35 Burst results for "Parkinson's Disease"

Jesse Jackson hospitalized after fall at Howard University

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Jesse Jackson hospitalized after fall at Howard University

"Civil rights leader Reverend Jesse Jackson has been hospitalized in the nation's capital after a fall I Norman hall a spokesman says the Reverend Jackson who's eighty years old was entering a building on the Howard University campus when he fell and hit his head he was taken to the schools hospital located nearby he had joined students protesting the living conditions Jackson instead of undergoing several exams including a CT scan which came back normal Jackson who has Parkinson's disease has already been hospitalized twice this year including treatment for break through covert nineteen infection is Parkinson's has affected his ability to walk and talk despite the setbacks Jackson has resumed an active traveling public speaking schedule I Norman hall

Reverend Jesse Jackson Norman Hall Reverend Jackson Howard University Parkinson's Disease Jackson Parkinson
 Michael J. Fox to receive honorary AARP Purpose Prize Award

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last month

Michael J. Fox to receive honorary AARP Purpose Prize Award

"D. A. A. R. P. will give an honorary award to actor Michael J. fox for his work with Parkinson's disease I marches are a letter with the latest Michael J. fox will receive the honorary AARP purpose prize award during a virtual ceremony on December fifteenth fox was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in nineteen ninety one and founded the Michael J. fox foundation for Parkinson's research in two thousand the organization has funded more than one billion dollars in programs for Parkinson's research the

Parkinson's D. A. A. R. P. Michael J. Fox Aarp Michael J. Fox Foundation For
"parkinson disease" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

05:59 min | 2 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Well you know maybe that passive means might take place more. You might see that more kind of moving beyond the neighborhood. So we're like okay. Maybe if we are looking kind of a little bit deeper and breaking apart this like total life space nobility into different components you know at the neighborhood level Maybe we'll see you know. Maybe there's something there and we ended up. Finding that daily. Walking activity was a significant contributor to mobility within the neighborhood limits so in this level one two three some score that we basically created but not beyond the neighborhood not with total lie space and then even breaking that down further. We wanted to see the difference in if there was a difference in sedentary versus active individuals. And we're finding that only at that one two three someday sort that level one. Two three some scored. There was that kind of significant difference in their mobility and particularly their disproportionate. reduction in In the total scored in the score there at the level three which would be the neighborhood level. Okay so we're going to break that down a little bit more a little slower. I think for our listeners so If i'm understanding correctly in the older population the research. That's been done today right. There is a correlation between this total score and the amount of walking that they do but in in your participants with parkinson disease. You did not see that. So total store score did not correlate to their amount of walking right okay and so and in particular that beyond the neighborhood really because we could theorize if you are getting a car to move beyond their neighborhood or some other form of motorized transportation all right so so but then when we look just more locally at how. They're moving within their immediate area of their home slash neighborhood You saw a correlation between how they're how much they're walking and what they report for mobility within the smaller region so sedentary people they were probably reporting more activity outside of their neighborhood and then less sorta daily activity within their neighborhood. Would that be fair to say. Yeah yeah so. We were seeing basically between active and sedentary groups more equivalent mobility when it was kind of beyond the neighborhood so into town and beyond the town I think the sedentary was still a little bit less but it was more equivalent with third reported mobility. Okay and so for your active group when you guys broke those down even further right. You found that really levels one in three. We're kind of more indicative of people's Walking behavior level to cracked. Yeah those were. The two were rehearsing more significant difference between the two groups. I'm the biggest. The largest difference was at that level three so at that neighborhood level. Yeah which kinda makes sense. But i was a little surprised to see that level to seems like it didn't have as much of an impact between the groups and do you have any theories as to why that might be. Yeah honestly. it's surprising not to see that in between level because when we're thinking about you know you have the difference between the inside the home and you know in the neighborhood and then you're not seeing it As much immediately outside the home do you think it's where these people live. So both of these centers are people are coming to our fairly urban people living in an urban setting or maybe suburban where they'll.

parkinson disease
"parkinson disease" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

04:30 min | 2 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Right looking at their life space mobility. Did you correlate it to anything. Like how did you know what they were. Actually doing. Sure we have lifespan. Ability to capture kind of just participation level constructive getting out in the community but to equate that to like the walking activity to understand like what component of that was walking We use the stopwatch activity monitor. Which is just that. The ankle monitor they would wear that captures like steps per day in intensity of locking and such so. We're able to kind of look at a correlation between that walking activity with life space mobility source. Okay so the that life space assessment right asks people to look at the previous four weeks. When did they wear the monitor. So this was all baseline data so it was taken so they came in for their baseline assessment. In still out this life space assessment In general and then they went home with the device at that point after that and they worked for the next seven days. Direct okay and were. They being enrolled in a study with an intervention. Yes so the larger clinical trial had two different arm was just two different ways of administering a walking program like mobile health versus just a typical lake paper exercise program but this was all collected more baseline so before. Any of the intervention has started. Okay sounds my question. So the the the participants knew that they were in a walking study but they hadn't started the intervention yet correct and the participants what degree what. Severity of parkinson disease. It have mild to moderate. Okay so nobody who was Greatly impacted in terms of their mobility. Correct okay all right. And what kind of numbers did you get for. Step counts the course of a week average per day or whatever they believe the mean was about seventy six hundred stops per day.

parkinson disease
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

04:54 min | 2 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

"A lot more. I think sometimes about the insight these disease processes get yourself so a support group. Those kinds of things you really. I think when i first started that was probably the best piece of advice somebody gave me because it really let me see from the bottom up what people were dealing with But those the organizations that i mentioned probably the three biggest lewy body dementia association the msa coalition than of course europe esp. You can always go onto the mayo. Clinic has some great resources. You can look at Nord also has some things that are out there. And sometimes good old mr google you just type it in and you never know what comes up. i also. I don't tell my patients to frequently do this. But i will search on facebook for groups that are out there and sometimes you can find some good information a lot of times nations. It's not good information so no it's better for the therapist to be the one to kind of see what's out there but i would say you know rely on the big organizations that are out there. Of course the parkinson found station. I'm does a lot of great education. Not only in parkinson's disease but also in the typical. So if you're ever feeling really lost and have nowhere to go. That's a great place to start in. How would you direct physical therapist listening. Who wants to start some aspect of in their pt. Connect you know our clinic. Our doors are open. We would be happy to talk to therapist if they want to. Email us because honestly there's there's so few of these centers who have this ability to have this team and it's a lot of therapists like you said like you. They're out there. And you're seeing lots of these folks and sometimes you can feel like an island all by yourself And then there's always you know reach out to your local neurologist who's a movement disorder specialist and say. Hey you know what you're sending me some of these patients. I wanna learn more about this than i want to really provide care. Is there anything we can do to kind of talk together to do this. And bottom line is this katie. It doesn't matter what the diagnosis is. They are human being with functional. Needs if you strip everything away and you get the fundamentals of..

parkinson's disease msa dementia europe google facebook katie
Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:52 min | 3 months ago

Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

"Canary speech has a full range of technology in our platform from a well developed extensive capability app. Available Apple and Android, of course. It operates on smart devices in multiple languages, we're currently deployed in Japan in Europe in Mandarin, and we've are entering the birds again market in Portuguese and of course in the U.S. and Canada. So we function within that app to be able to customize it for specific applications, whether we're dealing in stress anxiety or Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease or congestive heart failure. We have a range of engagements across more than a dozen hospitals in the world right now, where we're validating the initial models within the clinical environment for commercialization on those. We also have a well developed set of APIs that allow us to do multiple things, of course. One is to connect to internal health medical record systems. But also some of our some of our clients have existing apps and we interface to those in augment those apps through providing access to our technology stack and analysis of audio. With the same performance returning within three seconds, scores to arrange a different locations depending on what the application

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Congestive Heart Failure Apple Japan Europe Canada U.S.
Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:52 min | 3 months ago

Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

"Canary speech has a full range of technology in our platform from a well developed extensive capability app. Available Apple and Android, of course. It operates on smart devices in multiple languages, we're currently deployed in Japan in Europe in Mandarin, and we've are entering the birds again market in Portuguese and of course in the U.S. and Canada. So we function within that app to be able to customize it for specific applications, whether we're dealing in stress anxiety or Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease or congestive heart failure. We have a range of engagements across more than a dozen hospitals in the world right now, where we're validating the initial models within the clinical environment for commercialization on those. We also have a well developed set of APIs that allow us to do multiple things, of course. One is to connect to internal health medical record systems. But also some of our some of our clients have existing apps and we interface to those in augment those apps through providing access to our technology stack and analysis of audio. With the same performance returning within three seconds, scores to arrange a different locations depending on what the application

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Congestive Heart Failure Apple Japan Europe Canada U.S.
Jesse Jackson and Wife Hospitalized With Covid-19

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

Jesse Jackson and Wife Hospitalized With Covid-19

"Jesse Jackson and his wife, Jack will and are both hospitalized in Chicago after testing positive for Covid 19, the same civil rights leader and presidential candidate is vaccinated but also has Parkinson's disease. Statement from his nonprofit group says doctors are monitoring their conditions and will provide UPDATES when available.

Covid Jesse Jackson Parkinson's Disease Jack Chicago
On a Date With Reverend Jesse and Jacqueline Jackson

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

02:27 min | 4 months ago

On a Date With Reverend Jesse and Jacqueline Jackson

"It was a bitter cold november morning. When we got to the airport we were heading out to chicago. My old stomping grounds to visit reverend. Jesse jackson and jacqueline jackson not only are these two civil rights icons his work with martin luther king her lifelong activism. But they've been married throughout all yearly sixty years. I was really looking forward to it only problem. Our flight from new york was severely delayed and we were five hours late for our date. It was awful. I really hate being late for anything but even though it was already evening by the time we landed. They said come on over anyway. I've known them for decades and that's the kind of generous people. They are The children well. They all still talk to me. That's a good side. Jesse was diagnosed with parkinson's disease several years ago but despite his condition his spirits were lively and jackie. She's always full of life. As we settled in jesse began to recall their early days in college. She was a into modern dance and she had been librar- and beautiful begun. Measure parents versus freaked on her bills. A-plus all the time though the pluses so you beginning you say wait. What would values you share. The foundation was marriages. Don't last long as they have. No the norwich told free. Russa's deep is larussa foundation when the wind blows can't take it as i see what roles without roots. It cannot grow right over. How lucky you were to find. Jackie i mean other women would have run out the door because you were never home. I love you. I was lucky. I told him because he was going and going and going and then he wouldn't inform me. I went to him. And i said reverend. You're supposed to make me abbey. And i was. I mean because i really felt a man is supposed to make you happy. That's his

Jacqueline Jackson Parkinson's Disease Jesse Jackson Martin Luther King Chicago Larussa Foundation Jesse Jackie New York Russa Norwich
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

04:56 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Dr agarwal will be doing a far deeper dive into her research. At this year's international conference on nutrition and medicine the conferences running july fifteenth through the seventeenth and will be available on demand for a while after that even so. It's not too late to sign up and the cool thing about is that dr agarwal is just one of about thirty leading voices on health and nutrition who will be coming together to present the latest fact and evidenced based nutrition science. We are talking about credible information here. We're not talking about something that your grandma heard from somebody in church. We're not talking about something that your friend saw on twitter. We're not talking about your third cousin. Twice removed nutrition advice that they saw on instagram. No this is the real deal. Rentable research guaranteed to raise your health. Iq and you've actually heard a lot of the feature presenters on the show recently and this is your opportunity to get even more of that research. Go more in depth. P. c. r. dot org slash icy and is the website that you need to visit an order to register and use the code exam room to save fifty dollars and because the conferences online. This year you can literally join it from anywhere in the world. And i do hope to see you there. Let's head now to the exam. Room news desk. A new study is offering hope for relief from uncomfortable often unbearable hot flashes that occurred during menopause. It turns out that a plant based diet that is rich and soy can reduce moderate to severe hot flashes by eighty four percent. The promising findings come from a study by the physicians committee for twelve weeks. A group of women ate a plant based diet that included soy and according to researchers the average number of hot flashes each day fell from five to less than one and nearly sixty percent of women who participated in the study. Say not only. Did they have fewer hot flashes. They stopped having them all together. The study is published in the journal. Menopause we'll be doing a series of shows on this study. It's called the wave study and you'll hear many of those study participants. The women who went through this experience. Those changes firsthand. You'll also hear from dr neal. Barnard who helped lead the research and other experts including dr christie. Cobb stay tuned for that in the coming weeks but today's show was about alzheimer's disease and parkinson's disease and the incredible research that is being done on them. It's research that's all of us. Hope for the future. And that is why i am so honored that this episode of the exam room is made possible by today's dietitian and today's geriatric medicine. Today's dietitian is the leading independent source for news. Information and research for registered dietitians and nutrition professionals and today's geriatric medicine provides important relevant and timely content for geriatric physicians and the entire geriatric care team. Learn more about these trusted and respected public ations at today's.

Dr agarwal dr agarwal physicians committee for twelv dr neal dr christie twitter alzheimer's disease parkinson's disease the journal Barnard Cobb
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

05:59 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"To be given to everybody like okay. I'm consuming good food. But then there it is important that we also limit our unhealthy options Because in one of the recent studies we did. We found that those who were consuming more of these kind of unhealthy food items. They were Categorize more of the western diet had a did not have the impact of their Good food which they were eating so overall what. You're eating Does impact on like whatever bad yard. I am using the would bad but it's again like just like not not really bad but considered unhealthy will be like more fried food sugar for would end of that can affect night diet so consuming vest nights kind of diet was Attenuating the beneficial effect of all the good food. People were eating in the school. And this shows there's something happening there is there is this interaction or there is Some interaction happing definitely with between the good and the bad food in our diet so we have to. It is important that we have to limit. How much of unhealthy you can eat. So that's by mind either. Communication for example is like just limit your fried food intake to less than or equal to once a week. So let's not do it so regularly that you are diminishing the effect of all the other good foods. We have had in your breakfast lunch so in the if you wanna be needed. I'm just probably make it once league rather than just grabbing it everyday so so there is there is the study we have done ended probably the expanding more about the results in the conference upcoming conference. But that's definitely something we've found Patio boss effect. Like the bachelor had on the good ol boy all right now. That is something definitely to look forward to. And that conferences. Coming up july fifteenth through the seventeenth. And you can save your spot right now by visiting. Pcr dot org slash icy and reserve your spot today and by the way if you use promo code exam room all one word you can save fifty dollars off the cost of registration right now. So crm dot org slash icbm to reserve your seat and dr agarwal. I know you're going to be diving deeper into science. They're one of the other things that you're going to be covering And we're not going to go into this now because we have to save something for the conference you're also going to be looking at emerging research on pre and probiotics and gut health in terms of alzheimer's and parkinson's disease as well so this is all very fascinating and i just. I can't wait to sit down and watch the entire presentation and yeah. I think that's another area would just developing i said like a this nutrition unity Disease area is definitely very interesting and still developing and one of the aspects Which is People are like different groups. Autograph award looking at is the gut rain access. So did they say like the food we eat affect your gut microbiome affect your like overall diversity in microbiome and might have impact on brain health. So these are the new areas of research Where people delving in a like every every day they're like new answers on interesting Things are discovering related to this and so probably one of the mechanisms through which a healthy diet is working or helping your brain possibly can be through got. Don't you just love your job being able to study this day in and day out like isn't that just fascinating. I love what i do. And i think all of these interesting question. Just let me get up everyday and work more harder to make to look deeper and we are also trying to delve into more mcadams which is lock more exciting. And i guess i'll probably one of the few centers disease center. I think we are unique place to release. Study the effect of nutrition on brain up because we have these studies Collecting rains at the end of life. So we get all these bar savino what they aid in their lifetime. And now after post-partum. I mean we are looking at their brains than trying to link if there is an association with alzheimer's disease Or something else in their brains. We're trying to also established mechanisms link which really expand in for the Define or really like say how how might be affecting overall brain house so that's really exciting. So yes i do. Love may jail but it's it's exciting. It's fascinating but most of all it's important work. That is going to go toward improving the quality of life for so many millions of people worldwide and their family members their loved ones as well. And so that's why. I'm so grateful for everything that it is. You are doing and also for taking the time to join us here today. This has been an absolutely fascinating conversation. Thanks too much shock. It was a pleasure to be here. And i think talking more about this in the presentation and the upcoming contract so stay tuned.

alzheimer's dr agarwal parkinson's disease savino mcadams
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

06:17 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Get those crat noise. Yea like i. That's what i think. One of the mantras which most of the dietitians and nutritionists say tell everybody do follow is like have colorful blade but all the colors on your great so Just try and grab a colorful rule and vegetables and like tried to include as many as you can because all of these like hot like even the beats like purple color pink color they will specify correct noise and like for example greens a lot of latino which is another important type of keratin which have shown good evidence for its role in brain health. So yeah trying to be colorful on your plate. Well here's a question for you and wanted to just kind of popped in my head right now. Would you say a and obviously going to preface this by saying that they both have remarkable health benefits. But would you say that in terms of our discussion today. Is it possible to say whether fruits or vegetables play a bigger role. Can you even break down. Yes so that has been broken down in some of the studies on like fruits versus vegetables. So there are like other studies from Not only argo broad from other groups including nurses health study and help professional a studies alike. The bigger go hordes which really looked at the effect of fruits and vegetables looked at them separately for its effect on cognitive hell and primarily. The the results are more robust for vegetable intake rather than fruit intake like fruit had kind of mixed findings than some of the studies have found only some positive associations with cross-sectional cyanide like rude associated with cognitive function. But not maybe as much a t plans so there is no report on crew associated with cognitive decline. But there is a strong Like a raw good evidence on vegetables and primarily green leafy vegetables for its effect as up. There's also some evidence that corsi And cognitive decline. So i would say vendor comparing fruits and vegetables vegetables. We have more stronger evidence but from like the overall food category. There is more evidence coming from berries. Definitely so we have blueberries and strawberries and raspberries. All the betty. Category has shown evidence but not like Quitting through together as one thing. I mean there are few reports on fruit juices here and there but not that robust i would say to westerville the berries. I think it has to go back to those antioxidants. You were talking about earlier right now. You know speaking going back to things. It always goes back to green leafy vegetables with these types of studies. Too doesn't it. Those things are a nutritional powerhouses yes Let's let's talk a little bit more about this research. Okay so we talked about the mind diet. You also looked at the mediterranean and dash diets here A what what did you find. As far as their effectiveness. Compared to the mind diet zil a in our city specifically a kind of try looking at boga tree died. Scores like simultaneously and Trying to compare the standardized speed as like standardized effect size would say in scientific terms and the found excessive agree for mind diet those who are given zooming moderate and high a mind diets were having good effect overall had reduced risk of alzheimer's dementia. But when we're looking at mediterranean scores of the dashboard denver This effect was evident only in those with high adherence. So like probably take home Message from that paper. That particular paper that dr mark From joining fifteen Which was published in amazon dementia was even like a moderate to hide. It ends of mind diet Abbas dementia risk for mediterranean dash. We found only the highest darren's but this associated with geus risk. I'm curious for these studies. Did you also factor in things like exercise and getting adequate amounts of sleep. So far does steady. We do have physical activity in our model out. Also a study on parkinson's signs of an anti new we did include So we have a physical activity and view for cognitive outcomes. The also include the cognitive activities elite life interactivities people have been engaging 'cause that's another Lifestyle factor which has been found to be associated with cognitive outcomes. But we do not have a sleep in our model specifically. I think that's another area with still developing. I would say and let me ask you this okay. So there's no question they you and i. We live in a fast food obsessed nation. It seems like you can't go a single street or one block without seeing a mcdonald's or a burger king a chick-fil-a whatever. The case may big. If everybody that let's say not everybody let's say someone Is doing really well. They eat healthy for breakfast. They eat healthy for lunch They're exercising okay. But then every night on their way home they stop at the drive thru and let's say that their vices that big mac and fries so if they eat healthy the majority of time but still have that fast food once a day you know. What does that do in terms of their risk for developing either alzheimer's or parkinson's disease here. The that is a good question. I think that's an important message also.

mediterranean alzheimer's corsi dr mark dementia parkinson's disease denver darren mcdonald
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

07:48 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Which than in long run effects your comment when motor goods editor. I find Correctly enough but it's it's like really difficult to say if the oranges better than apple. Kind of got you got you. Here's here's a question. I know that Also in your presentation you're going to be looking at the dash diet and the mediterranean diet. I for one am not too familiar yet with what the mind diet actually is. Can you walk us through. What the mind diet is okay so mind. diet is a combination begin. See a hybrid of mediterranean and Confidence so it's a basically consisted of fifteen food components den are healthy food governance. Which shoes should be eating more to have a positive effect on cognition and then there are five unhealthy items which you should be limiting for example should be limited sugars fats. Fast food fried food processed red meat and so that's that's the five unhealthy components and then we have ten hilden which we score based on your consumption per week and then assign a score accordingly so so Coming back to what's mine. Mine died is a combination of mediterranean and dash diet with specic food companies. There is a special emphasis on green leafy vegetables here in the mind diet. We're just not there. In metro died than another important confident of mind. Diet is Berries and not to the overall food that recommended a dash and mediterranean wide varies. Because we do have good evidence on the effect of berries on brain health primarily because buries a very rich in different bioactive at Eleven hundred and polyphenols are which have shown a good impact shown to have a major impact on brain health and then Mind i'd also focuses on Fish intake but not as much as in mediterranean diet which rather communication as having at least more than three servings per week mine died recommendation as having one serving because the Fish has shown enough evidence to have effect on just held and I think the primarily these will be. I would say like main differences between mediterranean dash in mind because mine is more focused on. What's evidence in the richer specificity. For gog native held acsi would no mediterranean diet was derived more vascular factors in than dash diet is the dietary approach to stop hypertension. It's more again Geared to woods the vascular factors with mind was created in very in the inclusion of food groups specific food groups like great leafy in berries. Vich have shown such a positive impact on a cognitive outcomes. A great number of our listeners and viewers here eat a strictly plant based diet and one of the questions that we've gotten previously. Is that well. If fat is so detrimental to health y then would fish be considered a healthy brain food. Considering a lot of fish salmon included is such a fatty food. Yeah that's again a good question so when we talk about fact we have to be really careful on like what type of that. There is a good fan. We always say there's a good vendors of bad fed so again you're trans fatty acids. You're saturated fats. They always come under a bigger tiger. Like bad fats. But there is also a good fat like omega. Three fatty acids. I'm sure like Many of the listeners have heard about we got three fatty acids are the good fats and fish is very regional. Mega fads specifically a subtype goal. Dha just died hydroxy Donna gets specific against Time of Omega three fatty acid which is required for the important like brain functioning integrity and we have to also keep in mind that a brain has lot of lipid so it so the the memory has the Kind of fat so our brain does need fat. It's not like Do not require that it's part of it's integral part of brain function and we do. That's why between require good side. Which is the omega three fatty. Acid which consist of epa and dha primarily an officials. One of a very good source off this pretty good fatty acid. That's why it's considered to have a good impact on brain health. What are some others. Other sources of those omega threes that are not necessarily derivatives of fish and would be more in line with the plant based diet because again a lot of our audiences probably wondering that very question right now right so the richard. And i'm introducing myself so when you're saying like plan based died we have to also consider that mediterranean and mind diet and dash. Also i would consider more plant-based diet because the more emphasis on fruits and vegetables and lagoons and knots rather than the protein end up omega three coming from other sources but For omega three a there are definitely other sources in gouden including nuts. Exceeds and sunday is. There are like lot of alternative omega threes. For vegetarians. As well are so let's Let's get real nerdy here. Dr hacker wall indulge me here if you will We've we've talked anti-oxidants. We just mentioned omega threes. I believe you mention polyphenols and flavonoids flavonoids a little bit earlier as well. What are the other big nutrients that factored into your research that have shown to have a positive impact is for as cognitive motor outcomes of i think apart from that a major driver is the b. vitamins again like coming from different foods. Another major line which is part of antioxidant nutrients vitamin e. a. Which is another grade source than has shown a good Evidence on for its role in cognitive and motor declined. Time indefinitely cared noy dhs paranoids. Again are a the kind of antioxidant. Be keep it. In the category of antioxidant nutrients and a lot of the colored fruits and vegetables are the major source of crinoids In our diet and so we have somebody who wrote in last week on the live show. They were asking correct annoyed. Basically should they be looking for orange foods than to hint to go ahead and.

mediterranean Vich hydroxy Donna apple hypertension Dr hacker epa richard
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

07:48 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Parkinson's disease so both alzheimer's and parkinson's disease are i would cynic to most common Disorders for order adults. So yes a the exist in our society. We do not have a exact cure for both of them Is that ms diseases more pertaining to the cognitive decline over time and the dementia. A being present parkinson's disease is more towards the motor decline With our sonian signs being present a can easy or gait disorders associated with either can be a of associated So so yes abroad. Neither to menu region disorders and a reduced. See up quite a overlap. Sometimes like people with alzheimer's disease may have order decline. People with parkinson's disease can have dementia outcomes. So there's overlap. Also so i would assume that. It's it's not uncommon then in a family who has unfortunately seem a number of members have alzheimer's it wouldn't necessarily be so much of a surprise if other family members also developed parkinson's disease would i be correct and assuming that i would say like disease as in like diagnosed parkinson's disease because there is in the community. There's with medical fielders discrimination on like how to use to use the term. Arkansas disease Sonian signs having parkinson as to there are different. Ways of saying things So i don't know if there is an amniotic clinician to really answer on the diagnosis part. But there can be overlap of cognitive decline Variable like outcomes and the population. I think for the most part our viewers in our listeners are pretty familiar with what cognitive out outcome means and cognitive decline. But what about motor decline. Are we just talking about the ability to walk cure or does it extend beyond that. So the motivation kind will be our ability to walk our overall gate loss jer than there are like a bit of a dictator. Were grip strength to reach There are different ways to with the motor outcome together. as in like a already can balance also is part of it tremors or rigidity in the moment a Different deaths like tandem. Walk a time up in going like different tests which are done clinically or in the research setting to really define these variables now. Let's talk about what you have discovered With the link between nutrition and these diseases based off of what it is that you've learned in your research how big of a role does diet play in perhaps prevention and even slowing decline of both cognitively and from a motor standpoint. So what we have known like. There are a lot of studies now from population. Based of gourds. I save population. Be schoolwork people have Researchers have looked at gruber people and continued longitudinal following them over time in how there has been changed cognitive or motor outcomes in order adults and a lot of these Large cohort studies have found elaine between different food groups different nutrients and also with different dietary patterns. Which are now known or maybe all listeners have heard about it like mine. Diet mediterranean diet the dash diet like these kinds of dietary patterns. How day coordinate. With cognitive decline. So i would say they do have a currently good observational studies indicating that there isn't association between Nutrition or what we eat and our cognitive and mortar behavior in order age. Like as we age. This might be a difficult one to answer. But it were you able to discern whether or not there's a stronger link between the cognitive side of things and nutrition and the motor side of things in nutrition or does diet play an equal role is fars impact on both of those. I think it's a very interesting question But i would say we have kind of. We're still a time to these a bar like how and what's working for rich domain but more or less probably start the example of what he had done with a mind i addressed. Mind is what's secreted. Address by minded mentor dramatically more than goal leagues and dave primarily looking at the foods of picking out the foods specifically good for brain in that have been studied over the years and put together. This died score and looked at for its association with cognitive decline. And they found a mind died. Very well predicts outcomes by those who are consuming more mind diet had slower cognitive decline and they also had slow reduced. Risk of developing. I'm steven show or time and use the same score to get the cognitive out. I mean mortar outcomes which was console neon signs and be found like people who were eating. The mind diet also had slower progression of parking sonian sign. They developed parkinson's much later in life. And there's a similar kind of study by other rueben. Canada which found like people on diet had later onset of concerns disease. So when we're talking about these diseases they Diseases definitely related with your brain health. But it's difficult right noughties apart like if the nutrient is just affecting one versus bowl because i think everything is interrelated. It's difficulties part of what's doing what again say cognitive some. Some people read cognitive. Impairment have shown like more motor function dysfunction than stuff. So i think everything is interrelated. It's not just your specific. Food is hitting one of the rain. We're still trying to these about like mechanisms behind it so maybe just a good diet has not only helping your motor but cognitive outcomes and we can't forget the fact that died has been studied so very much over the years for its association with asking risk factors and then vatican rates factors comes in laid there again associated with cognitive Outcomes so there is definitely a lot of interplay between Overall diet its effect on our systemic levels are effect on our overall inflammation and oxidative stress in than probably a that's affecting parts of rain that's affecting our vascular health overall.

parkinson alzheimer's dementia Arkansas gruber elaine mediterranean rueben dave steven Canada
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Brought to you by the physicians committee high. I am the weight loss. Champion chuck herrell. Thank you so very much for racing your health. Iq with us this episode fifty seven from season four number two hundred fifty two overall and today. We are going to be talking about not just alzheimer's disease but for what i believe is the first time here on the exam. Were also going to be talking about parkinson's disease and so today. I'm going to be joined by a woman who is devoting her career to teaching and researching both of them and she is a nutritional epidemiologist. Ed rush alzheimer's disease center as well as an assistant. Professor in internal medicine at the department of clinical nutrition at rush. Doctor pooja agarwal. She is here today and she will be looking at the cognitive and motor declined that those living with alzheimer's and parkinson's will experience. How much of a role does nutrition play though in preventing that decline in slowing that decline. We're going to be looking at a number of diets putting them head to head and seeing what effect they may have had and we'll get her opinion by the way as to whether fruits or vegetables might have a bigger impact on these diseases and then coming up. After the interview with dr agarwal i will have details on exciting new study. That shows a change in diet can reduce hot flashes by more than eighty percent more than eighty percent brand new data. Coming your way critically important and very exciting for the three out of four women who will experience hot flashes during menopause. Stay tuned for that. But i a conversation that i hope will not just raise your health. Iq but also raised your spirits because there are ten million people worldwide right now. Living with parkinson's and another ten million are expected to be diagnosed with alzheimer's disease this year alone. So let's all join together and head into a healthier future and take those first steps right now.

alzheimer's physicians committee chuck herrell parkinson department of clinical nutriti pooja agarwal dr agarwal Ed
Robert Downey Sr., Actor and Filmmaker Dad of Robert Jr., Dead at 85

Colleen and Bradley

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

Robert Downey Sr., Actor and Filmmaker Dad of Robert Jr., Dead at 85

"Downey Sr. Actor and filmmaker Dad of Robert Downey Jr has passed away at the age of 85. He passed away in his sleep in New York City this morning. According to the Sun. He celebrated his 85th birthday last month that you might not know Robert Downey Junior's dad actor in his own right. He appeared in movies like Boogie Nights, Magnolia to Live and Die in L. A. And Downey Sr had been battling Parkinson's disease for more than five

Downey Sr. Actor Robert Downey Jr New York City Magnolia To Live And Die Boogie Nights Downey Sr Parkinson's Disease
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:01 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Show go ahead. Yup you're up go ahead. Oh hi how. Are you doing money day but i mean this is good. Yep go ahead. i'm sorry we got. We got messed up your up go ahead abrahams. You're up okay so Parkinson's does not discriminate I got diagnosed at age. Fifty and i was very fortunate in that I got in line with some great doctors. I was my. I noticed my my wife. My my my foot twitching tonight. And i went to my family doctor my neurologist he i diagnose me with Non essential tremors and then. He asked me to go back and six months. I went back. He said. I'm gonna change my diagnosis referring to one of the world. Renowned doctors in the world regarding parkinson's does yankovitch down in houston medical and He said i could all kinds of tests. But based on my experience. And you have you have parkinson's so he's by the way there's a initiative called parkinson's progressive marketers interested by michael j. fox if he's like the participant in that is totally voluntarily. Doesn't cost you a penny and we're gonna run some tests on you through a period of five years and so i did and i'm so part of the program and are you seeing progress. Well i started on mad about maybe three years ago. I declined the use of met for about four five years. Because i just did want. I don't wanna see how this this progress in I it has up. By a tremors or my my shaking. And so what happens is when i i. I got diagnosed notice that people know my family knows that i. I walked slowly kinda walk. Slow motion and move slow and so my wife who's angel and she's been along with me on this ride about parkinson's and she's really helped me a lot of research reading and just supported me through the whole the whole ordeal and So i got in this mess carpet of leftover and the and it's helped me i take out. I take four times a day and it really helps out. It helps you with the shaking. Or wh- what does it help you with. Yes so it it. it provides me what i what my brain can produce which dopamine and so things i can i could. I could not do without the meds. I can do now which is You know as best as i can I exercise every day. Walk about two three miles a day. Stay busy active and That's how it helps abe. Thank you for sharing your story. Thank you for the call. Let's go to daniel daniel. You're on the michael berry show. This is michael. Go ahead sir. I get more than michael They're talking about parkinson's and tvs. I wanted to call and tell you about my daughter. She's five and she's got a extremely rare genetic disorder. There's there's two hundred kids in the world that have it now that we know of As actually have to run the country club. When i found out that that she had at that time there was eighteen known cases and it's called. Gna oh one mutation. I don't we don't we don't have a different name for it yet. But that's a gene. That's not Not working correctly in her brain parkinson's it's very similar to parkinson's she It well it manifest itself in the same way and it can be it can be kind of controlled with dbs in fact One of the one of the kids that we know of that has it in holland just had to have emergency. Dbs because his medication wouldn't stop and his seizures anymore so they had to had to basically put them in a coma and and do emergency dbs on him to be able to control his seizures. How old is your daughter. She's five oh my so. How old was she when she started. Demonstrating these symptoms. It's our first child. So we we weren't really sure how kids were supposed to progress normally and that around nine or ten months. We started being concerned that she couldn't sit up on her own. And even if you if you sad or up she would just kind of fall over and so looking back. that's when we kinda. I realized that that's something wasn't right and talk to her pediatrician about it. And she They said just wait. We don't we don't know if that's if there's anything wrong yet and of course she wouldn't just jump to extremely rare genetic disorder but we did all kinds of tests for fema and a couple of other things and they wind up having to do a trio west test on her mom her mom and i and her and that's how they found out the genetic disorder that you've never had any problems in her mom's never had any problems. It's the novo disease or genetic mutation meaning neither one of us or her parents don't have anything at all so her body made it up on her own somehow and and we don't know how we've got two other kids two boys and they don't have anything so where are you going for treatment texas children's and you we appreciate it. Michael thank you for the call. My man so i'll go back to how i started this whole conversation. Imagine if everybody that was worried about. Racism was worried about solving the problems that are plaguing our bodies our families. Our children and our elderly imagine if we focused as much on finding a cure for cancer and parkinson's and alzheimer's as we do telling white people they're evil. Gosh when actually saw some of these bothers negative but then again jesse. Jackson al sharpton out of jail..

parkinson parkinson's abrahams daniel daniel michael j Parkinson michael berry michael houston fox coma holland seizures fema texas alzheimer's Michael cancer Jackson al sharpton
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

01:30 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Day. You know what. I mean right right i. Yeah yeah while and you're only fifty nine. You think you. I developed this at fifty two our away so I remember being at a redneck country club on on the very first new year's eve party we had there before the inside was open. You know and i started feeling bad. My back started hurting while right after the thing today saying.

Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

Brain Burrow: Digging Deep into Psychology and Horror

02:11 min | 6 months ago

Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

"So i'm very pleased to welcome on the program today crystal vero and i'm going to hand it over to crystal with the typical open ended question. Who exactly is crystal aveiro. I think you saw for having me market so pleasure to be here So who am i. Let's say well. I am an actor. A model of producer martial artist acting is my first and most passionate love in terms of what i consider myself and what i do. I grew up in binghamton new york. Which is upstate our south of syracuse. For those weren't super familiar with new york city so i started my career In college in psychology. That's why like super excited to be here because psychology is also huge huge. Love of mine sweitzer. Before i decided chase my dreams an actor so Yeah i got i. I went to courtland It's also in upstate. New york kind of a small town. Not a lot of people know about. But i there for year For psychology and then i transferred to binghamton university. Which is from my hometown on. And i switched over to neuro science. And i ended up graduating with a bachelor's of science and neuroscience. While i was there i did a lot of research on parkinson's disease. Actually the shirt. I'm wearing worked for the podcast. It's big brain. I got it from science twenty-six teen which is awesome neuroscience convention We were in san diego so after i graduated My thoughts words to go to med school to either be neurologist or cardiology list but you know as much as i love medicine and i was an emt and loved. The i loved the field. I didn't find myself very fulfilled. Feel like it was what i was destined to do

Sweitzer Binghamton Syracuse Parkinson's Disease Binghamton University New York City Upstate New York San Diego
How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

Does This Happen to You

02:16 min | 7 months ago

How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

"My dog's name is pepper. And i got him in the spring of two thousand six which is also the year. Both my parents had cancer. I was almost old enough to rent a car. But not quite. I lived at home with my parents. Well i lived with my dad most of that year because my mom was receiving cancer care out of state but more on that later. My dad also had parkinson's disease. I had graduated college three years before and in the inbetween time. I'm not sure exactly what i did. Other than quitting law school after six weeks checking out books from the library and surfing the internet which must have been boring. Because i probably had a super slow connection and there was no twitter. I also started working at a tennis club. Maybe ten to twelve hours a week. I was existing. But i didn't have anything close to a clear direction. Then my mom got diagnosed with a serious type of cancer. My dad got diagnosed with a less serious type and everything suddenly felt super dark. Like hell the florida skies become ferociously black when the massive summer thunderstorms descend. I don't remember what was going through my head during that time. I didn't keep a journal. And the only thing i'm good at remembering is random sports stuff but it seems likely. I felt scared and isolated while my mom was away undergoing multiple surgeries my dad and i- cohabitated in our traditional fashion. We mostly kept to our respective of the house and bumped into each other at mealtimes and when he wanted me to drive him to lows or the driving range so maybe. It's not so surprising that i decided i needed a dog to keep me. Company the chihuahua. All my parents got me. When i was five had died three or four years before so naturally the only type of dog i considered getting was a chihuahua

Parkinson's Disease Cancer Tennis Twitter Florida
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

08:15 min | 7 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Expresses is slow movement and you'll express his like having difficulty brushing your t.'s. Cutting sandwiches or dicing fruits or buttoning coast or your shirt things of that nature and it usually affects just one side of the by slice slice but it eventually moves to the other side of the body as well due to the reduction. Dopamine excites spoke about like dealing with bladder problems. Just another warning sign is trembling web trembling of the feet shuffling defeats trembling hand even your jaw slice and upwards of about sixty five to seventy percent of individuals with parkinson's suffer from trembling symptoms. Which is very very interesting. Ice another is rigid movement posture. Changes you into slouch. Experiencing muscle stiffness slice. The spinal is effected in those with this disorder. You may also experienced painful muscle cramps. That affects your movement. Another is balanced problems. Slice many individuals with parkinson's have trouble balancing themselves while changing positions and this is due to the degeneration of nerve cells in the area of the brain that controls your balanced early stages the balance problems will be pretty mild and many will try and overlook like ours just temporary but it does progress but even when you begin to notice yourself struggled with your balance. She adopted seen acupunctures. Contact acupunctures my life right away. Don't wait no need to wait. Another can be freezing in movement. Slice your attempt to walk in. You'll feel like you froze like what the heck is this slice functions and then you may start walking and then as you're walking you may fleas again. My slice another warning sign but now this symptom usually slight expresses itself in the more advanced stages of parliament at pain which can come in many forms. You know you can also experience numbness but the pain on the body. That you feel will be stabbing won't won't be a stabbing field to you also express or experience burning sensations. Usually we felt on just one side of the body slice now. Of course i was in asked you know how would an acupuncturist viewer diagnose sh- pocket zaslov. How would i analyze. The primary shift is an acupuncturist parkinson. And the three. Typical symptoms tremors brady caniggia muscle rigidity. You know when it comes to tremors like let's say constant trimmers let's say with numbness of limbs to an acupuncturist are usually the result of liver and kidney yen deficiency failing to nourish the sign news vessels slice now constant trimmers muscle rigidity accompanied by take significant lack of strengthen limbs show cold brady caniggia's shortness of breath with spontaneous. Sweating usually is as a result of our chee and blood deficiency with emptiness in the vessels in channels slice now the condition of intimate and trimmers accompanied by. Let's say heaviness of the body issues with keeping saliva in your mouth as i previously discussed to an acupuncturist dishes caused by wind. Flim complex is like within the body. Shwoing wind it usually manifests the trimmers obstructive flam presenters heaviness stiffness of the body or your limbs news deficient chief feeling to metabolize water which is a sign of phlegm accumulation. Now as the disease progresses to severe stage trimmers worshiping dysphasia skin slice with a quarterback. Tom now this to acupuncture student deficiency with blood stasis obstruct in the channels. So it'll give you. They can be four basic patterns to an acupuncturist of several more complex. But for basic ones can be delivering kidney insufficiency ci in blood deficiency wind flam obstruction of the collaterals deficiency with blood stasis throwing those basic patents out there you could be diagnosed in many ways and treated by with acupuncture..

Tom one side seventy percent about sixty five three
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:24 min | 7 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"This is relatively constitution and in some cases acupuncture was adjunct to our parrot. Pathak therapy and there have been quite a few instances where both forms of medicine combined helped relieve individual of whatever shorter. They were suffering. I slice so. I never professor proclaimed that acupunctures indoor to everything but there's a lot with regard to acupuncture and its ability to strengthen the body to allow the body to hewitt shelf slice when you ship with an acupuncturist or contact acupunctures. My life will explain that to you life in a way in which you thoroughly understand and most a left amazed. Totally intrigued with. I have to just make acupuncture part of my life thousands. I've heard thousand. Say that but one of the winning shining lights and usually one of the earliest sort is unexplained fatigue. Individuals who suffer from parkinson's usually have experienced fatigue is one of the earliest signs warning sign but he could be so intense that it affects your performance of professional tasks or even personal task. We you you can no longer complete these tasks chip accustomed to performing slice. That's an early warning sign to say. Hey something's wrong. Something's wrong here now. Another size isn't saami now experiencing insomnia doesn't mean or guarantee that you have parkinson's just something to be aware because most individuals who was suffering from parkinson's have trouble sleeping. They added finding it. Hard to fall asleep wisely. The wake up several times throughout the night any day usually early.

parkinson both forms one thousand saami thousands
Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

Breaking Biotech

05:38 min | 8 months ago

Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

"The first company. I wanted to touch on is news from july lilly and they're huge company. Say like a large mega cap at one hundred and eighty three billion dollars and what they recently presented was the full data set from their molecule demand in alzheimer's disease. And this is a phase two trial looking at this antibody that targets a specific epoch on the amyloid beta approaching and this episode is only visible in established plaques. Now i don't want to belabor the point about the amyloid hypothesis which i've done in previous videos. Suffice to say that a number of different molecules have been attempted in this indication in specifically the mechanism of reducing amyloid plaques. And they've all failed and what we're seeing here is that in this multi center randomized double blind placebo controlled trial. That donna had a significant is what they're showing here in the air score but not a very profound impact on cognition and so they looked at this primary outcome the air score and this is a combination of the as well as the ads. Ads and so eight ask cogs general measure of cognition whereas the ads. I is a measure of activities of daily living. So they did a combined score with that and demanded mobs improvement led to a p value of point zero four so technically significant. But i'm not sure that if they replicated the stayed in a face. Three trout necessarily be positive. It is an interesting thing because when you look at the actual aid. S cog thirteen score. We don't see any significant change. It is better in indiana but not by a significant margin and then the mse score is basically no difference between the two so this is another data point to suggest that perhaps the amyloid beta hypothesis isn't one that these companies should be looking at and the last thing i wanted to show here. Is that the one thing that they do. See a significant change in the amount of amyloid in the brain and so the pet scan here to show that the dynamic treated group has a significant reduction in the amount of amyloid plaque in the brain compared to placebo. So the drug is able to reduce the emily beta plaques. But it's not able to improve cognition really as much as you would expect given the effect is there so i wanted to bring this up because there is an upcoming. Pdf date for biogen's advocating mob and this is going to be a huge movie for the stock and it was originally supposed to be in march but it was delayed until june seventh of this year. So keep your eyes on that. I don't know if i'm going to make any position on it. I think that the fda should not approve it given the results from the advisory committee but given that the so many is on this pdf. I feel like there's a chance at the fda could overlook that and end up approving drug. So it's definitely jairo word. Play and i would treat it as such and proceed likewise so that is eli lilly. I wanna quickly move on to another company in the alzheimer's face called novus and i touched on them in my previous video and what we heard in the last week was that they announced positive face to data and this is interim data showing the nbs for one or another name for the molecule is positive in improved speed and coordination in parkinson's patients. And this is a twenty five day treatment. Nine patients were in the treatment group and five or in the placebo and on the announcement of this data. I think the stock was trading around one hundred fifty maybe two hundred million dollars market valuation and went up to around two fifty three hundred before settling around two hundred and fifty million dollar market cap so big move up in the stock and i'll tell you the data. The ceo explained that the study was power to investigate a difference of twenty to twenty five percent in biomarker levels not to demonstrate efficacy making this data that much more significant so to provide some context. And why i think this is interesting. Is that i in my previous video. Didn't really seem to bullish on a novus and the reason for this is that it reminds me very closely other types of amyloid beta drugs because this drug reduces app the precursor protein to amyloid beta. So my rationale is that if they're targeting the same emily data pathway. Given that there's been so many molecules that have failed previously targeting that pathway. I don't expect that this one is going to be any different now. Having said that. I decided to take a position because we've seen over and over again. That companies have been able to spin face to data in a positive way that leads to these big increases in the sock even though in phase three there's an eventual failure so i decided to take a position in stock and i have been rewarded handsomely so far and i'm going to hold on to see the rest of the phase two data so to get the actual data here in one test that measures the speed of execution. The results were statistically significant. P equals zero point zero four showing that while parkinson's disease patients are slow in coding. Boxes met with an s four. Zero one improves their performance. In these same patients other test that measures coordination showed an improvement in their movements and was almost statistically significant peak will s- appoint zero seven. Then they say in all end. Es up tests performed the placebo group either stayed the same or performed worse than at baseline instead the a b s four zero one group either stayed the same perform better than at baseline and as we know. Md s up drs is a specific tasks that measures severity and progression of the disease.

Alzheimer's Disease Parkinson's Disease Jairo Lilly FDA Biogen Donna Indiana Eli Lilly NBS
James Levine, who ruled over Met Opera, dead at age 77

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

James Levine, who ruled over Met Opera, dead at age 77

"New York Metropolitan Opera conductor James Levine has died of natural causes in palm springs California according to his physician Levine was seventy seven I marches are a letter with a look at his career James Levine conducted for the Cleveland Orchestra in Chicago's Ravinia festival but his claim to fame was presiding over the New York metropolitan opera for four decades he conducted two thousand five hundred fifty two performances and built the orchestra's world class reputation he was forced out in twenty sixteen due to Parkinson's disease and became music director emeritus he was fired in twenty eighteen over allegations of sexual misconduct Levine had planned to perform this past January in Italy but the concert was canceled because the corona virus pandemic

James Levine Levine Palm Springs Cleveland Orchestra New York Parkinson's Disease California Chicago Italy
Continuing to Navigate the Neurodegenerative Disease Subsector

Breaking Biotech

03:47 min | 9 months ago

Continuing to Navigate the Neurodegenerative Disease Subsector

"The first thing. I want to mention of course is what we're really dealing with here when we're looking at specifically companies in the next generation space. Now i'm going to belabor the slight even less than i did last time basically for good phase three data. I feel it'd be good. Expect a company trade between at a minimum really of ten to twenty billion dollars market cap and for companies. That are kind of earlier in the pipeline. I would say they've shown some good phase one b or some good early phase two a data. We can expect them to trade around at one billion dollar market cap and that seems to be the case so far and there's obviously tons of information that we can use to say whether or not they should be trading at a higher value or a lower value than that. But that's generally what i'm going into this with and using the data that's available out there. You can really make your own assessment. What you think is a fair value for some of these companies but anyway just to show this slide quickly because we need to know what we're dealing with here so keep all that in mind as we look at the market cap of these different companies. Today and the first company. I want to touch on. Is a company called aspira. Fire ticker symbol. Ha they closed on friday. The fifth at nineteen dollars and eighteen cents a share giving them a market cap of seven hundred million dollars they're q. Three twenty twenty net loss was eight point five million dollars and they had a q. Three twenty twenty current assets of two hundred thirty two million dollars and then they also didn't offering in february of this year adding another hundred three million dollars to their balance sheet their q. Three twenty twenty current liabilities. Sit an eight million dollars and to give some background of the company they went. Ipo in september of two thousand twenty at seventeen dollars per share so they're not trading it too much of a premium for matt but for anybody looking to take a position in the short term. I do want to remind you that. The lockup occurs on march seventeenth and an additional twelve million shares. That were previously locked up from the ipo are now going to be added to the flow. Which is at twenty three point. Seven million dollars today. so companies. That had this lockup expiration. I caution against taking a long position in only because the dilution. That's going to occur after the lockup is going to put some pressure on the stock price so keep that in mind but the company is looking at commercializing an asset that targets the hypothesis that growth factor pathway also known as the met receptor. And they're doing this to try and treat different. Cns disorders so there specifically using compound called a t h one zero seven and this was previously known as andy x one. Zero one. seven if you're looking in the literature and they're trying to treat alzheimer's and parkinson's disease but this and then they also a small molecule version of this where they're going to be looking at neuropsychiatric disorders like depression. And there's some benefits to using a small molecule version verses the other version using a t h zero one seven. But i'm not going to focus on that. I'm really just kinda talk about the molecule. That's going to be treated for alzheimer's and parkinson's disease and before we do that though i did want focus a little bit on event related potential and a touchdown this on a couple other episodes but i wanted to go a little bit more in depth because the main readout that a fire is focusing on is this p three hundred data point and so what event related potential is a quick primer. It's a q. Eeg measurement but it's a functional version of that so a lot of companies will show a q. e. e. g. measurement of just baseline brain activity. And what this does is it. Just measures brain electrical activity and q. E. e. g. sanford quantitative electro So the baseline measurement is useful. I guess but what's more impactful is actually do a sensory event which is a better surrogate for actual cognitive ability.

Aspira Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Matt Andy Depression Sanford
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

The View

03:55 min | 10 months ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

"One of the most dominant figures in talk radio in an architect of the conservative media movement. Rush limbaugh passed away aged seventy from lung complications lung cancer complications. There's been an outpouring of tributes along with a lot of criticism of his decades of controversial comments. So the question is how will you remember my start with joy. Well i did work. I worked at a radio station in. Nineteen ninety-one ish around that time. Wabc radio and he. I came on at ten. I believe and then he was on at eleven o'clock so i was engaged with him quite a bit in those days over the years. He's called me more bihar. Which i thought was interesting. I guess he was saying that. I was like b arthur in the in the show. Maude who was a raging liberal. I presume that's what he meant. And i consider that a badge of honor to be compared to maud. But it's interesting. I worked with him. I worked i've interviewed ann. Coulter many times Janine pirro has been on the view trump has been on the view. I went to his wedding for marla You know these people have gone through some kind of metamorphosis of of weirdness over the years and i was getting used to come on the show. She was actually fun. Ann coulter is basically. I consider her a comedian. I don't even consider her a pundit and we all know what trump was like before you know he was a democrat. So what's what happened to them. And i answer is money. Money is what happened to them. They have thrown at so much money at them at fox for example and various places that they could not resist the money so they go on the air and they spew their hatred their prejudices their lies as rush limbaugh for the almighty dollar and they fool americans into believing that they are authentic authentic. I know these people. They're not real right. So sonny what do you think his legacy will be. Well i been listening to to everyone. Eulogizing rush limbaugh. And i remember listening to him as a kid growing up and for me. He just normalized Hatred he normalized racism. And you know. I think he really weaponized. White male grievance and you know he sort of hard in these rural white listeners people sitting in their trucks and in the middle of america and in the south and listening to rush limbaugh and this is someone who called our president barack. The magic negro. This is someone who talked about an nfl football game as a gang match between the bloods and crips. This is someone who made fun of michael. J. fox's a parkinson's disease this is someone who likened a thirteen year old chelsea clinton to a dog. You know this wasn't someone who Was a nice person. This is someone that spewed racism and hatred yet. He is now considered. I guess the most influence the an influential person and building the modern republican party and conservatism. A to me. That's not something to be proud of. I mean how is that. A reflection of conservative values i thought conservatism was about small government and family values and if family values is making fun of black people and a child and a disease. I don't know where the the republican party is. I think his legacy is that he paved the way again for the modern republican party and trump is

Lung Complications Lung Cancer Rush Limbaugh Wabc Radio B Arthur Janine Pirro Bihar Maude Marla Coulter Ann Coulter Donald Trump ANN Parkinson's Disease Sonny FOX Limbaugh J. Fox Chelsea Clinton Barack NFL
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 10 months ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

The Bio Report

03:19 min | 10 months ago

Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

"Thanks for joining us as a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about regulatory t cell therapy and cinema bio therapeutics efforts to develop these for autoimmune and degenerative diseases perhaps we can start their. What are regulatory t cell. Therapy's and how do they work sure So this is a feel that has Really over the last two decades exploded in our understanding of the importance of these cells in controlling everything from allergy to organ transplant rejection to autoimmune diseases. In basically what to rags. Dr is a very small population of white blood cells largely circulating in the blood but also present in tissues and these cells have the capability and capacity to actually shutdown unwanted immune responses perhaps most Typically in patients that have a defect in these cells called apex patients They'll usually die within a year or two of massive autoimmune and allergic responses unless they get a bone marrow transplant from a mother or father that That gives back there to population so these cells are really essential to controlling tolerance in the immune system preventing immune cells from attacking and destroying self tissue. You see these. Potentially addressing large populations of people with autoimmune degenerative diseases potentially how big a market re talking about an. How effective are we today in treating these conditions. Yes certainly this is a very big bucket ranging everything from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis type one diabetes and over eighty other autoimmune diseases Up through including degenerative diseases like ls potentially alzheimer's or even parkinson's disease and the reason is is that so many of these diseases are mediated by uncontrolled inflammation. People don't fully appreciate the fact that the immune system is playing an active role in a of of diseases outside of the more classic immune diseases so when you think about market potential it's almost impossible to To ferret out what the actual size will be in reality. of course These cells are gonna be used. I in diseases that are highly morbid and potentially a strong medical need either as disease class or as individuals and we hope to start out in diseases that are clearly a fall within that that rubric but ultimately one can imagine cell. Therapy's being a new pillar of medicine where you can think about them. In a variety of immunological settings where you wanna give a treatment once or a couple of times and then have a long-term living drug that will suppress unwanted inflammatory responses.

Autoimmune Degenerative Diseas Autoimmune Diseases Sclerosis Type Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Allergy Rheumatoid Arthritis Diabetes
Understanding Space Station Science

Innovation Now

01:01 min | 11 months ago

Understanding Space Station Science

"Orbiting about two hundred fifty miles above our planet. The international space station is the only laboratory of its kind during the past two decades. The station is supported scientific discoveries and historic breakthroughs. Here are just a few fundamental disease research related to alzheimer's and parkinson's disease cancer. Asthma and heart disease the discovery of cool burning flames invisible flames that burn two and a half times cooler than a candle. The development of new water purification systems vital to humans everywhere methods to combat muscle atrophy and bone loss fluid research for applications from advanced medical devices to heat transfer systems three d. printing using human tissue and the ability to monitor our planet from this unique vantage point space station. Research helps us explore farther into space but it also makes our world a better place to live

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Cancer International Space Station Asthma Heart Disease
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 11 months ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Am I Drinking Too Much How Do I Stop Drinking Janet Gourand Worldwithoutwine Alcoholic Alcohol Free Alcohol Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

"Out tng and started having this conversation. 'cause andreas really a clinical expert. In parkinson's disease was aware of the parkinson's disease edge documents and was really always kind of searching to kind of improve practice. So angie like thinking back to kind of those original conversations. What we're kind of some of your thoughts as i approached you about this project yet. Thanks amy i was excited about the project being a therapist for over twenty years and really knowing a lot about parkinson's i had been doing a lot of the outcome measures myself but knew that a lot of my co workers were not doing commercials. I was doing so. I was excited because it was a good way to really i think approached them and get their input that were kind of approach it as a team. How can we do more. Parkinson's specific outcome measures In provide more research based gill to to people with parkinson's i was super excited about it. Anti give us a little bit of background on your clinic. Like how many clinicians do have there. What kind of populations do you see. It's a relatively small clinic. It's outpatient neuro clinic so there are currently. Actually we have three physical therapists at this point. I'm part time physical therapists in two full-time. Pt's we have two fulltime. Ot's three speech therapist and to physical therapy assistants. So that's pretty much our team right now in the front office staff. Jim itself is actually small which came into play when we were deciding which outcome measures. We're going to choose so as far as the physical barriers That was something we had to talk about amongst the team as ours. What outcome measures were gonna work for us. So that was helpful when amy came in 'cause we could all sit together for us as a team. What are the outcome measures. That we feel we can implement and continue to. Do you know a forever and were there other clinics involved in this effort yes We're the mainero clinic. But there are several other outpatient clinics associated with essential genesis. And so i guess how many there was about there were four clinics that were involved in the project in particular because so the grand blinked. Clinic is probably i would say. India said the central clinic that sees primarily neuro patients but there's other clinics and other remote parts in the flint area. Down a patient with parkinson's might not wanna travel a half hour so these clinics were closer to their home in these clinics were commonly smaller clinics. Two of the clinics only had one physical therapists. That was at that clinic but that would still see somebody with parkinson's disease. The project included four clinics that included seven physical therapist to occupational therapists..

parkinson's amy andreas angie Parkinson gill Jim flint area India
"parkinson disease" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on 4D: Deep Dive into Degenerative Diseases - ANPT

"Out tng and started having this conversation. 'cause andreas really a clinical expert. In parkinson's disease was aware of the parkinson's disease edge documents and was really always kind of searching to kind of improve practice. So angie like thinking back to kind of those original conversations. What we're kind of some of your thoughts as i approached you about this project yet. Thanks amy i was excited about the project being a therapist for over twenty years and really knowing a lot about parkinson's i had been doing a lot of the outcome measures myself but knew that a lot of my coworkers were not doing commercials. I was doing so. I was excited because it was a good way to really. I think approached them and get their input. We're kind of approach it as a team. How can we do more. Parkinson's specific outcome measures In provide more research based gill to to people with parkinson's. I was super excited about it. Angie give us a little bit of background on your clinic like how many clinicians do have there. What kind of populations do you see. It's a relatively small clinic. It's outpatient neuro clinic so there are currently. Actually we have three physical therapists at this point. I'm part time physical therapists in two full-time. Pt's we have two fulltime. Ot's three speech therapist and to physical therapy assistants. So that's pretty much our team right now in the front office staff. Jim itself is actually small which came into play when we were deciding which outcome measures. We're going to choose so as far as the physical barriers That was something we had to talk about amongst the team as ours. What outcome measures were going gonna work for us so that was helpful. When emmy came in 'cause we could all together for us as a team. What are the outcome measures that we feel we can implement and continue to. Do you know a forever and were there. Other clinics involved in this effort yes. We're the main neuro clinic. But there are several other outpatient clinics associated with essential genesis. And so i guess how many there was about there were four clinics that were involved in the project in particular because so the grand blinked. Clinic is probably i would say. India said the central clinic that sees primarily neuro patients but there's other clinics and other remote parts in the flint area. Down a patient with parkinson's might not wanna travel a half hour so these clinics were closer to their home in these clinics were commonly smaller clinics. Two of the clinics only had one physical therapists. That was at that clinic but that would still see somebody with parkinson's disease. The project included four clinics that included seven physical therapist to occupational therapists..

parkinson's andreas angie parkinson amy Parkinson gill Angie emmy Jim flint area India
K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

"A veteran country music star has died K. two thousand was her name and she had a big hit in nineteen eighty seven with the song eighties ladies the three time Grammy winner has died a friend says he heard from a family member that the single passed away at her home near Nashville at age eighty seven no cause of death has been released of the Austin had been suffering from Parkinson's disease and had tested positive for covert nineteen I was in was one of the most intriguing personalities and country music instead of starting young she didn't launch her music career until her mid forties and her songs were written and sung from the perspective of a strong woman she had a pair of million selling albums with this woman joining eighties ladies in reaching platinum status I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Parkinson's Disease Grammy Nashville Austin Oscar Wells Gabriel
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, , where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. . Excellent. . So Can you talk a little bit about? ? What Parkinson's diseases <hes> maybe just from from a basic standpoint. . Absolutely. . So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. . It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. . So we consider it a disorder of aging. . and. . Generally speaking, , we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. . In fact, , clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. . And or stiffness. . So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. . then. . Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. . So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and <hes> certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. . So generally speaking, , it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. . So walking an example, , but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, , they feel that things are taking longer to do. . And sometimes, , that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. . So as I mentioned, , Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. . What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. . Now again, , some of these other features are not specific. . So none of these are specific. . Kind of evaluating everything together. . But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. . Other non motor. . So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. . Could be mood, , for example, , society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, , two years, , and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. . Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. . So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized <hes> other things that are nominated that again, , me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. . The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves <hes> or innovate smooth muscles. . So this is things like your gut. . Your heart. . Your sweat. . Glands. . And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, , it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. . So constipation again, , in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. . Changes in the innovation to the heart. . These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, , Oh yeah before that, there , were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. . So the point is, , is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and <hes>. . We're appreciating that more and it finally. . I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even , more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, , cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, , the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. . Now, , that's not the same thing as dementia. . So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. . They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well <hes>. . So these things again haven't quite there's some understanding of why this may be happening <hes>, , but they're certainly part of park disease. . And also the idea that they are very much interrelated. So. . . Motor and cognition probably had some relationship to in terms of the idea that cognitive issues can sometimes contribute to more motor problems or cognitive issues can get you more mood related issues. . So they're they're not really separated. . They're very much interrelated and we'll begin understand how and why that may be happening either from a chemical point of view from circuit point of view

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine degenerative disease Disease University of Southern Califor Dr Pet Elba Dr Pet Singer skateboarding Yoga
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, , where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. . Excellent. . So Can you talk a little bit about? ? What Parkinson's diseases <hes> maybe just from from a basic standpoint. . Absolutely. . So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. . It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. . So we consider it a disorder of aging. . and. . Generally speaking, , we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. . In fact, , clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. . And or stiffness. . So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. . then. . Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. . So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and <hes> certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. . So generally speaking, , it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. . So walking an example, , but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, , they feel that things are taking longer to do. . And sometimes, , that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. . So as I mentioned, , Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. . What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. . Now again, , some of these other features are not specific. . So none of these are specific. . Kind of evaluating everything together. . But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. . Other non motor. . So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. . Could be mood, , for example, , society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, , two years, , and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. . Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. . So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized <hes> other things that are nominated that again, , me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. . The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves <hes> or innovate smooth muscles. . So this is things like your gut. . Your heart. . Your sweat. . Glands. . And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, , it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. . So constipation again, , in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. . Changes in the innovation to the heart. . These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, , Oh yeah before that, there , were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. . So the point is, , is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and <hes>. . We're appreciating that more and it finally. . I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even , more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, , cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, , the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. . Now, , that's not the same thing as dementia. . So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. . They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine degenerative disease Disease University of Southern Califor Dr Pet Elba Dr Pet Singer skateboarding Yoga