35 Burst results for "Parkinson's Disease"

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

The View

03:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

"One of the most dominant figures in talk radio in an architect of the conservative media movement. Rush limbaugh passed away aged seventy from lung complications lung cancer complications. There's been an outpouring of tributes along with a lot of criticism of his decades of controversial comments. So the question is how will you remember my start with joy. Well i did work. I worked at a radio station in. Nineteen ninety-one ish around that time. Wabc radio and he. I came on at ten. I believe and then he was on at eleven o'clock so i was engaged with him quite a bit in those days over the years. He's called me more bihar. Which i thought was interesting. I guess he was saying that. I was like b arthur in the in the show. Maude who was a raging liberal. I presume that's what he meant. And i consider that a badge of honor to be compared to maud. But it's interesting. I worked with him. I worked i've interviewed ann. Coulter many times Janine pirro has been on the view trump has been on the view. I went to his wedding for marla You know these people have gone through some kind of metamorphosis of of weirdness over the years and i was getting used to come on the show. She was actually fun. Ann coulter is basically. I consider her a comedian. I don't even consider her a pundit and we all know what trump was like before you know he was a democrat. So what's what happened to them. And i answer is money. Money is what happened to them. They have thrown at so much money at them at fox for example and various places that they could not resist the money so they go on the air and they spew their hatred their prejudices their lies as rush limbaugh for the almighty dollar and they fool americans into believing that they are authentic authentic. I know these people. They're not real right. So sonny what do you think his legacy will be. Well i been listening to to everyone. Eulogizing rush limbaugh. And i remember listening to him as a kid growing up and for me. He just normalized Hatred he normalized racism. And you know. I think he really weaponized. White male grievance and you know he sort of hard in these rural white listeners people sitting in their trucks and in the middle of america and in the south and listening to rush limbaugh and this is someone who called our president barack. The magic negro. This is someone who talked about an nfl football game as a gang match between the bloods and crips. This is someone who made fun of michael. J. fox's a parkinson's disease this is someone who likened a thirteen year old chelsea clinton to a dog. You know this wasn't someone who Was a nice person. This is someone that spewed racism and hatred yet. He is now considered. I guess the most influence the an influential person and building the modern republican party and conservatism. A to me. That's not something to be proud of. I mean how is that. A reflection of conservative values i thought conservatism was about small government and family values and if family values is making fun of black people and a child and a disease. I don't know where the the republican party is. I think his legacy is that he paved the way again for the modern republican party and trump is

Lung Complications Lung Cancer Rush Limbaugh Wabc Radio B Arthur Janine Pirro Bihar Maude Marla Coulter Ann Coulter Donald Trump ANN Parkinson's Disease Sonny FOX Limbaugh J. Fox Chelsea Clinton Barack NFL
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

The Bio Report

03:19 min | Last month

Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

"Thanks for joining us as a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about regulatory t cell therapy and cinema bio therapeutics efforts to develop these for autoimmune and degenerative diseases perhaps we can start their. What are regulatory t cell. Therapy's and how do they work sure So this is a feel that has Really over the last two decades exploded in our understanding of the importance of these cells in controlling everything from allergy to organ transplant rejection to autoimmune diseases. In basically what to rags. Dr is a very small population of white blood cells largely circulating in the blood but also present in tissues and these cells have the capability and capacity to actually shutdown unwanted immune responses perhaps most Typically in patients that have a defect in these cells called apex patients They'll usually die within a year or two of massive autoimmune and allergic responses unless they get a bone marrow transplant from a mother or father that That gives back there to population so these cells are really essential to controlling tolerance in the immune system preventing immune cells from attacking and destroying self tissue. You see these. Potentially addressing large populations of people with autoimmune degenerative diseases potentially how big a market re talking about an. How effective are we today in treating these conditions. Yes certainly this is a very big bucket ranging everything from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis type one diabetes and over eighty other autoimmune diseases Up through including degenerative diseases like ls potentially alzheimer's or even parkinson's disease and the reason is is that so many of these diseases are mediated by uncontrolled inflammation. People don't fully appreciate the fact that the immune system is playing an active role in a of of diseases outside of the more classic immune diseases so when you think about market potential it's almost impossible to To ferret out what the actual size will be in reality. of course These cells are gonna be used. I in diseases that are highly morbid and potentially a strong medical need either as disease class or as individuals and we hope to start out in diseases that are clearly a fall within that that rubric but ultimately one can imagine cell. Therapy's being a new pillar of medicine where you can think about them. In a variety of immunological settings where you wanna give a treatment once or a couple of times and then have a long-term living drug that will suppress unwanted inflammatory responses.

Autoimmune Degenerative Diseas Autoimmune Diseases Sclerosis Type Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Allergy Rheumatoid Arthritis Diabetes
Understanding Space Station Science

Innovation Now

01:01 min | Last month

Understanding Space Station Science

"Orbiting about two hundred fifty miles above our planet. The international space station is the only laboratory of its kind during the past two decades. The station is supported scientific discoveries and historic breakthroughs. Here are just a few fundamental disease research related to alzheimer's and parkinson's disease cancer. Asthma and heart disease the discovery of cool burning flames invisible flames that burn two and a half times cooler than a candle. The development of new water purification systems vital to humans everywhere methods to combat muscle atrophy and bone loss fluid research for applications from advanced medical devices to heat transfer systems three d. printing using human tissue and the ability to monitor our planet from this unique vantage point space station. Research helps us explore farther into space but it also makes our world a better place to live

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Cancer International Space Station Asthma Heart Disease
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 2 months ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
Neil Sheehan, Pentagon Papers reporter, Vietnam author, dies in Washington DC

Steve Scott

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Neil Sheehan, Pentagon Papers reporter, Vietnam author, dies in Washington DC

"A reporter and Pulitzer Prize winning author who broke the story of the Pentagon papers for The New York Times, has died. Or from CBS News, National security consultant and retired Army Colonel Jeff McCausland. Neil Sheehan, Vietnam War correspondent and Pulitzer Prize winning author who obtained the Pentagon papers. The New York Times leading the government for the first time in American history to get a judge to block publication article on grounds of National security. Has died at his home in Washington, D. C. His exhaustive coverage of the Vietnam War also led the publication of a book A Bright Shining Lie, which won the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize. Neil Sheehan had been suffering from Parkinson's disease. He was 84 years old.

Neil Sheehan Jeff Mccausland Pentagon The New York Times Cbs News Pulitzer Prize Vietnam D. C. Army Washington National Book Award Parkinson's Disease
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

03:12 min | 2 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

"Out tng and started having this conversation. 'cause andreas really a clinical expert. In parkinson's disease was aware of the parkinson's disease edge documents and was really always kind of searching to kind of improve practice. So angie like thinking back to kind of those original conversations. What we're kind of some of your thoughts as i approached you about this project yet. Thanks amy i was excited about the project being a therapist for over twenty years and really knowing a lot about parkinson's i had been doing a lot of the outcome measures myself but knew that a lot of my co workers were not doing commercials. I was doing so. I was excited because it was a good way to really i think approached them and get their input that were kind of approach it as a team. How can we do more. Parkinson's specific outcome measures In provide more research based gill to to people with parkinson's i was super excited about it. Anti give us a little bit of background on your clinic. Like how many clinicians do have there. What kind of populations do you see. It's a relatively small clinic. It's outpatient neuro clinic so there are currently. Actually we have three physical therapists at this point. I'm part time physical therapists in two full-time. Pt's we have two fulltime. Ot's three speech therapist and to physical therapy assistants. So that's pretty much our team right now in the front office staff. Jim itself is actually small which came into play when we were deciding which outcome measures. We're going to choose so as far as the physical barriers That was something we had to talk about amongst the team as ours. What outcome measures were gonna work for us. So that was helpful when amy came in 'cause we could all sit together for us as a team. What are the outcome measures. That we feel we can implement and continue to. Do you know a forever and were there other clinics involved in this effort yes We're the mainero clinic. But there are several other outpatient clinics associated with essential genesis. And so i guess how many there was about there were four clinics that were involved in the project in particular because so the grand blinked. Clinic is probably i would say. India said the central clinic that sees primarily neuro patients but there's other clinics and other remote parts in the flint area. Down a patient with parkinson's might not wanna travel a half hour so these clinics were closer to their home in these clinics were commonly smaller clinics. Two of the clinics only had one physical therapists. That was at that clinic but that would still see somebody with parkinson's disease. The project included four clinics that included seven physical therapist to occupational therapists..

parkinson's amy andreas angie Parkinson gill Jim flint area India
K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

"A veteran country music star has died K. two thousand was her name and she had a big hit in nineteen eighty seven with the song eighties ladies the three time Grammy winner has died a friend says he heard from a family member that the single passed away at her home near Nashville at age eighty seven no cause of death has been released of the Austin had been suffering from Parkinson's disease and had tested positive for covert nineteen I was in was one of the most intriguing personalities and country music instead of starting young she didn't launch her music career until her mid forties and her songs were written and sung from the perspective of a strong woman she had a pair of million selling albums with this woman joining eighties ladies in reaching platinum status I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Parkinson's Disease Grammy Nashville Austin Oscar Wells Gabriel
Jeremy Bulloch, Boba Fett in first 'Star Wars' trilogy, dies

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Jeremy Bulloch, Boba Fett in first 'Star Wars' trilogy, dies

"A key figure in the Star Wars movies franchise has died Jeremy Bulloch has passed away his agency the actor who first played Boba Fett in the original Star Wars trilogy is died he was seventy five and his reps say he had been living with Parkinson's disease for years when he died at a London hospital well looks role as the infamous Mandalorian bounty hunter is well known to Star Wars fans he swiped the frozen in carbonite Han solo in nineteen eighties the empire strikes back in nineteen eighty three eastern of the jet I Star Wars co stars mark Hamill and Billy Dee Williams are among those paying tribute hello says bullock was a fine actor and fine man while Williams is mourning the loss what he calls the best bounty hunter in the galaxy I'm a squirrel's Gabriel

Jeremy Bulloch Parkinson's Disease Boba Fett Hunter Mark Hamill London Billy Dee Williams Bullock Hello Williams
ASH 2020 Update

Breaking Biotech

05:21 min | 2 months ago

ASH 2020 Update

"So. I'm excited we back and we have a lot to get into and the reason for this is that we heard a number of from the american society for hematology conference. That just took place a couple of weeks ago. So we're going to talk about updates from trillium therapeutics tgi therapeutics actinium. Pharma and i wanna do a little bit of a follow on to my video about anna back with regards to their parkinson's disease data so we're going to touch on all of this stuff and Overall is a pretty interesting conference from some of the data. Updates that i saw of course i'm just going to focus on the companies that i'm interested in but then i'm gonna follow it up with a few other updates that we saw that led to huge increases in in their stock price. So have a lot to get into. So i'm just going to get right into it. And i think before we talk about the company's specifically i did just wanna talk a little bit about non-hodgkin's lymphoma and the reason for this is that to companies trillium in focus a lot on this disease and i just want everybody to be up to speed. So i've talked about non-hodgkin's lymphoma in the past. And i showed like a version of this slide. But i've included a few like prices of previously approved drugs for these diseases just so that we all have a bit more context on what we can expect in terms of a proper valuation for the companies. So just we all understand. Non-hodgkin's lymphoma characterizes a group of malignant lymphocytes cancers. These are known as he malignancies and lymphocytes as we know at their b or t cells and these are part of the adaptive immune system. They collect mutations such that they can grow and then deposit in different areas of your body leading to non lymphoma so they're characterized based on where the lymphocytes and of depositing also whether or not they're indolent or aggressive so the inland version are very slow growing. And they're not always emergency such that they don't need to be treated necessarily immediately but they need to be monitored so the decision to treat with any of the different treatments that event lined here is really up to the doctor themself. Now when it comes to aggressive versions of non hodgkin's lymphoma there's obviously more of a drive to treat and to get rid of this cancer because it's leading to significant side effects on the patient so just to give a little bit more context here the prevalence of non hodgkin's lymphoma and this is the all of them. So i'm just including all of them in this calculation it's around twenty cases per one hundred thousand adults and this is around seventy seven thousand patients in the usa per year so it's a significant patient population treatments out there. That exist are pretty numerous. Though so there's chemotherapies immune therapies targeted therapies. And then i also put radiation stem cell transplants. And then just to give a little bit of a description on the different one. So for indolent non hodgkin's lymphoma. Cdl small lymphocytic leukemia lymphoma marginal zone. Lymphoma cutaneous t. cell lymphoma so that would be on the skin now. All of these cancers have been aggressive version. So if the indolent version gets more aggressive it would turn into these types of cancers that include p tcl deal mantle cell lymphoma or burkitt lymphoma. So keep all that in mind. And i did just wanna put here. So i'm showing a chart from various corporate presentation on Talk about them but just to sort of frame What we can expect in terms of objective response rate of what we want some of the approved drugs already. They hit ours in the range of twenty to thirty percent and then the drugs that verizon was looking at they did a little bit better. But when we're looking at whether or not therapy is is good or bad. You need a reference to compare it to so depending on where they are in terms of the line of treatment. They're looking at and the mechanism of action in the side effects. If they can garner in objective response rate of twenty thirty percent in general that is seen as decent or approvable at least for the fda now it comes to price this is also pretty critical because when we're looking at understanding the total value or potential value of a company. We really have to look at the potential addressable market so drugs that have originally like longtime ago been approved for different types of non hodgkin's lymphoma reduction was one of the original ones and right now it's approved for first line non-hodgkin's lymphoma and i didn't get into the details because they do specific indications but generally a course of this treatment for four months costs around thirty nine thousand dollars so that's kind of the the floor and then there's another one here that's approved for second line or greater see. Tcl cost around twenty nine thousand per month in this zelina but then this can go all the way up to. Yes carta which is approved for third-liner deal as a gilead drug and the cost for that is three hundred seventy three thousand dollars per treatment course so there's a big range and the total addressable market for the entirety of non hodgkin's lymphoma is around three point two billion dollars. So you have to think of all of the approved therapies that are out there and if companies are going to try and get drugs on the market you know how much of that three point two billion are. They going to be able to get for their specific drug.

Hodgkin's Lymphoma American Society For Hematolog Trillium Therapeutics Parkinson's Disease Malignant Lymphocytes Cancers Lymphoma Cancers Lymphocytic Leukemia Lymphoma Pharma Cell Lymphoma Burkitt Lymphoma Anna USA Verizon FDA TCL
Michael J. Fox Details Crisis Of Optimism In New Memoir, 'No Time Like The Future'

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Michael J. Fox Details Crisis Of Optimism In New Memoir, 'No Time Like The Future'

"Michael J. Fox has a new book, no time, like the Future and Optimist, considers mortality In the book. He describes a recent fall in a paraphrase audio clip every day since the spinal chord structure in April. Everyone doctors, family members and friends have repeated this message to me over and over. You have one job don't fall you here I am. But for some reason, it's just feels personal. Make lemons and a lemonade. But I'm out of eliminate business box was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease at 29 years of age USA Radio News.

Michael J. Fox Parkinson's Disease Usa Radio News
Michael J. Fox retiring again because of health

Here & Now

11:05 min | 3 months ago

Michael J. Fox retiring again because of health

"The nineteen eighties were good to michael. J. fox the actor shot to fame with roles in the sitcom family ties and the back to the future foods at backup. Don't have enough road to get eighty eight rows row but in nineteen ninety-one age of twenty. Nine fox was diagnosed with early onset. Parkinson's disease in two thousand. He founded the michael j. fox foundation for parkinson's research organization has raised a billion dollars to find a cure through it. All fox found a way to maintain his signature optimism until twenty eighteen when his sunny disposition took a significant hit fox underwent spinal surgery. Then a serious fall that forced him to confront his mortality. He writes about that year in his new book. No time like the future which is out this week and michael. J. fox joins me now. Welcome here tell me about that fall. Well i when dealing with my thirty thirty. Th year outlook parkinson's so that that kind of had handle on been ahead. Spinal tumor had surgery on that and it took me a while to learn how to walk again. I'd barely learn what getting when i of course declared independence until they could walk on my own. And i belong in so i got up. Walk into the kitchen swift flooring shattered my arm and all the dean indignities that was for some reason cutting blow so you as you say you were dealing not only with parkinson's for many years you've just gone through this incredibly dangerous surgery to remove a tumor from your spine. Just spend a moment there for a minute. How serious was that spinal diagnosis in was pretty seriously lifting for a while for a few years. But he's been in a benign and static wasn't doing anything from the dodgers. Just watch that check on every now and then so when the last time that checked on it had grown quite considerably was actually on spinal cord itself which then made Something that Attach because they can't in any way touch her to remove some spinal for when you touch it. But johns hopkins adopted feodor. When's your with me. Discuss the risk. The risk of not doing it where i would be paralyzed by now by as we speak from when win puts me that way i realized yeah and then there you are lying on the floor in your apartment in new york city. Your arm shattered. You'd gone through all of these challenges and gotten through them for the most part right. So where do you think the darkness came from. Why did you so desperately lose that optimism that to become known for some reason it was almost instantaneous last lemon unknown lemonade Unbelie it was angry myself for taking for granted Detention in the in the care they put into my health in my in my life and you know what family Asked me to be careful. When i said don't be careful. Careful careful Carelessly walking too fast and it was two kind of full of pride of of at my might chievements to understand the risks of taking an inadequate To at risk in all the time engine Physical therapists who put me at risk and anti alexander myself I agree as said about how they push china's within a bum. Catchy raised the land myself. They get passes the nothing it was like. I started thinking with the parkinson's community i Optimism tennessee. And i kind of said it'll be okay and and really there are people that had a misery index lot higher needle. Lend me with a broken arm. Bagging car is these are people who've lost lives homes country family children woodward by bam. Who am i to tell them to be have to miss it online on the slowly a rag or i can see why you would be angry but what about scared was scared to well. Isn't that what happened. Was that came out of that. Here that come off the floor and heavily armed fiction which function in a. I would let examined all these things. Fear aging gratitude. Just all of these things came through my mind. And as i made notes on them out for no reason Lebron you're going through something with take contemporaries in alabama a. He's not that. I said let's deceased together into the story of what happened and how i lost and regained my commitment. How might new. Optimism is kind of a little more informed with a little more realistic eating. Be realistic at the same time. You reminded us for those who need to be reminded how precious thing it is to walk. And i found the way that you described your relationship with wheelchairs to be very powerful at one point in the book said that. Unless you know the person who's pushing you can be a very isolating experience in fact you compared yourself to a piece of luggage and then you went on to say that if we could ever just look at each other in the eye we would recognize our shared humanity. And i just want to thank you for that. Because actually i had never thought of that before and those are probably things. I imagine that you for granted at some stage in your life as as being and i talked about that will move momentum me my life and and how i was always moving in in my job is an actor. Energy do stunts or having physical representations of what was happening or as an athlete another good one persona in so. When i look at things i will shares do thing one to have been nail biting person. My whole life into be can't walk in the other thing about being in the chair. Is that for me personally. I'm i'm i'm someone who is easily recognizable. Everybody knows intense speed familiar with and even if they don't know me as a privilege of what i do but when you're unsure you just a piece of luggage and pushing Order hotel something. He's escaped me from point being open to get five bucks in so you just stay in you push Facing the wall can't get into the verbally again. Like you will not have Beings open as they are. They might as well. Apple's own smoke last bubbles. Is that people to be going on with him. Well let's talk about your acting career. The thing that made it so that people recognize you on the street. You've gotten roles in recent years. The didn't hide the fact that you had parkinson's symptoms but actually incorporated that into the role such as louis canning of courses. The lawyer on the tv drama. The good wife with listen to a scene there. I suffer from a condition turtle disconnect asia which is released a funny word for neurological disorder. And it makes me do this. And this i if you just look at me all of us to it so and i won't mind in the book you say that you're ready to accept the your acting career is over to an extent i i laugh in fact it's something surprisingly something to change but yeah the last couple times. I acted i actually. I haven't played warners again anyway. Resume lines difficulty for some reason. Always been some interesting. Even with. I look at her family. Ties scripted from five minutes Show and i just said they photographic memories Position where i didn't know struggling with the lines Lear capital in time in hollywood going off assessing what. What is the deal. But unlike him in that movie. Who's parading himself really angry when i found myself in that position. I said i'll gable. This isn't working so maybe we'll find some other way to do it or not. Do you also say you may be done with gulf another thing that you've loved. How is it letting these things go or acknowledging that it might be time soon to let them go. Insights about acceptance and gratitude and acceptance. Part of it is what is accepted into circuit. That is what liz i can deal with that. An investing came endeavor to change it. But if you don't accept the and be more blog that be cranny of your life Adjusted so. I accepted the fact that i assume golf club too hard. I fall down in a like boohoo. I'm falling nanosecond. Only now therefore i don't put myself in that position again fall down on but maybe one day i'll be treated in a way or find some way to get so. I don't fall down in the gulf again. I'll be grateful for it. It's just a matter. Is that come compartmentalizing really. It's taking inventory seeing where that fits in your life and the losses that have had are more than compensated for by my family my friends by the role habit in the parsis communities it change to relationships with people on the street to how much i enjoy reading how much film much writing is less to joe you live. I'm speaking with michael j. fox whose new book is called no time like the future and optimists considers mortality and michael. Similar listening to this may have just been diagnosed with parkinson's and that could be very frightening for them as you. Well know in fact you become an ambassador of sorts. For for folks with parkinson's what's your message to people who've just recently been diagnosed as i was talking to manually. Today's few was just diagnosed in like me was diagnosed. Daytona nine Items that was twenty nine years ago. So i did. I said for you. Being diagnosed a twenty nine means for sure no doubt bank on it. Better write it down. It will be here in your lifetime. And how much credit can the fox foundation take for that. I will take not moods. It'd be happy happened. We we are the largest funded research in private sector but never a mission. Our mission is we have a thing. When we first started we about how to structure foundation dissimilar brought up endowments down like e bala money said on this again and said we won't be doing that. Come to go out so we operated on then in the set aside purely motive. Where would you do it. It's your model that each is trying to get this work done as quickly as we can for people in. It's been so yeah. Optimism is is a driver knows every night. You because because there's no sense doing something again at least argue for michael j. fox thank you so much. Be well you to

Parkinson J. Fox Parkinson's Disease Fox Foundation For Parkinson's Spinal Tumor Michael J Michael FOX Dodgers Johns Hopkins Louis Canning Tumor Woodward New York City Lebron Tennessee Alabama Neurological Disorder China
How the gut protects the brain from infection

The Naked Scientists

05:10 min | 4 months ago

How the gut protects the brain from infection

"A brains sit cocooned inside a series of protective layers. They called them in injuries. And these together with a structure called the blood brain barrier keep out unwanted bugs nasties that could otherwise prove lethal forest. But how exactly the brains defense systems do. This wasn't known now. A new discovery is added an important piece to the puzzle specialized plasma cells these a blood cells that make antibodies is important potentially harmful bacteria in our intestines and then make their way up to the outer part of them in indies called the juror where they churn out antibodies and keep the brain bug free medical worthy. The thing that really got me interested in thinking about the brain is that there's increasing evidence that the immune system plays a role in a number of brain disorders so things like depression and anxiety and even the progression of neurodegenerative diseases like parkinson's disease as well as that. We know that the immune system is required to defend parts of the body from infection. So this could be important for defense against infections in the brain and in the ninja. So things like meningitis. How did you them. Pursue this to try and work out. How the brain was actually fending off infections. As with many studies in immunology we use mousers as a model and so the first thing that we did was to take meninges and look at them under the microscope and they were plasma cells in the sierra and they were not just got anywhere. They are actually lined up along. The border of large blood vessels that run through the zero. The these bug vessels are called venus. Sinuses the next question. When we find these plasma cells was empty they were producing to all surprise. We found that rather than producing igt. What's normally find in the body. They were actually producing an antibody. That's normally found gut so you've got this interesting observation an- tomic clear in the first instance of blood vessels running through. Jeez they've got cells that make antibody lining up along them. But the antibody they're making is one that you would not normally associate with the bloodstream. It's one that you would find in the testing. Yes so that was surprising. And i guess the next question was well duty cells actually originating the guts or are they influenced by the gut so to answer that we were able to use. Mice have never seen any sort of bug. They have no bacteria or any microbes in their intestine and when we looked at the dura from these animals they were no cells whatsoever but when we added bacteria back into their gut suddenly again the antibody producing cells reappeared in the era and even if we only eat put one type of bacteria into these mice a type of bacteria that couldn't go anywhere other than the gut we still saw the cells reappear in in the dearest that told us that those cells originated in the intestine. Your sort of hypothesis is the bacteria in the intestine. They educate the immune system and immune cells the intestine and what the cells then migrate from the intesting with the knowledge of how to make antibodies against those specific microbes. Up to the brain and take up residence in the meninges around the brain exactly and they specifically take up residence at the border of these d'oro venus sinuses. And i guess then the obvious question will why. Why would that happen. Why is the system being set up and the obvious answer would be. Maybe those cells there to protect The brain from microbes bacteria that originated in the gut into the bloodstream. When they're flowing through those at venus sinuses where blood flow is quite slow. It's an opportunity for the bugs to get out into the brain so to test that what we did was to remove all of the antibody producing cells and then we challenged mice with microbes into their bloodstream. And what we found was the bugs were able to get a cross into the brain as so it told us that really. We found a whole new defense system for the brain. What are you going to do next. We're interested in the signals. That might take the plasma cells from the gut to them. And jeez and then the other thing. I'm really interested in is whether this has implications for how we try and protect people from meningitis at the moment. If we vaccinated against meningitis we give that vaccine into the muscle but our study would suggest that actually if you want to make cells to defend the brain the route that you should give that vaccine is actually via the gut and so that's something that we look into the bodies a clever all thing. Isn't it minute klatt worthy there. She's basically comes university. Study describing that work has just come out in the journal nature.

Parkinson's Disease Meningitis Indies Anxiety Depression Klatt Nature
Bayer to Buy Gene-Therapy Firm AskBio for Up to $4 Billion

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Bayer to Buy Gene-Therapy Firm AskBio for Up to $4 Billion

"Bayer is buying a North Carolina company that's developing gene therapies for Parkinson's disease and congestive heart failure. The German chemicals giant agreed to acquire ask bio for as much as four billion Mayor expects to close the deal later this year and said Ask Bio will continue to operate as an independent

Parkinson's Disease BIO Bayer North Carolina
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

08:17 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"So things can be very physically challenging to learn skateboarding or Tai Chi or yoga and Parkinson's disease. The bottom line is there gate isn't normal. The balanced is not normal. We're starting all over again. So this is not normal walking right in this is not normal. Dynamic balance, they have impairments in that. So we can start at that level where we're concentrating on getting the balanced better, the walking stride better the posture, all those things are recall more normal automatic gate that's practiced them to get good into make it harder and that was that as the disease progresses, those things are are dysfunctional or you're saying even from the beginning, right we're already working on it and making it harder can make it harder yet. I mean, we can make you know have you be more accurate with it? Make you go through an obstacle so we can make it harder yet to get us even better for balance an example now what I was saying is. In terms diagnose like does their balance like for example, if they were just diagnosed. You know is there are they going to be having problems with their balance as the disease progressive? Disease Progress in general but gate is very common. I mean not normal gait. So they'll have slowness in the gate, for example, and by gate mocking exactly. Yeah. So I mean we tend to target, and that's why you see many excise programs really target gait and balance because many times. So people definitely can have slowed us in their hand and stiffness trunk. Let targeted gain a balance is huge because that's really ultimately probably where the biggest deficits are and many times in targeting balance you really engaging different parts of the body as well. Arm Swing and he sorts of things. So it's a good place to start if you will now, obviously you can add more with things in your arms boxing example that we can add more and make it more complicated. Tasks and if people that are doing this rock steady boxing, it's called the non contact or they just like doing like a bag or is it like is? Yeah. So I have to tell you have never gone to rock steady boxing class, but the idea would be that, yeah they're learning different types of patterns of movements, for example, so it may not just be pure moving the arm, but it may be a pattern that they have to replicate, for example so that would make. That you're exactly right and I don't think anybody thinks that one one type of necessarily negates the other the there's no you know. No one thinks one is necessarily better. They're just different I'm saying and I think fundamentally the reason we care as we think that the mechanisms which underlie they may be different and that's why I think. We're doing. We're very interested in that idea and some of the work that a colleague. Dr Whole Snyder. Shown is certainly an animal models that we've been doing a looking trying to separate out or tease apart. These different mechanisms were one group of rodents with Parkinson's have gone through a type of exercise practice more skillful meaning they're on a motorized wheel with spokes removed animals definitely need to pay more attention versus a group of Annals Parkinson where there aren't spokeswoman. So it's nice and smooth. They don't have to think as much about what they're doing say match for speed the animals that have the spokes moved have blood flow in top down circuit cognitive domains much more. So than animals that don't. So kind of the proof of concept that okay of exercises just excises exercise we shouldn't be seeing differences in blood flow to different circuits. Wow, right. Yeah Right. They were doing the same intensity. Yeah right and so again, why do we care I think the biggest thing honestly is that it's just beginning to say, Hey, guess what the rain is not passive this is not a passive effective excise brain is engaged very much in this repaired of mechanism and is driving this effect. So it's not just take blood and dump it onto the brain. No the brain is an important signal of this effect, and that's huge to think about I also think to some degree you know. Maybe. This is like the. With the animals like there wasn't like a dose that you haven't you know maybe a response would be an interesting to do as well in terms of intensity because I know from experience when I. Go really hard when I'm pushing my intensity to something like eighty to eighty, five percent of my maximum rate, and by the way, people usually aren't measuring their heart rate like. I have like my my my watch and stuff and all that. But for people that aren't measuring the heart rate, would you say good gauge is sweat getting flushing face I? Mean this is my your dog. That's right. That's right. You've got to like out of comfort zone. Yeah. Japan's yes. I have to think about what undoing a lot more like even though. In class right and it's like if I'm pushing it to my like eighty percent Max zone. Yeah I am more calling to engage. Yes. Absolutely for us when I am doing. Fifty percent why? No? You're right. They're speed I mean. That's true. So there's a speed component, right where so as you get faster, you are dinky I see a lot more and you are starting to you're right now. And I think the point you bring up which I think is so important is it's a spectrum isn't so it's not really often just one of the other right. There's some that have certain types of activities that are going to have a higher BEC- content maybe than skill but as I've often been reminded by many my physical therapists call it colleagues. It's like it's actually also kind of impossible not to have some level of skill. In anything you do I mean it's hard to be completely mindless whatever you're doing. Even I mean I see weight lifting even the weightlifting is required to fight loading. You don't want to get right exactly. Not just like throwing weights around. So yeah. So the idea is that there's always some element skill even in biking even stitcher by thinking about the speed, it's kind of the issue degree also again, the intensity and the two probably. Obviously I'm different types of mechanisms that may be contributing to repair, but the ideas they may be different, and particularly when we're thinking about coggin circuitry as an example, we may want to be thinking about how we could add more Kaga bloating great and was curious about the sort of idea of cognitive loading. You know many times when I talked to people about cotton looting, the first thing they wanted to do is tell me about a. A A. Like across puzzle they've done and I'm going wait a minute. A. Our brain has evolved to be pretty effective and movement through space. I mean it's it's pretty you know. Pretty on board when it tries to figure out how to GET POINT A to point B I mean it's important in our volition. It's probably why we've still living today because we've been able to animals at harm us, we've been able to be successfully going for meals. I mean the idea of luminance space is huge for us and that the point there is at that's cognitive loading myself just problem solving movement through space whether that be because of the skill that I'm engaging or even a different environment, right? So the idea of mixing that up. Changing the environment is going to be another type of load. There's been animal studies that have shown that during that exact thing like like changing the environment and I particularly putting's an animal and more enriched environment they increases. Sanath connection live. Right, absolutely, and it was interesting about that field though is even in the context of Richmond many times. It's also what else is in there like the wheel I mean, there's always a physical component find is also important so I think it kind of just. kind of goes back to the idea that. Move into space is a big deal for brain. itself is a cognitive load. We can definitely ramp that up in a lot of different ways certainly from a skill point of view we can from an environmental or richmond making it. A novel environment for us moving effectively through space is also an a new space in a novel virus is also pretty big. I know there's a lot of interest nail looking at natural spaces and what that does for cognition as well, and there's some really interesting things coming out of that. Again kind of tying it back into movement though is really where it gets really interesting. Yeah. Right I mean certainly. So in addition to. All the benefits that exercise I mean there's been studies showing that you know in in Parkinson's disease patients Parkinson's disease patients that do you know a certain amount of you know thirty minutes exercise monitoring moderate to too high intense?.

Annals Parkinson skateboarding boxing Richmond Dr Whole Snyder biking bloating Japan
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

07:52 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"To all the injury side. So exits offices model to understand all the repetitive magazines, all the resilience mechanisms that we believe at the end of the day or playing out a circuit level. Does that make so basically? What you're saying is that way and the exercise is. Activating all these resilient pathways, it's activating pathways that are involved in maintaining connections between neurons, making them stronger and repairing damage in. A variety of growth factors that are important for these signaling and and so that. So because the I mean, the exercise in his senses is a type of stress on the body we actually evolved doing we before we were in our industrialized societies where we sit in our office and cubicles we were out, you know hunting gathering getting our food and moving a lot right removing were meant to do that but it is a type of stress that activates all these resilient pathways and so in the face of another type of stress whether that's Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease or just the stress of aging. You're you're going to be more resilient to that stress you're going to deal with this better. You're going to have more of this brain drive neurotrophic factor that helps damaged neurons than you what you know. So so even though you're not gonNa take away that challenge, the challenge will be there I. Mean we're all aging right You're just going to do it better because I do have more of these. Resilient pathways are being activated, right? That's right and so in a way, it's sort of a continuum then. So then you don't think of it as before the Z's during the Z's right, it's just always there and so you kind of moving forward through an aging process with all these other risk factors happening that are causing some have without a doubt, some injury at some level, and so I mean the importance of US understanding excise a model is a model of or the mechanism. It's really trying to understand better what the brain is capable intrinsic repair mechanisms. What are we really ebeling there? You know what? What's the counterbalanced injury that we're able to tap into that allows us to compensate at a significant level and again, Parkinson's remember I mean think about that model self there's a threshold there I've lost. Forty percent of cells before I got I'm sure function parent, right. So that's important because it gives us an idea that the brain may be able to tolerate some level of injury if you will and through optimization. which we still believe has to happen at a snap Dick Level behavior is synoptic. So to get function improvement behavior, you need something at a certain level. So it's more than just sells that's the other important thing. Yeah. That's cute. Understanding those repair mechanisms and so I think people in the exercise field you know obviously, we're thrilled that we can be able to understand this better to enable people to do more things and to be more involved in care and these sorts of things I think other bigger issues or kind of the field of repaired of mechanisms and self. It's sort of like. Thinking about science spaces a final frontier, but there's so much. We don't understand about how the brain is able to drive repair mechanisms. What's the limit of that? Which is very interesting. Yeah. Absolutely. I think that. Not only we're talking about exercising in general term, but the specific types of exercise right and how they're how they're. Maybe Y- differentially improving there's different repair mechanisms happening doing high intensity intervals grant. Says Resistance Training I sixty S or seventy percent max heart rate might or you know treadmill walking in coordination so there's all different absolutely absolutely and I, think I think. There's an issue that different types of excise and also kind of getting into that discussion. Sort of underlying that is is obviously the mechanism question, right? So are they doing something differential right and and I think the reason we care about things like that is because I think one of the whole early concepts of exercise in general has been really more about bodies effect on the. Brain. As. The brain is a past recipient of all these sorts of benefit somehow. I think when we're teasing apart these different types of excise, I think one of the questions that come up is. We care about these different types of excise because we do believe. That there are. Certain circumstances where the brain may play a more active role meaning it's driving some circuit specific effect and what I mean by that is this whole idea. For example, if I'm more engaged in what I'm doing if I'm more top down cog nvolved in in my process of movement through space and learning something that may be activating certain circuits right and that activation of circuitry by virtue of using it harder may itself drive some of these benefits example that type of physical activity right. So for example, let's say something that would be more skillful, right so we're I'm actually having to get better at it. It's actually quite challenging for example. California surfing as an example where I'm not only considering. How I- balancing on the board but in watching the Wade's I'm thinking about my speed getting up on the board, my weight distribution. So there's a lot of different things I'm thinking about as I'm trying to get better on that I fall off and do it again and and getting through a lot of different practices. So it's a lot of practice repetition learning feedback. where I'm really thinking hard about what I'm doing so that as a skill versus for example, a stationary bike right where I'm just moving. Just moving my legs trying to get up to certain speed but maybe not having to think about balances much these sorts of things what would be an example for someone for example, that has Parkinson's disease they probably aren't going to be out surfing. So, an example, another Tai Chi or yoga as an example, right in boxing as an example, non contact. So but also even a physical, you know many of physical therapists will they'll do as an example is just even gate imbalanced practice harder anytime you're making something harder more challenging whether it's to balance whether it's two way changed the dynamic balance working. Carter with dynamic balance speed. You're you know you get the speed up you have to make them more accurate all those sorts of things it's going to make it harder for you. So the idea would be getting out of your comfort zone problem solving how to get more accurate, how to get that speed up how to become more dynamic on that task. And as I said that can be done even in with physical therapists working on gate imbalance, right? That itself is going to be more skilful over the skillful exercise that you're describing. It seems really independent of. Talking about something else which would be the intensity of your exercise vigorousness like how like that's another yeah. What you're talking about specifically has to do I mean you're obviously getting physical. You're you're getting some physical activity, but it's a very specific type of activity where you're you're you're focusing on something you're getting that feedback of learning, right? You're you're basically engaging a lot more just like right and I think fundamentally you sort of getting it the the to kind of. To kind of discussions that are going on with exercise actually, there's other discussions with. And those sorts of things but I think fundamentally some of the questions that are coming up intensity in context of learning. So one is learning more about motor learning right? Which is definitely requires lots of practice in challenge to get good right like ton. It says an example, right? In the other type and intensity was the heart rate getting your heart rate up feeling your heart, pounding your chests and sweating. That's also intent. So they're both they can both be very intense, but for different reasons, right. So one more from the aspect of learning and practice and problem solving to get better at something from a physical point of view..

Parkinson Alzheimer's disease US boxing California Wade Carter
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

08:42 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Don't mean as actually Porton floor. Facilitating. Synoptic city there, and there's a couple of forms that are developing. In that stratum. Ltd is the predominant form that's thought to be occurring in stratum particular motor control The issue though is that fundamentalists practice. So practice with dopamine as an enabler so don't. Robbing you losing functional and physical connections and we see that we know that that's happening. So the behavioral issue is probably that the circuit itself. Now, the reason we care is because there are other circuits evolved in motor movement movement through space, and one of those things is a frontal straddle circuit as an example and kind of keep that simple because there's other circuits in interacting with the prefrontal frontal system but the idea behind the frontal straddle is sort of volition movement. So my my ability to kind of update movements my ability to move into new spaces in actually my ability. To learn new movements so That's sort of what we call a bullish aspect of movement. So have the automatic movement you had the act ex movement, they're happening together all the time right and so if I'm losing my authenticity, if I'm losing that circuit hard because of doping depletion, I can compensate I can absolute concept by by kind of adapting towards a more volition type of movement and. If you ask Patiala Parkinson's they, they all do that. They'll tell you I have to think more bump and so the reason that's also interesting because at same circuit, many of those same circus had sort of a dull sort of dual behavior has a cognitive behavioral aspect of it of of what we called executive function, which is planning processing although sorts of things that. You're also kind of doing day to day. So there's sort of saturation effect capping here. I'm now depended on it more and I'm also using it to plan my day. So is that sort of the tipping point right there I've saturated and now that I can't do it anymore now that I'm I can take much for me to fall because now I'm using. It already also winters or firing, and now I have know now I have to hold plates and walk to the kitchen or something like that kind of supersaturated that frontal system and non falling right. So so that's why this whole idea of compensation threatful if we bring it up to the circuit level that may also begin to explain this that makes sense and finally. On the back end the idea of the world of cerebellar. Film also plays A. Role for motor control for motor. Planning. For a cognitive aspect to it as well, and the idea here is There's a lot of good data that shows for example in Parkinson's models that when we have it, just the beginning aspects of learning excise. That's our Bellum is on fire it's lit up like light bill. So we have to other circuits that are trying to put adapt, and so these are kind of principles, but we're going to talk about in just a bit but the whole idea of what? Is the fundamental aspects of brain change in homies stasis, which is reaching a new level balance or or. homeostasis stasis so that brain can function if you will. And what's interesting? Is that you begin to see like those are all sort of contributing to the Parkinson's and features right. So the dopamine depletion with the loss of ultimate tizzy, and then these other competitors circuits is that good or not good is I contributed some symptoms or not contributing to some symptoms so changes bring changes that happened the brain because of injury or in this case, dopamine depletion leads to lot of adaptation, some of which is good in terms of behavior and some of them not desirable. So it has kind of an interesting concept for the point of view that it may be kind of for some of these compensatory strategies that may be alive for some threshold at the same time, it may be causing some problems down the road, right? Yeah. Definitely. You're kind of touching on the things that that Seem to be to be important with with exercise and practicing. Certain types of gold, base. Expenses but I kinda wanted to ask you a little bit about before we get into that just you know. How many how many people I mean worldwide in the US have Parkinson's disease and maybe some of the the the environmental versus genetic causes of Parkinson's disease or what we know what the field knows. Right. So I mean I think in general. So the ideas that one hundred over the age of fifty have Parkinson's these and Don't know the exact. It's the second leading second-leading. Yeah. Definitely. The second right behind Alzheimer's and I think in terms of genetics genetic. So in general, we think that. Genetics play. Certainly the genetic risk factors, but in terms of strong genetic contributions. Most that data seems to be young onset by young women younger than thirty five, for example, not as common over the age of thirty five although now certainly recognizing that there are these risk factors like lark to, for example, where there may be running in certain ethnic groups. That where there may be some. Predisposition right to twos genetic mutation but the still in general I, think the ideas that most of these genetic predispositions are happening in younger onset people and that in the older in again older being anybody over the age of thirty five says an example or over the of forty at least that there's probably a mix between as environmental genetic factors and we've heard that again. By some work by a number of very. Important Best Gators who've been able to show us. That epidemiologic data, which is the idea that there has been some higher risk and in rural settings and in urban settings the idea that environment does seem to play a role. and. So in general, we would say still in Parkinson's these that it is sort of There's a number of different risk factors maybe genetic as we get older those genetic influencers. May Have some specific role in certain certain populations in general but that we would say that it's environment overs factors and maybe even things that play a role in genetics. that. How that are related to metabolism how we metabolize, for example, if decides right and and also the other genetic aspect of it is still questions related to plus this itself repair mechanisms is another example. So you can see that it gets complex pretty fast in terms of what genetic factors may be in what environmental factors may be and I think. I guess the point is people are beginning to recognize the Parkinson's may be kind of a common final pathway of a number of mechanisms which kind of makes it challenging away because it is late, every single one of those targets can be can be hard because it may not be one single doctor sample likely. Yeah. I was talking to you before we started rolling that basically the field seemed to really advanced back in the nineteen eighties s when you know this this precursor to our neuro talks and empty was found to basically 'cause Parkinson's symptoms and people I guess chemists. Synthesizing. It or even think IV drug use. It was actually the jugaris chemists seem to not get the problem drug users right? Exactly and the basically this This. This neuro toxin essentially inhibits mitochondrial function. Across the blood brain barrier. Affect, all sorts of you know. Bring regions and dopamine neurons. the thing that was very disturbing was the similarities between some of these insecticides and herbicides rotenone. Essentially have the same mechanism of action. Can cross the blood brain barrier right absolutely and are used as. Animal. Exactly, they're very effective. Aren't they? Yeah. I think the thing about that that you know obviously that the final of the. In the nineteen eighties so to clarify essentially what happened was. In the nineteen eighties, there was A. Outbreak, if you will of Parkinson's and what was so unusual about it is that these these particular individuals and there about eight individuals let's say that presented around the bay area and various emergency rooms had essentially developed Parkinson's futures overnight and nothing like that ever been seen, and there was sort of some really interesting investigative work that had been done to try to. Identify, what was the commonality between all these individuals and what they failed right off the bat was there had they had been heroin users and that they had gotten some access to some synthesized heroin essentially that had been tainted with this pro toxin. If you will be sort of pro toxin, it gets delivered to the brain and there it gets converted to MPP plus..

Patiala Parkinson Parkinson dopamine Parkinson's disease heroin US executive Alzheimer mechanism of action genetics.
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:16 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, , where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. . Excellent. . So Can you talk a little bit about? ? What Parkinson's diseases <hes> maybe just from from a basic standpoint. . Absolutely. . So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. . It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. . So we consider it a disorder of aging. . and. . Generally speaking, , we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. . In fact, , clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. . And or stiffness. . So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. . then. . Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. . So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and <hes> certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. . So generally speaking, , it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. . So walking an example, , but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, , they feel that things are taking longer to do. . And sometimes, , that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. . So as I mentioned, , Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. . What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. . Now again, , some of these other features are not specific. . So none of these are specific. . Kind of evaluating everything together. . But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. . Other non motor. . So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. . Could be mood, , for example, , society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, , two years, , and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. . Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. . So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized <hes> other things that are nominated that again, , me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. . The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves <hes> or innovate smooth muscles. . So this is things like your gut. . Your heart. . Your sweat. . Glands. . And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, , it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. . So constipation again, , in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. . Changes in the innovation to the heart. . These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, , Oh yeah before that, there , were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. . So the point is, , is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and <hes>. . We're appreciating that more and it finally. . I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even , more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, , cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, , the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. . Now, , that's not the same thing as dementia. . So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. . They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well <hes>. . So these things again haven't quite there's some understanding of why this may be happening <hes>, , but they're certainly part of park disease. . And also the idea that they are very much interrelated. So. . . Motor and cognition probably had some relationship to in terms of the idea that cognitive issues can sometimes contribute to more motor problems or cognitive issues can get you more mood related issues. . So they're they're not really separated. . They're very much interrelated and we'll begin understand how and why that may be happening either from a chemical point of view from circuit point of view

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine degenerative disease Disease University of Southern Califor Dr Pet Elba Dr Pet Singer skateboarding Yoga
Dr. Giselle Petzinger on Exercise for Parkinson's Disease

FoundMyFitness

05:16 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Giselle Petzinger on Exercise for Parkinson's Disease

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. Excellent. So Can you talk a little bit about? What Parkinson's diseases maybe just from from a basic standpoint. Absolutely. So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. So we consider it a disorder of aging. and. Generally speaking, we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. In fact, clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. And or stiffness. So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. then. Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. So generally speaking, it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. So walking an example, but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, they feel that things are taking longer to do. And sometimes, that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. So as I mentioned, Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. Now again, some of these other features are not specific. So none of these are specific. Kind of evaluating everything together. But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. Other non motor. So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. Could be mood, for example, society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, two years, and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized other things that are nominated that again, me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves or innovate smooth muscles. So this is things like your gut. Your heart. Your sweat. Glands. And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. So constipation again, in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. Changes in the innovation to the heart. These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, Oh yeah before that, there were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. So the point is, is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and We're appreciating that more and it finally. I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. Now, that's not the same thing as dementia. So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well So these things again haven't quite there's some understanding of why this may be happening but they're certainly part of park disease. And also the idea that they are very much interrelated. So. Motor and cognition probably had some relationship to in terms of the idea that cognitive issues can sometimes contribute to more motor problems or cognitive issues can get you more mood related issues. So they're they're not really separated. They're very much interrelated and we'll begin understand how and why that may be happening either from a chemical point of view from circuit point of view

Parkinson's Disease Parkinson Dr Sell Progressive Degenerative Disor Tremor University Of Southern Califor Constipation SAL Depression Dementia ADL
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:42 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, , where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. . Excellent. . So Can you talk a little bit about? ? What Parkinson's diseases <hes> maybe just from from a basic standpoint. . Absolutely. . So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. . It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. . So we consider it a disorder of aging. . and. . Generally speaking, , we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. . In fact, , clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. . And or stiffness. . So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. . then. . Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. . So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and <hes> certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. . So generally speaking, , it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. . So walking an example, , but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, , they feel that things are taking longer to do. . And sometimes, , that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. . So as I mentioned, , Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. . What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. . Now again, , some of these other features are not specific. . So none of these are specific. . Kind of evaluating everything together. . But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. . Other non motor. . So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. . Could be mood, , for example, , society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, , two years, , and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. . Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. . So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized <hes> other things that are nominated that again, , me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. . The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves <hes> or innovate smooth muscles. . So this is things like your gut. . Your heart. . Your sweat. . Glands. . And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, , it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. . So constipation again, , in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. . Changes in the innovation to the heart. . These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, , Oh yeah before that, there , were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. . So the point is, , is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and <hes>. . We're appreciating that more and it finally. . I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even , more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, , cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, , the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. . Now, , that's not the same thing as dementia. . So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. . They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine degenerative disease Disease University of Southern Califor Dr Pet Elba Dr Pet Singer skateboarding Yoga
Dr. Giselle Petzinger on Exercise for Parkinson's Disease

FoundMyFitness

04:42 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Giselle Petzinger on Exercise for Parkinson's Disease

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. Excellent. So Can you talk a little bit about? What Parkinson's diseases maybe just from from a basic standpoint. Absolutely. So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. So we consider it a disorder of aging. and. Generally speaking, we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. In fact, clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. And or stiffness. So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. then. Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. So generally speaking, it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. So walking an example, but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, they feel that things are taking longer to do. And sometimes, that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. So as I mentioned, Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. Now again, some of these other features are not specific. So none of these are specific. Kind of evaluating everything together. But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. Other non motor. So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. Could be mood, for example, society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, two years, and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized other things that are nominated that again, me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves or innovate smooth muscles. So this is things like your gut. Your heart. Your sweat. Glands. And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. So constipation again, in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. Changes in the innovation to the heart. These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, Oh yeah before that, there were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. So the point is, is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and We're appreciating that more and it finally. I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. Now, that's not the same thing as dementia. So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well

Parkinson University Of Southern Califor Dr Sell ADL SAL
"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:48 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"The care of patients with Parkinson's disease she divides her time between clinical care of patients in laboratory research at the University of Southern California. One of the areas of research. I'm particularly interested in is the role of exercise in slowing the progression of Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's disease is progressive nerve degenerative disease with no cure. It's caused by the death of dopamine producing neurons in a region of the brain called the substantial Negro, an area of the brain involved in movement. Genetic. Mutations and exposure to certain pesticides are risk factors for Parkinson's because they inhibit complex one of the electron transport chain in the Mitochondria, setting up an energy crisis leading to the death of dopamine producing cells. No therapy can slow or halt Parkinson's disease progression, dopamine replacement drugs such as Elba, provide some symptom relief. But as the disease advances more frequent dosing is needed and debilitating side effects often develop. and. This is where exercise comes in mounting evidence suggests that people who exercise are less likely to get Parkinson's disease. Later in life and discuss in this episode, exercise can benefit those already diagnosed with the disease. The functional symptoms of Parkinson's don't manifest until about half of the dopamine producing neurons are lost using imaging studies. Scientists can detect changes in dopamine receptor density in the brains of living patients allowing them to assess the effects of exercise base interventions. For example, one study showed that eight weeks of intensive treadmill training increase dopamine receptor expression by eighty to ninety percent. These changes in dopamine receptor expression are clinically meaningful and correlate with improved posture control. The take home from these imaging studies is that the right intervention can be profoundly helpful in Parkinson's disease. Other clinical trial show that moderate to high intensity exercise increases neurotrophic factors such as brain drive neurotrophic factor improves gait and balance and may even slow the disease progression. In one trial, high intensity exercisers experienced no disease progression over six months while non exercisers got fifteen percent worse this is remarkable because not drug or treatment has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease delaying. This neuro degenerative disease progression can profoundly improve a person's quality of life. What I hope that most of you will take home from this conversation today is that even devastating diagnoses like Parkinson's disease have the potential for very different trajectories at least partly affected by the lifestyle choices, we make each day. In today's episode Dr Pet Singer and I discuss what Parkinson's disease is what causes it and how common it is and the population. How a tragic event in the nineteen eighties involving IV drug users propelled the field forward illustrated to scientists that environmental factors such as pesticides could cause Parkinson's disease. How genetic mutations and pesticides can disrupt a condo complex one leading to the death of dopamine producing neurons in the brain. How the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear only when fifty percent of dopamine secreting neurons in this substantial Negro lost. How other circuits in the brain can compensate for the loss of function of this substantial Niigara how observational data suggested exercise can lower the risk of Parkinson's disease how animal research indicates that different brain circuits are stimulated by different types of exercise how skill based activities such as Yoga, Tai Chi boxing tango, or skateboarding may play a special role in ameliorating some of the effects of the disease how intensive exercise training increases serum brain drive neurotrophic factor levels in patients after one month and how this affects cognition. How vigorous exercise improves motor scores and slows disease progression. How exercise increases dopamine receptors in the brain to Parkinson's disease, allowing them to better use their remaining dopamine. How in both rodent and non human primate models the Omega three fatty acid Dha decreases love Adoga induced disconnect a long lasting negative side effect that occurs in many patients. How people with Parkinson's disease have higher circulating levels of pro inflammatory cytokines which might contribute to the disease and we discussed how diet may play a role. Dr Pet. Singers bottom line on frequency dosing type of exercise that is therapeutically beneficial in Parkinson's disease and so much more..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine degenerative disease Disease University of Southern Califor Dr Pet Elba Dr Pet Singer skateboarding Yoga
Working Smarter Not Harder

Secular Buddhism

05:56 min | 5 months ago

Working Smarter Not Harder

"In this podcast episode, I wanted to share some of my thoughts regarding the topic of effort. So in Buddhism we follow what's called the eightfold path. These are eight specific. That you focus on to live a more mindful life and the eight areas are right understanding right intent, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration and I've talked about these general I've talked about the eightfold path in general in the podcast before I mentioned it of course in my book. And I wanted to discuss some thoughts that I have regarding one specific aspect which is effort. So if you visualize real quick, the symbol of Buddhism is a wheel with spokes and these eight spokes represent these specific areas, these eight areas, and some people have divided these into three general groups, the group of pertaining to wisdom, which would be understanding and intent. The group related to ethical conduct, which would be speech action livelihood. Then, the group pertaining to mental discipline, which would be effort, mindfulness and concentration. And again I've mentioned this before but I've never taken the time to share thoughts regarding one specific spoke of the of the wheel and today wanted to do that with with regards to effort. Now, anytime, you encounter the eightfold path, you'll you'll typically hear it described as right this and right that right understanding right intent and so on. I've mentioned before that I prefer the term skillful because of skillful means being such a prevalent concept in. Buddhism. It's not right versus wrong. It's more of skillful versus unskillful. So I would like to talk about effort in terms of skillful effort versus unskillful effort. and. This kind of conjures up the expression that I'm sure you've heard which is that we can work smarter not harder and. I this is the first time. I've kind of correlated all of this in terms of Buddhist practice, and that's because over the past few weeks. I've been busy doing a lot of flying I had an eight day workshop where I was teaching for new pilots how to fly. Followed by an eight day, fly in, which is a gathering and you have vendors there and they're showcasing their equipment, and then all of the attendees were spending Oliver Time doing as much flying as possible just for the fun of flying. So it's a really fun event but I've been gone from my family and from my home for the past two weeks on the road doing all this work, and for during the first week working with four new students, I had this thought of skillful effort because of an experience that I had. So I had four new students and one student really stood out to me he joined the class. Several months ago he signed up for training and he expressed his concern I due to his age sixty seven years old and as you start reaching, I would say your mid sixties You know it's common for some people to lose a little bit of their strength. But to complicate things further for him, he he has Parkinson's disease. So he was a little bit worried about how those complications would factor into doing all this physical effort that it takes to learn to fly a pair motor, and for those of you who don't know the process of learning to fly. One of these entails strapping a motor to your back. That's usually sixty to seventy pounds and then running with that and and running to the point where you're going fast enough to take off, we don't have. Wheels in in powered paragliding at least not in the foot lunch powered paragliding, which is what I do. Our we are wheels are our feet. So you have to be able to run up to a certain speed to be able to take off just like an airplane has to get up to a certain amount of speed before it lifts off the ground, it's the same for us, but we don't have wheels. So has to be our feet. And student was a little bit concerned as as was I. I told him if if you're determined to learn, we'll spend all the time that it takes. If it goes beyond the eight days of a takes weeks or months, I will continue to spend that time with you and teach you as long as you put in, you know the the effort that it's GonNa take to do it, and that was kind of how we left things and then the day came for training to start. He was little nervous I was certainly a little nervous. And he did remarkably well and this is where I started to see and experience first hand what skillful effort looks like he knew himself so well. He knew at what time heating to take his medication he knew how long it would take before the meditate medication started to kick in. He knew when the window was opened for him to go out and start practicing and doing all the effort and the work it was going to take to learn and perhaps more importantly, he knew when that window was closing and he would be the first to shut it down and say, okay, I'm done I can't keep practicing because he knew that as the medication wore off and his Parkinson's kicked in stronger. Those were not skilful times to continue practicing and continue trying to push himself. And as I observed this over the course of several days. I was pleasantly surprised to see how quickly he was learning because of the effort he was putting in and it wasn't. It wasn't that he was trying really hard as he was trying in a very smart way he knew when to be trying and when not to be trying.

Parkinson Oliver
Atlanta WSB employee dies of Parkinson's

Sterling on Sundays

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Atlanta WSB employee dies of Parkinson's

"A WSB employee for more than 50 years, who became known for his running coverage of the Casey Pete's Tree Road race, died this morning. Former WSB TV news anchor Monica Pearson. When I first came to WSB in 1975, it was Donnie Mac who literally taught me the pronunciation so that people would know I was a newcomer. You don't say, Paul say daily on its pots. The Leon He was great for that. McClellan died from a year's battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 88 WSB news

WSB Monica Pearson Casey Pete Donnie Mac Parkinson Mcclellan Paul
Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

podnews

02:56 min | 5 months ago

Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

"Time everyone I'm Bernie Brown, and welcome to my new daily podcast on spotify spotify car cost has announced a new partnership with Brennan Brown. Current show unlocking also become a spotify exclusive from January to lead is another exclusive which launches next month. She's also collaborated on a yacht rock playlist. If you like Christopher Cross and Toto Africa that you'll love your brock NPR has released the NPR podcast reports containing data and case studies about the broadcasters PODCASTS podcast uses up twenty percent year on year downloads up twenty six percent can podcast from NPR public radio account for thirty two percent of time spent listening to podcast us. spotify testing listener polls. The features live on spot exclusive shows like the re watchable 's like video and sharing cards. It's another proprietary feature for spotify shows only had him. Curry's no agenda disappeared from spotify earlier this week I never submitted our feet Adam says last I checked it was not associated with my email or my account. After leaving spotify September nineteenth after to our rent on his show earlier, Joe Biden has announced the Joe but a network, the first non button show will be see the thing is hosted by Bridget Kelly. Mandy be Livia dope quote not what they'll say because I'm staying out a women's business lull says button. spotify has also launched your daily in the UK content in there from the time talksport in the evening standard, the BBC global and Bauer taking part later today the rain Digital Canada Twenty twenty summit is taking place. The event is online and free our editor James. Credentials. Moderating the opening session. Hey, that's me. It's at rain digital candidate twenty, twenty dot com if you want to go. The Australian podcast cost awards is giving you extra time to anti. You've now got until midday on. Monday. Blueberry has a fancy new website design, which is nice John. McTaggart's the president's and see of APM, is to step down. The company has been criticised recently for race and gender issues for target claims. His decision to step down is unrelated Pierre Remix of PODCAST radio station in the US is celebrating ten years on Air who knew during that time it said one thousand and eighteen audio creators. The first producer was Roman Mars and podcast movement virtual has announced Mark Cuban as a keynote speaker in conversation with the newsworthy is Erica Mandy. And Infocom News, the former host and producer of the ABC's in this podcast. Australia is now making at home with Brie away for kids across the country to connect. When life gives you. Parkinson's is back for a third season Larry gifts to his diagnosed three years ago hosts the show the season includes the collision of Covid nineteen and Parkinson's disease

Spotify Erica Mandy Christopher Cross Digital Canada Twenty Twenty NPR Brennan Brown Bernie Brown Joe Biden Brock Npr Parkinson Bridget Kelly United States Host And Producer Australia Toto Africa Curry Covid ABC Brie
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:57 min | 6 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"May Patience or may actually have more as well that that lobbyists and other forms of Ford's great. Thanks. Kevin three Shia here. Here's a question about a different type of exposure can high levels of stress affect the neurodegenerative process I think I don't know that we have good measures of stress in our research. So we don't have a lot of evidence that it can pause Parkinson's disease or is associated with it. I understand where the questions coming from though because. We do have evidence that stress can up regulate cortisol all other chemicals that are good in the acute flight phase, but can be toxic to and stressful to the arteries of the heart and the brain lead to cardiovascular and stroke risk. So why not you know Parkinson's because Parkinson's also involved inflammation and dopamine cells are highly vascular system. So I don't think we have the evidence. So theoretically. It's possible. I think the other navy aspect of that question. Is that. I and Theresa can. chiming if she wants to agree or disagree but I think it's not uncommon for neurologists who see Parkinson's patients to? Have Them, say what my? Symptoms began after my spouse died right after my spouse died or after major surgery or some other major life stressor. and. I stress can bring out the symptoms It doesn't necessarily cause disease, but it can bring out the symptoms perhaps earlier than they would've otherwise expressed themselves. I agree that I definitely observe that in my clinic that some external stressor can bring on the initial symptoms of Parkinson's, but we know as scriptures and physicians that the actual disease process of Parkinson's disease probably starts at least a decade or longer before the initial symptoms of Parkinson's disease manifest right? Good Point Maybe I'll ask both of you through shunned ten this next question. Why is it difficult to infer causation from observations about exposures and risks I think it's very important because. He we have to match the reason that we use animal studies as well as Pity me logic studies because epidemiologic studies don't give us causation. It just shows you know higher exposures are associated with Parkinson's disease but in order for us to fully understand the link of causation and understand, a treatment plan and also carry it to the next step, which is prohibiting the compound we need to establish that causal. So correlation does not suggest causation as a very common ten in of research I guess one way of looking at it as if for example, you know a pesticide is associated with. Disease well, maybe the particular vegetable, the patient is using There's pesticide on that's actually the cost not the pesticide..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease Disease Ford Kevin cortisol dopamine Theresa can.
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"So I think there are a lot of potential chemicals that can increase your risk of Parkinson's disease or cause Parkinson's disease. And I think we're sort of at the tip of the iceberg know filing these right now. Yeah. Now I absolutely agree with him that it's both the human epidemiologic studies and then the studies in the lab using either in vitro or in Vivo. Test to versus actual brain tissue to see if we can reproduce animal model of the toxin causing Parkinson's disease Both of those collectively can confirm the association or not You know there is certainly a limitation Oklahoma I was gonna say I think another potential outcome of this kind of research is that if you can identify. How these environmental toxicants and pesticides and herbicides. Make an the nerve cell sick and caused them to die You can design interventions to prevent that so. you might be able to give something post exposure after somebody has a known exposure, you may be able to give them. A treatment that would prevent the onset of Parkinson's disease eventually. Or if you had exposure to something like paraquat which. is believed to cause ongoing damage over years. if you could slow that degeneration down at the earliest stages after diagnosis. When somebody first comes to see a doctor neurologist. If. You can keep the disease at that level where quality of life it's still quite good. That would be second best to cure. You know in time if people's quality of life didn't declined significantly after diagnosis. So I think there's a lot of outcomes for studying environmental. Causes a PD yes I agree that understanding the mechanism of injury certainly gives us some touch points figuring out how to design disease modifying treatment that slows inflammation slows oxidative stress which restores energy metabolism dopamine. so very exciting. We've got a number of questions about head injury and especially A potential link between multiple concussions and Parkinson's disease Is there how strong is the evidence that the head injury contribute or can contribute to Parkinson's disease and is there anything that could be done? Early on after that injury could help mitigate. And three show me bill you take that one Yes So that is a tough one I. do think the evidence is pretty clear that repeat head injuries can cause not just Parkinson's. But unfortunately, a risk for dementia encephalopathy I think really needs to be more investigation of what treatment we can do after concussion after head trauma that is an area that needs a lot more attention and I think we're. Getting there with the recognition that head trauma is an issue particularly in athletics. So awareness is the first step and we have that awareness and now I think the next step is research where we can objectively measure how severe the head trauma is an track. It will lead to a treatment intervention but as far as I know the bachelor at in terms of understanding how to treat it, there's also an interesting tie in with with Environmental. Toxicants because. There's a study from UCLA showed that. If you if you're exposed to Paraquat, for example, have a certain degree of risk if you're exposed to. Head trauma you have a certain degree of risk but if you have a head trauma, your risk of. Parkinson's after getting exposed to Paraquat is much higher. So head injury increases the sensitivity of your brain to Paraquat.

Parkinson Parkinson's disease Paraquat Oklahoma UCLA dopamine.
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"You know one of the things that I find interesting and ironic is that. Paraquat is made manufactured by a company in the UK where Paraquat is is actually banned so that it's it's manufactured in a country where you can't use it. But they exported around the world particularly the United States. Yeah Yeah when we met with lawmakers and pointed out that It's banned in the European Union's span in thirty two countries around the world including China. lawmakers are pretty shocked by that that China would have banned something that we have not at this point. So Jamie. I'm going to bring you in here because we are funding some environmental related proposals, grant proposals. why don't you talk a little bit about that what some of the topics are and what you're hoping to find Yeah thanks Chad At this point we don't know what the topics are. This is a brand new funding program so We're just getting ready to review the application. But the title of the program is investigating environmental factors that increase the risk for Parkinson's disease because this is a funding program. With. The goal of funding research projects that investigate environmental exposures such as those were that were discussing today. that increase the risk of Parkinson's disease and or influence disease progression. And the the projects were utilized existing data sets. analyze those data sets so they won't be collecting new data, they'll be using existing data to try to understand links between specific exposures and risk of Parkinson's disease. and we believe a better understanding of such factors could lead to effort to prevent such exposures and could ultimately affect policy. So this is a new type of program for us, but we're really excited and as I mentioned, we'll be reviewing the application in just the next couple of months and the funding for the project will start in early twenty, twenty one. So stay tuned for more information early next year and hopefully, those projects will lead to important information about how these different types of exposures ultimately impact risk for the disease. Yeah I actually have a question for.

Paraquat Parkinson's disease Parkinson Parkinson's disease. European Union United States UK Jamie Chad China China.
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Here & Now

"Okay she's host of the Stream on Al Jazeera English. Femi- What we oh my goodness so much to talk about and also People were talking about the virus. Obviously order feeds a full of that on social but there are other stories out there to. We're going to get there. We're going to get to the corona virus. But why don't we start with some of the those headlines that we're not noticing right? What about Chelsea Manning? A judge has ordered the former army intelligence analyst at the center of the wikileaks scandal to be released from jail. When he's saying they're just going to do a quick recap on Chelsea Manning. She originally had that thirty five year sentence. Commuted by President Obama taken back into custody last year for refusing to testify before the grand jury investigating wikileaks and her legal team revealed this week that she tried to take her own life. And then the announcement of her release came very shortly after from a detention center in Virginia. Say let me tell you what I am seeing. The judge says that she still has to pay her finds that our number of Anti Trans comments about her personal life about her personal lifestyle decisions little sympathy for the fine. That is the pushback. The critics also a lot of love and empathy Chelsea Manning immediately. There's a gofundme campaign. The last time I looked there was over. Seventy thousand dollars in that Fines will be up to two hundred. Fifty dollars is not bad. That's in just a few hours. And then Edward Snowden a well-known whistle blower. He summed up what happened to Chelsea money in the last ten months. They offer to let her out in exchange for collaboration but she chose her principles instead. This is more strength and a lot of people out there online saying they should never have happened. This is torture. We're GONNA keep an eye on that story but of course Corona virus. We promised to talk about it. We should talk about it. the spread of it is now global. People around the world are getting creative to work around China's tight monitoring of social media to learn more about what's happening in Wuhan where the outbreak started they're using tinder femi- the dating APP. I skipped say I know about this because I'm a journalist and I'm researching is. There is a premium tinder subscription. Which allows you to reach out beyond borders beyond your neighborhood and the Hashtag. This is love in the time of Corona for instance. You can reach out to laughing. Twenty-six that's a doctor who works at the Wuhan Union Hospital. Looks very lovely. He's wearing a mosque. He's green scrubs and he's talking about life in Wuhan when there was the the very very severe lockdown. He's everything is on lockdown. Traffic Works Society. Even lovemaking I'm going to use. That euphemism doesn't quite use that. Because remember this is tender and what people are finding in that. Tinder connections is raw than during the normal sort of dating backwards and forth. They're actually asking questions. Like how do you know when you when you're free of the corona virus and the doctors talking about antibodies and how you live your life and what you need to do and suggestions for how you you manage your isolation so sort of conversations that you rarely see tinder And it's a really interesting way to maybe get around the way that that China has quite very severe monitoring policy of social media and tinder subscribers have managed to break that although now that we've been talking about it and sharing it. I suspect they will grow their way to lock down love in the time of Corona advert is interesting and to be clear. These are not necessarily romantic. Changes people are just going to change the native as to what it is like to live in Wuhan Province. Which of course is where we first light learned about the corona virus. Look I don't want to minimize the severity of what's happening but we need a little bit of relief. Here Disco Queen. Gloria Gaynor.

Chelsea Manning Corona Wuhan Wuhan Province Wuhan Union Hospital Femi President Obama China Al Jazeera English Chelsea Gloria Gaynor Virginia Edward Snowden wikileaks intelligence analyst army Traffic Works Society
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and WBZ Dowd. I'm Tanya Moseley it's here and now and president trump is scheduled to hold a press conference at the White House this afternoon to talk about the corona virus the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Today that forty five states have reported infections but the epicenter of the pandemic right now is really Europe and Italy. At least fifteen thousand. People have reportedly tested positive. That's the most cases outside of China and more than one thousand people have died. In the United Kingdom health officials are monitoring the growing number of cases there and NPR's Frank Langfitt joins us from London. And Frank the government. There is trying to delay the worst onset of the corona virus until summer. Can you tell us exactly what that means? Yeah it's a really interesting strategy that Boris Johnson. The Prime Minister laid out yesterday. And what he's talking about is he doesn't WanNa put any social distancing policies that we've seen in many other countries shutting down schools things like that until he thinks the virus is really going to take off and part of his argument is he's afraid of he starts now they'll be fatigue and people won't follow it. The other problem here is our national health. Service has been wildly underfunded for years. And he's afraid of overloading it very quickly. So what he wants to do is kind of flatten out these cases over many months and this is how he described yesterday when he was talking to the nation if we delayed the peak even by few weeks than our NHS will be in a stronger state as the weather improves and fewer people suffer from normal respiratory diseases. More beds are available and we'll have more time for medical research. This sexually sounds kind of controversial What's the reaction to this strategy? There is concern if you talk to ordinary people here as well as epidemiologists were the government seems to be saying that knows that it cannot handle the big onslaught but ordinary. People are wondering. Why aren't we shutting things down? Now we seen in France They're closing schools Obviously this has already happened in Italy. Some time ago in Ireland with which the United Kingdom shares of border. They've closed down schools in universities yesterday so the UK seems to be an outlier Are there public health officials that have spoken out about this? Oh yeah now. There's been some support For the prime minister. Keith Neal with University of Nottingham an emeritus professor in epidemiology. He calls this sensible but There's a lot of criticism Richard Horton. He's the chief editor of The Lancet. The famous medical journal his quote instead of powerful one. He says. The government is playing roulette with the public. This is a major error you mentioned that Folks there who live and work every day or kind of wondering. What's next what? What have you heard at least anecdotally or from the folks that you've spoken to about how they're feeling about this measure? I think right now. The trains are full of people. People are still going to work. But there's a lot of anxiety uncertainty and questioning the policies of the government. I can tell you Mike. It's go to the international school which has just at British kids have a lot of European kids. They'RE GONNA be shutting down early. They're basically making their own decision to shut down next week. Kids are already leaving so last night. I was at a school play and borders People who boarded the school were walking ran into one walking through the parking lot with all our luggage heading back to continental Europe And some people don't want to put their kids in school actually. At the beginning of this week they're going to pull them early. So there's a lot of division anxiety about this and uncertainty about whether the government's doing the right thing that's NPR's Frank Langfitt. He joins us from London. Thank you so much for this update. You're very welcome on you. There's been a mad dash of Americans trying to get out of parts of Europe after President. Trump announced travel restrictions to the United States from twenty six European countries and here in the US. American airline companies are now putting protocols in place for people who want to cancel existing flights overseas and within the country. We wanted to get some clarity on how to do that. And joining us now is Christopher Elliott. He's a consumer advocate and he joins us now from niece. France Chris. Welcome so you're there for work. Tell us what you're seeing there What's the level of concern about the corona virus well Francis preparing for a surge in corona virus cases the French president on on TV last night and said that the schools and universities? We're going to be closed Starting on Monday here in niece people have greeted the news with a very French. Collective Shrug people are still out enjoying the cafes and the restaurants and they're out sunbathing on the beaches at the Mediterranean. So it's very much I don't WanNA say business as usual. But it's not panic. Yeah Yeah I know that you're there for work and you were planning to travel to Italy but now Italy is a red zone. So you won't be doing that. I WanNa talk a little bit about the airlines. And if it's even possible to get a refund for tickets right now yeah probably start by saying that. The refund policies are changing by the minute. But generally if your flight is canceled. You'RE GONNA get a full refund if you WANNA cancel your ticket for a flight. In March or April. Most of the major airlines are waving their change fees. They usually charge change fee and now they've they've decided not to do that. But there are also offering refunds on a case by case basis. And this is interesting. If you can make a case that you either can't fly or you wouldn't be able to use a credit on the airlines are much more receptive now to that than they've ever been so you can definitely try doing that. I also list all of the names and phone numbers and email addresses for the executives at the Airlines on my consumer advocacy site. That's Elliott Dot. Org and you can try reaching out to one of them. That's also been known to work. I want to ask you about hotels. What kind of refunds are they offering a lot of hotels have refundable rates? And so chances are if you have a hotel reservation it is refundable already if you cancel within twenty four to forty eight hours but hotels also have something called a prepaid rate and that is non refundable and they've just recently in the last twenty four hours started loosening their policies really good example that is Hilton which Just this morning announced that forgets that. Do not have a refundable rate so they have a non cancel rate if they want to cancel their reservation scheduled for a rival before April thirtieth. They can do that at no charge so that was kind of a new thing. Where the hotels are I think trying to be a little bit more consumer friendly so much to think about thank you so much for laying all of this out with us. That's Christopher Elliott a consumer advocate joining us from niece France. Thank you very much. We'll financial markets continued their roller coaster. Ride this morning with a surge in early trading. Investors are hoping that Congress is close to getting a stimulus package on the president's desk. Let's hear from Mike Regan. He senior editor and Bloomberg News and Mike so far at least today a glimmer of relief the Dow up now two and a half percent. What you've seen. Oh right you're right. There is a little bit of a bounce back today. There's some renewed hope that the government Congress will be able to get an agreement on a bill That they'll be able to pass. Yesterday there was a lot of concern that maybe politics would get in the way Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats had worked on a a big Relief package but there was a lot of pushback from Republicans. Today there is a little bit of optimism. that They will be able to get an agreement ready this week. I will say though that You know as far as the market's concerned it's doubtful that the government anything the government can do right now we'll be a sort of panacea that fixes all the economic damage being done and therefore give the market Enough confidence to really start rallying again. We're we're bound to see this type of volatility up and back down Continue for the foreseeable future simply because there's so much economic being damaged damage being done right now from this virus. That's a good point because yesterday the stock market had its biggest one day drop since nineteen eighty-seven and there was government. Stimulus involved yesterday. I it was not calmed by the Fed's decision to inject one point five trillion dollars into the banking system. So why have investors Ben so immune to these stimulus measures up until this morning? It appears right. Well the Fed's main focus is that there's just this massive demand for cash right now for the US dollar Because the corporate bond markets are basically ground to a halt so that companies are going to banks to tap those emergency credit lines. You know it's like one of us going in sort of maxing out our credit card because we're afraid about our cash flow going forward So that's really just caused a an numerous amount of pressure Banks and corporations to sort of word the dollar So what the Fed did is try to elite Relieve that pressure which is very acute in money markets There are signs that it is helping to do that again. Even that is not going to be a sort of this. Miracle Cure all for for the massive economic damage being done It's just be on. It's an unprecedented risk to the economy. Basically right now when you see so many things closing down I mean the the NBA suspending The ban on flights to Europe or at least a severe restrictions on them. I mean we've never really experienced this type of shock to the economy. Before and I think the government you know And the Federal Reserve. They're going to do the best they can as quickly as they can but It's hard to imagine them being able to really counteract all the problems that we're we're going to see in the next few weeks and months You know the government simply can't replace all the lost sales and profits of all the companies in the country Regardless of what their agree on so quickly Mike. When are we going to see some actual data about how hard this is actually hit in the economy? I think you know the earliest thing to look at here is the weekly. Jobless claims They just tally up. How many people are filing for unemployment insurance across the country? Surprisingly this week they remained very low. And that sort of low. Two hundred thousand level The expectation is that they should start picking up and I think that will give you sort of a sense of of how swiftly the damage is being done..

government Europe Mike Regan Italy France President Frank Langfitt NPR London Prime Minister Federal Reserve Christopher Elliott Centers for Disease Control an United States trump UK Boris Johnson United Kingdom WBZ Dowd NHS
"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

11:19 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Sloane welcome to the show thanks for having me I appreciate it so we are here. You're boxing gym here in Tulsa Oklahoma engine room boxing. And we're GONNA talk about boxing but you have interesting twist on it but before we get to that twist. How'd you start it with boxing? What's your story? Well my I think like a a lot of the guys got into their fathers or grandfathers. My grandfather was a boxer when he was young. So you always talked about boxing and we'd always watch you know. Watch the fights together Mike Tyson. He likes so you know maybe Lebron. Toil went out to go to the convenience store and buy the rent the little box you bring home put on the TV and watch the and watch the fight right so you know. Of course anything he was Kinda my hero and I looked up to him so anything that he was into. You know that's kind of what I what I was into so I was always was interesting curious about you know. We're just kind of the background that I came from. We were Kinda main rough little kids anyway and we get out in the yard and box with the little sugar ray Leonard Boxing gene gloves and wrap my grandma's dish towels around her hand. Our hands and boxing in the yard and so that kind of got my interest up and as as I got older older wanted to pursue that started you know seeking out local. Boxing gyms and and probably started when I was around. They start actually boxing when I was seventeen. Did you ever compete you. Yeah I competed for about four and a half years only amateurs I never did. Any any pro steph box at the north also boxing club here in Tulsa and my trainer was Ed Dunkin. WHO's the decently known coach? especially around. Here he trained a quick Tillis and Dell Cook and you know some of our other bigger name guys is actually they came out of Oklahoma. And someone did you transition from fighting to training. When did that happen? You Know I. I was boxing a- at an early age and looking back on it now I understand that you know. We didn't travel a lot because our our coaches and our program didn't have much money to travel so we were just. I did a lot of training and didn't get a whole lot of fights you know. We didn't travel nationally or anything like that. So anger got a decent job in sales and that took a lot of time so I just kind of phase myself out of the box even even though I I wanted to do and continue to do it as more of a hobby for me. I didn't have a grand aspirations. Have Gone on and been a a world champion fighter or anything like that. I just I I just enjoyed the sport so got involved in sales and fast forward. You know several you know ten years ahead and decided to go to nursing's goal when the construction market slowdown sylvestry spy sale. So that slowdown in I. I ended up. Put myself through nursing school and getting out of that wanting to You know exercise and stuff. I start thinking about boxing again and I didn't WanNa course too old to compete and I was maybe thirty. I think thirty five. I've been in ten years now so about thirty five years old thought. Well maybe if I started coaching some kids or something like that. It would give me my fix for boxing and get that. Get that part of it. It kinda let me play a little bit in the sport again. So I rented like a little basically a story building storage unit in a oiseaux outside of Tulsa and opened it up on on a few bags in it and and the ad in the paper and the next thing you know we had a lot of school kids come in so so you started trade school kids but then you sort of training different type of client and this was clients with Parkinson's disease. How did that happen? Like we're we're GonNa talk about this program. You develop a boxing program for Parkinson's patients but how did you start. Training people with Parkinson's disease in boxing. I told you we started the gym and Eloise so and it was mostly just a you training like I said Gee Choe competitive kids the box but but you know Tom I was there for a few years. We had people asking them. Maybe fitness training and I had a girl that I'd I'd worked with that had cerebral palsy. Actually in out there and so having my nursing background and then doing this boxing it was it was kind of in the back of my head to do something a little more health related but I just started started on this nursing career and I just never entertained the idea of so we fast forward a few years and I've had five years of coaching experience running the gym and and kind of started deciding. You know I'd like to try to make a push in this full-time I'd trained a few boxers. That kind of made it to the national level and I knew if I was gonNA coach those guys at that level all. I needed to have more time to do it. You know I couldn't be working part time any more than they could be working a lotta hours. Either you know so we moved to Tulsa. We opened this facility and I was here for about a year and One of the local doctors Had A patient that had been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and he had seen you know that. Of course it exercises this is is one of the we can talk about later. But exercise is one of the main things that slows down the progression of Parkinson's disease and so he recommended that he come into the boxing gym and gets yet Start Training here. So Bobby Moore's his name and he came. Probably I guess maybe three and a half years ago and I started personal training with him one on one just for his his fitness and I think we did maybe twenty four sessions and he went and visited his physical therapist and the physical therapist did notice. What is such an increase in his ability that he reached out to the Parkinson's foundation of Oklahoma and had those guys contact me about if I wanted to start a class? So and that's what what ready to fight. It's all about when before we get into more about the program. What are you you tailor? The boxing program for these guys. Let's talk about Parkinson's general for those who aren't too familiar with it so reminder listeners. What has Parkinson's disease? What are the symptoms? We know what causes it. Things like that Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder. So once you get it. It's there's no cure for it. It's GonNa continue to get worse over time. Said disorder affects our central nervous system so it primarily targets motor movement. uh-huh anything that's a motor movement as going to be affected by it so it can affect of course your your balance your speech your handwriting. Usually most people would pitcher Parkinson's Disease Aziz with a tremor course in in one hand or sometimes both but usually just want one side but there's more patriots shaking their rigidity. Somebody like Michael J. Fox Freddie Roach is who they think of. But there's a lot of other things that go along with it. Just as a general slowing of movement people lose their facial expressions Like I said loser spacious lot of of a sleep insomnia Goes along with it and just you know a lot of dementia. That can come along as a certain point time so it do we know. Does it affect men or women and more or is it about the same now. It affects a lot more men than than women think. I think it's a seventy percent I thanks to the number. That's affected more men compared to women. I really don't know why it affects more men than women but it most definitely does genetics. Play a part in in developing the disease they know you know maybe fifteen percent and then chemical emiko exposure. So there's if you're supposed a lot of pesticides where you've been like in the in the Gulf War a lot of those guys that were you got affected by chemical some of the chemicals and things that were used over there but the rest of the people. It's kind of a a known unknown quantity. They really don't they really don't know yet. Why target some people and not others and yeah? I mean definitely affects effects significantly the quality of life of an individual. I mean absolutely right. So let's talk about what the research says. It has no cure for it for Parkinson's but what does the research say that. What can help help? Parkinson's patients well. I mean primarily. We know that medications. The frontline approach so Parkinson's patients suffer from either. A lack of dopamine Maine are the ability to use it so Leyva Dope Auriol Dope is going to be almost every Parkinson's patients going to be on on dopamine their surgeries and stuff like deep brain stimulation. Also as toil but next to the next line of Defense is exercise. So it's proven without a fact you know clinically that exercise slows down the progression and and it helps the neuropathy in our brain helps us re regenerate neurons new pathways and it also helps the ability for us to uptake and regulate our opening in better and it needs to be a fourth intensity exercise. Exercise is good but once a force intensity and and when I say forced intensity I don't necessarily mean it has to be hard. It means means that it has to be something. That's not at your own pace so I I compare a little bit You know if you went and walked outside at your own pace it's not as beneficial as vice stick you on a treadmill on set you at a pace so it it just. It affects the brain differently when it's forced intensity so so you won't find any hardly any Parkinson's client that hasn't been recommended exercise. And there's a lot of forms of exercise. People do dance and they do cycling and boxing. While we're talking about here you know here of course today but there's a lot of a different exercise that they they push for for clients to do in. What do you so boxing is definitely? There's a fourth intensity there because I've done the stuff the heavy bag workouts and I just WanNa die after it so there's definitely forced intensity but do you think there's something else going on with boxing the movements movements you do in boxing that sort of like it's a secret sauce that can help Parkinson's patients at the idea you know and and that's what we're I think most people's Kinda come into consensus at that boxing's kind of the gold standard of exercise for Parkinson's disease. There's some other Parkinson's boxing programs out there. Of course as well. We thank to our sisters superior because of some of the changes and things that we've done with it but I kinda tell people I don't know how familiar you are. Our listeners are with boxing. But you said you've tried had the box before so you know that there's a certain movement that goes along with that and you see a boxer and he's moving and it's real flood and it's it's it's like watching a ballet dancer in it's it's A lot got a rhythm that goes along with it and so when you're coaching you see I say sometimes that's one of my coach and I see people come in if you came to the door and you want me to teach you how to box you. Don't move like a boxer yet and so then I get a person with Parkinson's disease it comes and they can't move like a boxer yet to me. You both have movement disorders. I mean so I need to train both. Have you had a move and be balanced and fight like a fighter. So I'll take that approach with all of them. It's not I don't WanNa run a acute program. That's only just a good program that were Oh. Yeah we're training Parkinson's people the box and they get by with everything. No if you come to box I'm GONNA train you like you're a fighter. No Matija Jabex correctly and so I think with our program. It's it's made a big difference that approach with balanced reaction time hand an eye coordination and boxing's count just as is built for Parkinson's disease on accident. If I put a client on a speed bag. They're getting the hand eye coordination from that takes a lot of hand in coordination to do that and nobody can hit hit us feedback when they first started as a matter of Parkinson's disease or not but that bag is a speed bag is a forest intensity exercise because of the rhythm of it once you hit it it's GonNa come back and you have to hit it again and so it's telling you when you're going to hit it you can't make up your mind when you're GonNa hit it only has one rhythm you're going to have to adapt to that rhythm and order bill to hit it and all all the bags in the gym. Were the same way if you heavy baggage swings and so what it swings back you gotTa hitter. You got to move or it's going to push you off balance and so the the equipment in itself you teach them the right techniques are going to challenge the the the symptoms that they have and then in boxing. You're throwing a lot of your did a lot of twist emotions so Parkinson's his patients suffer from horrible rigidity. So they gave her..

boxing pitcher Parkinson Parkinson's disease Tulsa Oklahoma Mike Tyson Sloane Lebron Matija Jabex Dell Cook Tillis dopamine Michael J. Fox Freddie Roach Ed Dunkin Bobby Moore Eloise Gee Choe Tom I
"parkinson disease" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Where it opens wounds in things it sends a signal to the whole world that this kind of barbaric punishment <hes> is <hes> in public is very very bad and I believe that plane spanking where there's no physical injury three is an effective punishment along with other methods but I think it works and then okay. There's a piece of advice very useful. If you think it's appropriate don't threaten don't scare your child right. Don just put him in the dark room. It's really going to cause the cycle. Although you're not spanking. You're not spanking but you're doing something more harmful and then I have a piece of advice. This is from my father. You know I'm still happy and healthy psychologically. It's my father. Did this the different your father did something before he really spanked you or you know the spelt one morning yeah wanting my father had you know erupt of sort of burst of temperate would resort to physical action I but every time you know he realized that the Yurt me right. He would come and talk to me that He. I'm sorry I just know why did something and Blah. Blah Blah. This is like A. I hope you open the wound right. You try to heal it after it's better than nothing so if you cannot held your temper in check you did something you hurt your little baby always find time to make it up a little bit but my watch but my mother did poorly and now I have problem with my mom. I have problem deal with my mom. Mom Did sometimes also resort in they are intellectuals actually because they were believed into the physical punishment and sometimes they were lazy. I call them. They have the means. If they think a lot they can talk like you need. They can talk more right. I'm a dose IOL little girl. I'm not a so so mischievous so I think the problem I'm is that it affected my relationship with my mother could be possible. My mother never disciplined me only my father but I have to say that I think he was very much ahead of his time because he came up with this philosophy and and I call it one belt one row one though rope I am very thankful to my dad even today you know he's suffering from his Parkinson disease but still every time I I have this body. I'm very close to I wanted to kiss him but I never I'm afraid of approaching. Mike physically approach you my mom so these things just stay lingers you know he needs the brain implant because it's good for park yeah indeed if my government says no spanking total spending I would totally against it because if you are asking somebody or banning something you need to think about what other options available for your for Oh young parents for grandparents who are taking care of grandchildren while the parents are in the city doing the Labor's they don't know how to deal with very naughty boys in running everywhere and then you do you have means in ways to coming. I mean to intervene and other alternatives. I mean you don't but you can see the evidence. After the fact of this nature of the Brousseau actually I applaud the legislation good message but it's very difficult to enforce of corn to follow enter. The law can't be well in force which is unfortunate but it set it sends out a signal a model of what's acceptable socially and what's not so sending the the message is so important to raise people's awareness not as heating children is good for them on actual Horan and so as it goes spare the Rod spoi- to child child is spoiled and more or Robin. The boats are hidden so we belong to the same sneeze anyway exactly. That's it for this weekend edition of today the weekly of quick wrap up for today's topic's..

Don Parkinson disease Horan Robin Mike
"parkinson disease" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:59 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Hello. Welcome to the science podcast for November. Second two thousand eighteen I'm Sarah Crespi on this week show begging Cantwell talks with Vivian LeBron about the surprising link between the panics and Parkinson's disease. Why is getting rid of a tiny bit of the gut linked was a lower risk of neurological disease. And I talked to Peter frats all about his review of sustainable composites or what material scientists can learn from butterfly wings, heightened carp asus. And spring loaded seedpods. I'm with Vivian LA to discuss her research on the relationship between the appendix and the development of Parkinson's disease. Hey, Vivian, high American should be here. Great to have you on the podcast. So I'm curious what led you down? This path have other researchers investigated the relationship between the appendix and Parkinson's disease before Herkus Zeus for longtime was sought to be this movement disorder driven by the destruction of voting neurons in a specific area of the brain is called a substantial Niagara, but in the last ten years has become really evident than Parkinson's disease is not just a movement disorder, but has a whole range of non motor symptoms, and one of the most common on what sometimes is issues with the GI track, for example, customization, and these symptoms occur often very early prices sees for some people it's as early as two decades before the onset of motor symptoms. We got really interested in connection with the giants. Check of the track was such a huge place. You know, where do you even begin? So we had a very simple question actually of where should we start the look? And so that's when we turned our attention to the pendants. What exactly in the GI tract is linked to Parkinson's disease? So the judge is not only involved in the Simpsons of Parkinson's disease. But has also been proposed to be placed in the body where as in sees might begin MS because there's this hallmark of all Joe parts seizes Louis bodies. And that's formed of a clump protein called off the win one. It starts to get cut in a certain ways it can increase its clumping ability in the pendants. There was cut versions or the shortened versions of this protein and look very much like the stuff you find in bodies in the parking, sissies brain. And there's evidence that even many years before the onset of homes, you can detect this clump office, I knew in protein in the track of individual. Nls who are going to go develop Parkinson's disease. So is this protein only found in the appendix of those who have Parkinson's or are. They also found in healthy individuals as well, we found that actually there was a full host of this protein in the human appendix, and this isn't just in Harkness's patients, but this is also in healthy individuals so in helping visuals very normal to have this protein, but it's actually very unhealthy and could leave the Parkinson's disease. If the pump protein were to go to the brain in people with Parkinson's does that mean that you see more of this protein this clump protein within their appendix? Or is it just the spreading that you're looking into? We did find that. There was definitely more slumped protein in Parkinson's patients. So there was an excess of this protein in the appendices of Arkansas stations. Okay. Gotcha. So how does this protein alpha psi nucleus start in the GI track? Then make its way up to the brain this protein, doesn't like to stay put it stable to jump from Toronto neurons on there's evidence. Showing that it can actually travel up the nerve that connects the GI tracts of brain. And once the clump out, this new been has entered the brains be really disastrous because it concede it can spread and causing her attacks of facts related Parkinson's disease. And so what distinguishes Parkinson's person from a healthy individuals, not presence of this homework. Thala gee this from protein, but rather what are the mechanisms that allow it to accumulate excessively, and possibly escape is there a way to prevent this from going to the brain that would be kind of for future studies at this point. We're just sort of documenting of this protein is resident in the appendix, and it also can be found in other parts of the track. But the panic seems to be a hub where there's a lot of it all sort of concentrated your study centered on determining whether removing the appendix actually led to later onset of Parkinson's or just overall the risk of developing arts in so how did you begin to evaluate this for this? We tapped into these really Larr. Charge medical databases so one database is the Swedish registry in the country of Sweden. There's information about all individuals all their medical records and with our collaborators what we did is we looked to see of the risk of archaisms disease was changed in an individuals that had received an appendectomy relative to individuals that didn't and sure enough. There was actually almost twenty percent decrease in wrists or Parkinson's disease in people that had had previous appendectomy and unimportant aspect of that is that the appendectomy has to occur early in life. So nothing dictum you the day before you develop Parkinson's disease is not so helpful. It's only is beneficial. When affect me has occurred these affor- that kind of early phase of Parkinson's disease, two decades or more before the onset of clinical motor symptoms, Nevada. Happened a long time ago can modulate something that happens. Many decades down the road. One interesting thing you discovered was that in rural communities removing the pen. Knicks Mehta reader difference in the onset age any overall risk of developing Parkinson's than in urban areas. So why do you think this is the case we think that this because there's been a various kind of robust association of Archies is used with the use of Esa sides. So one possibility is that rule areas Easter normally farming areas for there is a youth Santeuil use of of chemicals pesticides is just a normal firming process. Those chemicals are known also to sometimes have a risk related to partisans disease the panic's in practices. These may be related to what you're exposed to in. Your violent did removing the appendix also have an effect on people who have a genetic history of Parkinson's disease. We compared individuals that had genetic risk for Parkinson's disease to this is common genetic mutations that have been previously associated with meal Parkinson's disease now remember familial Parkinson's diseases relatively rare. So only ten percent of cases, we'll have one of these genetic mutations the rest of. Individuals will be Canoas sporadic or idiopathic Parkinson's disease. So that's ninety percent appendectomy did not have a beneficial effect. If you were genetic carrier one of these genetic mutations, but if you had a family history of Parkinson's so families shared genes, but the also shared virement if you had a family history of Parkinson's disease, then enough injectable was protective. So again, the suggested that the environment somehow plays a role in the mechanism by which the headaches modulate the risk for Parkinson's disease. So then would you recommend that people who have this greater environmental risk yet, preventive appendectomies? So I guess what our study is not saying is that all cases of Parkinson's disease is due to having a pen, and that all people should remove their PEX or even people who live in rural areas should remove their pen. Excess. Not what we're saying what better form of treatment is to start exploring some of these compounds that. Might reduce or block the excessive accumulation or the spread of this protein. Never member. The appendix is a hub has a lot of it. But there's other GI track areas the have the potential to have this protein as well. And so using therapy that could dampen down this protein in the track would be a much more holistic or would cover a lot more ground and the GI track being such a big place. We haven't fully vested all the areas that could be others judge could be hubs as well. So what is the next step with your research will really wanna get to understanding these differences between parking's of patients and a healthy person Unimak inisting level, what allows the protein to be triggered into an access sausage humilation in Parkinson's disease in the appendix, and what lows to escape and travel up to the brain. And I think if we can find out what those mechanisms are. We're at a really good nothing stone for developing treatments and early diagnostics. All right. Thank you so much my. Pleasure, vivian. Lebron is an assistant professor at the van Andel research institute, he can find a link to a research at signs MAG dot org slash podcast. Stay tuned for my interview with Peter frontal on whatever Lucien can teach designers engineers and material scientists about making multifunctional materials.

Parkinson Parkinson's disease Vivian Vivian LeBron Peter frats Vivian LA Sarah Crespi giants movement disorder Sweden appendectomy Toronto Cantwell Canoas Harkness MS Thala Arkansas
"parkinson disease" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on WEEI

"Hand headlines illustrate a little bit we'll but even even when you go to the grabs you when it goes to the payouts rate because there is a lot of atlanta guys you or part of this lawsuit i think they're going to get paid by the of this big truckload of money coming i will i mean yeah but you have to have like a ls to get a you have to have alzheimer's you have to have parkinson's disease you have to have a a moderate dementia or early dementia but that's this the tabot diagnosis that we're talking about these crazy aol that that's i mean i'm not i'm not part of this so i don't really get into it that much because he says in all more than three hundred forty former patriots or they were states have sued the nfl or its former helmet manufacturer and then we're talking about more than fifteen thousand former players are part of all of this now is a player wouldn't it makes sense if you think you might have problems later on in life you've now discovered if you didn't know it at the time that getting pounded in the head continue rally during football game is an issue with the president so when you line up and be one of those players that's why weather's more than fifteen thousand former players who were sitting there going maybe i want to register because i want to be able to get something and get a benefit out of this somewhere down the road of financial benefit correct yes okay but it doesn't cost anything to do either three hundred and forty former patriot fifteen thousand former players and a full was that he heard this is this just i don't know here's the budget information it's the globe anyone else iran and it seemed like a headline i was like wow i know of these guys the i mean i know his guys are whose i mean what's going on i think the patriots believe that the goal does pick on them from time to time i think this is one of those were you purposely lead people into that this is a patriot story when this is not a patriots don't at strange thought it's a it's a it's a football store a call and i see this headline i.

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

14:24 min | 4 years ago

"parkinson disease" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

"Immediate precursor that is a substance that is natural but one step removed which is Leva Dolpa. The brain receives it because it's transported into the brain and brain manufactures document out of that that was a huge discovery and it was FDA approved and sixty nine. That isn't quite the end of that story. A lot of people were nauseated. Took milligrams of Leyva doper to do any good so scientists. This is really a clever Recognition that scientists. May they recognize that Lebed Dolpa before it got into? The brain was being converted to dopamine and there are too bad consequences of that number one. There's a blood brain barrier and dopamine cannot get into the brain couldn't be transported. So it did take a zillion milligram stick it in there. But it's not entirely couldn't get into the brain that is the dopamine it crossed into the nausea and vomiting center. Where there is no blood brain barrier so everybody was nauseated and a lot of people were vomiting so scientists designed another product called in this country Carbon Dolpa in Europe and serious side. Does one thing can cross into the brain and it blocks the conversion of leave a dopey to dopamine by blocking one enzyme so the standard of treatment for the past forty. Some years has been carbon. Dolpa Leva Dolpa the original brand name attached to that by the company Merck Cinema. And so those of you that were in Catholic grade school recognize sinner without emphasis without vomiting. Oh Yeah Yeah and so. That's been the standard treatment. Now what what was recognized early on was that A lot of patients became like brittle diabetics there are a lot of ups and downs and fluctuations and and you know it really took a I think savvy clinicians awhile to figure out that these can be managed and it does take a lot of investment in that and this in this current era savvy clinicians. I think do the best managing Parkinson's disease with carbajal believe adoped alone. And we should mention that to our audience that you if you want the Bible on and you're a patient on the treatment of Parkinson's Disease Alcohol L. Scabs Book Second Edition. It's called the new Parkinson's disease treatment book highly successful. Iso and thank you by the way for sending me a copy. Well I don't know to be honest with you but it's it's downstairs in the mail store and flying show. Yeah Yeah. I haven't seen that as I walked by but yeah but actually everything that I. I know a lot. Parkinson's disease they tried to put in there and I tried to make it readable so I hopefully. It's a useful book from people. That was the intent terrific book so when someone comes in. And we'll talk about how you make the diagnosis. How do you explain the disease to the patient and their family? Well I started off by talking about dopamine. 'cause that's a fundamental substrate for whereas the visible evidence of Parkinson's disease there are things that we know now occur in sort of a subtle way not all people but years before acting out your dreams. That's called behavior disorder. People who are constipated in middle life have a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease relief people who have been anxious Are at a greater risk of later. Developing Parkinson's disease. Sometimes loss of sense of smell is in early marker. Now that doesn't mean that everybody who has been constipated or anxious gets Parkinson's disease but it's now recognized that there is a significant increase in that risk. If you have those problems so those probably are early forerunners. Parkinson's disease but they fly under everybody's radar screen. What really then becomes. Recognizable would be slowness of movement Shuffling Gait Stu posture loss of animation. Loss OF ARM SWING. And then some nine motor symptoms to. They actually still don't get recognized anxiety common problem of Parkinson's disease even though it's not visible insomnia is another one I mentioned Acting out your dreams well Getting to sleep is a problem. If you have Parkinson's disease as well too. And so those are things that are so-called non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease but what really brings it into evidence would be shuffling gates and things like that. Tremor is that tremor frequent weld occurs an eighty percent of people but in twenty percent. You never see. Tremor is it that tremor or shuffling that help you diagnose the patient then or how you ultimately diagnose them or you take all these symptoms and signs and you can put them together in any package so some people will shuffle. Some people don't some people shuffled with one leg. You know they have a stiff leg Some people have facial masking loss of facial animation. Some don't their occasional people I'll see were anxiety is in spades panic attacks and And yet the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease fairly minimal. And if you look at what goes on in the brain with his dopamine loss. It isn't uniform. You'd think something like this. It should be everywhere the same but it's very patchy loss on one person is a little more here little there in the next person. It's an entirely different sort of a random pattern of that dopamine system. This is a clinical diagnosis. You don't have any help from a blood test or a brain scan correct are. It is a clinical diagnosis. So it's what people tell you and then what you see in the class. There are occasional people. I see who are on treatment and doing well and then I go by what they report pre-treatment because a lot of times what. I mentioned the Carbonaro believable but it gets people almost to normal. I saw somebody yesterday. Who was normal. Wow so it's it's probably Appropriate to say that you have made huge progress in the treatment of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease over the past thirty years. Well have and I think it really gets down to the discovery of Lebron Dolpa then the discovery of Karbi Dolpa in this country and been serious side in Europe so then that makes it tolerable and then I think what's changed has also been the recognition of how to treat it. There's sort of a side story here. Doctors were always looking for something better and better so they started digressing looking for other drugs. And and I've been. I'm one hundred percent in the clinic all day every day and I've tried all these other drugs and they really come up short and I realized some years ago. You've gotta get the carbondale believable but dosing scheme right and it's a little bit of a dynamic to a changes over time you know people are stable for a number of years and then they become tied to each dose that they take so we'll take Joseph Carbajal Pahlavi dope. Ah The new good for a few hours in it whereas off so you have to match not only not only have to get the right dose but you have to get the right dosing interval. And there's a lot of flexibility there so I tell people do not worry about. The number of doses are tablets per day. Find the dose that works the best and then you adjust the dose to match the response duration. And you all of your experience. I'm sure helps. Also not right myth or matter of fact. I'm really interested in this matter of factor all Scott people who have a high Iq are at an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. Is that a myth or a matter of fact. I don't know about any data I Q and most of us. Don't get our accuse measured so it'd be hard to know but it is high though measured or not but me and says they're the one who said where did you hear this all right when. I did hear a one time that the that the population that had the highest risk for Parkinson's disease was physicians. And of course I immediately assumed that it was people at high in there too. But that's what brought the whole issue up and church so I wanted to ask you. Well let me. Doctors are increased risk. Let me say this myth or matter of fact. Doctors are an increased risk for Parkinson's. Well that is true based upon olmsted county patients who are followed here at the. Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center and so it's sort of a captive audience. You know once you moved to Rochester Minnesota. You never want to leave. I wonder live in Florida when I grow up and I've been here thirty eight years. That's that's a different side story. Why in fact it is true that in Olmsted County when when the group here in epidemiology looked at professions that were associated with Parkinson's disease physicians rose to the top there. That's the group that was the most likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease so intuitively. You might say that. Well maybe it's just because they recognized it and made the diagnosis themselves. But there was another study done on something called Incidental Lewy body disease so it turns out that about fifteen people out of one hundred who are over the age. Sixty and die without Parkinson's tremor dementia or any neurologic problems on post mortem brain examination will have the microscopic marker. Parkinson's disease which is Louie bodies and it turns out that Mongo's incidentally body cases. There were about thirty six I think. Thirty some that in our cohort here and it turned out that guess. What profession rose to the top physicians again? So that wasn't a diagnostic. Kind of confounding factor. These were people that they knew there were physicians. But they didn't know they had lewy bodies so your suspicion isn't so much that this is a bunch of smart people like to believe but that may be Something of the lifestyle of physicians are what contributing contributes to that. That's the sixty four dollar question the exposure as we were talking earlier about. Maybe it's that some physicians never slept during the previous year. Or you know now there. There are rules rules relations. Yeah there are limitations but I- described how when I was a medical intern. You know working one hundred ten hour weeks. Two months in a row is actually expected. Yeah it was expected. And they're that's that's one of the ways that you clear bad breakdown products protein products that are like Alpha Beta amyloid in Alzheimer's Disease Elvis Nuclear and Parkinson's disease. There's good scientific evidence that when you're asleep the areas around the brain cells dilate and you kind of tend to flesh out those bad things that don't belong there so if you're serious about this perfectly serious about that yes. It was published in Science magazine. Which is I mean. One of the most reputable scientific publications in the world. I mean this. This is the how you how you get rid of some of these bad products in your brain. Well that the interviews that we've done in the past that talk about you know the genetics piece in the telomeres on the ends of those gene codes. That sleep is one of the things that helps to protect and restore that so it would make sense that if you're going periods of time with very inadequate sleep that it would end up doing some sort of cellular damage and apart from the telomeres. You know that the thought about what causes all of these Midlife neurodegenerative disorders from Alzheimer's disease to Al s to various forms of dementia and Parkinson's disease. There's a protein at least one in Alzheimer's. There's two that seems to be the bad actor. And these are natural proteins there in all brain cells so Beta amyloid and Tau and Alzheimer's Disease Elvis and nuclear in Parkinson's disease. These belonged there. They have a purpose in the brain cells but it seems that they dissociate from where they should be the aggregate and then they sort of gum up the works so to speak so you want to get rid of those You know there's A. There's a natural turnover of products everywhere in the body. You make them and you dispose of them and in in terms of Elvis nucleus for Parkinson's disease. You probably want to get rid of all that bad elvis nuclear and it's now starting maybe to gum up the works so during sleep. Maybe that's one of the factors these things these diseases Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. They're very complicated. However probably there are many factors weigh into this but I think that's one plausible component of that one interesting thing about a Parkinson's I know that age is is the biggest risk factor. The older you are the more likely you are to get it but there are. There are young people who have Parkinson's disease right. What's the youngest person you've ever seen Twenty s the if you if you get Parkinson's disease before age forty than you have an increased risk of having a detectable gene if it's before age twenty and then it's very likely three knowing genes called Parkin Parkin Gene Pink One. Dj One. So that's that's the only population of patients where I would. I would measure a gene product to see if there's a genetic underpinning for folks that get it in a normal age the likelihood that you're going to detect something isn't very great. What is that age a normal age? What's the usual age? Well peaks and sixties and seventies and kind of depends on on how you look at it and maybe it continues to go up and olmsted county. It looks like it continues to increase. But it's it's rare certainly rare before age forty in olmsted county less than one percent of our incident. Population developed it before age forty less than one percent and then as you continue increase the age and it becomes more and more likely all right. It's Parkinson's disease awareness month. Why is that a good thing for you and for the population in general? Well I think funding for research would certainly be one important aspect of this you know it's these neurodegenerative conditions. They're they're affecting more and more of the population because we're we're getting older and stuff happens when you get older and for just like Alzheimer's disease which has gotten a lot of press we don't have any ways of curing this. Fortunately in Parkinson's disease we have pretty good but not perfect symptomatic treatment. But that's not fabulous forever so we need to figure out how to get it to cause of this and that takes a lot of research and some time and and money to fund it. Thanks so much for sharing your expertise with Parkinson's expert Dr J. Eric..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine Alzheimer's Disease Olmsted County Lebron Dolpa Dolpa Leva Dolpa Europe Lebed Dolpa vomiting FDA nausea Alzheimer Merck Cinema Mayo Clinic Olmsted Medical Center Rochester Parkin Parkin