the pill. I love how how raise pill a capsule filled with pellet released a thirty milligram time released until Monday. I'm not going to stay. I'm I'm literally not gonNA sleep tonight. Probably I'll probably go to bed at like five in the morning. You've been knocking out. Looks Young Fun projects for the tea party. I leave for Denver on Monday. Eh Aspen on Monday. Oh that's right you're doing that. That's GONNA. I cannot wait to hear stories from them. And how literally wearing long long johns under my tights doing asking gay ski week at a Bingo on Tuesday. I'm going to hang out with peppermint. She's doing some events over the West. We go fucking. She got books with the same company that booked me so yeah so actually legit hang out with her and I'm excited because so before we went to break there is a story that we were going to tell about Robin Parliament. While we were in London we got to do a private tour of parliament and with a guy may get a very very nice gentleman. Not Megan met at a bar in Japan. Meghan meet him or from you know she met him yeah. He was much older than she mail. She's no the Dow met him. Okay yes matt so. We did a tour of the parliament and it was so when you're in parliament. especially what were the two rooms. Rob The the green and the red you're talking about the House of Commons and the House of Lords. Yes we were in the House of Commons right rob okay. I guess we're doing taste bad. It's the I haven't heard the story and we're in the House of Commons in the tore like there's toward little tour groups and we're on our private win sitting on the side and the tour guides explaining the Queen's tear going into all the history and it's very grand the whole All parliament's very grounded. You can feel all the history and like just in. You're not allowed to say any like talk very much in parliament. Like it's everything's very quiet and very regal and royal whatever Rob's over here in the corner like just fidgeting video I don't I don't know about it and I was like okay and then we're finishing the tournament right when we finished the tour parliament. Rob's like I gotta go the bathroom so he runs about the museum there forever wherever then he comes back and stop the story right there backing up just a little bit. So we're in the house of the comments and in these. He's showing US where they I don't even know what you call all the stuff but he's during where they put that staff thing and the bow to that when it knocker black staff right so the queen knocks. Yes and Megan's over here. She got to be Prime Minister for a few minutes. Where they're like okay? This prime minister stanzas ends or whatever. So we're talking about that and I'm like oh I don't feel very good so like I am through my head. I'm thinking was it that Seafood Pie We ate ice on the way over here. Scholars back into Scotland. No no no no this because we had another seafood pirates rape before right before this. So I'm like I don't know if I and then I'm like oh I gotta go to the bathroom soon. Where where do you get a bathroom like? Where does parliament go? Yeah but I'm thinking where it just bothered me. Yeah so so while he's talking I'm just like okay. I gotta Tom. I'll be right back or something because I don't feel good kind kind of like you know like that feeling like did I eat something like came on all of a sudden so anyway so then we are leaving House of Commons. He's like okay. I'm GonNa take take you somewhere where we don't normally take everybody so we got to go out onto the patio. The Darius tariffs were all in the tem. No we went out onto. The terrorists were out on the Thames. I guess they have parliament parties or whatever and there was a bathroom. I'm right there but as I was walking to my oh it went away. I'm fine I don't feel sick anymore. I don't have to go. I feel good so we went out there. We took we took some discrete pictures. We weren't you weren't we weren't allowed to take any picture. No one point. He's going through your phones out really quick and take a picture really quick. Yeah uh-huh and this is the guy to are not that's awesome. I didn't get to go about a royal flush. Great eight royal flush later go so so then we're like walking back inside and we were heading towards the Great Hall and then that's when it all started coming I'm back on the a lot faster and so we walk out into the Great Hall of the Great. How is this huge huge volumes? So he's telling us all about that he's and so he's like if you look up you'll see these wooden. It was like a wooden ballast or whatever. So he's talking about how they were thousand years old and and I'm like Oh so then I'm like now it's like emergency state where I'm like. I'm sweating on the floor of a thousand year old carpet like rob. I'm sweating. So then he was telling us the story about Oh. This is where Barack Obama gave Barack Obama. Era The ROB Kim. And I'm like I'm just trying to speed this up like how many more minutes Barack Obama okay data so so then we walk into the mid on. They've got like these little commit markings of where and he said. This is where the queen's mom was lying in state and I'm like Oh like I probably have a good thirty seconds ninety that I know next thing I know he's like Oh and God forbid the Queen should pass away today this is where she will lie in.

House of Commons parliament ROB Kim Barack Obama Robin Parliament Megan Prime Minister House of Lords adderall Great Hall Marion London Meghan US Japan Denver Dow rape matt
"parliament party" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Amanpour

"For us to onto and agreements to have a treaty agreed to the UK to leave the EU inordinately fashion Adopt Upton by the end of October but there's the step between company and lots of things are not in my control the Irish border has of course being the main sticking point for the last three years of the struggle for this divorce John Bruton is the former t shocked of Ireland which is the prime minister and the former ambassador to the United States and he's joining me now from Dublin Russian welcome to the program thank you you've heard Leo Vodka and you've heard what he said that there's a possible breakthrough even the opposition parliament party in your country who said they happy to hear that this megaphone diplomacy is now being replaced by a in-depth discussions behind closed doors we don't really know what what they've discussed today but put your experienced hat on where you think there could be some kind of movement? I think the big area where there has to be movement is in regards to Customs Boris Johnson was a member of the government which agreed in December of two thousand seventeen to negotiating with European Union which said there would be no customs control news on the border in Ireland at the Good Friday Agreement which is about convergence rather than divergence would be respected now the proposals that he came forward with a week ago Boris Johnson came forward with a week ago don't comply with the with Dash really in respect particularly of the costumes controls there's a real problem Willoughby tariffs if Britain leaves e you will be tariffs to be imposed on imports from the UK into the European Union If Britain leaves the the the the you there would be different standards of goods applying in the UK to those that apply in the European Union and Boris Johnson has said that he and deliberately in fact to diverge from a U. standards presumably to gain some sorts of competitive advantage but if that happens the would have to and defendants interest by imposing tariffs of the arrangements that are Johnson proposed for the collection of those types so sloppy as to be not enforceable I don't believe I don't believe the European Union we willing to accept that value added tax would be collected properly under the arrangements proposing are Josh and the tariffs would be connected either Jon Gruden did one of the things that I think much of the world can understand about Ireland and being the major sticking point is because of that as we've been talking the boarder idea the border issue that has been resolved since Nineteen one thousand nine hundred seven Good Friday Agreement which you had done so much work in the lead up for that before it was actually signed by successive with Prime Minister Blair the Good Friday Agreement that ended the war essentially between between Republicans IRA and the British government what is the threat we already seeing dissident IRA having done all sorts of opportunistic violence Over the last several months and what is.

Boris Johnson European Union prime minister Ireland UK John Bruton Leo Vodka Prime Minister Blair Jon Gruden United States parliament party Upton Dublin Britain British government Josh three years
"parliament party" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

16:02 min | 1 year ago

"parliament party" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Sensible Rex it fights off the threat from the insurgent Brexit party. And I have to say that, that is a the job that I believe I'm best suited to do today. Bus Johnson came out fighting yesterday to finally launch his bid the next prime minister as the field of candidates narrows impulsion way out in front can anything derail the bars express. Also this week, we'll be looking at whether any of the contenders promises on Brexit tax cuts, and the economy actually stuck up past all in this week's politics weekly. It was standing remain the at the Notre Johnson's leadership bid yesterday with hard Brexit is and conservative rising stars. All that show support with maybe an on the job in the next cabinet at the time of recording. We don't know who hasn't who hasn't got the sixteen th needs to stay on the list of contenders. But we can probably see in that Johnson Dominic Robb, Jeremy hunt, Michael Savage, avid, and Matt Hancock all on there at the moment. The contest is bosses to lose. Is he really the best man for the job or anything? Well, I'm joined to discuss all this by Isabel Harbin, from the spectator Jonathan list from British influence and politics from the guardian. How do you think the boss when yesterday sort of emerge unscathed sufficiently boring enough? Well, that was certainly a was to make it doll safety, I, which is really the, the theme of borstal since campaign when he's allowed out to speak. The aim is basically to try to make him look a bit more serious politician. And so, in terms of his speech, and in terms of I think the way he answered the questions will didn't answer them in loss of cases. I think his team would have been quite pleased with that. There was one thing that, that over-shadowed it bit thing, which was that some MP's as she heckled journalist for asking Johnson, a very reasonable question about his comments about walking women who were berkers, and it's often the case activists from parties. Get annoyed with journalists for us dear leader inconvenient questions, but it's still quite unusual for MP's to do that. And I'm not God load of welfare candidate. It's very badly for. Candidate. It makes them look defensive as they call something to hide and what I thought made it. Worse was Liz trust. One of Boris Johnson supporters that went on TV to defend her colleagues heckling saying that they were entitled to question the questions of journalists, which, I think it would be much easier. Just to say, I think some of my colleagues over excited here can also himself, the, the idea of being PM. I've been laughed at a few months ago, and an and I think that probably we thought that his colleagues had lost trusted him toy MP's lost trust in him. Particularly his performances foreign secretary. Why are they running behind? This is being quite extraordinary. It's the conservative party completely losing any sense of responsibility for the fate of the nation, the party that used to be the solid, the reliable, the party of government has become wild reckless revolutionary because they think he is the only person who might. Squeak past in general election, and save them from both thorough and from Corbin unsaved, their seats and save that party. He might on the other hand be the final explosive device that blows the whole thing apart. It might be that he is so poorly that if he really does take us out of Europe. Ota no deal that the conservative party makes it self unelectable forever afterwards because of the self inflicted chaos caused, but they reckon that as things stand, he might save them this eat a very low reason choosy. Doesn't. He He seems seems to to have been. been concentrating quite a lot on just on just securing the backing of MP's announcing a thing you know, particularly controversial into things. I think a tax cut and also that he would leave with thirty. I is just him kind of keeping things. Very simple. As best route to success is only seem sort of the moment. If you all the kind of the pole position candidate of your day you won't have any controversy under Johnson is famous for that. And so he's, he's just letting the ship go on. If you like Theresa May to the Cima thing in a way in two thousand sixteen. When she just washed everyone else, self combustion. She was the last person standing there. The problem for Johnson is that he's told the truth extraordinarily when he said that the tour spaced extinction, if it didn't liver Brexit both thirty Tober there is no way on earth. They can deliver Brexit thirty post Tober. There are a couple of weeks parliamentary time after the summer recess where nothing can be done sell you that can. No more renegotiation, and no more led to legislation. And so he's already made a rod for his own back, that the first thing he'll have to do is prime minister is go to the EU and asked to stay in it. So already the trust will be will we smash I can't understand why the Tories don't understand that. And conversely, if you did try to get that no deal. As police said, if you actually went over the cliff, and then Boris Johnson would never be forgiven out the toys, wouldn't either and then parliament, probably humiliates him and try to stop it anyway. So there's really no way through him that he can emerge from this with any kind of credibility whatsoever. Smell somebody other candidates have tried to gain a bit of credibility people like Jamie hunt, and my ankle by saying, actually it's very difficult to leave with no deal deal no deal by thirty because his Dunton's laid out. You know, it's difficult to negotiate in that anything new in that time. And also because parliament is like to stop an ideal Brexit. Do any of those candidates avenue chance of beating him when it comes to the runoff thinking people? Turn me on all the sausage avid month ago. Jeremy hunt or such genital Mike who gave the most light, he might Hancock, he mentioned, this is probably going to get knocked out, either in this round or the next one because he just doesn't have enough of a constituency within the conservative party and his pitch. We went to his launch on Monday, his pitch was slightly crazed or have. Difficult to sort of pinned on what he believed other than motivational aphorisms. I felt like I was spinning class well to relationship. The other say are trying to sort of offer a bit more realistic Brexit plan. And that's tricky in the current Tory party, because the mood in the party is not really one for any further delay. They're still reacting to the procrastination of Theresa May. I'm perhaps, not looking at the situation that she's left the party. And in trying to work out the best way out of that they just don't want anyone who's going to put it off any more, and that's why Boris Johnson. Dominic Robb were the only two candidates who even got auditions before the European research group, which is the, the most Brexit he group in, in the conservative party, and has a huge amount of power, not just in the parliament party. But also, I think amongst the conservative membership. So it's tricky, because I think there is Brexit. Purity contest going on at the moment that doesn't bear a great deal of relation to reality of those putty of, of Michael Savage. Avid, Jeremy hunter DC is having the most. Likelihood of beating Johnson, what I suppose it would be go, if he can recover from the ca- Cain hypocrisy, which really sunk him oughta rolls astonishing. But maybe he can be forgiven in which case he's much the strongest contender. He knows burst back front if he really decides to put the knife in again, as he did last time he could be very effective when one of the candidates, not really talking about a tool anymore. She was quite strangest Dominic Robb. Who did you know sort of seen as maybe he could be the true Brexit tier candidate when Boris you know, it folded early than him said he was gonna vote trees may deal. But he's lost all of that year. G support to Boris what he used on the sue the winner under Johnson is going to match rob pound for pound in Brexit. Then those no reasons about rob who is much less sympathetic charming character. You have question marks over his personal character, which haven't quite been addressed. And who is has the kind of eight. Tori. Boy thing about him bay, which is going to not be particular turn, onto the tweet party was certainly not to the wider electric. Yes. So that's always don't since we've not now all the space is really ain't rob is also tainted, his, he didn't leave the cabinet obviously, after the check is agreement that was Boris, who did that? And, and Boris Johnson is therefore able to, to claim that he is more Brexit Pierce. We come back to this incredible sort of holy Brexit. Contest is going on the Johnson survived. The backstop no one's talking about the box December. Twenty seventeen Theresa May sign us up to customs union a great time. Johnson was he knew what it was. And then after extraordinarily when he left the company said he didn't know what it was. So he was basically saying that he was the gullible stupid or liar. I didn't seem to matter because he's tashaun. It's fascinating how there's actually a higher bar for the behavior of all the other candidates part from Boris. Johnson is something his team say the whole, always purse. Life is priced in. It's almost as though he could actually have killed people. And that would also trunks shooting Fifth Avenue, the front runners who've said that they are the two, I suppose we, if we still count rob amongst the front runners that they've said that we prepared to take the UK out of the EU with no deal on October thirty first Burston Dominic Robb, the others of, of sort of said that they think it's possible that parliament would be up to stop that. But we saw yesterday at there was an opportunity for parliament to set in motion for that to be another to at least reserve another date to try and pass a law to stop it. And Isabel some people listening and probably anyone who's not been following this with the minute detail of a full-time job gonna find it quite quoted to hear that it was defeated last night, feels like parliament's voted against no deal. Quite a few times, and what can you maybe you could explain to me about what happened last night? Here's those interesting topics going on last night. You had a group of conservative MPC voted with labour on this vote, which was to allow Paul. Lament to rule out no deal in future vote just to complicating confuse matters even further. But then you had a group of labor MP's, who voted with the government people like katoey, who obviously, managed to enrage their policy on, on regular basis, with their with that Brexit views, and you also had a number of ubstantially as well. And so this is turned the labor party in on itself again, with the very pro remain pro second referendum, anti no do, and, like, Ben Bradshaw, friends since turning on their colleagues and saying how much they've let the party downs. We, we've got another labor split here. This is a big boost to those candidates. He believe parliament actually won't stop new deal. I suppose it is if, if there is a mechanism for stopping teaches clear what that make an ISM could be done that all of the people like all of let win been out this morning that the Taurean peon and the former Tory bowl saying that this was the last chance, there are no more assigned opposition day debates. Which the government has to grant, but in power to grant labor time to have debates on things where they want, but those, those days of now, run out, and there's also no obvious legislation going through parliament for for amendments to be attitude that could stop no deal. So what is the root pop from a confidence vote without is the nuclear button, the confidence..

Boris Johnson Brexit parliament Brexit party Theresa May Johnson Dominic Robb Isabel Harbin MP prime minister parliament party Matt Hancock Michael Savage Jeremy hunt EU Dominic Robb Europe labor MP Jamie hunt
 All aboard the Boris Express

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

16:02 min | 1 year ago

All aboard the Boris Express

"Sensible Rex it fights off the threat from the insurgent Brexit party. And I have to say that, that is a the job that I believe I'm best suited to do today. Bus Johnson came out fighting yesterday to finally launch his bid the next prime minister as the field of candidates narrows impulsion way out in front can anything derail the bars express. Also this week, we'll be looking at whether any of the contenders promises on Brexit tax cuts, and the economy actually stuck up past all in this week's politics weekly. It was standing remain the at the Notre Johnson's leadership bid yesterday with hard Brexit is and conservative rising stars. All that show support with maybe an on the job in the next cabinet at the time of recording. We don't know who hasn't who hasn't got the sixteen th needs to stay on the list of contenders. But we can probably see in that Johnson Dominic Robb, Jeremy hunt, Michael Savage, avid, and Matt Hancock all on there at the moment. The contest is bosses to lose. Is he really the best man for the job or anything? Well, I'm joined to discuss all this by Isabel Harbin, from the spectator Jonathan list from British influence and politics from the guardian. How do you think the boss when yesterday sort of emerge unscathed sufficiently boring enough? Well, that was certainly a was to make it doll safety, I, which is really the, the theme of borstal since campaign when he's allowed out to speak. The aim is basically to try to make him look a bit more serious politician. And so, in terms of his speech, and in terms of I think the way he answered the questions will didn't answer them in loss of cases. I think his team would have been quite pleased with that. There was one thing that, that over-shadowed it bit thing, which was that some MP's as she heckled journalist for asking Johnson, a very reasonable question about his comments about walking women who were berkers, and it's often the case activists from parties. Get annoyed with journalists for us dear leader inconvenient questions, but it's still quite unusual for MP's to do that. And I'm not God load of welfare candidate. It's very badly for. Candidate. It makes them look defensive as they call something to hide and what I thought made it. Worse was Liz trust. One of Boris Johnson supporters that went on TV to defend her colleagues heckling saying that they were entitled to question the questions of journalists, which, I think it would be much easier. Just to say, I think some of my colleagues over excited here can also himself, the, the idea of being PM. I've been laughed at a few months ago, and an and I think that probably we thought that his colleagues had lost trusted him toy MP's lost trust in him. Particularly his performances foreign secretary. Why are they running behind? This is being quite extraordinary. It's the conservative party completely losing any sense of responsibility for the fate of the nation, the party that used to be the solid, the reliable, the party of government has become wild reckless revolutionary because they think he is the only person who might. Squeak past in general election, and save them from both thorough and from Corbin unsaved, their seats and save that party. He might on the other hand be the final explosive device that blows the whole thing apart. It might be that he is so poorly that if he really does take us out of Europe. Ota no deal that the conservative party makes it self unelectable forever afterwards because of the self inflicted chaos caused, but they reckon that as things stand, he might save them this eat a very low reason choosy. Doesn't. He He seems seems to to have been. been concentrating quite a lot on just on just securing the backing of MP's announcing a thing you know, particularly controversial into things. I think a tax cut and also that he would leave with thirty. I is just him kind of keeping things. Very simple. As best route to success is only seem sort of the moment. If you all the kind of the pole position candidate of your day you won't have any controversy under Johnson is famous for that. And so he's, he's just letting the ship go on. If you like Theresa May to the Cima thing in a way in two thousand sixteen. When she just washed everyone else, self combustion. She was the last person standing there. The problem for Johnson is that he's told the truth extraordinarily when he said that the tour spaced extinction, if it didn't liver Brexit both thirty Tober there is no way on earth. They can deliver Brexit thirty post Tober. There are a couple of weeks parliamentary time after the summer recess where nothing can be done sell you that can. No more renegotiation, and no more led to legislation. And so he's already made a rod for his own back, that the first thing he'll have to do is prime minister is go to the EU and asked to stay in it. So already the trust will be will we smash I can't understand why the Tories don't understand that. And conversely, if you did try to get that no deal. As police said, if you actually went over the cliff, and then Boris Johnson would never be forgiven out the toys, wouldn't either and then parliament, probably humiliates him and try to stop it anyway. So there's really no way through him that he can emerge from this with any kind of credibility whatsoever. Smell somebody other candidates have tried to gain a bit of credibility people like Jamie hunt, and my ankle by saying, actually it's very difficult to leave with no deal deal no deal by thirty because his Dunton's laid out. You know, it's difficult to negotiate in that anything new in that time. And also because parliament is like to stop an ideal Brexit. Do any of those candidates avenue chance of beating him when it comes to the runoff thinking people? Turn me on all the sausage avid month ago. Jeremy hunt or such genital Mike who gave the most light, he might Hancock, he mentioned, this is probably going to get knocked out, either in this round or the next one because he just doesn't have enough of a constituency within the conservative party and his pitch. We went to his launch on Monday, his pitch was slightly crazed or have. Difficult to sort of pinned on what he believed other than motivational aphorisms. I felt like I was spinning class well to relationship. The other say are trying to sort of offer a bit more realistic Brexit plan. And that's tricky in the current Tory party, because the mood in the party is not really one for any further delay. They're still reacting to the procrastination of Theresa May. I'm perhaps, not looking at the situation that she's left the party. And in trying to work out the best way out of that they just don't want anyone who's going to put it off any more, and that's why Boris Johnson. Dominic Robb were the only two candidates who even got auditions before the European research group, which is the, the most Brexit he group in, in the conservative party, and has a huge amount of power, not just in the parliament party. But also, I think amongst the conservative membership. So it's tricky, because I think there is Brexit. Purity contest going on at the moment that doesn't bear a great deal of relation to reality of those putty of, of Michael Savage. Avid, Jeremy hunter DC is having the most. Likelihood of beating Johnson, what I suppose it would be go, if he can recover from the ca- Cain hypocrisy, which really sunk him oughta rolls astonishing. But maybe he can be forgiven in which case he's much the strongest contender. He knows burst back front if he really decides to put the knife in again, as he did last time he could be very effective when one of the candidates, not really talking about a tool anymore. She was quite strangest Dominic Robb. Who did you know sort of seen as maybe he could be the true Brexit tier candidate when Boris you know, it folded early than him said he was gonna vote trees may deal. But he's lost all of that year. G support to Boris what he used on the sue the winner under Johnson is going to match rob pound for pound in Brexit. Then those no reasons about rob who is much less sympathetic charming character. You have question marks over his personal character, which haven't quite been addressed. And who is has the kind of eight. Tori. Boy thing about him bay, which is going to not be particular turn, onto the tweet party was certainly not to the wider electric. Yes. So that's always don't since we've not now all the space is really ain't rob is also tainted, his, he didn't leave the cabinet obviously, after the check is agreement that was Boris, who did that? And, and Boris Johnson is therefore able to, to claim that he is more Brexit Pierce. We come back to this incredible sort of holy Brexit. Contest is going on the Johnson survived. The backstop no one's talking about the box December. Twenty seventeen Theresa May sign us up to customs union a great time. Johnson was he knew what it was. And then after extraordinarily when he left the company said he didn't know what it was. So he was basically saying that he was the gullible stupid or liar. I didn't seem to matter because he's tashaun. It's fascinating how there's actually a higher bar for the behavior of all the other candidates part from Boris. Johnson is something his team say the whole, always purse. Life is priced in. It's almost as though he could actually have killed people. And that would also trunks shooting Fifth Avenue, the front runners who've said that they are the two, I suppose we, if we still count rob amongst the front runners that they've said that we prepared to take the UK out of the EU with no deal on October thirty first Burston Dominic Robb, the others of, of sort of said that they think it's possible that parliament would be up to stop that. But we saw yesterday at there was an opportunity for parliament to set in motion for that to be another to at least reserve another date to try and pass a law to stop it. And Isabel some people listening and probably anyone who's not been following this with the minute detail of a full-time job gonna find it quite quoted to hear that it was defeated last night, feels like parliament's voted against no deal. Quite a few times, and what can you maybe you could explain to me about what happened last night? Here's those interesting topics going on last night. You had a group of conservative MPC voted with labour on this vote, which was to allow Paul. Lament to rule out no deal in future vote just to complicating confuse matters even further. But then you had a group of labor MP's, who voted with the government people like katoey, who obviously, managed to enrage their policy on, on regular basis, with their with that Brexit views, and you also had a number of ubstantially as well. And so this is turned the labor party in on itself again, with the very pro remain pro second referendum, anti no do, and, like, Ben Bradshaw, friends since turning on their colleagues and saying how much they've let the party downs. We, we've got another labor split here. This is a big boost to those candidates. He believe parliament actually won't stop new deal. I suppose it is if, if there is a mechanism for stopping teaches clear what that make an ISM could be done that all of the people like all of let win been out this morning that the Taurean peon and the former Tory bowl saying that this was the last chance, there are no more assigned opposition day debates. Which the government has to grant, but in power to grant labor time to have debates on things where they want, but those, those days of now, run out, and there's also no obvious legislation going through parliament for for amendments to be attitude that could stop no deal. So what is the root pop from a confidence vote without is the nuclear button, the confidence. But I think that we need to look at John berko hear abo- cove is cost himself as some kind of maverick revolutionary when it sees him, and he is prepared to cost aside, conventions and rewrite the rulebook. I mean, I'm not an expert in, in three parliamentary etiquette and protocol. So I don't know exactly how much power he has. But it seems that he can rewrite us in may sort of as he goes along. So if he decides if parliament has a will, to introduce legislation, very quickly as cupid early this year, and they all given an opportunity to vote for that. I just can't see any way which was say no. The procedure says, unfortunately, what happened last night is that. Parliament decided not to have the opportunity, it'll make it very difficult. I think for berko to devise anything also you're asking him to do something way out of anything he's done so far. I think we're going to end up with whether there will be enough conservative MP's willing to bring the house down willing to have a virtual no-confidence in what who will presumably be Boris MP appear them and a call for general election. And I just don't know when it comes to it, whether the likes of people who have very anti Brexit, whether they'll really go that for what do you think is about? Do you think enough of them to actually agree with? That would be if you get government. And then in the confidence that you lose it. Yeah, I think that is your way basically saying, I've it with the conservative party who knows that things are quite Phibro at the moment till they, there is less of a thirst for leaving parties given. What's happened to change? You K because I think that stuff Shane, how difficult it is to, to go to loan from a big structure this being rumbling along for many decades labor LaTour. He's, I suppose we can, we also have to see what happens over the course the leadership contest. If Boris Johnson has heart and his position over summer to try and win over very hard. Brexit. Selectric una comes parliament is still sitting at the end of July, when he's elected then that could be the moment where his colleagues, Dominic grieve just in greening, maybe say in office enough. You're going to take on the touch toba. We know having it. And then you trigger that election, when there's still time to stop no deal. Three months later, but they will not be allowed to stand as conservative. I mean that only. Seats are there enough of them, we don't sacrifice their careers for the sake of the country? And that's what it'll come to possibly. There are enough noble minded people willing to do that. I mean, I guess one of the things that we haven't touched on his whether it's it is possible for any of these candidates to get any kind of new deal bioterr- thirty. I, I mean, we of laughing about that. But if it comes to the crunch, d think that there are people who maybe didn't believe Theresa May was prepared to take that with no deal. But may believe that someone I on snus. Well, this is the line that the sort of the Boris style candidates of news, the European Union, saying they're not going to reopen the withdrawal agreement, they're not going to start renegotiating any way. They say will they would say that wouldn't they that's kind of, you know, they're starting line in the Goshi -ation, and perhaps studies, the stance, the European Union, that will then fold when suddenly this new powerful conservative leader comes in, but even. The leadership candidates who claim they're trying to be more realistic like Jeremy hunt, for instance, still saying they want to reopen the withdrawal agreement. So all of them are prompting something that according to what has been said, so far is not realistic. How would it look from Europe? The EU is tied to these games it's actually written into the extension that you can't renegotiate withdrawal agreements that is put, so the box office and changing the only thing in might be able to. And this is a purse is to renegotiate a political declaration, which isn't going to be enough, because it has no legal way. But more importantly, there are only two things you can do the political declaration, the first is to soften it. So you explicitly asked to negotiate accustomed on a single market, which is obviously not help any, the Tories or you hard in it in the pad on the backstop, just Northern Ireland and not cleaves the concert. India's partying one clean slice. So there's nothing that they can do, which will help them tool on the backstop is simply not of negotiation. It's only use political interest to sacrifice its. Leverage for a prime minister. He hates them and the feelings mutual. Thanks willie. Back after this.

Boris Johnson Parliament Brexit Theresa May European Union Brexit Party Prime Minister MP Jeremy Hunt Johnson Dominic Robb Europe Dominic Robb Isabel Harbin Matt Hancock Parliament Party Michael Savage Jamie Hunt Jonathan
"parliament party" Discussed on Inside Europe

Inside Europe

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Inside Europe

"Income generated by mass tourism the tourism industries wanted the main employment drivers in a country where joblessness is stubbornly high at fifteen percent budget carriers insists they've turned the holiday season from just the summer all year round and say that planes more fuel-efficient than ever. Within and give it cooling for limits on the number of low cost flights sits easily Spain's green party echo, which has three seats in the Madrid lower parliament party spokesperson common. Molina can Yannis says nonetheless the budget airline sector has to be tackled. L impact medium being the LA lobby. Local reconciling the environmental impact of low cost aviation is really tricky because it's such an unsustainable mode of transport together with the mass tourism industry. And I mean, the drunkenness and hedonism that these cheap flights bring there's a huge cost and few benefits for our community. The whole future of the low cost aviation sector has to be questioned tackling fuel efficiencies and reducing the weight of planes isn't enough. We know we must reduce CO two emissions quickly. So increasing this type of transport won't help in luck. Yes, he end up. Dando quotas cooled for Spain and other European countries to invest more in their rail infrastructure to allow more long distance train travel and additional GT's to be levied on budget carriers combined parapro Morecombe Alternativa, we should think about increasing taxes depending on the pollution, and the co two emissions that this tourism model causes the same as happened with other industries, such as coal we should campaign to promote alternatives to flying like transverse example. Yes, flights are the only feasible way for intercontinental travel, but for journeys of less than a thousand kilometers trains are more sustainable.

Spain Yannis Morecombe Alternativa Molina LA thousand kilometers fifteen percent
"parliament party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC. British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leads voted down another Brexit plant. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no. Plan NPR's Frank Langfitt is in London and joins me. Hi, Frank by David. All right. Some more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days? Well, what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a move to the UK saying, it won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent a hard board of their if that happens then most likely on Thursday, they'll be a vote on whether postpone this, of course, that'll be up to the US to whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit, tears. But there's also the problem of a European parliament elections coming up in may. So if there were going to be a delay. It would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is. You know, what are we going to tell them? We're going to do with us extra time. They've been negotiating this for over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution so the us going to want to see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing we should have. You're going to be very busy in the coming thing. I am. And I think I think that we're gonna be covering this for a lot longer. David. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture put yesterday of a sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It said on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless abouts. Let's bring in Sara hobbled. She's sitting next to Frank there in London if I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mine goodness studying electoral behavior, you must have had a lot of material to work with in Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's a very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary trainwreck? Well, I mean, the the nation right now is very divided. But there's one thing that British people agree on and that is that they are very unimpressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's very little. Trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this the apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're now going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. Well, the the big problem is here that both into public but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hot to agree on a compromise. It's so hard to sort of split the difference and Brexit because on the one hand, you have remainders who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise. And just think it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we redefined in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they are against but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit tears, whose attitude might now just be let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with BreX? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes. What we've seen since the the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps the delivers the Brexit here on the one hand and the remains on the other hand, really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people at fault line that people are polarized along and undecided Brexit or the the leave camp, they they really want to there's a big majority among those. Let's just leave. That's not talk to the EU anymore. That's not pay them anything. Let's get out of there soon as possible, of course, on the other hand in the remain cap. There's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really in both camps. There's not a lot of support around a compromise deal for me because the remains want what they call the people's vote a second referendum Efren referendum a second chance to overturn the decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Humboldt, we've gotten the impression from afar that. There is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. I mean, there is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know. The public was was sort of evenly split for came out in favor of leave and Representative democracy. Whether it was a very clear majority in parliament full remain, a leading up to the referendum, and that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty protests that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now that they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's killing not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public. Exactly there is both in the public and also in parliament again. I don't think that's the majority today in parliament for another vote. But it could as we approach the twenty ninth of March or the end of may awebber in the next Clifford will be it might be that the the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without you? Which is Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's just bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life. If it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question, or whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, wet spilled over into how people feel about each other that there are these sort of camps where levers and remains field, very distrustful of each other. And and think that you know, the other side and not really have the the, you know, the nascent. Best interests at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in in the United States. Sure. Well, in the United States, in some cases, families are divided is that happening where you are. That is very much happening. People are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise. Sarah kobylt thank you very much.

parliament European Union Brexit Frank Langfitt European parliament Britain David Greene Theresa May London United States NPR Steve Inskeep Washington DC California Culver City Prime Minister Europe London School of economics
"parliament party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR. News. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC. British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leads voted down another Brexit plan. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no plan NPR's. Frank Langfitt is in London and joins me. Hi, frank. Hi, david. Right. So more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days? Well, what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a move to the UK say, it won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent heart board of their if that happens then most likely on Thursday, they'll be a vote on whether to postpone this. Of course, that'll be up to the US to whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit, tears. But there's also the problem of a European parliament elections coming up in may. So if we're going to be a delay. It would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is you know, what are we going to tell them? We're going to do with this extra time. They've been negotiating. For over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution so do use gonna wanna see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing as you're going to be very busy in the coming thing. I am. And I think I think that we're going to be covering this for a lot longer day. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture report yesterday of a sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It sat on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless bouts. Let's bring in Sara Humboldt. She's sitting next to Frank there in London if I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mind goodness studying electoral behavior, must have had a lot of material to work with Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary train wreck. Well, I mean, the the nation right now is very divided. But there's one thing that British people agree on and that is that they are very unimpressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's very little. Trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this the apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're now going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. The big problem is here that both independent but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hard to agree on a compromise. It's so hard to sort of split the difference and Brexit because on the one hand, you have remain is who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise. And just think it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we redefined in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they are against but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit tears, whose attitude might now just be let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with Brexit? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes, what we've seen since the the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps the levers of the Brexit here in one hand and the remainders on the other hand have really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people faultline that people are polarized along an undistracted or the the leave camp they really want to there's a big majority amongst those let's to sleep. It's not talk to the EU anymore. It's not pay them anything. That's this get out of there soon as possible, of course, on the other hand the remain cap. That's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really both camps. There's not a lot of support around a compromise deal from it because the remains want what they call the people's vote a second referendum Efren referendum a second chance to overturn this decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Humboldt, we've gotten the impression from afar that. There is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. There is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know the public was was sort of evenly split, but came out in favor of leave and Representative democracy. Whether it was a very clear majority in parliament full remain leading up to the referendum. And that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty process that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that sort of the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now that they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's clearly not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public. Exactly there is both in the public and also in parliament again. And I don't think that's the majority today in parliament for another vote, but it could as we approach the twenty ninth of March or the end of may aware. But in the nNcholas Clifford will be it might be that the the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without a deal, which has Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life. If it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question, or whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, wet spilled over into how people feel about each other that there are these sort of camps where levers and remains field, very distrustful of each other. And and think that you know, the other side and not really have the, you know, the Nathan. Best interest at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in the United States. Sure. Well, in the United States, in some cases, families are divided is that happening where you are. That is very much happening. You know, people are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise. Sarah kobylt thank you very much for helping us.

parliament Frank Langfitt European Union Brexit London European parliament NPR Britain Theresa May United States David Greene Steve Inskeep Washington DC California Culver City Prime Minister Sara Humboldt Europe London School of economics
"parliament party" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC. British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leads voted down another Brexit plant. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no plan NPR's. Frank Langfitt is in London joins me. Hi, frank. Hi, david. All right. So more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a a move to the UK saying, it won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent a board of their if that happens then most likely on Thursday, there'll be a vote on whether to postpone this. That'll be up to the US to whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit ears. But there's also the problem of a European parliament elections coming up in may. So if we're going to be a delay. It would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is what are we gonna tell the we're going to do with this extra time. They've been negotiating this for over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution. So the us gonna wanna see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing we should have as you're going to be very busy in the coming thing. And I think I think that we're going to be covering this for a lot longer. David. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture put yesterday of a sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It said on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless votes. Let's bring in Sara hobbled. She's sitting next to Frank there in London if I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mine goodness studying electoral behavior, you must have had a lot of material to work with in Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary train wreck. Well, I mean, the the nation right now is very divided. But there's one thing that British people agree on and that is that they are very unimpressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's very little. Trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this the apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're now going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. Well, the the big problem is here that both in the public but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hot to agree on a compromise. It's so hot to sort of split the difference and Brexit because on the one hand, you have remain is who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise. And just think it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we really find in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they against, but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit tears, whose attitude might now just be let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with BreX? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes, what we've seen since the the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps that the levers the Brexit here on the one hand and the remaining on the other hand have really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people a fault line that people are polarized along on this Brexit or the leave camp they really want to there's a big majority amongst those for thing. Let's just leave. Let's not talk to the EU anymore. Let's not pay them anything. Let's get out of this soon as possible, of course, on the other hand in the remain cap. That's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really in both camps. There's not a lot of support around a compromise deal for me because the remains want what they call the people's vote second referendum Ephron referendum thicken chance to overturn. This decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Hobart, we've gotten the impression from afar that. There is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. I mean, there is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know the public was was sort of evenly split, but came out in favor of leave and Representative democracy. Whether there was a very clear majority in parliament full remain, a leading up to the referendum, and that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty posts that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now that they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's clearly not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public exactly though is both in the public and also in parliament again. And I don't think that's majority today in parliament for another vote. But it could as we approach the twenty ninth of macho the end of may awebber in the negative. The Knicks Clifford will be it might be that the the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without a deal, which has Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life of it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question, or whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, wet spilled over into how people feel about each other that there are these sort of camps where levers and remains field, very distrustful of each other. And and think that you know, the other side and not really have the the, you know, the nascent. Best interest at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in in the United States. Sure. Well, and in the United States, in some cases families are divided is that happening where you are. Yeah. That is very much happening. You know, people are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise on this, Sarah kobylt. Thank you very much for.

parliament Frank Langfitt European Union Brexit David Greene European parliament London Britain Theresa May NPR United States Steve Inskeep Washington DC California Culver City Prime Minister Europe UK Ireland
"parliament party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC. British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leads voted down another Brexit plan. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no plan NPR's. Frank Langfitt is in London and joins me. Hi, frank. Hi, david. All right. So more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days? Well, what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a move to the UK say won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent a hard board of their of that happens, then most likely on Thursday, there'll be a vote on whether postpone this, of course, that'll be up to the US to whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit, tears. But there's also the problem of a European parliament elections coming up in may. So if there were going to be a delay. It would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is you know, what are we gonna tell them? We're going to do with this extra time. They've been negotiating. For over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution. So these want to see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing we should have as you're going to be very busy in the coming. I am. And I think I think that we're gonna be covering this for a lot longer day. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture put yesterday of a sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It said on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless bouts. Let's bring in Sara Humboldt. She's sitting next to Frank London. If I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mind goodness studying electoral behavior, you must have had a lot of material to work with and Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary train wreck. Well, I mean, the the nation right now is very divided. But there's one thing that people agree on. And that is that they are very unimpressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's. Very little trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're not going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. Well, the the big problem is here that both into public but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hot to agree on a compromise. It's so hot to sort of split the difference and Brexit because on the one hand, you have remain is who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise and think it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we redefined in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they against, but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit tears, whose attitude might now just be let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with Brexit? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes, what we've seen since the the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps the levers of the Brexit here on the one hand, and the remain is on the other hand, really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people fault line that people are polarized along an undisclosed brexit' or the the leave camp. They really want to there's a big majority amongst those for to sleep. That's not talk to the EU anymore. That's not pay them anything. Let's get out of there soon as possible, of course on the other hand in the remain camp. That's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really in both camps. There's not a lot of support around the compromise deal for me because the remains once what they call the people's vote a second referendum Ephron referendum ethic can towns to overturn this decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Hobart, we've gotten the impression from afar that. There is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. There is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know the public was was sort of evenly split, but came out in favor of leave and a Representative democracy. Whether it was a very clear majority in parliament full remain, a leading up to the referendum, and that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty process that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that sort of the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan. Not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public. Exactly there is both in the public and also in parliament again. And I don't think that's a majority today in parliament for another vote. But it could as we approach the twenty ninth of March or the end of may away in the Nick Clifford will be it might be that the the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without a deal, which is Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's just bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life. If it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question, or whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, which spilled over into how people feel about it said that there are these sort of camps where levers and remain is field, very distrustful of each other and think that. You know, the other side and not really have the the, you know, the nation's best interest at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in in the United States. Sure. Well, in the United States, in some cases, families are divided is that happening where you are. That is very much happening. You know, people are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise on this, Sarah kobylt. Thank you very much for helping us.

parliament European Union Brexit frank European parliament NPR Britain Frank Langfitt David Greene Theresa May London United States Steve Inskeep Frank London Washington DC California Culver City Prime Minister Europe
"parliament party" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC. British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leads voted down another Brexit plan. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no plan NPR's. Frank Langfitt is in London and joins me. Hi, frank. Hi, david. All right. So more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a move to the UK saying it won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent a heart board of their if that happens then most likely on Thursday, they'll be voting. Whether to postpone this, of course, that'll be up to the US to whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit, tears. But there's also the problem of European parliament elections coming up in may. So if there were going to be a delay. It would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is you know, what are we gonna tell the we're going to do with this extra time. They've been negotiating this for over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution. So the us gonna wanna see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing we're should've as you're going to be very busy in the coming thing. I am. And I think that we're going to be covering this for a lot longer. David. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture put yesterday of a sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It said on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless votes. Let's bring in Sara Humboldt. She's sitting next to Frank there in London if I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mind goodness studying electoral behavior, you must have had a lot of material to work with in Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's a very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary train wreck. Well, I mean, the the nation right now is very divided. But there's one thing that British people agree on, and that is that they are very impressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's very little. Trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this the apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're now going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. Well, the the big problem is here that both in the public but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hot to agree on a compromise. It's so hot to sort of split the difference. And Brexit does on the one hand you have remain is who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise and distinct it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we really find in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they against, but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit tears attitude might now just let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with BreX? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes, what we've seen since the the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps the levers of the Brexit here on the one hand and the remains on the other hand have really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people a full line that people are polarized along and on this Brexit or the leave camp they really want to there's a big majority. Amongst those for distinct, let's to sleep that's not talk to the EU anymore. Let's not pay them anything. Let's get out of there soon as possible, of course, on the other hand in the remain cap. That's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really in both camps. There's not a lot of support around a compromise deal for me because the remains once what they call the people's vote a second referendum Ephron referendum a second chance to overturn this decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Humboldt, we've gotten the impression from afar that. There is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. There is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know the public was was sort of evenly split, but came out in favor of leap and a Representative democracy where there was a very clear majority in parliament full remain a leading up to the referendum, and that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty process that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that sort of the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now that they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's clearly not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public exactly though is both in the public and also parliament again. I don't think that's a majority today in parliament for another vote. But it could as we approach the twenty ninth of March or the end of may awebber in the Knicks. The Knicks Clifford will be it might be that the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without a deal, which is Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's just bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life. If it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question. Whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, wet spilled over into how people feel about each other that there are these sort of camps where levers and remains field, very distrustful of each other. And and think that you know, the other side and not really have the the, you know, the nascent. Best interests at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in in the United States. Sure. Well, in the United States, in some cases, families are divided is that happening where you are. That is very much happening. You know, people are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise on this, Sarah. Thank you.

parliament Frank Langfitt European Union Brexit David Greene London NPR Britain Theresa May United States Sarah Humboldt Steve Inskeep Washington DC California Culver City Knicks Prime Minister Sara Humboldt Europe
"parliament party" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Brexit, a softer Brexit who doesn't the problem is the trade union movement want freedom of movement. The the further left you go in the trade union movement spectrum the more they want freedom of movement. So he's odds with the the trade union. And the party members. This is the problem that Jimmy Kobina's he's not really talking to the country anymore than Theresa May's talking the countries talking to his own party and attention is on party. And well, the prime minister can stagger on as long as the Tory. Ponti Kahn quite worker who wants to replace and Jeremy Corbyn as we've just been hearing count work whether or not he really does want a second referendum in the people that are in the strangest place this morning role in pretty strange place right now. But the people who are in the strangest place all the horns joint European research group, they've effectively taken themselves of their own cliff. How that is about seventy or eighty members of the conservative parliamentary party. It's a party within a party right now. It's a problem that labor has faced for years. It's now on my side of the aisle, the voted against the prime minister's. Do they have to now work at what they're actually four and therefore do not rule out. Yes. You heard it here. Maybe I or maybe before the prime minister bringing this deal back a meaningful vote three in another at ten days time because I think a lot of those MP's, and I'm hearing this overnight are sitting drinking some pretty cold thi this morning because their Brexit. The thing that they've only really a lot of them being in politics to be about might not be a bite to happen on kind of happen under her what I mean is it time for Theresa May to resign. Well, ends up slightly right? That there's a lot of things that are in the Tory party. No, the Tory party don't know who to replace Theresa May with they know they don't want the parliamentary party. No, the Tolan to replace with Boris Johnson. But at least half a dozen. In of the cabinet think and Kevin and former cabinet members think they could be Tory leader to stop Boris. They've got decide on to to to push him off the final shortlist and only one of the two can win and all six to eight of the pretenders contenders. Think that they can win. So the Theresa May is kept in place because the men who want to her job cont agree on which one of them can stop Boris Johnson supplanting them with the party in the country. So you have the strange to you leaders who are odds with their parliamentary caucuses leaders who are parliament parties leaders who are awed with run a party members in various ways. And no nobody able to resolve the issue in labour or Tory an answer what we're going to see this evening. Probably by a very large majority in the British parliament is parliament, take back control of this process. So one of the reasons why left whites conservative labor doesn't work in terms. Of analyzing any of these questions right now is that every politician is an island on this issue. Jacob REEs morgues version of Brexit is subtly different from in Dunkin Smith's version of Brexit there on the Brexit tears like amount, it's very different from Jeremy corbin's version of how we should be doing Brexit. So basically now the British parliament is a kaleidoscope of sick more than six hundred faces and voices on the traditional party. Whipping tonight's vote just to be clear for listeners. Tonight's vote is not going to be whipped to each of those MP's is going to vote 'em by their conscience and not by party label anymore. I on this is I mean, this is completely new stuff for all of us. Now talking about parliament here in and the government. But what about the people because the argument that keeps coming up again, and again is democracy. And I think that we have to. Separate things here. We have the constitutional democracy that happens in parliament. And then you have the direct democracy that was happening or that did happen with the EU referendum. Can we continue to separate those two? Ima- imagine where we'd be today if when to resume became prime minister, she had said I wants to stay in the European Union..

Tory party prime minister Theresa May British parliament Brexit Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn Tory European Union Jimmy Kobina Ponti Kahn cabinet Kevin Jacob REEs Dunkin Smith ten days
"parliament party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington, Washington. DC British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leaves voted down another Brexit plant. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no plan NPR's. Frank Langfitt is in London and joins me. Hi, frank. Hi, david. All right. So more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days? Well, what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a move to the UK saying it won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent a hard board of their if that happens then most likely on Thursday. They'll be a vote on whether postpone this, of course, that'll be up to the US whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit, tears. But there's also the problem of a European parliament elections coming up in may. So if we're going to be a delay would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is what are we gonna tell them? We're going to do with this extra time. They've been negotiating for over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution. So the us gonna wanna see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing we're sort of as you're going to be very busy in the coming thing. I think that we're going to be covering this for a lot longer day. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture put yesterday of sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It said on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless abouts. Let's bring in Sara Humboldt. She's sitting next to Frank there in London if I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mine goodness studying electoral behavior, you must have had a lot of material to work with in Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary train wreck. Well, I mean, the the nation right now, it's very divided. But there's one thing that British people agree on and that is that they are very unimpressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's very little. Trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this the apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're now going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. Well, the the big problem is here that both into public but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hot to agree on a compromise. It's so hot to sort of split the difference and Brexit because on the one hand, you have remain is who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise and distinct it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we redefined in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they against, but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit. Here's whose attitude might now just be let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with BreX? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes, what we've seen since the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps the levers of the Brexit here on the one hand, and the remain is on the other hand have really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people at fault line that people are polarized along an undisputed or the the leave camp, they they really want to there's a big majority amongst those let's to sleep that's not talk to the EU anymore. That's not pay them anything. Let's get out of there soon as possible, of course on the other hand in remain camp. There's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really in both camps. There's not a lot of support around a compromise deal for me because the remains want what they call the people's vote a second referendum Ephron referendum a second chance to overturn. This decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Hobart, we've gotten the impression from far that there is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. There is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know the public was was sort of evenly split, but came out in favour of leave and a Representative democracy where there was a very clear majority in parliament full remain a leading up to the referendum, and that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty process that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now that they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's clearly not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public. Exactly there is both in the public and also in parliament again. And I don't think that's a majority today in parliament for another vote. But it could as we approach the twenty ninth of March or the end of me a web in the Knicks Clifford will be it might be that the the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without a few weeks as Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's just bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life. If it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question. Whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, wet spilled over into how people feel about it said that there are these camps where levers and remains field, very distrustful of each other. And I think that you know, the other side and not really have the the, you know, the nascent. Best interest at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in the United States. Sure. Well, in the United States, in some cases, families are divided is that happening where you are. Yeah. That is very much happening. You know, people are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise with Sarah. Thank you very.

parliament European Union Brexit Frank Langfitt European parliament London Britain David Greene Theresa May NPR United States Steve Inskeep Sarah Hobart DC Culver City California Washington Europe
"parliament party" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"NewsRadio. Colorado's news, traffic and weather station. Mostly cloudy skies for the rest of today. High temperatures in the lower fifties early in the afternoon, and then temperatures slowly falling through the afternoon after about five PM, we do have the chance for a few flurries around Denver while much better chance for seeing snow in the high country this afternoon, including along the I seventy mountain corridor mountain snow wraps up tonight tomorrow sunshine, pretty much statewide cooler in Denver, high forty three and then Friday back in the fifties with sunshine beautiful weekend ahead. Highs in the fifty s with sunny skies from CBS four I'm Ashton Altieri on KOA, NewsRadio eight fifty AM and ninety four one FM. We have high clouds and fifty five degrees in the Denver tech center. This news just coming into the KOA newsroom. The United Kingdom's parliament announcing results of a vote. That would have a no confidence vote against the prime minister. Theresa May Theresa May has survived. The no confidence vote. The parliament party does have confidence in Theresa May. After the vote. She survived that no confidence vote. She has said that she will. Will not run again as we continue to get more information. We will bring it to you on KOA NewsRadio. If three years in prison for Michael Cohen. And for some observers as a win for Cohen, it appears he's dodging a bullet. If you added up all of the potential prison time on the charges against him. You're up around seventy years. And so by cutting a deal, certainly this has to be a great day for him in that sense. ABC news legal analyst, Royal Oakes. President Trump's former personal lawyer told a federal judge that he took responsibility for his actions. But he also said he was acting at the direction of his former client, he said Trump. There is little to admire he made clear his split from someone to whom he was admittedly loyal blindly. So and he seemed to regret now. Not listening to his own voice and instead covering up for the dirty deeds as he put it up for Donald Trump ABC's Aaron Katersky. He says that in addition to the three year prison sentence Cohen was ordered to pay more than a million dollars in restitution for tax campaign finance violations. The fiance of Kelsey Berith. The woodland park woman who has been missing since thanksgiving is cooperating with authorities frenzies lawyer has released a statement. Jeremy lows has phrase's cooperation includes law enforcement interviews, releasing his phone to be search and submitting DNA swamps. Frasier and Barrett share custody of a one year old daughter who's currently under his care frizzy missed a press conference this week held by woodland park. Police is lawyer says he was only told about an hour before it happened and would have been there had he had more notice. Jerry, Bill, KOA NewsRadio. We are learning. More about details about the to California nuns accused of embezzling a half million dollars from a Catholic school. So they could gamble in Vegas. According to the arch dis is Los Angeles Sister, Mary Margaret Cooper, the principal at Saint James Catholic school for twenty nine years and sister. Lana Chang, a teacher for twenty years, stole half a million dollars since two thousand six.

Theresa May Michael Cohen President Trump Denver Aaron Katersky Donald Trump Ashton Altieri KOA CBS woodland park United Kingdom parliament party NewsRadio. Colorado Lana Chang prime minister Kelsey Berith Mary Margaret Cooper Jeremy lows ABC California
"parliament party" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"For over email so we will have the exit interview podcasts and when those answers come in we will have we'll be joined at once again by liana boris the chief rha p player of the exit interview a dramatic reading oh exciting well we'll we'll have fun with that that's gonna be coming up on thursday but then of course a great batch of podcasts coming up to talk about all of this as well your friend in mind michael snow will be joining me on the recap i love michael snow in ten seasons since michael snow played in happy birthday tonight to michael snow happy birthday and as a birthday present you've decided for the first time this season to not have a millennial or a gem exeter on the podcast you're about like ten weeks late to the parliament party sure i just learned the joke i was so excited about the joke already onto thirty five by the way okay and then we're going to have be joined by the great bryce is asia who once upon a time it was oh why do you always have all these vivor coggin people on the show here's the best prices as gonna join me on the very excited that he made purple cool before even chelsea did when he was the purple pants bad ass yes the original purple pants badass yeah so the fun week of podcast series with tribal council and i know you wanna talk about ciba's in what he was up i don't really need to talk about that much i mean the big story of this episode is.

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"parliament party" Discussed on Riggle's Picks with Rob Riggle & Sarah Tiana

Riggle's Picks with Rob Riggle & Sarah Tiana

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on Riggle's Picks with Rob Riggle & Sarah Tiana

"Like i'm about to pass out don't give comedians too much time if you have too much time this is the shit that will happen and i ended up he was betting on stuff i didn't even know you could bet on the first fifteen points i didn't know you could bet on who scores the first fifteen i didn't know there was a thing you could bet on anything though if you can dream it up i think there's a place to wager yeah and they had so daniel always goes to vegas around big sporting events so they had all their tickets from the super bowl that they were bringing back to cash is cash and then they bet he bet on every single game like five six different things in a game and i bet like three things right i bet buffalo to be kentucky which those bad one bad one considering their first round and then i bet another like team underdog team to be duke or whoever the team that do that was about flow but anyway i lost those two and then i had a parlay of all the big favorites and because tennessee lost i lost everything you parlays your become quite the vegas queen the par lay i like the parliament party but yeah i i like like the the part southern accent yeah kicks in out it was on fire this week i had so much jagged and it's just like doing banjos coming out of my mouth so fun group to hang in vegas with on a fun weekend.

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"parliament party" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"To territories that china claims control over that didn't conform with chinese political speech and the exact it uh changes from dozens of other companies and they also you know demanded apologies which they definitely got then they went even further they demanded that this employee fired like the offensive tweet they actually threatened the chinese student who responded to this week by approaching his family back home in china the chinese student was in canada and what this all says and what you know a lot of people in washington are concerned about focus on my call them is that this represents an escalation in the willingness of the chinese this parliament party to use economic cohesion as a means to force foreign companies to their political lives garden josh what this system is that china is going to use its economic power to a chain geopolitical ends many of which undermined the united states and it seems to me that the united states and i'm not asking you to respond to this but it seems to me that the united states needs to make it as a matter of policy to undermine the chinese economy because this is economic warfare we have to fight back i know that does doesn't sound good to the ear but at some point we're going to realize what jeopardy we are in because the chinese are worthless and we have to protect ourselves we haven't done that in previous administrations were only starting to do it in this one there's a lot that we've got to do if we want to ensure our way of life gordon did you know that they work at that they were looking over tweets tweets by employees there anybody who works for married did you know that was happening garden with john i didn't know perfectly that they were looking at tweets of employees but they do look at almost everything because they've got an army of sensors which you know can number may be thirty million maybe even more than that and so you know if as people say uh you can't hit a keystroke without the chinese knowing about it and i'm not talking about strokes just in china it's almost anywhere that they can do this so they've got the capabilities there now marshalling it and they are a real threaten we've got.

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"parliament party" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"parliament party" Discussed on The Big 98

"It on the bobby cast kelsea ballerini night had a chance to look back on her first single love me like you mean it i remember putting on my headphones listening to this the amount being like that special and i don't know why is it not lyrically genius that especially in in the label felt the same way that in a got pitched around town to which i didn't know till later also they're trying to get the funk some other people i didn't know that because i wouldn't find yet and also you are i've had good law putting into place now you weren't signed is an article euro song now it's fair than they pitcher yep to you it may not feel faereby bible is is this the first one i get it i can hardly a bit looking every month thought it was way teapot because what what's happened with you as you created this new niche in the format and now a bit i don't think you're being penalized for but i think this your one record and it got so big people only know you've as the pot countries i know so now it's your goal it is me talking to show your death search and follow the bobby jackson all bobby bones podcast on iheartradio mm what do you think the each spent a week on larry since eighteen if had averaged a we average it out pry seventy vauxhall week so seventy times fifty two weeks twenty years eastman about seventy two thousand dollars a lottery tickets wow that is and what do you think you've won back ballparks three thousand four thousand blokes cmt after midnight instant replays play paul the deed on the phone here from seem teat who in country music are you a fan of who's music do you realize well i tell you what i'm brand with the people from little bit town yeah you know i know them parkway and egypt just good laino down home folk out like sheldon when he was sure kind of really get now they get known came in did parliament party with me and i thought he was a go aboard hey there this is dr vanessa marie perry a host of the.

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