35 Burst results for "Parliament"

Brittany Higgins Files Police Report on Parliament House Rape Claim

The Signal

05:45 min | 1 d ago

Brittany Higgins Files Police Report on Parliament House Rape Claim

"Almost a not. Australia has been transfixed by the story of brittany hagans. The former political stuff who alleges she was raped in a minister's office inside parliament house more allegations against the same men have followed along with ongoing rounds of recriminations about how badly brittany higgins case was handled all giving rise to the clear impression that something is very wrong in parliament house on stephen smiling. And i'm angie lovelock and today on the signal the case that might just trigger some desperately needed reform women in australian politics. Okay so it's it's been a couple of weeks. Maybe you could take back to the moment when this story broke. Yes so it was the first monday of this sitting fortnight around eight o'clock the morning. This is clear armstrong. She's the national political reporter at the daily telegraph newspaper based in parliament. House in canberra. An article appeared on newstalk today written by a journalist code cement the maiden and she Published the allegations of brittany higgins question of where the parliament housing camera is a safe workplace for women is again in the headlines following allegations that a young government staff member was raped in minister's office in an interview with news dot com dot. Au higgins claimed. She felt forced to choose between reporting the assault to police or keeping her dream job. Britney alleges that she was raped by a maiocco lake in the office of now defense minister linda reynolds and The instant reaction i would say was one of complete and utter shock. This abject failure to provide a safe place of work here in parliament and in politics more. Broadly has got to come to an. I think there is. I called for problem inside this building. I've spoken about it many times. I think for far too long young. Women have copped the brunt of the culture in this place and it's time we cleaned it up often beak political scandal type stories us saved until the monday of a sitting week. Because of course you have all of the politicians in cambra unable to escape the issue which was pretty much exactly why that story was published when it was but then quite quickly became apparent that this was going to be a really huge issue. More than i think what people may be realized at that moment because of course she was also booked. This brittany was also booked to appear on the project that night and give a full kind of unfettered account of what she was alleging. And that's really how it kicked off really starting the week with the most possible drama. I think i've had since. I've been camera eighteen months. Welcome back to this special edition of the project tonight. Claims of ripe roadblocks to a police investigation and a young woman forced to choose between her career and the pursuit of justice. And it all happened right in the heart of our democracy as you said clear. It broke on the monday of the start of this session. But the details of britain higgins allegations relate to twenty nineteen. What does she say happened in. What happened back then when she first talked about it. Yeah absolutely so her. Her allegation dates back to sort of the friday. Saturday of of twenty dead of much in two thousand nineteen And brittany alleges that when she was out at a with colleagues drinking at one point The the man she alleges raped her. She says through the night he'd hurler drink. She realized she was quite drunk. Wanted to home. I notice that he was buying meal out of drinks. And i was just sort of job. Well done kind of broadly being rewarded in a weird way. So would you say you were drunk when you decided to go home obsolete. She says it was suggested that because they lived in the same direction. They should share cab when she was in that cab he said i've got to pick something up from parliament on the way i and she goes along with it ends up being signed dean to parliament. Neither of them have their passes. It's quite light after hours. They have to sign themselves. Will he. signs. Both of the men go into the office. She says she would feel well. She laid down and she alleges that she wake up with with demand on top of that i woke up mid ripe essentially. I don't know why i knew. He was almost finished. But i felt like it had been going on for a while or that. He was done. He was sweaty. I couldn't get him off of me at this point. I started crying fast. Forward to the the the start of the workweek she. She comes to work and immediately. The issue is initially traded as security breach because obviously Linda reynolds was defense industry minister at the time a lot of classified important information potentially in that office so she learns pretty quickly that the male stafa involved in these instant has already been had their employment terminated over these potential security breach and she's brought into a series of formal employment meetings to discuss. What is that time. Believed to be a security breach felt like a disciplinary meeting. It was we've been made aware of the events in that. You guys were here after hours. And you know that's not acceptable She of course then disclosed to her boss when reynolds what she alleged happened to her and that also then led her going to the afp.

Brittany Higgins Parliament House Brittany Hagans Angie Lovelock Parliament Housing Camera Au Higgins Linda Reynolds Cambra Daily Telegraph Brittany Canberra Armstrong Stephen Parliament Britney Australia Higgins Britain Reynolds
The story of Australia and the internet

This Week In Google

02:23 min | 2 d ago

The story of Australia and the internet

"So just to recap long tawdry story of australia and the internet so rupert murdoch who is of course australian and i you know kind of coincidentally also six hundred. He is the Well he's pretty is pretty burs very close very close. Who's love journalism refusal. He started it was his first newspaper. Australian i know he is yes yes he inherited from his father. Oh okay from kevin murdoch. And then he bought sun in brittany brought. Some venture eventually ended up in a battle with with robert maxwell and one that the sun but he built his empire first austrailia and of course now the wall street journal fox He is your post. The times of london does on a media. Baron and apparently has quite a bit of clinton loss in australia. Because he yeah. He convinced the australian parliament to consider a bill which was likely by the way to be Voted on this week and pass that would essentially Establish a link tax to companies like google and facebook co published news snippets. They would not the the value. The sent to newspapers and magazines would not be a compensated. Any way it merely the fact that they're using the content some small amount of that content in their search results or in their links That the parliament said well. We're going to say you got pay for that. Google is the first to capitulate first threatening. We're gonna we're gonna retract search. We're gonna if this passes. We're going to leave australia. Apparently they didn't either didn't work or they didn't. They lost their nerve. Because shortly thereafter they made a deal for paying some unnamed some to murdoch and other publishers thought to be fairly hefty amount of money tens of millions of dollars to the benjamins tens not hundreds tents. All right well but a two platforms times ten times five years or something. It adds up. Buddy was one of those deals where there's a face-saving going on as well because oh we're going to work together we're gonna create stuff. It's going to be a joint venture that kind of thing that i've just here go away. Take some money which is what it really probably is

Kevin Murdoch Australia Rupert Murdoch Robert Maxwell Australian Parliament Brittany The Wall Street Journal Baron The Times Google Clinton SUN London Facebook Parliament Murdoch Buddy
Genocide, why won't world leaders call it what it is?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:29 min | 2 d ago

Genocide, why won't world leaders call it what it is?

"Sounds like term from antiquity. The kind of thing that there might have been an eleventh commandment forbidding it is not the word dates from as recently as nineteen forty four when it was coined by the polish lawyer raphael lampkin to define the holocaust he survived and which dozens of his family did not genocide is also a relatively modern crime though. Humans have fought clan clan tribe on faith on faith and nation or nation for as long as they have been humans. The ambition of completely wiping out an entire bunch of people was substantially thwarted for most of history by the limits of technology. They are arguably cases to be made for rome's destruction of coffee in one hundred and forty six bc and athens conquest of mills to hundred and seventy years before that but the industrialization of extermination is in general and as raffaelle lincoln recognized name modern blights pilot. And i think that's the spirit. The unanimous bill family the biscuit behind by all allstate ratified mile parliaments at the earliest date inaudible advised acumen rights. Forgive given the protection of international law for the sake of progress and international. Lincoln's legacy is the un's nineteen forty eight convention on the prevention and punishment of the crime of genocide and the row continuing unto the present day over what genocide means who is entitled to accuse him of committing it. And what should be done about it if someone has this week. Canada became the second country to officially describe china's repressions of it's largely muslim week minority as genocide. Well after a fashion though the motion passed parliament. Two hundred and sixty six votes to zip canada's prime minister justin trudeau and most of his cabinet sat out. The motion was put forward by the conservatives. Who called on the liberals to send a united message about human rights. The vote was non-binding although it was backed by all opposition parties and some members of trudeau's own liberal party with the pragmatism or cowardice or a bit from column a and a bit from column be this abstention highlights the reason that governments are often pretty reticent about accusing anybody else of genocide. The convention on genocide does not merely oblige signatories to not commit genocide. It obliges them to act if someone else does. It's right there in article one. The contracting parties confirmed that genocide where the committed in time of peace or in time of war is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish the trouble with invoking. The g word is that it implicitly summons an assumption of accompanying action which puts into context the motivations of the first country to accused china genocide against the week as the united states in the very lost hours of president. Donald trump's term so possibly laissez noble statement of principle and more the diplomatic equivalent of sewing prunes into the curtains vixen incoming tenant although intriguingly president joe biden's administration has thus far stood by the declaration. We're going to stop the chinese from their actions. We should be gone to the un immediately and so at sanctions against them in the united nations. For what they did. We have to be firm. We don't have to go to war but we have to make it clear. This is as far as you go. China the difficulty is that stopping the genocide very often necessitates confronting the people committing it and this can be risky expensive and difficult to sell to voters whose interest in the travails of people in place. They couldn't point to on globe cannot be taken for granted. This is the conundrum that to site. One inglorious example lead to the us administration of president bill clinton wintering squeamishly about act of genocide in rwanda in nineteen ninety-four had the us formally called the acts of genocide. An actual genocide questions might have been asked about why words were not being accompanied by the eighty second airborne

Raphael Lampkin Raffaelle Lincoln Motion Passed Parliament Justin Trudeau Canada Athens UN Mills Rome China Trudeau Lincoln Liberal Party Cabinet Donald Trump United Joe Biden United States United Nations Bill Clinton
World Bank threatens to suspend vaccine funding to Lebanon

Not Too Shabby

00:22 sec | 3 d ago

World Bank threatens to suspend vaccine funding to Lebanon

"Corona virus vaccines in Lebanon over what it said were violations by members of parliament of the Agreed vaccination campaign. Lawmakers were vaccinated in parliament. Without the approval of the officials running the campaign, the World Bank's regional director said. Everyone had to register for the vaccine and wait their turn. Electoral Commission. Indonesia's

Lebanon Parliament World Bank Electoral Commission Indonesia
'Temporary solution' found ahead of Iran nuclear deadline

The Pension Group: Your Money Matters

00:31 sec | 5 d ago

'Temporary solution' found ahead of Iran nuclear deadline

"Iran agrees to continue the verification and monitoring activities of their nuclear program for up to three months. But there will be less access and no more snap inspections of their facilities starting Tuesday that from the director of the United Nations nuclear watchdog group Rafield Grassi, We've got two reasonable result. After what was a very, very intensive consultation negotiation with our Iranian counterparts by the administration's negotiating with Iran's parliament over full return to the 2015 nuclear

Rafield Grassi Iran United Nations Parliament
Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

Coronacast

09:50 min | 5 d ago

Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

"Today is the day that vaccination start to roll out across australia but we got a little preview of that yesterday with the with the prime minister and world war two survivor and a couple of other people getting the vaccine yesterday. Yes they go to i. Those of the pfizer vaccine which also followed a day on saturday of anti xers demonstrating and being talked to list in one city by pete evans. Some people criticizing the prime minister. Full so-called jumping the queue to get the vaccine before anyone else does but maybe leading by example. I just don't think you can criticize our leaders for having the it's not as if whole parliament skating it. It's really just showing their confidence in the vaccine. I think it's really important. Thing down the track. You'll see the health minister leader of the opposition getting the astra vaccine or the chief medical officer. Getting the astra vaccine to show that the our leaders are. You do have trust in this. And do you do believe in science. And i mean it's like laser immune to getting the virus either. Pay dutton got covid early. Jia by tribe and you you want your leadership cupboard and there's tens of thousands of accents that are gonna roll at in just the next couple of weeks. So i suppose people sort of is on the horizon going cool vaccine zahia. That's a really big comfort in a time of pandemic. When do we start to see things going back to normal. That's the critical question. And it depends what you call going back to normal because in most parts of australia. Things are pretty normal. We've got very little if any covid. Nineteen virus around in australia and new south wales is going weeks so has so have other jurisdictions so available around so we're back to normal internally back to normal means opening the borders having international travellers and tourists coming to australia us being able to go overseas listening. You'll becoming part of the world again. I think that's what we mean by becoming not becoming normal and covered that on tonight's Seven thirty program by talking to a mortar spoke to chris. Murray who heads the institute for health metrics and evaluation and he's of the he runs one of the world's leading modeling groups and covered on the health report back in november. He predicted the dr the global downturn in cases of covid nineteen that. We're seeing now he. He predicted almost to the week and his was. That was going to be nothing to do with. Thanks to nation and everything to do with season. -ality that really. It would have itself out in terms of the winter surge in covid nineteen. Because it's so seasonal. So i decided to go back to him. Seen other vaccinations going out. What what what's your modeling moving forward and it was quite sobering. He says he's not as bullish. Nah as he was back in november the variables that he's taking into consideration people's behavior. Now remember we're talking about the northern hemisphere not stralia new zealand but of almost no virus. And we've got close borders visit. If people's behavior goes back to normal before you get down to very low levels of virus transmission then you. He believes that you could. Well see a third wave evolving at the end of the northern summer. Pretty much like you saw in in twenty twenty and what could make that. Which is the second variable that he's worried about our vaccine resistant. Very variants of the virus escaped the vaccine and that they could really muddle the muddy the water considerably. How does that fit with other data that seeing coming out saying that the vaccines are reducing transmission in places like i and that's a place where the at least the uk variant is very prevalent on the uk very sensitive to the vaccine it's african variant and other variants than meyer is including the brazilian variant. We're not much is known. And you'll remember that. We spoke some days ago. About the brazilian city minnows. Seventy six percent of people had been infected with the virus. There were only five hundred admissions to hospital in the beginning of december beginning of january first nineteen days of january. Three thousand five hundred hospitalizations in so vaccine trials a very high percentage of people where had had covid nineteen when they were into the trial and in the placebo group they got reinfected with the south african variant so these vaccine escape variants are really worrying in terms of reinfection. Saw the vaccine does is turns covered one thousand nine hundred common core. Which is why. I'm gonna take the astra and we're five. We'll take whatever is given to me. Because i don't want to die of covid. Nineteen but if what we are looking for an opening of the borders and international normalization at least in australia. According to chris murray. We've made the wrong bet with the astro vaccine. He says you really do need to be immunizing with pfizer or madeira. Or perhaps even novak so that still to be proved in the real world. We're much higher. Degrees of efficacy and reduction in transmission and remember the other issue reduction in transmission is that these new variants emerge in countries. Where there's a lot of spread where the virus is multiplying and replicating all the time. And that's where these new variants are being thrown off. They won't be thrown off in austria. Where there's no virus around they'll be thrown off in low income countries like sight words middle income countries like south africa. They'll be thrown off in the united states in britain and other places if the virus keeps on circulating. So what we've got to do is get to very high levels of immunization very very quickly with highly effective vaccines and hope that that minimizes these of virus. Which is resistant to the vaccines. And then what we gotta do. And it's got to be done right now actually getting vaccines op through visor. Moderna novak's which are designed to cope with the resistant variants. That are around. Perhaps the brazilian one certainly the south african one and within a few months star boosting with them. This is really demoralizing. When with sort of on the cusp of vaccine. Roll out of here in australia woman. And if i'm just an average person sitting at home listening to corona 'cause what should i take away from these. Iud urging people from getting vaccine that they often no. Because i think it's really important that we all get covered so that shoots so first of all we're going to have a layer of protection. The international evidence is increasingly by the pfizer vaccine prevents transmission. So that means with hotel. Workers bar workers being immunized and hopefully their families to and that's a really important part of the story. We are creating a ring of confidence around the hotel borders. We've also got to institute with the pfizer vaccine. Not the astros vaccine ring vaccination around outbreaks so that we are controlling this any outbreaks there and everybody else immunized with the astra vaccine so that we are turns it into the common colds. We create a very safe situation. The problem is wayne. Do we open up to international travel and windy relax on hotel quarantine and with a country. That's largely covered with the extra astro vaccine. Which is not very effective somewhere doggy. Effective at all against the south african variant certainly in terms of transmission. Then it becomes a very nerve wracking decision to make. So that's why we've got to be planning in twenty twenty one for a booster. Does of vaccine resistant covid nineteen. That's actually a question that we had from john who's in australia who leaves in the us. And he's basically asking now. The australian vaccination program is rolling out. Do we expect. When do we expect the quarantine might be lifted. And what kind of factors go into that decision making so you could be quite cool about it if you think that we are all. We've turned effectively. Destroyed population susceptibility to covid nineteen into the common cold. And it does look as though the it's pretty effective at doing that with you're talking about african variant or indeed other variants. So we're pretty protected so you could say well maybe sooner rather than later but you know. It's just a very nerve wracking theme because we variants from all over the world and we are not donating vaccine to low-income countries. At the rate which will get van covered quickly enough and they will be throwing off variants and those variance will come to look at hiv hiv started around contrast saw in zaire and then you tens of millions of people have been infected with. Its an died. It doesn't matter where these variants arise from. They will spread to other parts of the world. So we've got to get the globe immunized as quickly as possible otherwise. It's very hard to relax just when you thought you had this thing pinned down at escapes again. Norman so so becomes really does become a bit like flu where the first vaccination does protect us to very significant extinct in terms of dying and serious disease. That's why i'm lining up. For whatever vaccine i get and i would urge other people to do the same. But it means that the government has got to not be complacent about this any shape or form and has to star ordering what's called multi vaillant vaccines are trying to ranging them now so that by spring summer of this year. We're getting boosting booster shots with multi valent vaccines that will covers against the current range of resistant. Variants around the world and that swing will open up borders.

Australia Astra Pete Evans Pfizer Institute For Health Metrics A Stralia JIA Dutton Moderna Novak New South Wales Chris Murray UK Murray Meyer Madeira Chris Novak New Zealand Austria
Australia is demanding tech giants pay for news. Google relented, Facebook didn’t

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:14 min | Last week

Australia is demanding tech giants pay for news. Google relented, Facebook didn’t

"A dispute between lawmakers and american tech giant's took a dramatic turn this week for months. The government has been debating a new media code that would force the likes of google and facebook to pay traditional news outlets win linking to their content. The code was approved on wednesday by australia's lower house of parliament and is expected to pass in the senate next week on the same day. Google announced a three year. Deal with news court. The rupert murdoch owned conglomerate that has a big presence in australia's broadcast market google's decision to pay up in line with the proposed legislation was seen as a move to placate lawmakers but facebook took a different approach. Australians waking up yesterday to see the news wouldn't have actually seen any news if they get their news from facebook because on that day facebook decided to block all news articles australia. Tom wainwright is our media. Editor facebook tried to ban just news websites. That was the intention but it eased some kind of machine learning method which didn't seem to go very well because as well as banning news sites they banned all kinds of other things charities the fire service health services a project for children with cancer and most of those were reasonably quickly corrected npr thames. The damage was done people outraged. Why exactly where people outraged well. People are outraged about fact that so many things have been blocked the whence pace to be blocked but people are saying that in the middle of a pandemic is obviously not a great time to be blocking legitimate news sites providing true information about things. You know what the state of current lockdown laws are or where to get your vaccine that kind of thing. Scott morrison the prime minister not surprisingly is capitalizing on this. The idea of shutting down the sort of sorts digest today as some sort of threat. We'll have a strategy is reactive at. He's keen to make this as much of an international question as he can and he's pointing out to other countries are considering these codes as well and and wrestling with the same dilemmas. So i think australia is hoping that other countries will take it side in this battle and so what did facebook say about. How did they explain itself. Facebook says the australia's position basically rests on a misunderstanding about the relationship between facebook and publishers. And they say the actually. When facebook publishes a link to an article is the publisher actually benefiting from that not facebook and so they think that they should be the ones who are required to pay publishers for linking to publish it stories in fact they say the australia last year they reckon that they generated more than five billion referrals to australia new sites which they say would be worth about four hundred million australian dollars and they say actually if publishes thing that somehow getting a deal from this they should just stop publishing their stories to facebook. They're not under any obligations. Have their stuff on that. But for its part. Google made a different decision. Well that's interesting google's done exactly the opposite you know the tech firms faced with this in some ways. Impossible demand know they were told to pay up or take their business elsewhere. Facebook decided it was probably less bad to shut down its news links than it was to set the precedence of coughing up. Google the opposite choice. And it's this week a deal with news coal. Which is rupert murdoch's news organization and smaller deals with of the news organizations the terms of which have been fully disclosed. But the gist seems to be that. They'll basically pay them lots of money and in return they'll be allowed to carry on listing their news articles. And what do you make of those different approaches to this threat of of the differing actions that google and facebook of taking on this i think really reflect the kinds of business that they're in for face but they say the news actually is quite a small part of what they do is less than four percent. They say of what you see on your news feed for google. I think search engine. That wasn't allowed to show links twenty news articles wouldn't be much of search engine and you can imagine people pretty quickly abandoning google and going to something else like say being which is owned by microsoft which has been a chilly diversities these australian reforms. So i think google just decided that it was too big a hit for it to take facebook decided to gamble and i think we'll see in the next few days whether this gamble pays

Facebook Australia Google Tom Wainwright Rupert Murdoch House Of Parliament Scott Morrison Senate Government Wrestling Cancer Microsoft
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | Last week

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
White House To Review Plan To Pull Troops Out Of Afghanistan

Here & Now

04:20 min | Last week

White House To Review Plan To Pull Troops Out Of Afghanistan

"When the U. S Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin meets with NATO defense ministers today and tomorrow they'll discuss the future of the 2500 American troops still serving in Afghanistan under a deal the Trump Administration signed with the Taliban. The U. S is supposed to withdraw those troops by May, 1st. Biden administration is now questioning whether that's still a good idea, given the ongoing violence. BBC chief International correspondent least to set joins US now from Kabul on Skype and lease The Times of London is reporting that the Afghan government wants US and NATO troops to stay for another two years. So if the body administration were to agree to that, how would they justify breaking this deal with the Taliban? Right now. Our understanding is that the Biden administration believes it needs more time and now Afghanistan is in a situation whereby depending on what figures used 50 to 70% of the district's of Afghanistan or other controlled or contested by the Taliban, and that one way or the other either through the negotiations were through the battlefield that the Taliban will return to power. The Taliban are threatening that if the U. S doesn't keep his deal, they're going to resume their attacks against the NATO forces. They want the U. S. To keep this side of the bargain. We know that President Biden never supported the troop surge into Afghanistan when he was vice president. We know he wants to get out. But the big urgent question now and it's a really, really hard question is that it's not that they we will get out. It is how we will get out. And what will happen when we do? Well, you're right. That is the crux of the problem for President Biden and for NATO, that if you pull out troops or when you pull out troops that terrorist groups will emerge again in Afghanistan, but from what you're telling me It sounds like the Taliban already carries quite a bit of influence in the country. So how much of a concern is it that these violent groups would take over the country? At some point when these troops are gone, Rob The very pessimistic assessments, which say that the Taliban had moved so close to many of the provincial capitals, which they've been prevented from taking in the past because of U. S air power because of U. S intelligence gathering because of US and other NATO support that once all of these Foreign troops are gone, that they will be able to overrun these provincial cities. And then, of course, Kabul is the biggest prize of all. There are people in the Afghan government who say this summer will be the worst fighting season as it's called that Afghanistan has seen for years, But they say they're confident that the Afghan security forces will be able to stand up to them. I think the reality is that the Taliban have strengthened their positions. They believe that their return to power one way or another is just a matter of time. It is hard to believe at this point that this year will mark the 20th anniversary of the 9 11 attacks, which, of course, sparked the U. S led invasion of Afghanistan now two decades ago. What has been accomplished in that time? Lisa's we consider pulling these troops out. It has been 20 years of some successes. I think we have to bear that in mind. Afghanistan is not the country it was in 2000 and one There is a vibrant press. There is a parliament there is an elected president. There is the most educated, most connected to generation in Afghan history. But you cannot also avoid the fact that year in year out the Taliban from their sanctuaries in neighboring Pakistan, and the resistance from other outside actors. Have the inch back district by district into power work and what we see Eat today in Afghanistan is a time where Afghans are living in fear of targeted killings that one by one Human rights activists, female judges, journalists that young, educated generation expected to play a role in the future. They're being picked off one by young one, and there's a brain drain. They're leaving because they see their lives. They're not safe here and they don't have a future in Afghanistan. I don't think I'm going to say that All hope is lost. But there is a feeling that this is what the Taliban say. Time is up. Now you had your chance, and now it's

Taliban Afghanistan Biden Administration Nato U. President Biden Afghan Government Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin Trump Administration Kabul United States Skype The Times BBC London ROB Lisa Pakistan
The next of 1,000 cuts: Hong Kong activists on trial

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:31 min | Last week

The next of 1,000 cuts: Hong Kong activists on trial

"Rock. It's a scene. That's becoming ole too familiar in hong kong this week more pro. Democracy activists are on trial before appearing in court. One of the accused lee. Cheuk yan said hong kong's rule of law is deteriorating because he became a in some political him eight other profile figures have been charged with organizing and participating in an unauthorized. The charges stemmed not from hong kong's draconian new national security law but from the protests prior to its introduction in june twenty nine thousand nine millions of hong kongers began taking to the streets. They were opposing and extradition bill but they saw as a grave threat to the territory's delegate independence from the mainland government over months. The demonstrations escalated vandalism and violence were met with tear gas and rubber bullets. This week's training focuses on one particular protest so on august. Eighteen two thousand and nineteen mole than one million. People gathered to protest despite very heavy rain that day. Su lin wong is a china correspondent for the economist and is based in hong kong so the police had granted permission for people to protest in victoria park but they weren't granted permission to march on the streets but because there was so many people showed up inevitably people flowed out but the eight hundred august protests. Actually marks the first tig free weekend in a month so really was extremely peaceful. Compared to many of the protests that had come before it and so if that days protests remained peaceful wire or activists on trial for for being a part of it. They're nine high profile activists who on trial charged with organizing and participating in unauthorized and so they faced penalties of up to five years in jail. It's important to know that they haven't been charged under the national security law which was introduced after up. These protests occurred so the prosecution is accusing these group of defying police. Instructions encouraging crowds to watch and causing traffic disruptions. While the defense doesn't contest the facts that helped to organize and participate in the peaceful assembly. What they're arguing is that. The charges violate a basic right to assembly guaranteed under hong kong law and they are challenging the constitutionality of the polices ability to ban assemblies especially when the protests were directed at the police themselves. And you say that all the defendants are are high profile. Parts of hong kong's democracy movement. Yes so interestingly. This particular case is focused on an older generation of pro-democracy activists in hong kong who are generally considered to be moderate and who believe in trying to change the system from within by for example running for parliament in contrast to a younger generation of protesters who we saw take to the streets in two thousand nine hundred eighteen. So the fact that it's it's this group of older per democracy campaigners indicates the dominant is trying to crush the democracy movement as a whole as opposed to going after particular protesters who a particularly violent the two most high profile defendants in this case. Are martin land. Jimmy lai so muslim is considered the father of the democracy movement in hong kong. He's now eighty two years old. The other high profile figure is jimmy. Lai who is a media tycoon and runs a pro-democracy tabloid in hong kong and his despised by the chinese communist party. And so how do you think this trial will go so two of the nine have pleaded guilty to the charges and the remaining seven have pleaded not guilty to the sentence for the to pleaded. Guilty is expected next month and then the trial for the seven. He pleaded not guilty. Expected to last two weeks and so courts in hong kong still have a relatively high degree of autonomy and as a high standard of evidence it's expected in cases so people hoping that the courts will will still remain as independent as they were known to be prior to the protests as you say targeting these fathers and mothers of democracy in hong kong is quite telling so i think the outlook for democracy in hong kong is extremely grim and while some supporters did rally outside the court on tuesday since the national security law was introduced me last day. Her beam very few protests harshly because of covid restrictions but also because there has been a real layer of fear that is settled across the city. People have been arrested for holding up blank posters and slogans that we heard all the time on the streets in two thousand and nineteen have now being labeled seditious

Hong Kong Cheuk Yan Mainland Government Su Lin Wong Victoria Park LEE Jimmy Lai Chinese Communist Party China LAI Jimmy Martin
Australian PM Morrison apologizes to ex-staffer alleging colleague raped her

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | Last week

Australian PM Morrison apologizes to ex-staffer alleging colleague raped her

"Today to a former government staffer who alleged that she was raped by a colleague and parliament. Two years ago, Morrison promised an investigation into the accusations and also the culture inside the country's political capital At colleague was fired Britney Higgins and an interview with Australia's the project said she passed out on a couch and woke up to find her colleague assaulting her. He then refused her demand to stop. She says She spoke with police at the time, but decided against making a formal complaint amid concerns about her job. In a statement to CNN, Hagen says that she's come forward now because she didn't want this to happen to anyone else wins news time. 1 51.

Britney Higgins Morrison Australia Hagen CNN
Dutch court orders government to scrap coronavirus curfew

Mike Gallagher

00:37 sec | Last week

Dutch court orders government to scrap coronavirus curfew

"Dutch courts, ordering the government to lift a nationwide coronavirus curfew and to do so immediately. The government implemented the curfew based on a little, which states that the Cabinet can introduce rules in an emergency without consulting parliament and the Senate. But according to the court, the curfew was brought in in response to something that didn't constitute an emergency. Like for example, if a dyke was breached. On the evidence for this finding was that the 9 P.m. curfew was discussed before it was introduced, so the court rules it didn't meet the necessary legal criteria on therefore must be scrapped with immediate effect. The BBC's

Cabinet Government Parliament Senate BBC
Myanmar's Military Coup: How We Got Here

Morning Edition

03:59 min | Last week

Myanmar's Military Coup: How We Got Here

"The country's civilian leader, Ahn Sung Souci, will remain in custody for another two days. The military staged a coup on February. 1st and people have been protesting it, but the big questions right now are why did the coup happened when it did? And what happens next? Here's NPR's Julie McCarthy. By the hundreds of thousands citizens armed only with indignation March daily against the military takeover. the escalating dangers, teachers, engineers and doctors in their scrubs demand that civilian rule be reinstated the country's defacto leader Aung Songs, Hoochie was arrested February 1st thwarting the decisive re election of her National League for Democracy. The U. N Human Rights Office is tracking more than 350 political and state officials, along with activists, journalists, monks and students who have been detained. Young gon based commentator Kinzel Win, says the atmosphere Feels like the upheaval of 1988 when the whole country went out to protest on the streets of Yangon just by comparison, at time, it ended badly. Some people shot and kills and the army taking over again. When says it is a once in a generation event, especially inflaming the young voters who came of age under me and Mars fitful transition to democracy. They don't want to even hear the name of that. C zero Power takeoff power historian thought Manu, author of the Hidden History of Burma, says over the past decade the Army had relinquished day today governing to an elected parliament. Ah hybrid arrangement that left to the generals in charge of security and believing that after surviving years of Western sanctions They were in a position of strength. But chief parliamentarian Long songs who achieved sought to change that governing model and the constitutional change she wanted was to have the army under the control of an elected government. And under the control of her and this has led to tension meant who says Souci was alert to the possibility the army would probe for an opportunity to overthrow her November's election set the stage. Souci refused to discuss any alleged irregularities at the polls, which the army claimed had reduced its share of oats. Generals took the refusal as an affront on do that feeling of disrespect comes after many years where they've also felt not properly consulted where she's had the limelight where she seeking to undermine this kind of set up that they've had over the past 10 years meant juices from the Army's point of view, the hybrid model might have worked with lesser luminaries. The generals didn't count on the 75 year old on songs. Hooches sustained Star power or that this daughter of Burma's independence hero had a taste for power that might sideline them. But she broke the mold and in a way what's happened this past week? Has been the end of that experiment to see if that system could work with her as well, innit? Kinzel Win says it's entirely possible that the Army never intended Maura than one term for young songs hoochie and they had to find every Ruthie can think of You keep her away, and now it has succeeded but meant who says it's not clear whether the generals will only be satisfied if Souci is permanently removed. The situation, he says, is difficult to read. Myanmar's military rulers have seized power during a pandemic, which has made the messiness of governing even Messier. People are hungry and financially hurting, and now they stand on balconies, banging pots and pans furious over losing their democratic experiment. Julie McCarthy. NPR news

Ahn Sung Souci Julie Mccarthy Aung Songs U. N Human Rights Office Kinzel Win Army Souci National League For Democracy Hoochie Myanmar NPR Yangon Long Songs Manu Parliament Kinzel Maura Ruthie Messier
Russia says it's ready for split if EU imposes new sanctions

Larry Elder

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Russia says it's ready for split if EU imposes new sanctions

"Lavrov says his country's ready to sever ties with the European Union If the block imposes new, economically painful sanctions. The rhetoric of the sanctions is ramping up. In that context, Sergei Lavrov said. If you want peace prepare for war, he insisted that Russia does not want to isolate itself. But when the EU's foreign policy chief paid a rare visit to Moscow last week, Mr Lavrov underlined that Russia saw sanctions over Alexei Navalny as illegitimate. The recently jailed Mr Navalny is in court again in a separate defamation case. He's been challenging the judge accusing her of lying over why state media has been broadcasting footage of the trial despite an order banning filming. That's the BBC's Danny Eberhard reporting. Australia's parliament will

Sergei Lavrov Lavrov European Union Mr Lavrov Alexei Navalny Russia Mr Navalny Moscow Danny Eberhard BBC Australia
Somalias political problem

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Somalias political problem

"The logic of defined political terms that they provide the body politic with the sort of inoculation against what usually results when one person holds power to loan going back to the voters every so often to ask whether or not they won't. The person in charge to crack on is a sensible precautionary measure. See also the term limit. Which in some jurisdictions imposes a ceiling on the talk any single citizen may occupy the big desk there is however and as somalia. Is this week discovering an inbuilt floor with the setup at the moment the term elapses either the incumbent needs to have a renewed mandate in their pocket or a successor has to be ready to take the oath of office. The time of somali president mohamed abdullah muhammad better known as fa- modu was up on monday however because no elections have been held. No president has been chosen. Several opposition factions and two of somalia's five states have declared that they will no longer recognized for marjo as president before we look at what happens next spoiler alert very possibly nothing. Good a brisk. Recap of the backstory is probably in order the new president from i. I'm i'm very happy today. Because the new president's da for mall. Joe was elected in two thousand and seventeen. The idea had been that this was going to be a proper one person. One vote direct election but it was decided probably correctly that the polling stations and qs. Office somalia's various incorrigible militant groups rather too many targets. Instead from our joe was elected by somalia's parliament which is also not directly elected but instead chosen via a framework which has power among somalia's clans and states. This is a necessarily complex apparatus. Many of the clans dislike each other and a few of the states Iffy on whether they even think they're part of somalia says much about what somalia's mp's were up against when they chose the president that this vote was held not in the parliament building in mogadishu but in a heavily guarded and fortified hangar at aden a international airport and only after it had been closed to air traffic and mogadishu's roads closed to all traffic. It had been hoped for a while that by the end of joe's term somalia would by now being a position to conduct a more orthodox one person one vote direct election. What would have been somalia's first such since nineteen sixty nine however this was eventually reckoned once again an unacceptable security risk specifically that to hold such a vote would have been asking somalis to bet too large a steak on the goodwill of the islamic terror group al shabaab covid nineteen ni- certainly being vastly under recorded in somalia provided further discouragement. So this election was to have been another indirect one though with a broader pool of delegates but for modules opponents believed or purported to believe that the president had been stacking the regional and national electoral board's with his political allies. Which is why we are where we are or perhaps more accurately a delayed election israeli a good thing but it doesn't have to be the end of the world since the beginning of the covid nineteen pandemic at least forty national votes of various sort have been delayed and around thirty five regional or local elections in places where the democratic architecture is solid. This will bailey count. As a wobble especially at subnational national levels it will not cause the citizens of new south wales to question the legitimacy of the democracy if they have to put up with their local councillors another year. Ditto those of london as regards the mayor but when the stakes are as high as national government and the foundations much less stable. Such a jolt can have more dangerous consequences. a delayed. Parliamentary election has already triggered a war in ethiopia in an ominous. And surely not coincidental gesture. Shortly after somalia's politicians failed to reach agreement at the latest talks in. Do some marib an shebab. Roadside bomb struck a military convoy near the town killing thirteen people. And then there's at the security council condemned terrorist attacks by al-shabaab they reaffirmed their support for national sovereignty territorial integrity and political independence of somalia from jo now plans to meet with state leaders next week in an attempt to locate a compromise. It has to be hoped that they find one. Nowhere on earth is a power vacuum good thing and nowhere on earth is a power vacuum a worst thing as recent history has repeatedly demonstrated funding somalia.

Somalia President Mohamed Abdullah Muh Marjo Mogadishu Al Shabaab JOE FA New South Wales Bailey National Government Ethiopia London Shabaab Security Council AL JO
What's happening at the protests in Myanmar?

Talking Politics

04:47 min | 2 weeks ago

What's happening at the protests in Myanmar?

"Maybe we should just start with where we are today so we're recording this uk. Time on tuesday morning. We're about a week out from the code. What's your understanding of. The current situation is on the first of february army took over arrested. The president's in the de facto head of government on succi said that they were acting within the emergency provisions of the constitution. They said that they would hand back. Power after holding elections within a year's time since then protests have been growing every day. They've spread around the country in several different towns and cities over the past forty eight hours. We've seen massive protests in the biggest city former capital. Rangoon may be hundreds of thousands of people on the streets yesterday yesterday evening. The government put out new regulations. And this morning. They also blocked major intersections and bridges as well in the city so the protests i think have become smaller but they have continued at in naypyidaw the capital. We're getting the first reports that someone may have been killed in altercations between protesters and the security forces. So it's a very very fluid time. We don't know what momentum the protests have they seen bay determined people seem incredibly energized in their desire to oppose takeover by the military. But we don't know what's going to happen because this is an army after all that's crushed many uprisings and demonstrations in the past. So we'll come onto what might come next In a bed. But what's your best understanding of why now so the ostensible reason that's been given is unhappiness about the elections but the elections were in november. So why february. So the elections were in early november around the same week as a. Us elections the commander in chief. The head of the army who turned sixty five. This year is meant to retire. I think he had thought that he might have a chance of of becoming the president after the elections. I think he had hoped that the pro army party the union solidarity and development party usdp would do reasonably well as well as many ethnic minority parties. Were contesting the elections as well when they didn't do well when the nfl the party amongst says suci a landslide. Victory the army. I said they would recognize and respect. The results but in december came increasing allegations from the us dp side of massive electoral fraud. And the army commander in chief and others in the army latched onto that and demanded an investigation that call for an investigation was rejected by the union election commission and that led in january two demands by the army that there'd be a special session of parliament to discuss these allegations that was also rejected by the speaker of the lower house of parliament that was followed by ultimatum and parliament the new parliament the newly elected parliament was meant to sit on the first february and the ultimatum was the weekend before the ultimatum past attempts back and forth reaching compromise that failed in the army seized power just on the on the eve of parliament sitting and the promise now is of new elections within the next twelve months so what reason is that i think that the outcome would be any different unless the elections themselves setup in such ways to guarantee a different outcome given what happened in november given the result would elections at any point in the next twelve months produce a different results. It's very difficult to say that they would. I mean the analogy won a landslide. I think with the army takeover. If anything else has g is more popular than ever strength of feeling against other militaries very high. I think the the pro army party would do even worse if elections were held today or unit. In years time. I think a couple of different sort of possibilities. I mean one is that you know. Assess has now been charged with illegal. Possession of walkie talkies communications equipment. That carries i think maximum prison sentence of three years. One thing would be that they would keep her under house arrest for this period through the next elections which is what they did back in. The army did back in twenty ten when elections were held than the other. Possibility is that they would disband the analogy. The other might be that they hold fresh elections and count on the d. says gee boycotting those elections. They're different possibilities. There's also the possibility that they might try to change the electoral system from first past post system to a proportional representation system in which case smaller parties including the ethnic minority parties. Might do better than they might think that they would have a better chance because the army has an automatic hold on twenty five percent of the seats so they actually just need allied parties to to win twenty five percent up to choose the president and a new government

Army Succi Army Party Naypyidaw Parliament Union Solidarity And Developme Suci Rangoon Union Election Commission De Facto UK House Of Parliament United States NFL
Syrian who fled to Germany 5 years ago runs for parliament

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

Syrian who fled to Germany 5 years ago runs for parliament

"Derek otherwise who five years ago crossed the Mediterranean and trekked north through the Balkans tools Germany fleeing the civil war in his homeland Syria is now running for national parliament since arriving along with little German found a steady job and launched a campaign to run for a seat in parliament in September he's told the Associated Press at a rally in support of asylum seekers outside the Reichstag building in Berlin where parliament seats but as the first refugee from Syria to aim for such a political appointment he wants to give a voice to refugees and migrants in Germany and five full of diverse unfair society or otherwise joined the Green Party last year and he's running as the candidate in a west German parliamentary constituency I'm Charles the last month

National Parliament Syria Reichstag Building Balkans Derek Mediterranean Germany The Associated Press Berlin Green Party Charles
Iran’s supreme leader says U.S. must lift all sanctions if it wants Iran to return to nuclear deal

Married With Microphones

00:28 sec | 2 weeks ago

Iran’s supreme leader says U.S. must lift all sanctions if it wants Iran to return to nuclear deal

"Urging President Biden to return to the 2015 nuclear deal. He also said his parliament passed legislation forcing them to harness nuclear stance. That's if US sanctions are not eased by February. The 21st. Those sanctions were re imposed by former President Donald Trump in 2018 as he was abandoning the deal done under deal Obama administration by in his exploring ways to restore the deal, Iran was the sanctions eased before they resume compliance with that deal, A federal judge

President Biden Obama Administration Donald Trump United States Iran
"parliament" Discussed on Box of Neutrals

Box of Neutrals

02:13 min | Last month

"parliament" Discussed on Box of Neutrals

"Sergio <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> is fifteen dollars <Speech_Male> in mexico. Stephens <Speech_Male> fifty <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> tell you what the interesting <Speech_Male> one would be <Speech_Male> would be on. You <Speech_Male> literally ran through. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> didn't run for all but <Speech_Male> peres <Speech_Male> to apple. Form <Speech_Male> step in head to head <Speech_Male> that year <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> coming into the <Speech_Male> monkey <Speech_Male> than <Speech_Male> that. Is i <Speech_Male> little <SpeakerChange> sort <Speech_Male> of stove fire <Speech_Male> all. <Speech_Male> It's <SpeakerChange> a full-blown <Speech_Male> electrical fire. Joe <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i would go down if <Speech_Male> he managed at <Speech_Male> rank step in <Speech_Male> very well in mexico. <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> but mainly <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> considering. He's new in <Speech_Male> the team. <Speech_Male> Would <Speech_Male> that would that. <Speech_Male> Would that guy the <Speech_Male> guy <Speech_Male> in that that would be <Speech_Male> that'd be a <SpeakerChange> hell of a stocks <Speech_Male> the anthrax. Oh <Speech_Male> tell me <Speech_Male> about it that would be. <Speech_Male> Maybe <Speech_Male> it will happen. Maybe <Speech_Male> that will be chinking <Speech_Male> zyppah but that would <Speech_Male> be a fascinating <Speech_Male> story. Line <Speech_Male> is that became. <Speech_Male> I don't think it will. I don't think <Speech_Male> it'll happen. But if indeed <Speech_Male> it would <Speech_Male> be whoa. <Speech_Male> That would <Speech_Male> be very good <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> to hit. Between <Speech_Male> those <Speech_Male> you'd have heard <Speech_Male> from john. <Speech_Male> I wanted <Speech_Male> to debut on <Speech_Male> that driving <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> us jonah disturbance <Speech_Male> dramas <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> clearly <Speech_Male> predicted nicaragua. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Big winning <Speech_Male> from paul. Who's <Speech_Male> not happening for me to <Speech_Male> want an incredible <Speech_Male> so you didn't play <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> thanks coming on. John <Speech_Male> plays <Speech_Male> no worries. <Speech_Male> It looks like he really enjoyed <Speech_Music_Male> it. <Speech_Male> Oh yeah <Speech_Male> auto. <Speech_Music_Male> Occasionally and <Speech_Music_Male> Anyone <Speech_Music_Male> disagrees with any <Speech_Music_Male> said <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sat <Speech_Music_Male> down. <Speech_Music_Male> And and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> you give it <Speech_Male> your best. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Buy with both barrels <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> with five <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> tweets <SpeakerChange> as <Speech_Music_Male> stars absolutely <Speech_Music_Male> result <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> role. End of <Speech_Music_Male> the prune stuff. <Speech_Music_Male> Get up <Speech_Music_Male> it would be an old <Speech_Music_Male> miracle. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> They oh no that was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the surface. No <Speech_Music_Male> one wants to prone results. <Speech_Music_Male> That's the advice <Speech_Male> keeping all the social media <Speech_Male> channels. Facebook twitter <Speech_Male> instagram for voting <Speech_Music_Male> on the bills that have been passed <Speech_Male> today in the box of neutrals <Speech_Male> parliament. These <Speech_Male> technically not an <Speech_Music_Male> episode of initials usually <Speech_Music_Male> know back till much <Speech_Music_Male> to whenever the <Speech_Music_Male> grown pray and testing <Speech_Music_Male> happens. Probably much <Speech_Music_Male> fingers crossed. Everybody <Speech_Music_Male> count <Speech_Male> doesn't sell too <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> many changes. So until <Speech_Music_Male> then i'm <Speech_Music_Male> michael here <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> this is the box <Speech_Music_Male> of neutrals.

John Stephens fifty Sergio fifteen dollars mexico twitter Joe john instagram Facebook michael Speech_Music_Male both barrels today paul Speech_Male five
"parliament" Discussed on Box of Neutrals

Box of Neutrals

08:39 min | Last month

"parliament" Discussed on Box of Neutrals

"Raking bone of yours fine. Both alex hallett writes in with twenty odd races in a season they might be. The two main drivers can only dry for fifteen races per year. The rest set aside for the third driver. The lead dr choose at the beginning of the season which tracks they will draw cricket. Yes i suppose so. I've even heard this in in in ifm when the talking about potentially expanding the season to having two rounds of the season so by somebody around each other. Taurus raise playing the said or the you know the senior pi pi twenty times and they can only seventy five percent at these because of work life and all this sort of extra stuff nowadays with all the games quicko united to protect them and all this sort of stuff saw that seems like lockerbie of paul on the scars sorta stuff i kind of like it was they. Were if you bring you best twenty two to one game and then bring your worst twenty two against the worst when he too but the thing is probably you'll probably have. It mixes the best and the worst twenty two because you imagine her you still in terms of good but but not every race is going to have twenty two dogs or twenty. That's exactly right because the other thing is presumably. If you're you're you would have influence over this decision. You wouldn't have both of your subzero. Yeah but then if you if you look dominating by ran fifteen frozen in a drought you're going to choose at the start of the year which rises of course like. Let's say you. Of course you can put louis how you can put all your drive testing. Let's pretend this is a world without coverage Because look that's true but they would be rules around. That'd be fine. You put all of your drives in all of the great events. Like all the classic silverstone germanacos whatever. So what if you go to land a farmer as john. You have the seconds thinking more about saudi arabia. This point in time maybe not for the first strikes but that that you could also say this is how it works as an incentive it for the sanctions fay you pay premium for the premium drivers for if you paying for the whole house. Brand groom prix the matador barbecue barbecues growing. They'll see like el chapo. Right sort of thing. You get the drive-ins not the dodgers the because giving fun and they're still win rice. Sign up the big. The big bashes just like and he is you know they say lewis isn't coming to australia and all the fans like this idea is one of the problems we have at the moment in to one is that particularly. Thanks to me reichmann. For example is it's hard to break into the sport drivers. You probably deserve to have a crack and from time to time. They we have you mecca coming in next to you. One formula too good but this why the reserve drivers would have an automatic five rice pass into a season returns out the great then not really spicy so this is a way of getting around the fact that basically half the spots filled up the paper that effectively pay to draw in whether they not necessarily the best driver just in the. Because i've got to be not even about pay drivers. All i'm saying is an essentially means you go from twenty to one eight to forty the. Nra does this already. I think before the world rally championship. You're you're gonna have like a roster through four drivers why we could do this. I mean red bull changes drives all the time. I reckon this is a good idea. I wonder why they have categories. I have like the reserves rice luck on the same waken idea right because the seconds sort of draw their little tournament a but that would not one. That's been floating around not submitted. Today the idea to sprint race for grid might be reserved drivers or things like that. I really like his idea. I don't think it's ever going to happen. Look we're going to put to avoid because just four. I really liked choosing it in advance. And i really liked it. It means you create extra sates drivers that we're having crack on. That's going to avoid quoting from christian. Lopez mariachi ought to be considered the painter. Saint of formula wanted should return for future visits. Sorry mario archie closest for me. The one had to a. What do you say mascot although formula did have a mascot ones but it was extremely short-lived mariachi was a racing driver dressed up as a mariachi band mark. What do we call someone in mary cheese. Why not understand. Know whether they the formula one paper give a mascot delivery sort of the phone with the one mascot was named axel from memory. You think it ever got ego will that other than for one. Vip event and they do it. I mean just whether it would be worth it. Well the only time the mariachi really made the let's say the mainstream consciousness was when he was on the podium in mexico in confused i eat maybe an sebastian middle pushed him away because he was confronted. Because yes because he was trying to get in on the photo yes. That's right now minister of facade motion would you. Would you also propose that we have every constructor so not only. Do we have the national anthem for the drive of the national anthem of the team. But then we have a individual tame anthem. We like a densely red lied. We come now too much nation of some of these two long time on the. It's a load of music especially if you get like the russian anthem on. Its long of the gym and one gets play quarterback and that is quite long. Isn't it. it gets there. I know emoji payday. Kind of just truncates the despite their stocks when when daniel kara wins do we get the julia. Anthony the wash the jewelry anthony version of the national as julian. It's the one that i play at the finals. Every year and truly anthony would that much Royalties out of it's crazy. Rich should always be the richest performer. Estrada the amount of money should get from at bank light every every year. Twenty five cents in the mile every single pretty much coin format unfortunately. That's clinic the julianne and he wanted to just gets played everywhere here complex because we have the twenty five cents. An exactly exactly. We've got a billion for mock. from london. Removed blue flags. It is possible to get a podium without ever overtaking. Another car of them by blue flags. That's true this is. He's words and reading. Blue flags would force teams to build. Kosic can overtake. it would have to change. The design philosophy a fostered poorly designed car would get stuck behind back until they caught and passed by with the flags and stuff obviously for slow a cows if you got different teams that are clearly malls off the person. He wound up. Getting rid of the blue flags is gonna work because they're just gonna go slow anyway. That's a good point. You've pretty much pretty much. He's the man he knows he stuff well not champ watching kind of worked out. I mean it's just one of the during practice. Doesn't it not that it's a bad thing. It is a bad idea. But how long did i practice for about four hours. Every rice died. I i look up to three three hours. He gets.

twenty fifteen races australia mexico daniel kara Today Twenty five cents one game mario archie london julianne twenty five cents two rounds third driver twenty times alex hallett twenty two dogs twenty odd races julian russian
"parliament" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Current

"How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell him that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark net the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police ace who hunt down online predators. The environment. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made it hunting. MOORHEAD subscribe wherever you get at your podcasts. This is a CBC DC podcast. Hi I'm Laura Lynch. This is a podcast from the December fifth edition of the current. But we're looking for in this throne. Speech is some clear indication that Mr Trudeau wants to really make a difference in people's lives and invest in healthcare invest. In Pharma Care Make It. Public and universal stopped taking editions kids to court tackle the climate crisis. Like we actually want to win it. We are more than willing to work together but we will not vote for something. That doesn't align with what Canadians need. That's n DP leader. Meet zing laying out what he hopes to hear later today when the Liberal government kicks off the forty third Canadian parliament with a speech from the throne for more on what to expect. I'm joined by Chris Hull. He's the CDC's National Affairs Editor and host of the House and he joins me from our Ottawa Studio. Hi Chris Good Morning. What do you think we'll be the headline from today's throne speech it's I hope that it's brief. We're expecting it to be about twenty minutes which is kind of a surprise Laura. You've worked here. If it's a big broad mandate type of letter that you're expecting from the from the government This I don't think will be it in. This is the reason Since Justin Trudeau has decided to make public of the mandate letters that he gives his cabinet minister in other words the marching marching orders. He sends to each and every cabinet minister. That has been a better clue. And we'll be a better clue as to what the priorities of the government will be so. This is more about the broad strokes. There'd there'd be three I think basic themes around the importance of collaboration. Not just with them. the other parties in in the Commons. We just heard from Jagmeet Singh but also with the premier's climate change will clearly be one of the key Measures that they WANNA talk about. If not begin to kind of detail that Jagmeet Singh like and the last one of course is affordability. It was a big I've seen during the campaign for almost all the parts making life easier for particularly middle class Canadians. But as you said broad themes where are the mandate letters well. We had expected them tomorrow on Friday They may be Monday. But they're coming shortly. I think the the schedule is a bit Knocked off by the NATO. visit that the prime minister just-concluded so either tomorrow tomorrow or Monday. We'll get a real sense of what the priorities for each of those cabinet ministers will be and of course the other dynamic here which is highlighted by what Doug Singh had to say that this is a minority government so liberals need to play Nice affect any concessions to to the DP's priorities or other parties priorities. I don't know there will be a nod to them. A concession may be too strong a word the the message that I was getting in talking to various people yesterday as the importance of collaboration to signal to Canadians that liberals got the message in the last election campaign way by being reduced to minority government by being blanked in in Saskatchewan and Alberta that they need to work and to listen to members of the opposition and to those premier so so I think there will be a collaborative collaborative sort of tone. I think for example under the heading of affordability will see a reference to Pharma care if if fall short of an absolute commitment to introduce universal single payer system. There'll be a talk about the importance of dealing with those costs. We heard from the PREMER's earlier this week that they want to see the the transfer is for healthcare to be increased. Not for new measures like Pharma Care but to deal with the growing problem of recruiting and retaining doctors of trying to reduce waiting times at hospitals. This sort of thing so I think that they do need to send a note that they have listened and that they are prepared to work with those parties to get things done would you. Would you expect any other. Bold initiatives lives in the throne speech about regionally nation. No I don't think so. I think there's an acknowledgement here that the government You know we'll have heard the message and they we'll talk about Some of the big issues that they have confronted but to your point. I asked a number of people yesterday. For example would the government considers signaling rolling in the throne speech a willingness to open regional offices for example the Ministry of Natural Resources Might Open an office in Edmonton where after all is sort of the headquarters of Jason Kenny's government but also a big part of the oil patch the energy sector. Maybe open a a a a minister's Office for Western economic development as an SASCHA tuner. Sooner Regina just to show that you're listening and you have a footprint in the area even if you didn't elect any MP's I don't know if that will be there but that was certainly one of the signals that a number of MP's he's told they would like the throne speech to include so as again with with a minority government. There's there's the issue of possible confidence votes. There's the potential for The other opposition parties to band together and pulled the government down throne speech could become a confidence vote or spending Initiative could become a confidence. Vote these they're facing these early on. Is Anyone angling to take the government down. No I don't think so and talking to both the MVP and Black Quebecois. which are the two one of those to the government would need to be able able to stay in power? There's enough MP from one or other of the parties to do that. The block recognizes. It has a A new foothold in Quebec in his willing and wants to show quebeckers. Becker at that vote wasn't wasted that they can get things done for Quebec. So they'll be looking on the climate change file. For example around pipelines what is the signal on pipelines and my understanding he is the Liberals are alive to that issue that they need to show they are aware of the block and the Quebec has a different kind of set of needs and desires in this the MVP quite frankly doesn't have the money to run a campaign again. And I think that they are also after being reduced from forty four to twenty seats. They need to show that they can get things done. Even even with the smaller membership and to give Jagmeet Singh an opportunity to prove that what we saw of him during the campaign his ability to strike the right chord can continue in the House of Commons. One last last quick point on that We are looking as you mentioned Laura for a number of bills to be introduced fairly quickly. This is only supposed to be a week or ten days that we have the parliament sitting before Christmas I think we're GONNA see legislation. That would introduce that middle class tax. Cut sometime next week to ensure that Canadian see that they are beginning to deliver on that. Promise I I think we'll see legislation to ban assault weapons After all this was a huge wedge issue for the Liberals Every single M. P.. I talked to said that the one big vote vote driver particularly no suburbs around. Toronto was harder stand. They're taking on firearms and gun control and lastly potentially a fiscal update to give Canadians a sense of where the books are. It may be in the context of supply bill because the government needs money to continue to operate. So these are the sorts of things will get an early indication of what Lisa legislative the initial shall legislative priorities will be twenty seconds. Chris and we gotTA talk about President Prime Minister Trudeau's hot mic comments at the NATO meeting in. US President trump calling him two faced. How big a deal is this? I don't think it's a big deal and Kennedy. US relations might be a bigger deal here. We heard both Jagmeet Singh and Andrew Scheer the Conservative leader talking about the misstep in very important international setting Justin Trudeau shoot over. Frankly should have known better. Instead of having a focus on the throne speech we spent a large part yesterday talking about whether he's hurt Kennedy relation all right Chris. Thank you very much okay. Laura thanks six. Chris Hall is a C._B._S.'s national affairs editor and host of the hosts he was in our Ottawa. Studio for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

government Jagmeet Singh Laura Lynch Prime Minister Trudeau Pharma Care Chris Hull Justin Trudeau MOORHEAD Chris Good US Quebec CDC Commons parliament
"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay so let's say hypothetically that you succeed seed in this plan to have your intelligence operative elected to Australian parliament. Once they're inside. What is it that y'all looking for from them like what? What kind of information do they then have access to? That is really valuable to you as a foreign power internally within the party they be able to learn a lot more about factions and stuffing and this would actually help a fun intelligence agency buildup and even large number of operatives within within parliament and there are so many rumors going around Parliament House for example. Some of these could be quite valuable to a political party. If they turn up turn out to be true. In terms of being able to compromise someone through blackmail for example and then get them to become an agent that way. That kind of reminds me of like house of cards odds right like there. I remember there being a couple of plots where they would find out some sort of rumor about that person's personal life I don't know maybe they're closeted or maybe they having an affair air or something like that that they don't WanNa come out publicly. Is that the kind of rumor that you're talking about that. Would they be used against say Stafa. Or maybe even another elected politician to to then get them to do what you want. Absolutely on there have been allegations for example of cabinet ministers. Yeah having affairs with with members of this stuff and these are the kinds of things that you know of course valuable to other political parties and of great interest to the media which seeks to uncover and report on them. They're also just as interesting to intelligence agencies because of the power that they have if they have that information. That really isn't something that I thought of. Yeah neither so that is one extremely dramatic option manipulating stuff politicians using blackmail as well as fading dating back General Information About how the government all the potty is thinking and working and then there's influence on the actual political prices we talking votes on the floor of parliament. Committee is you can talk to my own onto especially anything to do with intelligence security foreign affairs in the West we have a picture of spies as a people who steal information whereas I think in in in Chinese history spies if they really look up to and a praise of people who specialized in political influence of people who could format mutiny in enemy on these people who could gain the trust of enemy leaders and push them towards a peace treaty with the Communist Party in China for example what is some of the big policy areas that China would be interested potentially to influence. I think certainly China would try to make life Ephesia by the repeal for interference laws ensure that they are enforced by not giving resourcing political backing to the agencies involved but in that and that would be the Attorney General's department the Department of Public Prosecution Prosecution in Asia they will be having significant foreign foreign policy objectives so that would mean for example seeking to change Australia's position on a territorial dispute that countries engaged in Signing up tomorrow trade deals that that gives the other country more leverage and more channels for influence into country. It feels like kind of new frontier though. I mean actually seeking to have an operative installed as an elective an elected member of parliament element in another in another government or at least if not in opposition. Do we see this anywhere else in in history or or in countries similar to Australia. I I honestly can't off the top of my head. Think of something so agree GIS in history may have happened by. This is clearly a sort of much a high level and much much more disturbing level of interference. Then we've heard about in Australia previously. So Alex sees. This is uncharted territory and so does the political editor the Sydney Morning Herald. Peter Hart show. Who's written a lot about Chinese influence? Most recently for the CY win the CY. I quite the full ahead of Isaiah Duncan Lewis. Who told me that? The Chinese government wants us to cover Hundley take over the political system as well as the economic and social systems of a strident and operate them in in China's interests and that it might take Dick is for the full effect to happen by one day we would wake up in Dunkin Lewis's woods and find out government making decisions which were not in Australia's interests what what do you think when you hear that warning accords with sort of the standard thinking among people who are looking at Chinese Communist Party and authoritarian Tehran influence operations. which is that quite often? They're not necessarily seeking just to break down to Moxie. They're also seeing seeking to repurpose repurpose them and manipulate them. It's not about exporting for example an authoritarian government. It's being able to call up the players in a democratic system so that it superficially democratic you still got to vote as people just did in Hong Kong but your elected leaders don't actually reflect flex your views so it's definitely not an exaggerated concern. I don't think so. And by the very nature of these activities we we will probably probably on the the the tip of the iceberg.

Australia China Parliament House Chinese Communist Party Communist Party Isaiah Duncan Lewis Hong Kong Chinese government Sydney Morning Herald Asia Peter Hart Alex Tehran Department of Public Dunkin Lewis Ephesia
"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. stridency that it's political system. It's very repower and hasn't been infiltrated or sabotage by Chinese operatives. I can assure strains that under the resources have never been stronger. The laws does have never been tougher and the government has never been more determined to Cape Australians free and safe from foreign interference. Thank you very much is Jio is investigating a Chinese government to get one of its spies elected to parliament and if that sounds far fetched you should know. It's an easier job than you think I'm Stephen Stockwell and and I'm Angelov Weipa and today on the signal. We explained step by step. How like that would come off and ask what kind of damage quota foreign spy do from inside inside parliament as an investigative reporter? There are very few times. I've received message this important. It's late October. And One of my sources tells me I spy for the Chinese Communist Party wants to blow his his cover out of the spawn Happening in Melbourne with Impunity. So this story broke on sixty minutes over the weekend and and likely blimpy Andrew Hastie was saying it kind of does sound like a spy novel. Yea It really does and the center of it all is a luxury car dealer. Name Nick Zhao. Now the story is that he was approached by the Chinese Communist Party and offered a million bucks to run as a liberal candidate for federal parliament. He reportedly then with Australia's by agency is zero and in March was found dead in a moment hotel room and so obviously there are a lot of questions everyone has about that case including zero which is currently in the middle title of an investigation. But we also have questions about the toss that Nick Gel was reportedly asked to complete specifically how foreign government any foreign government might go about making this happen in Australia and what might happen if they pulled it off. I think there are a couple of governments that might be engage in these kinds kinds of activities Russia for example. But I don't think there's any country that engages in such high levels Australia apart from China Alex Jones ski is an analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute and he specializes in monitoring. The Chinese Communist. Party's foreign influence efforts so we asked him to talk us through how light these smart rotten beginning with step on finding the right candidate. You're looking for someone. Who could plausibly present themselves you know in political circles someone someone who speaks the local language Has At least a couple of us in the country is relatively intelligent but also as has has been hinted in the case of Nick Jal someone who you could also find ways to compromise and his case. That's that's through financial means. Are you also looking for someone. Who has I guess you know a clean record in terms of norges surname links to the foreign government in question differently the Preferable but in some cases I think a lot of politicians to have ties to foreign countries. Some of them quite strong but nonetheless on the list legal and acceptable within our society. So it's not necessarily an issue as long as it's at least appears to be a normal levels. I I think when you hear this story in the first place we'll hear about this scenario immediately. Sounds so far fetched right like you naturally assume I think as an USTRALIAN Woida that there would be some checks and balances in place in you know some just some background in security checks that would prevent someone who was a I guess a spy from another country being elected to hold high office. What kind of checks are there along the way frankly? There aren't many checks currently in place that could pick up this kind of activity easily Political parties do run checks on potential candidates. It's but I don't think they'd have much luck if they're looking at someone who's being successfully recruited by foreign intelligence agency and I'm not sure what level of involvement as you're heading that vetting process early stages it probably has involvement right so the kind of involvement that would be what like a basic police check may be calling a couple of referees. What are we talking about here? You're looking employers. I'm not sure exactly but potentially potentially looking at their financial information potential conflicts of interest to get them getting them to disclose these kinds of things before the public has a chance to to to find it out themselves so asking the person directly basically saying Oh you buy it works in some cases where you'd be looking get people's background facebook and finding they've been involved in questionable organizations or something but it's quite difficult to to expect a political party to suit to this entirely on their own. I think political parties if they haven't already should be finding ways to cooperate more closely with government government security agencies on bidding so maybe getting involved at a much earlier stage is what you're saying potentially I think it's a discussion that the parties have to with the government. So let's say you clean the bidding process of your chosen political party. Then there's the small matter of winning an election and at this point it's money that really helps. The most fundraising is a really important aspect of Australian politics and that would be a relatively easy way for a foreign intelligence agency to build up the status of someone. They were hoping to get into parliament by funneling donations to them through said potties rights. I just throwing a ton of money at that campaign and you try to diversify the source of the funds as much as possible muscle. None of it would have caused directly. Come from a foreign intelligence agency would be through businessmen they bribed or or organizations that they somehow compromise. So after all that if you are elected somewhat shockingly. It's pretty much a clear run to Canberra. There's no for example security clearance process for members of parliament and as far as I know becoming a member of parliament or cabinet. Minister is the only way that you can actually access classified material without so having a security clearance is that in and of itself why that is an attractive course of action for foreign power as opposed to say trying to plice and operative at some stage in the political power structure absolutely I think they recognize it is it is a weakness and And even now when accusations of this come out it benefits them in the sense that it helps questions the legitimacy of some of democratic institutions the potential that someone could be in parliament as a representative of these people but as a representative of hostile foreign power..

Chinese Communist Party Australia Chinese government ABC Andrew Hastie Nick Zhao Jio Nick Jal Nick Gel Angelov Weipa Russia Canberra Stephen Stockwell Melbourne facebook Australian Strategic Policy In Alex Jones
"parliament" Discussed on FT News

FT News

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on FT News

"This Financial Times podcast is supported by capital. One capital one is building a better bank one that feels and acts nothing like typical bank. It's why they're reimagining banking making and building something completely different they offer accounts with no fiercer minimums the also offer one of the best savings rates in America and you can open a capital one account from anywhere in in five minutes capital one. This is banking reimagined open an account today. Inexperience banking reimagined for yourself capital one. What's in your wallet capital a hello from the Financial Times in London. I'm Shona Jenkins and this is news in focus where we offer our insights into the stories that matter we have seen a historic day for British politics today as the Supreme Court will Boris Johnson's decision corrode parliament for five weeks unlawful. I'm here in the studio with Jane. Croft our law courts correspondent and NEO PUCK leader writer to discuss the ruling and what it means looking forward. I let's hear the moment when Lady Hale President of the British Supreme Court reads out the the unanimous verdict. The court is bound to conclude therefore that the decision to advise Her Majesty to Perot Parliament was unlawful because it had the effect of frustrating or preventing the ability of parliament to carry out its constitutional functions and without reasonable justification and let's hear the reaction of leading legal petitioner in today's Supreme Court case. What's the last few weeks seen an extraordinary series of attacks on our democracy. Parliament elected from forty six million of us was unlawfully suspended by Prime Minister elected from one hundred sixty thousand judges have been threatened by a number ten source and those of us who have sought saw protect the only institution in our Constitution with the U K Y democratic mandate have been subject to death threats and some of us have had our home addresses published. I am delighted today that the Supreme Court is protected the foundational principle of any democracy which is the right of Kabamba Parliament to do the jobs for which they were elected. There is much to be done to protect democracy for myself. I am very grateful rightful to the exceptional legal team and to the almost eight thousand small diagnose able this case to go ahead the victory so Jane can you tell us the specifics of what's been ruled against and what this means for parliament will the prorogation just be rendered void. Yep So basically the Supreme Court had to consider to cook aces one from Scotland Highschool Wom- from the High Court in London and both about the same issue about whether or not the Perot gang was local the first thing that caught to consider was whether or not justiciable so whether the colts could actually review this under Britain's partially coded unwritten constitution and they did decide it was just ish until then they had to decide whether Renault it was motivated by improper purpose of stymying parliamentary scrutiny of the government and they did decide that it was motivated by that purpose purpose so it prevented parliament from doing its job of scrutinising the executive and therefore was unlawful and this is being called a historic moment. Neil has has parliament ever seen anything like this before well to have been a succession of key moments in the history of palm and the British constitution where the powers of parliament and the crown and so on have been defined in the past but I think he's safe to say there's been nothing like this in the modern era in parliament where a court has taken a decision that directly impinges on the Prime Minister's powers to Perot Parliament and this is of course why the courts were so reluctant Alexa to get involved and why those low sensitivity vertical getting involved but the court ruled that although normally the exercise of proactive power to Perot Parliament and wouldn't be a matter for the courts here there was an important issue at stake on whether that power was being used allusively and exceeded now there have been calls for Boris Johnson to step down. How is he reacted. And what do you think the impact will be on his foothold in parliament he has this made clear that he intends to carry on. He said that he disagrees with the ruling and the expectation is I think he will try and tough this out as he is tough out the number of things that have gone against him recently in parliament and earlier in his career but I think he's going to get more more difficult for him. In parliament that must be a very big likelihood now that he will face some kind of no confidence votes in the coming weeks a nights could well trigger an election certainly will be a lot more difficult who for him to fulfill the strategy that he'd been intending to do of using the threat of a no deal brexit to negotiate with a you know if if an election is called and if he makes fall then we'll see what voters make of his behavior on the various different parties positions on Brexit so parliament is going back into action as of tomorrow Wednesday and in the run-up to the crucial October thirty Brexit Day as you mentioned this ruling could have a significant impact on brexit negotiations could you elaborate on that it will be a lot more difficult thing now for Boris Johnson to credibly probably threatened or have the implicit threaten the background of our no deal brexit if he's not able to reach an agreement with the EU and therefore I think the pressure on him will greatly increase to try and get some kind of a deal if he can do that and get it through parliament then he could in theory at least go into an election and say I delivered on my promise to ensure brings. It was achieved by October thirty first. But of course we're very short time. It's very very difficult for him to get agreement in the short time that's now available so the likelihood is we'll have another extension either. He will have to do that as he's he's being mandated by the law passed in parliament or parliament will seek to take matters into its own hands with some kind of vote of no confidence or even some kind of addressed addressed you leaders themselves somehow bypasses the Prime Minister Jane what does the ruling mean for UK democracy in politics in general. Do you think the decision opens the gate to further judicial interventions in the government's decisions. I think is possible. It certainly strengthens parliamentary sovereignty not and it also shines a light on the British constitution as I say we've gotTa Kinda partially coded largely unwritten constitution which consists of things like common law legislation it consists of works authority and it also consists of political conventions and prorogation is school convention and the whole point about political conventions in the past is that politicians new standards of behavior and ways of behaving around the conventions and you know the whole constitution worked quite well but but I think the problem is that also MP's now saying that some of these political conventions like prorogation perhaps needs to be put on a statutory footing so that you know they can't then be potentially abused by politicians in the future so neil. Do you think Boras can survive. That's a very difficult question to answer. I think I think as I said before I think it's very likely that there will be some kind of no confidence vote in him which will lead to are you an election but I think he's making clear at the moment is intention is to hang on and to try and deliver deal Vegan or sunny to fight an election. What we don't know is whether other senior Tories may now be starting to conclude the Boris Johnson has become a liability ability that his position is becoming untenable and whether there might be some pressure put on him before an election them stand down. I think a lot depends on whether he he can pull a rabbit out of the hat and miraculously get a deal in the next couple of weeks. Thanks Jane Thank you. Neil and thank you for listening. Don't forget forget if you missed our episodes on Edward snowden 's new memoir China's role in tackling climate change or the breakdown of talks between the US and the Afghan Taliban. You can find them all the usual podcast platforms..

Parliament Supreme Court Boris Johnson Jane Kabamba Parliament Prime Minister Financial Times British Supreme Court London Neil Perot America Lady Hale High Court Shona Jenkins NEO Afghan Taliban Alexa leader writer US
"parliament" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"This is politics weekly. I'm really mason vice given by the government to Her Majesty. The Queen to Parliament from Ninth September Fourteenth Tober it was unlawful and therefore appropriation itself is unlawful after losing six votes in six days. Boris Johnson was dealt yet another blow yesterday. A Scottish judges declared his decision to prorogue parliament was unbelievable and then another as the government was forced to publish it secret no deal plan operation yellowhammer hulme which predicts public disorder rising prices and disruptions to food and medicine but the possibility parliament being unproved no deal of the table for now a new immediate chance general election the prime minister is running out of options could a Northern Ireland only faxed up his only way out also this week we talked to protesters outside parliament about whether the wounds opened up by Brexit can ever be healed and the Economics Author Grace Blakely about how to save the world from `financialisation. That's all at this week's politics weekly but I the House of Commons witnessed unprecedented scenes on Monday night as MP's MP's protested against the suspension of parliament with signs saying silenced or shouting shame on you at Torrey MP's that was even about of singing but not so fast I yesterday Scottish judges found unanimously that the prime minister effectively misled the queen by advising had to suspend parliament and that prorogation was unlawful awful. The government will appeal against the ruling at the Supreme Court next week what this means is anyone's guess but after also forcing him to publish yesterday's Operation Yellowhammer Hamad Documents Parliament is certainly looking more formidable opponent than Johnson kind of expected a fortnight ago. The narrowing of his options even signaled a change of governmental tone this week with Boris Johnson calling a no deal brexit failure of statecraft which we would all be responsible so what options are now left open to him. Well I am joined to discuss this Bhai Rafael bath from the Guardian cables from the spectator and grace blakely from the New Statesman. Hello everybody so what does yesterday's decision Asian by Scottish judges mean and could parliament be recalled next week. He wants to have a go walking. There's a very fiddly tactical also technical point. Reyes which is recalling parliament is not that easy wants his paroled so you have to so actually the mechanisms do that isn't entirely obvious but now the bigger point I think is that in Lourdes has been established more or less that Boris Johnson was lying when he said that the reason for proroguing parliament was because you needed queen's speech and the parliamentary session going a bit too long when there were some agenda other than breaks it that really needed a new session of the Commons. No one really believe if that any way. I don't think I mean the ministers and supporters of the government will really struggling to even remember that was the line was supposed to be giving when the announcement was I made about a prorogation. Everyone plainly understood that it was because the woman's was noticed the cool potentially to Nigel Brexit the prime minister wanted to get out of the way now what's interesting about the ruling from the Scottish Appeal Court is that they accept essentially the argument that Boris Johnson kind of weaponized weaponized a crown power for partisan agenda but decided that that was unconstitutional and therefore against the principles of the Constitution and and also really disrespectful to the Queen if you care about that sort of thing and therefore the prorogation shouldn't stand but at the same time there's been a separate ruling in the English High Court which chose not to judge whether or not a Johnson had an ulterior motive in other words they didn't do the judges not stint sort of say. He wasn't lying. They thought his entire entirely possible. He was lying but what they said. Is that a political opinion and not justiciable by the call in other words. Actually you can Kinda Pirogue for political prowess. Let's go and it's not very nice. It's still route to the queen but it's not illegal so now the supreme court basically has to decide between the kind of scots law interpretation of of whether or not the likely invalidate the per radiation or the English Lord interpretation which is year was ally but that doesn't make it unconstitutional. We all kind of something of a tipping point in terms of how how the British constitution actually works. I mean obviously historically you. Have you know a set of norms and a set of legal and political norms that suggests there's a particular balance of power how between the legislative the executive and the judiciary with parliamentary sovereignty meaning that the legislature is supposed to be in charge but like looking back back to like this is really naughty but referencing the way badge thought of the English constitution saying that actually power does lie with the executive in the UK and actually we have one of the most powerful executives in the developed world so I think this is kind of very metastable constitution and is not a tool Klay. Eh Who's GonNa come out on top. There's no I mean ultimately I was kind of discussing this last night on news like what happens next and if Johnson does try and kind of defy the courts what's defy defy parliament and go to the EU to say we'll go to the union say anything and then goes to them and says we want an extension. There's a question about who speaks for the British state who will civil servants who will officials of the state obey and that's like a really deep seated heated like constitutional question with quite profound implications so with Boris Johnson testing these the boundaries of the Constitution here it is certainly possible that the supreme court rule in the Scottish see prem- court could rule in the Scottish touches favor next week and if they do that Katie what are the ramifications of that going to be and and could the government in fact make a sneaky move to bring back parliament exactly on the eve of Labor Conference and try to ruin it. I think there's ramifications and wherever the Supreme Court the first one which I think is probably the horry even get the consequence for the Tory government if they lose this case in supreme core is what they win. It and I think say if they say the Scottish cool is wrong that does not stand in relation to the English cool. You're playing very easily into the hands of the SMP and you're gonNA quite quickly see scenic Stanford and and her MP's who make this point that look we told you a different than England told you this. Tory government doesn't represent you and now the judiciary is the judges on even taken seriously so I think if problems for both parties whatever happens if she says that it was the parliament does in fact talked to be ridiculed what happens then we begin to see conferences cancelled and which are money spinners for the parties involved with an election. What would the government do at that point. I think if they say that this has been a part of it has to be returned then yes it is problematic for conferences but I think that he look at this rebel alliance of MP's the talk over the summer. They wanted to cancel conference recess anyway. I think that these political point of view if this is deemed unlawful awful is very much the conservative government now you might have a smaller version of conference go on you have confidence with politicians few politicians because they all had they have to sit in the chamber and the rebel. Alliance wants to take control of the paper and de various things but the the the biggest headache is for Boris Johnson and his team now they wanted to Peru parliament for a few reasons. I think we can all agree the political native there at one of the things I would say they had time to negotiate eight without people trying to tie their hands. Now the fact that you've already had law passed to extend article fifty try and force Boris Johnson to get breakfast makes it more difficult difficult for them to have those negotiations but the thing they did want to do is a few weeks ago. The government was looking fairly smooth at least compared had to now and you had the situation where because parliament wasn't sitting they use the August recess asked to really take control intense the gender and terms of pushing the domestic priorities taes. I think they had hoped this five week. Period would be a time where they scan early general election campaign and if parliament returns. I think that we sold the past couple of the days. I was almost like a prime minister who is being taught shit on a daily basis. Whether it's extending no deal I think that this group of opposition parties he's plus some former conservative. He's had the whip patrol category and a few more things you've had the humble dress.

Parliament Boris Johnson Supreme Court prime minister Grace Blakely Nigel Brexit Scottish Appeal Court yellowhammer hulme Torrey MP Northern Ireland Bhai Rafael House of Commons English High Court Stanford EU Reyes executive England
"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

"All are busy. That's why listeners tune into the daily so they don't miss out on the most important news and when it comes to hiring employers turned to Ziprecruiter so they don't miss out on the most qualified candidates edits ziprecruiter's powerful technology finds the right people for your job and actively invites them to apply. That's why four to five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day and today our listeners can try ziprecruiter for free at Ziprecruiter DOT com slash daily. Here's what else you need to the trump administration said it was calling off for now the year long negotiations between the US and the Talbot I want to end the war in Afghanistan after the Taliban took credit for a car bombing in Kabul that killed twelve people including a a US soldier. We're GONNA walk away from a deal if others tried to use violence to achieve better ends not right it's not appropriate killed an American and it made no sense the Taliban to be rewarded for that kind of bad behavior the negotiations appear to be on the verge of a peace deal so much so that leaders of the Taliban the man and the Afghan government on their way to Camp David for a secret meeting with trump a meeting secretary of state might pomp hail defended on on Sunday and interviews with CNN NBC then anybody bring up a weather was appropriate to have the Taliban set foot on Camp David. There were lots lots of discussions around that <hes> Camp David has a long history and important history and also had an important role in complex peace negotiation sometimes with some pretty bad actors as you well know check doc the Taliban had not agreed to stop attacking Americans in advance of a peace deal but in a tweet trump quote quote if they cannot agree to a ceasefire during these very important peace talks and would even kill twelve innocent people then they probably don't have the power to negotiate a meaningful agreement anyway and the leader of a prestigious lab at MIT has resigned from from the university and from the Board of the New York Times over revelations that he solicited far greater donations from Jeffrey Epstein than previously no bill and tried to hide the source of the money. The New Yorker magazine reported that the lab's director Joey Ito instructed staff took conceal epsteins donations as anonymous to avoid scrutiny of his record as a sex offender who had solicited minors..

Taliban Ziprecruiter Camp David US Jeffrey Epstein The New Yorker magazine Joey Ito Kabul Afghanistan New York Times Afghan government director CNN MIT NBC
"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

"Episode is supported by Capital Group home of American funds an investment firm that has helped change your clients can I into I can visit capital group DOT com today. Talk to your adviser or consultant Alton for Investment Risks and information so more Boris Johnson calls for a special election but it turns out. He needs a two-thirds vote from parliament to make that happen so what actually happens. Opposition leaders have roundly rejected his call for a general election next month. He doesn't get his two-thirds majority for an election. It's Johnson had never known an opposition in the history of democracy. That's refused to have an election so in effect he stuck he's boxed in on his big goal of pulling Britain out of the EU and he's not able to move ahead with the election. The thing he was hoping would break the logjam ugh jam would give him the mandate so basically this all backfires it all backfires he loses more votes than any incoming prime minister in recent in British history and he finds himself in far worse shape than he was before all this started and that leaves the brexit situation where where exactly well it leaves frankly everything in a state of paralysis and confusion by the end of the week and London one of the questions on people's minds were would Boris Johnson simply have to resign really well. If you take the prime minister at his word word. Can you make a promise today to the British public that you will not go back to Brussels and ask for another delay Brexit and so average. I'd rather be dead ditch but hate by Brexit he has said he would rather die in a ditch then have to go to Brussels and and ask for an extension of Britain's departure yet as things stand today. That's exactly what Boris Johnson will have to do. Who and if all of this were not enough this week of back to back defeats? Boris Johnson had to endure the indignity of his own brother Joe uh-huh Johnson who is also a member of parliament and a minister in the government <hes> announcing that he too was going to resign because as he put it he he was torn between family loyalty and the national interest when you planning to resign for comment to say it's been an honor to be roping minister under the three governments but it's time to move on sorry. This is a very tight knit family so the fact that Joe Johnson felt obliged to take this step really says something about the depth of his concern about a no deal brexit about the course that his brother Boris Johnson has the country going on right. If your own kin a member Conservative Party your brother quits then. What does that say? That's right so just to be clear. Those people opposed to Johnson right now in parliament they are insisting on going back to the European Union to negotiate some kind of an accent and so if Johnson is unwilling to do that he might might be out of office but I guess the question is is the EU willing to actually enter these kinds of negotiations. Aren't they pretty fed up with Britain. At this point. The is completely fed up with Britain at this point. They believe that they had months of good faith negotiations associations with Boris Johnson's predecessor Theresa May. They offered her an agreement. She brought that agreement back to parliament it was overwhelmingly defeated defeated not once but several times and there's absolutely no indication from European officials that Boris Johnson is going to get a better or different outcome than Theresa may did and whether or not he holds an election is being largely dismissed in Europe. Their view is we have have given Britain the best deal it's going to get and if Britain doesn't want that deal. It's time for them to simply leave. <hes> what do you make of this remarkable remarkable sequence of events your your first full week as London bureau chief well. There's a couple of ways to look at it. One is is that this is just a situation of overwhelming chaos confusion paralysis finger-pointing so on one level level. It looks like dysfunction you know on a on a grand scale but if you dig beyond that if you sort of look a little closer what you see is that this this was really a week in which the checks and balances in the British political system really worked you have the prime minister coming in with this this hard line even reckless approach to brexit embodied in his decision to suspend debate in parliament to sort of circumvent <hes> the normal functioning of parliament by sending the MP's home and then you've got this coalition of members of his own party and the opposition coming coming together to put a brake on the prime minister to head off some of these most extreme outcomes and that's kind of what makes British democracy so unique that there is this set of conventions of folk ways that impose a level of of moderation on these proceedings and we really did see a victory for that in parliament victory that was not at all clear when the House House of Commons convened at the beginning of the week so mark you're saying that even though this all looked especially chaotic that actually what we just saw was is democratic institutions holding functioning and succeeding but of course the other way of looking at this and the way Boris Johnson I assume looks at it is that the will of the people has just been subverted that they want brexit with or without a deal and that parliament what what you described as the kind of assertive functioning of democracy in Britain just stood in their way yeah that's right Boris. Johnson's argument will be I want to go to the people to to put this to the people and these. MP's Britain's politically elite is standing in the way of popular sentiment and and that will be the core of the message that he brings to the British public as he attempts to turn this situation around and how are the British system is holding up compared to the American system that you know so well if we put these two democracies side-by-side. How does it stack up well. One thing that is very striking to me in covering this rebellion in the Conservative Party is to compare it to the Republican Party in the United United States and they're of course UC barely a handful of Republicans who have stood up to president trump. This is a Republican publican party. That is one hundred percent under his control. He has engineered a total takeover of the Republican Party. I think Boris Johnson tried ride in the past two weeks to do the same thing over here. I think this rebellion shows that the party wasn't going to stand for it. I think it's also fair to say that Boris Johnson's having a tougher time in his populist crusade paid than Donald Trump is in the United States.

Boris Johnson Britain prime minister Republican Party Conservative Party European Union London Capital Group Theresa May United States Brussels Brexit consultant Alton Donald Trump DOT Europe House House of Commons
"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Daily

"<music>. Hello Mark Hi Hi Michael. Hey there so you're in the you're in the London bureau right. Now I am am. You're on a landline I am. I think this office is pretty quiet. I closed the door and I don't think anyone's GonNa Bother me. Oh Oh you have an office now. I got a corner office. I got two windows. Does I'm sitting here looking at double decker buses living the dream okay. We're GONNA get started. Are you recording okay up. I'm recording okay <hes> so mark you just became the London bureau chief after several years covering the trump administration being a White House reporter. This is quite a moment to make that leap. I guess you could say it's a little bit like the frying pan to the fire metaphor. There's probably more newsy situations you could parachute into but it's Kinda hard to imagine imagine there are political fireworks in Britain this morning over a surprise move today by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to suspend parliament parliament's now. Here's what it will do. <hes> parliament was supposed to sit again on Monday for a number of weeks but instead this will suspend parliament the week of September tenth and it won't resume until October fourteenth just as Britain is to leave the EU at the end of Tober you'll say insulted Lorcy and deny the MP's and toilet need to today's possibly Voto brexit done that is completely untrue. UTICA what we're doing what bringing forward they knew legislative program talk in our <music> so in our last episode about Brexit. We spoke for for colleague. Catherine bent hold just after Boris Johnson had suspended parliament and basically cut them out of the decision making process about how brexit would move forward and counter and talked talked about how that had set up this question about what version of democracy would prevail in Britain should be the version that prioritizes the popular will of the British British people who voted for Brexit with or without a deal with the EU which is what Boris Johnson wants or should the version of democracy be allowing parliament element the People's representatives to play a major role in what leaving the e looks like so. How has this all unfolded in the days since Boris Johnson made that move well. I think the answer is that it unfolded resoundingly in favour of parliament as parliament reconvened gene on Tuesday because remember Boris Johnson's suspension of parliament doesn't again for another week or so there was an atmosphere of high-drama NBA's takes the Duchy that when he turns up but our children's school as it was apparent. He's very well behaved fellow. He wouldn't dare behave like that in front with MP's going on TV on the radio the one nation this is not one dogmas complaining about Boris Johnson having committed a constitutional outrage is a constitutional outrage this extraordinarily he needs to be held to account by power but not shutting Dan Parliament and all of this emotion climax of course one of the most remarkable things took place during the statement was to see the member for Bracknell crossed the floor prime minister. You've lost your majority with a member of Boris Johnson's own Conservative Party crossing the aisle in front of the prime administer to sit with members of the Liberal Democratic Party and act which deprive Johnson in one stroke of his majority in parliament. He is it winning friends in Europe. He's losing friends at home his government with no mandate no morals and as of today no majority. Dr Thing so after this very stormy start the next thing that happens is tonight. The United Kingdom has been plunged into even deeper political. Oh chaos the opposition joined by twenty one members of the Conservative Party vote in favor of advancing this legislation that would effectively Saito Boris Johnson. You can't go to Brussels and pull Britain out of the European Union unless you make a deal with the European Union first the majority of British lawmakers including some members of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's own party voted to stop Johnson's plan to leave the European Union without without a withdrawal agreement good stuff the is to the right three hundred twenty eight the nose to the left three hundred one. The is the is heavy. I love so that's the first major defeat. He suffers in his term as prime minister and it's a big one. There is no consensus in this house to leave the European Union without a deal there is no majority see for no deal in the country because it goes straight to the heart of what Boris Johnson said he would do as prime minister <hes> and that is to withdraw withdraw on October thirty first dealer no deal regardless of this situation so when that one conservative lawmaker theatrically flipped on on the floor of parliament it turned out that was a signal of a bigger growing uprising within Boris Johnson's party over this approach he was taking to Brexit. Try to cut Hutt parliament out and just kind of crashed this thing through that's right and it's really very unprecedented. I mean the Conservative Party. British parties in general have iron discipline so to see twenty-one lawmakers peel off and vote against the prime minister and the government is really a wholly unprecedented development in British politics so from the very first session of parliament the British people understood that what they were witnessing with something entirely new in their modern political history and what exactly is underlying these defections affections and rejection of Boris Johnson's plan. I mean why is this so unwanted that even members of his own party are rising up against him. Well the basic fear is that if Britain withdraws from the European Union with no agreement in place overnight overnight it will cause a multitude of major problems you could imagine trucks that transport food and medicine from Europe into Britain being stuck at the border in Calais France. You could imagine chaos at the airports as people who are used to travelling back and forth without passports suddenly suddenly face the prospect of having to show identification you risk in short havoc havoc that could really hurt the economy but could also further polarize the debate over brexit so I think that even within Boris Johnson's party which remember is a party that wholeheartedly supports the goal of pulling out of Europe where e idea of pulling out in this disorderly abrupt way just scared a lot of the members of Johnson's own own party and that fear is what motivated this rebellious so this is not opposition to brexit per se it's opposition to a brexit brexit that creates no predictable trade scenarios ordeals that could suddenly just blow up the function of the British economy. That's that's right many of the rebels if not most of the rebels are on record as saying they think Britain should leave. It's just the way you do it that that is so important and for these twenty one pulling out in a chaotic sudden way is simply too big a risk and that's what they're pushing against or didn't the entire Conservative Party and presumably these rebels who voted against him didn't they know just a couple of weeks back when they elected poorest. Johnson is our prime minister that this is the manner in which he planned to proceed to crash out of the EU without a negotiated deal with the European Union. I mean isn't that understood. Stood that is understood. Yes Boris. Johnson never made any secret of his intentions here but remember. It's not just these twenty-one anyone people who elected Boris Johnson the leader of the Tory party and hence the prime minister he was elected by a slightly broader group of people and so Boris Johnson is tapping into a legitimate view on the part of many members of his party that the time for negotiation the time for for compromise is over and Britain really just needs to pull the Plug uh-huh but to these twenty one rebels he's setting Britain on a horse that they feel ultimately will be economically and politically destructive so they view their role as saying. Hey wait a minute. We want to deliver brexit but we want to do it. In a responsible way in this is not the responsible way to do it. So how did the Prime Minster respond to this rebellion to this smooth in parliament force Johnson does two things. The ruling conservatives are in turmoil. Boys Johnson has kicked hot twenty-one members of his own party after they voted against same disease control of the parliamentary agenda the first thing he does is he carries out what you almost have to call us. Stalinist purge of these rebels rebels. He kicks them out of the Party while I would have to say. Boris Johnson really had the worst week. I mean here he is. He's new. He lost everyone of of his first votes. In parliament which is unprecedented. He purged twenty-one people in his own party because they didn't support him. I mean I think it's kind of dunning and it leads to this extraordinary tableau of these conservative. MP Some of whom have served for decades some of whom are elders of the party giving these emotional farewell speeches in the House of Commons you have the grandson grandson of Winston Churchill Nicholas Soames the speak. I'm not standing of the next section. I'm bus approaching the end a thirty seven years service to this hice of which I've been proud. I'm honored beyond words to be. I'm not I'm showed a very sad that it should end in this way speaking very emotionally nationally about all the years he spent in parliament who have titans of British politics Kenneth Clarke who's known as the father of the house a former Chancellor Chancellor of the exchequer a man who might well have been prime minister himself party tonight. It's been taken over by a Roman knockabout. uh-huh so character.

Saito Boris Johnson prime minister Conservative Party Britain European Union Brexit parliament People Boys Johnson Liberal Democratic Party Dan Parliament London Europe Dr Thing United Kingdom NBA Kenneth Clarke House of Commons
"parliament" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

boris johnson britain m._p. european union Brexit prime minister ruth davidson Tom pete briggs john berko brussels biarritz theresa nato akers president editor oscar nigel rogers ireland berlin
"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Have a love influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern. Well, Dr Trifon. When did we start to see this latest fragmentation of European politics and the rise of nationalism and euroscepticism? If we look back to the past year. Shogo special euro-zone, that's crisis would be a very big stimulation to listeners ROY so for populism in Europe because we know this that crisis explored a lot of. Contradiction. So a lot of the problems or challenges will in European Union, especially so far, as we, if we can find out the situation in European Union, especially the very peak divergencies between the so-called lost part of Europe and south part of Europe, and especially eastern part and the western part. So I think it gives a I mean, the earth or soil for ROY so populist because it take a chance. Thea. To find some more, how to say extreme policy on annoys extreme principles in the name of people. I think Jessica Oakham hokum mentioned populace to parties Misir, too. Very big disappointment with his establishment parties, and those comments because they are not, they could not they are not successful to deal with the issue of the development and also that crisis. So he gives a space for populist party, another issue, I think to the change of the political situation in Europe with the feature of the voice of populist me center, it's also a part of the huge change in western countries. Indeed. It's kind of result of these. We have a very short break here coming back. We'll continue our discussion. You're listening to world today. I'm joing stay with us. I am on car sharia. I teach at the university in today has organized its programs, and it says, on bringing in a lot of views from all over, it is an extremely good platform for information and analysis than I should all success in the future. China plus dot cri. Dot sin.

Europe European Union ROY Dr Trifon Jessica Oakham China
"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"So I think the resort of the election for this European parliament will give a very, very pick. I mean impact on French politics in future, and also toured the Italian politics on this yearbook. No, we know that for quite a long time. The European politics had a fairly stable, alignment, is two or three major parties holding sway, but how much? They rake configuration of party, alignments and party system. Are we going to get coming out of this election? I don't want to speculate what's going to happen. But indeed, the rise of these so-called, far-right populace has been a theme over the last few years in all national elections across a number of countries. And it's worth to talk about that, and why I want to stay clearly did I don't endorse some of their especially anti-foreign rhetorics and the way they talk politics. I think I'm not as worried as some commenters in Europe are, and the reason for that. I recall a few years back, there was is congress between people like the builders marine lapenne foul Kapit of German, French Dutch, and other far-right populist leaders and I found that a huge change for the better because if we think just one hundred years ago, these. Right wing parties from France, Germany. They would call for war against each other to defend their culture against the other culture. Now, these countries sent their right-wing people to a congress together in order to debate how they can protect their common culture. Of course, again it's against foreign influences against Islam against the Africans against Middle Eastern immigrants cetera. But still it just gives me the sense that even the right wing parties to the vast majority. They're not trying to dissolve the European Union, and then end up in a state of pre e-. You -times of independent countries or even longer before Europe has been at war for centuries. Most of history of Europe is small countries fighting against each other. And I don't see any of these new populist parties one. Wanting to go back to that. And the second statement, I want to make is about this term populism, which I'm very unhappy with because. Populism comes from the word populace, which is people, right? And the biggest part is the European People's Party, which is ironic because it refers to the same route of people and the Greek term for people then is demos, and from that re is, is the word democracies. So it's about the rule of the people, and populism takes this majority rule, and turns it negative, which I find risky, because it just gives a very, very strong opening for these parties to say, yes, we are populous. That's a good thing because we stand for the majority of the people, which don't but that's what they're claiming. So I'm very careful with this term populist. Well, Mr Perry, how'd you look at this, this issue this rise of populism or nationalism on a continent? Do think they have perhaps become softer compared with one hundred years ago. Well, it's very very definite the'd as you be airing. And. Is absolutely corrected far better to how have the past all far better? But it is a great concern for those who are in power that we are seeing an issue, where in Hungary, for example goal band, and, you know, Farrar Britain, the Brexit party. We're going to staying a issue, where policies driven by parties of extremes. And they want to be the EU influences anyway, they won't tend to laugh intend to write, but they want far-right fall, and they say she populism, which appears to be and. There are different variations across Europe, but it appears to be sweeping across the year. We have kids builders in Holland. We have all we have Faraj. So it is to conceal low, historically, much better than it has in the past in relation to what is happen. But it is also concern for those people in power, the these parties such as for our break the party, we should likely to hold sway, and we'll top the poll in Britain holding sway. Have a love influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern. Well, Dr Trifon..

Europe Brexit party European People's Party European Union congress France Dr Trifon Mr Perry Hungary Britain Farrar Britain Holland Germany one hundred years
"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Will the votes change the makeup of the European parliament? Are we going to see an explosion of populism in these elections? How good a predictor will be to the national politics in each Member State, and where is a you heading in terms of his role on the world stage for these questions? And more. We are joined by doctors who Jen, head of European studies department was China Institute of international studies, and her ought boop man, from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international studies and Phil Perry editor of the eye and investigative news, Beppe side in wells UK, welcome to work today. Day. Well, I think before we move on to our discussion on the European elections. There's breaking news this afternoon. Theresa May is stepping done as British Prime minister she anals to quit as conservative leader of on the seventh of June. So Mr. Paracha, study was the could you bring us more on the latest of this? Yeah. Basically, Theresa May lost control of the cabinet. In fact, there was a very major resignation leader. The palm tree party in the Commons, unrelenting them few days ago, and she's out, she had no where to go. She has tried and failed on several occasions to get he withdrawal, they'll through pollen. And now she's been told he has to go and she has plying resigned after one of the shelties ten years post second World War as prime minister in Britain, so Mr. power, we know UK was supposed to have deft the by now because the government has failed to reach the old that satisfies either the British parliament or the EU. They're now holding the elections as usual will cost more than one hundred million pounds. To choose the MVP is to take up seizing apartment that you're not into part of. So how many Brits are actually going to vote this time? That's very good question. I mean. Theresa May really didn't want these elections. They are distinctly old in Britain because, frankly, any Ps will be lactate, possibly Rhodia few weeks to take this before Britain comes out of the EU, and he didn't quite conceivable and the poll suggests that the tower is could come behind, for example, the glean, and that election result, which will compete. They election wall yesterday Britain, but the results coming on some day would be absolute anathema for the Tories and one of the reasons why she I think why he decided she had to go. And I think she decided she wanted to go now before the results come in on Sunday, which would be bad for labor after the polling poll, the toys. Yes. And if we believe in the pools, Mr. bug. C'mon. The pools actually suggest the candidates in the UK, that's most likely to be seated in a European parliament are actually those school are most determined. That Britain was leave the issue with the Brexit party that by Nigel Farraj expanded to come up on tops. Are you surprised by that? Well nine away. Yes. Great good come pain. I think. Yes. Mr. Volkmann was her take. From looking maybe from a bit more a far away from the UK. It's I wouldn't say surprising, in that many European elections have always shown that parties on the fringes get elected, much easier much more because voters may not fear so much that they're more extreme election. Choices have any tangible consequences. The parliament is very far away. It's actual powers limited, and national government have remained very strong autonomy above the European Union parliamentary decisions. So people may feel free to vent anger at their own, national government by voting some extreme parties into the European parliament. And I think that's something that's also happening in the UK with the special case, of course. That this Brexit has been going on for so long, and from all I hear is people are really fed up. I mean half, maybe half the Brits would like to have a revote and not leave at all the other half is saying, we should have left two years ago, and people are really fed up and they want to really show their government that they're really not happy..

European parliament Theresa May Britain EU Mr. Paracha UK Prime minister British parliament Jen China Institute of internation Phil Perry Switzerland MVP Rhodia Mr. Volkmann editor Nigel Farraj Mr. power
"parliament" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"parliament" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Parliament. The White House is trying to draw rank and file Democrats from their party's leadership to pick up votes for President Trump's proposed border wall. But no Democrats showed up yesterday. What was supposed to be a bipartisan luncheon hosted by Mr. Trump? Here's New York. Democratic congressman Hakeem Jeffries. Always simply asking for is Republicans to undertake their article one responsibility as a separate and Coequal branch of government and stop acting like wholly owned subsidiaries of the Trump administration. Meanwhile, since the enactment of the Taft Hartley act in nineteen forty-seven, federal employees have been legally prohibited from striking but lawmakers who approve that measure back then likely did not envision a scenario where the government would require its employees to work without paying them. As is the case. Now, another angle of the shutdown. From Russell Berman staff writer at the Atlantic. Russell explain this, central employees. These are PS agencies are corrections. Officers bureau of prisons either air traffic controllers, these are the secret service, and they have to go to work. Anyway, even though they are not currently being paid. That's putting a lot of financial strain on them. But they're not allowed to walk out. Because even though they're not being paid federal law. Prohibits federal employees going on strike or or staging any kind of mass walkout, and why is that why is that law in place? Has been in place since the Taft Hartley act in nineteen forty seven. And you know, of course, that was designed in the era of, you know, big labor unions to prevent, you know, federal employees from using the leverage of of a strike to demand higher pay more benefits, better working conditions where they would clearly have the power to shut down the government themselves or operations or the government in this case. However, the, you know, this.

Mr. Trump Russell Berman congressman Hakeem Jeffries New York President Coequal White House Parliament. Atlantic staff writer
"parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"parliament" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Look. It is unlikely all things considered that US President Donald Trump, ever spares much thought for the domestic political travails of his Iranian counterpart president Hassan Ronnie. So I believe in meeting I would certainly meet with Iran if they wanted to meet. I don't know that they're ready to have a hard time right now. Don't sheet Mr.. Trump do not play with the lion's tail. This will only regret, you'll regret it. And while Trump is probably and quite rightly be lost person to whom Ronnie would turn for advice. Both men do have something in common, the lapping around their knees of political quicksand related to the mishaps of their associates. In the last month, two of Ronnie's cabinet, labor Minister Ali Rabea and economy minister, Masoud combustion have been impeached and removed from office by Iran's parliament. Some reports suggest that industry minister Mohammad, Sherry mattress may be next earlier this week. Ronnie himself was summoned by parliament in order to explain himself. Not allow a bunch of anti Rainiers who've gathered in the White House to try to conspire against us. What is really going on here is that Iran's economy is tanking and Iran's parliamentarians would rather not wear the responsibility for this. They are correct to be nervous. Demonstrations have been occurring across Iran in recent weeks, expressing dissatisfaction with shortages of basic stuff like mortar, electricity and opportunity. It is no small thing for Iranians to express dissent in public, and he arraigning who remembers as far back as two thousand nine when dozens of those who protested against the alleged fixing that us presidential election were killed by security services understands the risk. Beyond that, it will not have escaped the notice of Iran's politicians, inheritors of the revolution. They are that many of the people attending these protests have been members of the urban middle classes. Traditionally, the demographic who's angry eventually does oppressive regimes which cannot deliver the security. They promise in exchange for the freedoms. They take Ronnie's appearance before Iran's parliament, the Islam, consultative assembly did not go brilliantly in fairness to the president. The nature of the inquiry would have been more honestly illustrated if literal kangaroos had been sitting in judgment of him. Fishing. To Ronnie argued plausibly that many of Iran's current economic woes due to the reimposition of brutal sanctions which has followed the United States petulant and pointless exit from the Iran nuclear deal. The parliament has now referred Ruhani to Iran's judiciary while this does not in itself necessarily open a path leading to Ronnie's own impeachment. It does mean that he's status may be formally upgraded from mealy embattled to downright beleaguered. Various as there always is base and grubby politics in play. The Ronnie has twice being convincingly elected president, though his supporters control parliament. He is widely disliked by Iran's hardliners and Iran's hardliners are about as hotline is hotline has get and count among their number. The country's actual alternate decision, elderly supreme leader, totally alley Hemi who has never been any great fan of Ruhani who many regards as disconcertingly moderate. At which point the popular depiction of Ruhani as a moderate does need to be addressed. Moderate is a relative term which in the context of Iran can be applied to and in Ronnie's case is a dog theocrat who has never expressed any serious objection to, for example, the flogging or execution of gay people for being gay or the imposition of address code on all women under threat of arrest and or arbitrary violence. But Ronnie does appear to understand well how many can't or won't that Iran in two thousand eighteen is increasingly comparable with the Soviet Union circa nineteen eighty eight. I e is a country which simply has no excuse for its failures. Iran is as the US was a potentially mighty nation, rich in natural resources and human capital pointlessly shackled by the graying zealots of an obviously impractical ideology that AMI that damn during this time of revolutionary epic. Jihadi Islamic spirit will not let you. Comfort for a single moment. Nations have awakened. They know who the enemies. Never had unit on it. There is no good reason non at all. Why Iran is not a wealthy orderly and functional country at peace and in partnership with the world. It is easier. However, for Iran's parliament, its president and its leadership to blame each other for this rather than consider the reasons why. From article twenty four amount dream.

Iran president parliament Hassan Ronnie Donald Trump US Minister Ali Rabea White House Mohammad Ruhani Rainiers Sherry Soviet Union
"parliament" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"parliament" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The move spot cheers from crowds as separatists outside the building in barcelona also in madrid the cell it has been meeting with the central government urging it to vote to strip the catalunians authorities of their pies james menendez but truck correspondent in madrid guy garbage coach well it's in a way the culmination of this process that this catalan government has been building up too not just for weeks but for for several years so it's it's a huge moments for those who wanted independence it's finally being declared in a sort of formal way by the catalan parliament for many of them it's it's the dream of a lifetime fulfilled although the big question now is having declared independence will they be truly independent what is the next step from the central government in madrid which is also being a meeting the senate been debating this today what happens where you are well an equally important decision is expected the senate's is 22 votes on a motion presented by the central government to introduce direct rule in catalonia to holtz this independence process and we're expecting the senate to approve that because the governing popular posse of mariano rajoy has a majority that has the support of some other parties as well says that vote is expected to go through and then tomorrow probably that's a direct rule plan will be in place and the spanish government will begin the process it says all of replacing the members of the catalan government the president's culls push amonte and his entire cabinet as a first step in that plan of of direct rule from madrid.

barcelona catalan parliament senate mariano rajoy spanish government president madrid james menendez holtz