35 Burst results for "Parkinson"

Atlanta WSB employee dies of Parkinson's

Sterling on Sundays

00:30 sec | 2 d ago

Atlanta WSB employee dies of Parkinson's

"A WSB employee for more than 50 years, who became known for his running coverage of the Casey Pete's Tree Road race, died this morning. Former WSB TV news anchor Monica Pearson. When I first came to WSB in 1975, it was Donnie Mac who literally taught me the pronunciation so that people would know I was a newcomer. You don't say, Paul say daily on its pots. The Leon He was great for that. McClellan died from a year's battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 88 WSB news

WSB Monica Pearson Casey Pete Donnie Mac Parkinson Mcclellan Paul
Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

podnews

02:56 min | 6 d ago

Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

"Time everyone I'm Bernie Brown, and welcome to my new daily podcast on spotify spotify car cost has announced a new partnership with Brennan Brown. Current show unlocking also become a spotify exclusive from January to lead is another exclusive which launches next month. She's also collaborated on a yacht rock playlist. If you like Christopher Cross and Toto Africa that you'll love your brock NPR has released the NPR podcast reports containing data and case studies about the broadcasters PODCASTS podcast uses up twenty percent year on year downloads up twenty six percent can podcast from NPR public radio account for thirty two percent of time spent listening to podcast us. spotify testing listener polls. The features live on spot exclusive shows like the re watchable 's like video and sharing cards. It's another proprietary feature for spotify shows only had him. Curry's no agenda disappeared from spotify earlier this week I never submitted our feet Adam says last I checked it was not associated with my email or my account. After leaving spotify September nineteenth after to our rent on his show earlier, Joe Biden has announced the Joe but a network, the first non button show will be see the thing is hosted by Bridget Kelly. Mandy be Livia dope quote not what they'll say because I'm staying out a women's business lull says button. spotify has also launched your daily in the UK content in there from the time talksport in the evening standard, the BBC global and Bauer taking part later today the rain Digital Canada Twenty twenty summit is taking place. The event is online and free our editor James. Credentials. Moderating the opening session. Hey, that's me. It's at rain digital candidate twenty, twenty dot com if you want to go. The Australian podcast cost awards is giving you extra time to anti. You've now got until midday on. Monday. Blueberry has a fancy new website design, which is nice John. McTaggart's the president's and see of APM, is to step down. The company has been criticised recently for race and gender issues for target claims. His decision to step down is unrelated Pierre Remix of PODCAST radio station in the US is celebrating ten years on Air who knew during that time it said one thousand and eighteen audio creators. The first producer was Roman Mars and podcast movement virtual has announced Mark Cuban as a keynote speaker in conversation with the newsworthy is Erica Mandy. And Infocom News, the former host and producer of the ABC's in this podcast. Australia is now making at home with Brie away for kids across the country to connect. When life gives you. Parkinson's is back for a third season Larry gifts to his diagnosed three years ago hosts the show the season includes the collision of Covid nineteen and Parkinson's disease

Spotify Erica Mandy Christopher Cross Digital Canada Twenty Twenty NPR Brennan Brown Bernie Brown Joe Biden Brock Npr Parkinson Bridget Kelly United States Host And Producer Australia Toto Africa Curry Covid ABC Brie
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

02:23 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"So I try to I try to confuse my body and do something different every day so whether it's Strength Training or cardio dancing boxing swimming just try to kind of keep things different and and and test every part of my body. That's really what I try to focus on and and if nothing else it just you know is good for general even if it doesn't necessarily slow the progression but I like to think that it does and there have been many studies show that does. The other thing for me is this is I guess more of a psychological part of it is it. It's kind of motivated me to live more in the present instead of thinking or wondering you know where I'll be in ten years or fifteen years. I really try to focus on where I am now and enjoying then enjoying my friends and my family. Thanks so much over. So, we are coming to the end of our our So I'M GONNA. Sort of stop the QA now a couple of things First of all, thank you everyone for being part of our community and for joining us today and a big thanks to our panelists for for for sharing all their information and insight today So we'll be sending link after this call, we'll be sending a link to the Webinar so you can watch it on demand if you'd like to watch it and we listen and if you missed a few parts when. It listen to it again I know the few questions in the in the feed about the role of environmental factors and Parkinson's disease, and we actually have some some prior webinars that have touched on that topic. So you can find those in our on demand list as well. Please do mark your calendar for next Thursday with an art which will be on October Fifteenth and I'm excited to say are a favourite moderator Dave Iverson will actually a special appearance. To bring us an important episode going into the election that's coming up in November we'll be discussing Parkinson's policy priorities and the power of the government and making decisions that impact people with Parkinson's in their loved ones, and so we really hope you'll be able to tune into that to that women are. So with that, we're going to end the call and again thank you everybody for listening. Thanks for listening. Community members like you are bringing us closer than ever to a world without Parkinson's disease, learn.

Parkinson's disease Parkinson Dave Iverson
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:51 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"See a number of people asking essentially the same question in different ways and this one's I'm GonNa, send you Joe a lot of questions just to kind of about different family. I guess I was the way I would call it a Parkinson's disease You know both parents have disease. What does this mean for my risk? Does it skip generations? You know uncle had it things like that and I thought maybe could you talk a little bit more about when you look at a family where there's Parkinson's disease? What geneticists? What are you looking for? What sort of what when you see something what what does that tell you and how do you sort of approach that and thinking about looking for a Potential gene it might be linked to Parkinson's. Yeah. So that's a very good question actually because you know we we we wanted to keep his short and not very complicated I. Didn't really get into the details but but yeah, these genes that we were talking about you know some of them are inheriting different patterns of world some of them you know having only one variant either inherited from the mother or funded on chrome the father you know to either increase the risk in the case of va, for example, or cause disease in the case of Sino. Korean. For example but others you actually need to inherit too. So he has to come wandering the MOM and Dad and you know the first type is called a dominant and then the second type is called recessive So so when we looked at our family, we always considered both options, right so sometimes, you'll see, for example, the both parents are healthy, but then they have a kid that my have Parkinson's disease. Those usually are receptive on usually the the kid will have the disease early with an early onset recessive genes. Most of them cause a early onset Parkinson's disease. So the younger it is. Usually, the more we think about this recessive or these forums where you have to get two different variants So yeah when we looked at our family, we always start to look that You know first second degree relatives that are affected in the family the obviously the more number of people affected in the family usually will be rafer suspicion of being genetic caused, but you always have to remember that you know families also share environment. So for example, you have a family. That lives in now farm all exposed to pace. This is he is because there's a family history doesn't mean that you know he's always genetic, but also raise a flag right on and we always want to studied those those families but I, yeah, I think it's very important to remember that the these variants are inherited in very different ways and they have different effects. So so it is there it's complicated. That's why we have to go to school for so long. To try to understand all these mechanisms and all these about you behind it. Right. But But yeah, in a simple way again, we look for for what we call family agregation. So many different people and different generations are affected with the disease with similar symptoms similar age of onset..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease Joe rafer
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

04:11 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"All, right. So what's next for genetic? Research. Obviously, we've uncovered a number of genes. We're learning more about the genetics ultimately the biology of Parkinson's needs but still a lot more to learn and I you know what a touch on a few. Points and maybe go back to the NACHO and talk a little bit about one important part of genetics which is that a lot of genetics in Parkinson's done to date is really been just a subset of the population particularly in particular European Caucasians and a lot of the work that we're doing now is making sure that we understand the genetics and everybody would Parkinson's disease and I wonder not joking he's not a little bit more about some of the work that you're doing and really trying to expand our understanding Parkinson's really globally in sort of in a more diverse for people with Parkinson's. Sure and you. has clarified that unfortunately, there's not a parking since Feel problem it's all over across the all these is You know there's being a huge representation of non European population. So it is be issued only in Parkinson's disease, but in any other diseases and the good thing is that we're you know we're working towards changing this hopefully much faster than other diseases that we can said they example but yeah, I think you know we already talked about some of the various that have been identified associated to parking. And the truth is. These studies that have been done without a thousands of patients I'm talking about almost thirty, eight thousand patients and you know over a million controls those include only individuals that are highly from a European advocacy background and they're they're many reasons why these this has been done this way you know but I think ultimately, you know it's something that we need to fix because not only. You know we wanna be able to treat everybody you know with the best drugs apply to their ethnic or does genetic makeup. But you know we also want to understand better to disease and we we believe that these publishers have been studying the key to find new genes. So as you said, new genes, new therapies more understanding that disease. So we can provide better care and more opportunities for people to you know hopefully, be able to One day cured is they see so So we've been working on on Latin. America. Latinos. Are One of the populations that are very, very underrepresented this bag the fact that there's a lot of them in the in. The US. The fastest growing minority. So you know there's a lot of them in the US we need to be able to again proved provide equally good healthcare to to them so So about two thousand, hundred, six, we started working in in Latin America to try to getting up samples to be able to do this type of studies right because unfortunately as we mentioned some of these genetic have very low effect. So that means that you need to have thousands and thousands of people to be able to even see them So so we're trying to gather days and we've been working on it for about fourteen years now to the point where..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease US Latin America America
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

03:38 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"K. Two gene again, which makes a protein called there to the. Gene and office nuclear gene, and there are companies that are now making drugs that target the altered mechanisms. Underlie these genetic differences and and how they lead to Parkinson's disease that are in various stages of clinical development We talk about the different stages of clinical development you make your the word stays one as two, and also phase three Those are just the different stages of clinical testing phase. One is usually sort of early safety testing phase two is sort of early efficacy testing seeing if the drug is actually having a benefit and then phase three is sort of the ultimate test where we're actually looking to see. If those drugs are actually having real benefit and a large number of people So for these three genes, we actually have a number of trials that are ongoing for the K.. Two a gene for example, we have two companies, Denali and. That are both making drugs that target this mechanism and our testing those in people with Parkinson's now We also have a lot of efforts looking at mechanisms targeting GPA, with companies like Sanofi, genzyme, other companies, eastgate bio another company called licensed therapeutics that are developing different approaches to targeting GPA..

Parkinson Sanofi Denali genzyme eastgate
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:37 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"Twenty three and be was running a really sweet Valentine's Day special on their ancestry and health chips and so I think that's to my husband Hey. Let's go do this and so we did and got the results in April 'cause mine had to be redone for some reason and there I was with the Lark to mutation. But in the meantime I been doing a lot of other research. I saw that there was a mountain of. Risk factors that. with the Lark to if you're OSCHKENAT Jewish it raises the. Risk. Factor up to Twenty five percents and then A. Little corner of my paternal ancestry North African Berber and that raise it up to forty one percent. And then other risk factors such as living on a farm drinking well, water. Being their chemical. Dotted up and I thought okay. I Have Parkinson's early. Going on I, kind of diagnose myself before I went to a movement disorder specialist. And, that's how it happened and I was so glad to know. Thanks. So much I mean obviously a different story from for his but certainly, very compelling and the fact that you took. Charge. I think of your sort of own sort of knowledge about new genetics that really helped you. Then I think understand what was happening so I think everybody again, really powerful message. I'd love to talk to you a little bit more maybe near the end of the call with some of the questions that were getting about your experience but let's let's move on and talk a little bit about some of the exciting advances were making this genetic information in actually developing new treatments. So maybe before we sort of dive into where things stand a couple of points here first of all, what does it mean to when we understand genetics Parkinson's how did that actually lead to GonNa make new therapies and so getting this, this brings us back to the first slide where I talked a little bit about what you know jeans actually do in the body and how how they are really the instructions for proteins in the cell. And again when we see those changes in the gene recipe that can actually alter how the protein works and functions in the and then cases of disease if that function is impaired or altered in some significant way, it actually can potentially disease and so when we think about the genetics Parkinson's and you know as we look at these various genes that have been linked some of the ones we've already mentioned. L.. R. K. TWO GB a there were retained. An unseen called this new clean, which again is instructions for making a protein called Alpha Nuclear and And by understanding these genetic differences and how they impact those proteins..

Parkinson movement disorder R. K.
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

02:24 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"I think more information is better some people when they're about to have a kid, don't want to know what gender the kid is I would want to know, and in my case, I would want to know as much information as I can about my own body and I am. I think it's just helpful in general because I'm a numbers guy and I think that if the more information you have in the more numbers, you can crunch the more data you can collect and potentially the more therapeutics you can come up with down the road. Things over. We Need I. Know You have kind of an interesting story and your journey I think was a little little different from offers and wonder if you could walk us through that Sarah. I'm and thank you very much and over it's tonight to. Hear your story. I've seen your picture on Michael J. Fox foundation Brochures and booklets and everything, and it's nice to meet you and hear your story Yeah for me so much more recent journey. my father had Parkinson's. Very, mild and He had other things going on. So it wasn't the most prevalent thing in our lives and kind of forgot about it. And then I had started working in hospice became a medical social worker went back to school late graduated in twenty seventeen and started working as A. Hostile social worker in January of twenty eighteen and one of my first patients had. and stage Parkinson's and. Most people don't get to that stage necessarily, but there she was. And I was looking for a way to help her be more comfortable talk to her sister about the possibility of therapy and her sister said, well, that won't work because she lost her sense of smell a long time ago and I thought. Well, I want my smell sense of smell about five years ago. And then I was remembering. Well, let's see my father has Parkinson's disease and started looking up some of the Early symptoms and Counted off about five of them I had myself..

Parkinson Sarah Michael J. Fox
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

04:40 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"Of carrying some of these genetic changes doesn't necessarily always mean you're GonNa get Parkinson's and probably a lot of reasons for that in you looted to some of them even some of the sort of quote unquote more higher risk genes always necessarily guarantee that you can get Parkinson's, and I think this is an interesting. We can talk about this maybe in later on, we talk about the future of genetics but that there probably are a lot of factors including other genes that. In combination might oxy protect you from Parkinson's even if you carry some of these, some of these genetic changes that are normally linked to the having disease. So we can talk about that more near the end of the of the call today but I think that's a another point that you raised. All right. So let's move on time. So I WANNA. So now that we kind of have a grounding at least in sort of genetic basis Parkinson's as it exists today let's let's talk a little bit more. You know with people who actually had gone through this journey of. The genetics linked to Parkinson's and and sort of have gone through genetic testing. So before we kind of Go to our panelists I mean, there's a couple of quick points here. you know? When you think about getting genetic testing, a lot of ways to think about this and I think one of the most important things versus to ask yourself WH- why why do you WANNA get genetic testing not everybody necessarily wants to to go through this journey is important. I. Think when you when you think about these kinds of a decisions dachshund talk to your doctor, it's good to talk to A. Genetic Counselor you know talk to your family members make sure you understand again the reason for awhile you want to get you netted testing, but once you do make that decision, there are different ways that you can. You can go about getting genetic testing. You can actually go directly through your doctor and and actually have a genetic test sort of ordered as if you would, as you would any other medical.

Parkinson A. Genetic Counselor
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:52 min | Last week

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"These from biology standpoint. On the how many different players and that's only the genetic part, but there's also an environmental part, right. So there's a huge combination of things that really have to happen in most cases for somebody to develop the sees you know. Thanks thanks for that and you know so I think one of the ways we like to think about it just you know the slides sort of prevents are provides a little bit of that sort of concept is this sort of range of genetics again, and so we can think about you know those genes that you know are pretty rare but you know have no carry a high risk if you have those particular changes verses. Those that are lower risk and and you know but maybe an aggregate and and more frequent in the and people but maybe an aggregate increase your risk, can you talk a little bit more about that concept again because I think again, that's such a powerful thing when we think about. you know Parkinson's genetics rise. Exactly. So I think we need to different say those two things that I was trying to explain before you know the ones that will be after stated through familiar forms, which is you know very few and maybe even like less than five percent of the patients are caused by one of these rare variants right So you're you're playing maybe in lay terms I I I always liked the thing about the genome is like all different buttons that they're playing pigs. has rights if you run into if. You walk into a coffee, you see all these buttons. So our south are Kinda like that. It has all these different jeans needs to be turn on and turn off and really th. There are Kinda like two types of button. So there's both of that are completely necessary for the plane to to function. Well, right it's a pretty simple. You can think about the button that turns on and off the engines semi something goes wrong with that. You know the plane won't fly or if it's lying, they might belt flying which. Is You. Know is is it has a big effect that's what we usually call genetic how having a big effect or a huge impact on in this case, a a disease risk or Yeah. This is risk but they're older variants or other buttons on the plane. Worried something goes wrong. You know it may might get uncomfortable but he's not he's not enough to to become a problem right? So you can think of, for example, the as you're going off and we I think we all have been plane where to as he wasn't. Working or the heat was too hot and I mean, it makes it uncomfortable but you know in terms of genetics, those various don't really caused a disease per se..

Parkinson
Hurricane Sally, now a Category 2, takes aim at the Gulf Coast towards Alabama

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:13 min | 2 weeks ago

Hurricane Sally, now a Category 2, takes aim at the Gulf Coast towards Alabama

"Sally, which is set to hit the Gulf Coast as a hurricane by this evening. Hurricane Sally. Now a cat to storm is slowly moving in the Gulf towards Alabama. Matt Piper with the latest Hurricane Sally is taking aim at the Gulf Coast. Hundreds of miles of coastline are under storm watches and warnings and it appears will make a direct hit on Alabama, CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson the big thing that we are most concerned about with this storm system. Is the tremendous and I mean spectacular rainfall totals that we're going to be seeing. It's expected to make landfall hours from now. After midnight and we got more from CBS news correspondent. Mammal Bohorquez in Alabama has time to prepare runs out. The threat of Hurricane Sally comes into focus. Storm surge of up to 11 FT. For parts of the Gulf Coast and rainfall of up to 16 inches. Just don't take any changes with storm. It's always going to be prepared. Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana declare a state of emergency winds could likely hit 110. Miles an hour. By landfall. It's 9 36

Hurricane Sally Gulf Coast Alabama Sally Gulf CBS Matt Piper David Parkinson Louisiana Mississippi
The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

"All right well, nice to see you. Thanks for doing this my pleasure. Thank you for having. What how would you describe the the thesis of this book? Debating whether I should start right with a thesis or tell you how I came to the pieces. So. I think I'll do the second way because. I didn't go into this project with pieces, but a big linking pieces showed up halfway through. So what happened what led me into this? Somebody's what this book is. About is how we deal with these big wrenching changes in our lives back hallway light quake. And like what we're in now. And I got interested in these because I went through a life quake some years ago as you know, I I got cancer as a new TAB. About was that same year as the great recession and my family was hit very hard. And then my dad who has Parkinson's Lost Control of his mind. This was a man who was never a depressed admitted his life. And he tried to take his life. Times in twelve weeks. And this was kind of a big crisis. In every way, you can have a crisis, the conversations that we had to have. unhabitable eye like difficult conversations and these were difficult conversations that were impossible to have. But I'm the story guy and I'm the meaning guy in one morning on Monday morning I woke up and I said, well, your idea like what if I send my data question because my dad was always a bit of a storyteller. And I sent question like what toys did you play with a kid? Couldn't move his fingers at this point Dan. But he thought about it all week he dictated his answer to Syria who spit it out he began to edit it in at work and so I. Also another one like dummy balance you grumpy. And This went on essentially every Monday morning for what became years. Up. The. Hatch Become Eagle Scout. How'd you join the Navy how you meet mom and this man who had never written anything longer than three sentence memo in his life back into writing a fifty thousand word. And I got very interested in times of crisis in our lives like it. It's a narrative event in some way and it turns out there's a whole field narrative gerontology. There's all field of narrative adolescence, narrative medicine and kind of storytelling becoming kind of thing that people talked about at that time and so what happened and you know this makes me think of your own life and how you ended up in this conversation is when I began to tell the story to people everybody had a similar story. My wife had a headache and went to the hospital and died my daughter tried to kill herself. I. had nervous breakdown on my television in your case and and I thought well, no one else to tell their story anymore and. Let me see what I can figure out because people were saying like the life I'm living is not the life I expect like I'm living life out of order in some way. And I call my wife one night and I said. I got to figure out how to help. And I don't know I'm going GonNa find and I don't know how to do it but I feel compelled to do this and so I set out on this journey. What became Three four years crisscrossing the country collecting what became hundreds of life stories of Americans all ages all walks of life all fifty states and you name it damn. People lost homes, lost limbs, changed careers, genders, Religions got. Sober got a bad marriages. And at the end of it, I had it was powerful, but it was too much. I had six thousand pages of. Transcripts a thousand hours of interviews and I ended up doing something. I've never done thirty years of writing books. I got a whole team of people and we spent a year coating these. Combing through them debating I'm kind of beating one against the head trying to figure out. What was the big message? What was the big theme coming out of it?

DAN Parkinson Headache Syria
Miami - Tropical Storm Sally Strengthening and Could Strike Florida and Louisiana

WBZ Afternoon News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Miami - Tropical Storm Sally Strengthening and Could Strike Florida and Louisiana

"For a storm that could become a hurricane that's tropical Storm Sally. CBS meteorologist David Parkinson says New Orleans could be in the crosshairs, depending on how the storm moves if the models were correct in their projection. But it is a little bit more of a westerly track that puts New Orleans the city that has such history. With hurricanes coming in from this direction under the right side of the storm. What that means is it now gets the worst storm surge some really strong winds, potentially the farther west. This thing goes, the stronger it has the potential to be further out in the Atlantic.

New Orleans David Parkinson CBS Atlantic
Hurricane Laura forecast to become "extremely dangerous" Category 4 storm

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:56 sec | Last month

Hurricane Laura forecast to become "extremely dangerous" Category 4 storm

"Laura will likely be a catastrophic Category four hurricane when it hits the Gulf Coast overnight tonight. Right now, it's a Category three packing top sustained winds of 125 miles an hour. CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson right within 20 Miles or so either way of the Louisiana Texas State line, That's where you're absolutely going to get crushed by this storm. And then 200 miles away from the coast. You will be seeing hurricane force winds. CBS's Courtney's Dabrowski on the effort to get people to safety Louisiana Governor John Bell, Edwards says residents have until noon to be where they want to be too right out the store. My biggest fear is not so much that people aren't evacuating gets that they're going to decide to do that when it's going to be too late to move them. Storm surge of upto 13 FT is expected along the Gold Coast. In some spots. Water is already freaking up. We hadn't gotten storm yet, and it's already over the street. Well, it was a deadly night in

Gulf Coast Gold Coast CBS Laura Louisiana Texas State Louisiana David Parkinson Courtney John Bell Edwards
Louisiana to be hit by tropical weather systems Marco, Laura

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:50 sec | Last month

Louisiana to be hit by tropical weather systems Marco, Laura

"Along Louisiana's Gulf Coast are in four days of stormy weather. CBS meteorologist David Parkinson says the first of two systems Marco will make landfall later today. The storm has lost all semblance of formation on the satellite. There's not gonna be much wind out of the storm at all, but another storm could AMP. Up to hurricane status. Before it bashes the coast Wednesday, CBS's Janet Shanley and says it's already killed at least 11 people in the Caribbean. Tropical Storm Laura ripped across the island of Hispaniola Sunday rushing water overtaking the streets of Haiti. Trash everywhere. Bodies of victims laid out along the side of a road storm slammed the Dominican Republic. Flooding as far as the eye can see.

Gulf Coast CBS Janet Shanley Dominican Republic David Parkinson Louisiana Marco Haiti Caribbean Laura
Tropical Storms Headed to the Gulf of Mexico

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:52 sec | Last month

Tropical Storms Headed to the Gulf of Mexico

"Storm Marco is now Hurricane Marco and heading towards the Louisiana coast could make landfall tomorrow. More on that with CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson Marco was more promising, and frankly, it has higher wind speeds right now. Unfortunately, it is going to be running into sheer with sheer basically destroys our hurricane. It tears it apart the top part from the bottom. It can't consolidate. It can't get stronger And as a result, Marco will likely make landfall either as ah, we category one or a strong tropical storm and meanwhile, right behind Marco's Tropical Storm Laura, which is already doing some damage along Hispaniola. That storm is expected to turn up the Gulf later in the week. It would be the first time in more than 100 years that two hurricanes appear in the Gulf of Mexico simultaneously.

David Parkinson Marco Hurricane Marco Gulf CBS Louisiana Mexico
Tropical storms Marco, Laura near Gulf, expected to strengthen into hurricanes

The Organic Gardeners

00:40 sec | Last month

Tropical storms Marco, Laura near Gulf, expected to strengthen into hurricanes

"Storm in Marco was swirling over the Gulf of Mexico, heading for a possible hit on the Louisiana coastline Monday as a tropical storm or hurricane. Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Laura is following a track forecast to take it to the same part of the U. S coast later in the week. CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson says it's still not clear. Where Laura is going to make landfall. Laura is the one to watch for a Wednesday to Thursday landfall Texas or Louisiana, so Louisiana would be Wednesday. Texas would be Thursday. Everywhere from Houston and Galveston to Grand Isle, and New Orleans needs to be watching out for Laura.

Laura Louisiana Texas David Parkinson Marco Grand Isle Mexico CBS New Orleans Galveston Houston U. S
BRIAN'S ALIVE! - and he's going to release a new bedtime stories podcast

podnews

03:05 min | Last month

BRIAN'S ALIVE! - and he's going to release a new bedtime stories podcast

"Boys Girls S Brian, blessed here with another bedtime story. Yes. Best known for playing Prince Voltaren in the Flash Gordon movie actor Brian Blessed is to do his first podcast at bedtime stories podcast. It'll be released early next month with UK Broadcaster Union Jack Radio Feud night sleep tight. Job led the Brian. Try, and digital has released their latest US podcast rancor. The top ten networks top five podcasts are unchanged. Total downloads were up one point one percent the rancor only measures participating published has. Bryant by letter poster. Super. Interesting and very technical pace about reporting ad impressions on podcasts. Particularly what's actually possible and how useful and IP address actually is sink floor, which offers music licensing for projects. Including podcasts has partners with Gio sovereigns, artist originals. Aj Feliciano has been named head of the Roost Roost Tapes podcast network congratulations to him, and if you help podcast is published their shows all work in support for a podcast host, you might have wanted. Is Google podcast getting this podcast feed from we wrote a Google podcasts are helper today designed to help answer that question at last you'll find links from our show notes and newsletter today. Thank you to for becoming fifteen thousand newsletter subscriber yesterday. That's a nice big number as seventy, eight, thousand, two, hundred, and five, which is the monthly users on our website and six. Thousand Eight, hundred, sixty, four. That's you. That is the amount of monthly listeners to our podcast that's exciting and thank you, and here's to the next fifteen thousand. That's celebrating fifteen thousand subscribers. With free pulled news laptop stickers, send your postal address today and the code word podcast to editor at Pod News. Dot Net I'll get some stickers out to you have to do it before eleven fifty, nine pm San Francisco time tonight. That's Friday August the twenty first and if you missed any of that, just hit the rewind button because that's how podcasts work you know. Anti podcast news the Parkinson's podcast from the Michael J. Fox Foundation has been relaunched as a monthly show presented by broadcaster Larry Gifford. Larry also presents when life gives you. Parkinson's a personal journey into the condition he was diagnosed with three years ago. This week he's a top man as well. Oxford road presents has launched a new series divided states of media launching in partnership with the National Institute. For civil discourse, it's focused on the current state of media against a backdrop of an increasingly polarized populous and the pod news podcast. is now available on Ghana. We linked to every podcast directory in and how to submit yours too, and

Parkinson Brian Blessed Roost Roost Tapes Aj Feliciano Google United States Larry Gifford Ghana UK Pod News Bryant Michael J. Fox Foundation San Francisco National Institute Editor
A Gamified Therapy System Helps People with Brain Injury Recover

The Bio Report

08:05 min | Last month

A Gamified Therapy System Helps People with Brain Injury Recover

"John, thanks for joining us. It's a pleasure to be here. We're going to talk about mine motion, Go Neuro Rehabilitation and gamification complain improving outcomes for patients. Let's start with my motion. Go itself Oh. What exactly is it? Right. So Go is is one of the platforms produced by mine maze and it was specifically designed to be asked of technological advances in assist to physical therapists. That's the way to think about it. and it is as you say, a game of five platform. Which? allows. Patients to interrupt with therapists virus set of games on a screen. which are than the movements picked up by a camera has been used mostly is in the connect camera you know that probably from. Microsoft and so essentially, you should see it as. A camera picking up the movement to the patient while they play games projected onto the screen. With the computer present as well. So the therapists can program the game's changed at levels watch the patient play and record their movements for subsequent analysis for follow up. How how does it work? What's what is the patient due to use this? So the the patient will stand. In front or sit in front of a screen that movements we picked up by a camera. And then there's twenty seven games that they can pick from usually picked by the therapist and those games will Consists of games for the upper body lower body. And basically the standard. Movements and strategies therapist of used for time immemorial have now been turned into a quantifiable game old form. That the patient COMPLA- so for example, the patient and be a little octopus which is on the screen in a water channel, and then they can crouch up and down and up and down crouching movement they make will lead to a thrust of illegal octopus as it goes up the water channel, for example. So it's essentially bringing gamification quantification and standardization. Onto the repertoire of treatments at therapists have always had. And from a neurological point of view what's happening to someone who's using it? Well, I think it's very important. To sort of take a step back and you should ask that question what's happening to a patient when they're getting regular therapy right and you know we feel like what is happening during regular therapy is a patience on learning. To use what they have left after the damage to optimize their movements and retrain and what this game is doing is upping the efficiency. Of that approach. So I think the way to think about. Is. For example, you know you lose your right arm, you learn how to write with your left arm that's called compensation. Now. Think about doing that within the arm, just getting better with what you have left and so it's kind of motor learning. That, this platform encouraging. In patients and they also probably do a little bit more than motor aligning depending on when they get this treatment, you get it very early off a stroke you can actually probably get reversal of your deficit. And this allows you to practice in that setting as well. But see it as a kind of training device. For Motor learning off brain injury what are the range of conditions it's intended to treat? I think to the degree that therapists around the world are fairly generalized and who they look after, and there's a considerable lap in the set of movements and techniques that they use that this platform although has been specifically designed as a neurological platform and with originally devised for patients after stroke that means Article Jane, it be used in spinal cord injury brain injury And probably extend into other conditions, Multiple Sclerosis Parkinson's disease and at Hopkins it's being used. For Orthopedics and may be used, the cardiac patients sets quite general in so much that therapists are used to treating many different kinds of patients to surgery after injury. So I think quite general.

Microsoft John Jane Parkinson Hopkins
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:22 min | Last month

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"White and and so that that biased studying as a movement disorder course you learned that you know this is a primarily white you know elderly white male disease but my experience has you know been otherwise it of course that started my interest in trying to learning and improve pretty logical studies and improve here for for all people with Parkinson's growing up in in Mexico. Of course, you never heard a Parkinson's now is as communist as it is in in the US. I'm myself was in my late thirties when I was diagnosed. which was kind of you know an unusual thing even for myself as a movement disorder specialists, you know my grandmother had Parkinson's but she developed a later live like and so for me to be in my thirties and having an illness was definitely something I opener and having those barriers you know going to precision as saying. You're Hispanic you're a woman you're in your thirties why would you have Parkinson's and I'm like I'm a Parkinson specialist I have Parkinson's and the, but it doesn't happen. Well, you know why would you WanNa have Parkinson's is not that I wanted to have pregnancy. I'm having Parkinson's it. Took me three years of specialists three years to get officially diagnosed because everyone gives saying you're a woman you're Hispanic and you're young Bernadette I wanNA know how does underdiagnosis and sub optimal care for communities of Color in clinic affect the research side. Right. So you know medical research is about learning a disease you. So you can find treatments and so we know that the best way to learn about a disease is to study people who have the disease on. However if you have under diagnoses on, you're missing a group of people or communities on that, you won't be able to understand and study how the disease on affects them, what the symptoms may be more relevant or prevalent in that community and. How to treat that. So one having a missing a large portion or a significant portion of people who have the disease is going to make us difficult to define and understand how to treat the disease, and then second if we are studying populations in research, which right now we are who come from a very similar background. It's very difficult for us to kind of questioned the hypotheses that were generating. So I'll give you an analogy Larry if I were to. Only, see Brown cats in my life than I want to you Larry, and said, you know all cats are brown that's it. There's only brown cats in this world and you'd come to me and say, well, that's not true. I've Seen Kassim..

Parkinson movement disorder Larry White US Brown Mexico Bernadette
Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

Moving2Live

05:20 min | Last month

Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live podcast. As you heard in the Intro, we are a podcast where we try to break down knowledge silos our ethos along with our sister podcast lab Pittsburgh is to spread the word that movement should be treated as a lifestyle not just in activity. Some of our best guests often come from recommendations or introductions from other guests and a big. Thank you to fred go PT Helper who connected me with today's guest. Fred was the sponsor or cosponsor with P T helper of a virtual clinic that was held with a company called urban polling. When I saw urban polling, I'm like I'm not exactly sure what that is. I looked it up I found out and I was fortunate enough the defender of the company Manish Shantanu who is a gerontologist occupational therapist. Was Willing to speak to me. So Mandy, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to live. Oh. Thank you so much for having me. Ben In I. Agree Sometimes, the name is a bit misleading in terms of. Away represents I know my first question I always liked to start out with with moving to live is what your elevator spiel and you get on the elevator someplace in your either carrying an urban pulling tote bag. You have an urban pulling sure people say, what do you do? Who Are you? What do you tell them? On okay, in two minutes well. Generally I'll say to them is that. Bourbon polling is based on Nordic walking which is. Security that. Is Very popular over in Scandinavia. Have the healthiest people into world. And basically, your upper body is doing something that looks like cross country skiing at your body you're just walking in urban settings so Sidewalks. Roads. Parks trails. For Friday other different ways. But that's usually my elevator pitch on the on the topic. and. I know we'll get into that more detail in the second half of the interview. Out of curiosity, just for the listeners, how does this differ from maybe somebody who's a hiker or a trail runner who uses polls on rough terrain? Oh, we're great question Whitmer gave asked that a lot. Well, basically onion I'm a big hiker myself and the different is died. It's one as the design of the poll and second round it's the technique. So when you're hiking usually you're you know you're elbows are banned in, you're using it to offload the weight off your hip Sidney used to give it more stability. Whereas this activity, your arms are straight more like cross country skiing not sure every volunteer this user familiar across cross scene, and it's about changing your walking into brisk walking or an athletic walk. You're using the pool and has got allege. That's designed. Did you press down that legislative move your arm back and you get insert you work like seventy five to ninety percent of your muscles. So it's all about getting like a high intensity cardio and including resistance training there as well. So just say different benefits, different pools and in different technique. So. It's almost like it's the exact opposite when the trail runners using the hikers are using it as you said, to offload the body or to offload the worker, decrease the work. In the case of polling, you're trying to increase the workload or make it more of a workout that is an accurate representation. Yeah. Absolutely. That's a great description however just to. Add to the confusion we. Developed in in different ways, what we did was we took the generic activity ignored walking and we looked at I'm as as an occupational therapist I I look at the research and then I was like Haney, how could we doubt this so that we can actually use this fitness activity for habilitation that case it's more like hiking. You Know Allen Allenstein posture offloading like hearing candidates since it's the best practices to use it for pre and post beneath surgery for those exact reasons. So on the one hand. You do all those use it for that reason for Rehab but on the other hand it, you wanted to use it for losing weight or you know increasing your intensity exercises. So for example. Here in Canada people with diabetes people recovering from cardiac heart surgery, a people who are beasts will action use the urban pollinger fitness technique whereas Parkinson's stroke pre abusive new surgery on you. Other neurological conditions they will actually use our activator which provides more balance instability and

Fred Mandy BEN Pittsburgh Manish Shantanu Allen Allenstein Haney Whitmer Scandinavia Sidney Canada Parkinson
Hurricane Isaias makes landfall in the Carolinas

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

Hurricane Isaias makes landfall in the Carolinas

"A yes Makes landfall slammed into Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina last night as a Category one hurricane. Hammering the coast with heavy rain and 85 mile an hour winds. Almost 270,000 utility customers have no power. Storm surge and flood warnings are in effect from Cape Fear to the Virginia border. Randy Webster is with Horry County, North Carolina. Public safety, he says, the pandemic will get in the way of cleanup. So all the events that typically we response you real quickly. And handle could be slow this time. Just because of the covert have fewer folks here to help out. The CIA's has been downgraded to a tropical storm. Now, CBS meteorologist David Parkinson says the system is headed north mid morning through lunchtime in the DC Metro area. You're going to be seeing at least 4 to 6 inches of rain, with isolated spots higher. And that probably carries all the way up through Baltimore into Wilmington and Philly, likely as well.

North Carolina Randy Webster Ocean Isle Beach Horry County CIA David Parkinson CBS Virginia Philly Baltimore Wilmington
Elon Musk Wants to Stream Music Directly to Your Brain With His Neuralink Chip

Dave Ramsey

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Elon Musk Wants to Stream Music Directly to Your Brain With His Neuralink Chip

"Heads up Tesla's Space six and the boring company also cofounded another startup back in 2016 called Nora Link. If you heard about this, um there hasn't been a lot of details about the start I could accept that involves the chip that's supposed to be surgically implanted. Into the brain. That kid next to a computer. Get the goal is to add a level a I artificial intelligence to a person. But before that, Must said that it actually has a really great purpose for help people suffering with conditions like Parkinson's, but more information supposed to come out late next month, But you know, Elon Musk is pretty active on Twitter. And sometimes he tweets about, you know, every once in a while things that are actually coherent makes sense, and he recently had a few things to say about the chip. He said that nor link had potentially retrained parts of the brain as a way to cure addiction and depression. He also said that the chip could control hormone levels. That's a pretty bold claim. In a few days ago. He tweeted that the interface will allow you to stream music listeners stream music directly to your brain. Imagine that no speakers. No, You're buds, headphones. Nothing. Just go right into your brain. Just a small microchip that he claims is no worse than LASIK eye surgery, getting it in their interesting prospect when it comes to the possible medical benefits, But If you think you were having trouble getting a Taylor Swift song at your head Now we'll just wait till that thing gets in. You

Elon Musk Nora Link Tesla Must Twitter Taylor Parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:03 min | 2 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"People with Parkinson's in terms of their symptoms and and their overall wellbeing. So that was part of the inspiration for trying to understand how the pandemic affected. these people that were not infected by Kobe we presume but still still obviously had to undergo all the shelter in place guidelines and restrictions from the pandemic so. We found a large number of people that had impact obviously to their healthcare to exercise activity to social activities we asked about a variety of different types of social activities like the poor groups community, gathering, volunteer, experience, religious gatherings A lot of those were were either postponed or cancelled and a lot of impact on the central daily activity as well. So you know disruptions of things like getting essential services, home care other types of support in the house. and a lot of this also Kinda was associated with worsening symptoms in people who Didn't necessarily have covert but we're in the pandemic You know one other kind of there's a lot to talk about this and we talk about a lot. In the manuscript patrol which we're working on, but the you know important point too is how many people were able to find other. Avenues of doing these types of things. So if some everything two types of social activities and exercise activities, there was A. Decent number of people that were able to find different ways you know because you're me to tell A. Telemedicine or other types of of virtual visits and continue these activities and you know the hope would be that would be even more accessible and more available in the future. This continues. Yeah. That's absolutely right and that's in. We'll talk about this on the next slide. But something that we need to continue to advocate for the future is more widespread and continued access the Tele Madison. But as you detailed really nicely, there were such broad impacts on things that are so important to Parkinson's care. The cornerstones of not only just seeing your doctor and and and getting in touch with your doctor. But.

Parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"Parkinson's You know first and foremost we know that there are a lot of biological neurochemical changes that result from the disease process that characterizes Parkinson's. So we see changes in sort of the amount and the availability of the feel good chemicals called neurotransmitters that are available in the brain we. Also see changes or traffic jams or interruption across them. The highways that connect different areas of the brain as well as you know, some decreased activity in certain brain regions that are related to mood. But in addition to those biological neurochemical changes, they're also behavioral factors and cognitive factors that are implicated in moods. So what do I mean by that? So when I say behavioral factors, you know what a person is doing or Not. Doing. in response to the various and very real challenges that they're experiencing. You Know Day in and day out doesn't individual have kind of enough exposure to the people places and things that provide them with a sense of satisfaction or reward or meaning or productivity in their day to day. Parkinson's can really change the landscape of the day and we really have to think creatively you know think outside of the box sometimes build. A better box to figure out You know how we really can expose ourselves to those life experiences that are going to enable us to feel good about ourselves. You know. So as an individual exercising are they engaged in, you know meaningful social connections do they have hobbies or leisure activities that enable them to feel good about themselves so we really need to look kind of behaviorally and what an individual doing as well as consider. You know how they're thinking about themselves and their world and their future You know what Parkinson's May mean or not mean for them and their ability to you know to cope with the changes difficulties that they are going to be experiencing from time to time. So really depression and anxiety or are multifactorial the biology sets the stage, but individual reacts and cope with the changes and the challenges that Parkinson's per presents. Also plays a really important role. So you know learning coping skills to best manage stress negative feelings as well as becoming aware of you know how we're talking to ourselves. What are the messages that we're giving to ourselves? You know are we speaking to ourselves with the same kind gentle you know compassionate tone that we would speak to a dear friend or are we being overly critical and harsh towards ourselves? And oftentimes those self critical messages play a very important role in maintaining these negative mood states. There's been incident if you look at the laundry list what were some of the things that you were experiencing and head this little changed over time for you I mean the sleep problems are definitely initial who are. Really. You know I worry all the time. Just mood swings And and just feeling feeling really down.

Parkinson
Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

"Actor Ian home has died from an illness related to Parkinson's CBS is Peter king takes a look back at his extraordinary career he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I still have an ending for my book Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated routed to a satellite calm dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor it hard he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy Awards night in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS

Ian Home Parkinson CBS Bilbo Baggins Ian Holm Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy
'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

"Of the rings star Ian home has died correspondent Jason Nathanson has celebrated actor Sir Ian Holm was nominated for an Oscar for his role as coach samosa beanie in chariots of fire it said the bloody years for this because starting everything from alien to Brazil to the fifth element but one of his most high profile role was as Bilbo Baggins in the lord of the rings movies in nineteen ninety eight he received a knighthood for services to drama he passed away from complications due to Parkinson's disease Sir Ian Holm is eighty eight

Jason Nathanson Sir Ian Holm Oscar Brazil Parkinson
'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

"British actor Ian Holm has died after an illness related to Parkinson's disease he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I thought of an ending for my book and he lived happily ever after Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated right to do it it's not like Cologne dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor at heart he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy award was knighted in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS news

Ian Holm Bilbo Baggins Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy CBS
Test Show 05-24-2020 00:00 - burst 3

AP News - Recording Feed

01:16 min | 4 months ago

Test Show 05-24-2020 00:00 - burst 3

"Another study with one hundred thousand patients around the world finds there's no benefit from hydroxy chloroquine and there is a higher rate of heart problems and death former vice president. Joe Biden's walking back this comment on iheartradio's breakfast club. I'm telling you if you have a problem figuring out whether you're familiar trump and you ain't black later saying that he does not take black voters for granted. Some of basketballs greats are honoring Jerry. Sloan the former UTAH. Jazz coach died from Parkinson's disease and other complications. The Dow was down slightly lower. The NASDAQ UP. Forty this is. Ap News the FBI's launching an internal review of its Michael Flynn investigation or rare after action review of the investigation of former trump administration. National Security Adviser Michael. Flynn has been ordered by. Fbi Director Christopher Wray. There was no information on. What sort of potential misconduct is being investigated? The review will be led by the bureau's Inspection Division which handles internal investigation into potential employee misconduct. The timing of the announcement comes two weeks after president. Donald Trump suggested that race status has FBI. Director was in question.

FBI Vice President Donald Trump Michael Flynn Joe Biden Director Parkinson's Disease Christopher Wray Chloroquine Sloan AP Jerry Utah National Security
"parkinson" Discussed on Spit

Spit

10:31 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Spit

"I was diagnosed at a very young age. I was only twenty seven years old and this was back in two thousand and three my wife and I had just gotten married and we're starting our lives together. We had a mortgage right. You're grown up. We're finally adults <hes> back then. I knew nothing about Parkinson's. I was active. I played golf <hes> so I'm going to be stiff especially. I refuse to ride in the cart. I always walked for now with Kerry forty pounds of clubs in my back back so being a little stiff after walking eighteen holes is normal right. I worked in. It industry this is back in the early nineties in the DOT com boom so so being stressed at work is very common minor twitches here and there can explain away these things that I'm feeling I was losing my balance and you know I just always thought maybe I was this is not paying attention being a Klutz so everyday life can be used to explain away the things I was feeling. How did you decide that this. Could no longer be explained blamed away. Actually I didn't someone else did I bought life insurance and of course what comes with a life insurance insurance physical right the insurance physical. Oh the the nurse that came in did the physical actually noticed some things about me. Then all started with the dilation of my pupils being really slow and then she explained to me that hey you know I do insurance turns physicals on aside and I actually work in a neurologist office should never said the word Parkinson's. She never said anything else except that I should have a discussion Russian with my doctor about the things that we're about to talk about which is all related around the way that I was moving and the things that she was noticing. I wasn't swinging my arms. When I walked across the room and back my peoples are still leading really slow and I would have stiffness and minor twitches here and there one UH referral after another a easy four to six months later in Hell diagnosis process. I was finally told that I have Parkinson's. What what did they discover in your body. That confirmed that it's Parkinson's GonNa know. There's no blood test for it. There is absolutely no blood test for Parkinson's. There is no single thing that you can do. Ooh The tell you that you have or don't have Parkinson's. The most reliable thing back then was what they called a Dat. Scan and brings can that essentially looks for changes changes in the area of the brain where dopamine being produced and even that is unreliable. They say that would be an indicator and then after we look at the scans then they said all right. It looks like you might have something so here's some drugs to take and these are Parkinson's medications which is Lever Doper Carbon Yoga if my body reacts positively to these drugs then that's how I was diagnosed and that's exactly what happened. Yeah so you find out four to six months later you you have this disease and you don't do anything about no absolutely. I can get my head around it. I always thought that Parkinson's was for older people. I never knew view that someone who's twenties can possibly have it. I was convinced myself that my doctors are wrong after three opinions yes all three neurologists were wrong. I convince this myself. I convinced myself that I would just push through it and it would go away. Just like everything else is thought you could shake it. I thought I can just shaken walk-off. Lock it off exactly wrote some dirt on it and we're good to go for the next eight years. I didn't go back regularly the only back when I needed refills by took the same dose of medication. No changes didn't even open a pamphlet that they gave me. When I was diagnosed. I went into full denial L. Mode. How is your wife responding in this period where you both know you. Have this but you're doing the bare minimum to manage it. She didn't even know it. I I didn't tell her for a couple more months after I was diagnosed only when I decided that I would have to take medication regularly that tell her how did that go. I think it was shock and it was more disbelief on her part like what you kidding that can't be right and I think she took the same approach that I took because she's getting her. Choose from me and if I'm not displaying any signs that need help then. She didn't think she needed to help at the time right eight years later under my disease has progressed to the point where I was walking with a cane because I kept falling over. I became very inactive. I weighed actually two hundred and forty pounds. It's two hundred and fifty pounds at one point like a fifty percent. Increase in my weight has gotten so hard to move to this point that I just stopped moving. I would have put on weight without the cane. I could fall so that's how I live my daily life one day coming down the stairs at home carrying my infant son. He was ten months old. Wow by went started preceded downstairs in I of course I fell tumble down the stairs with my son. So you're desperately trying to save his life life. Yes protect him. Even though the act of carrying him down the steps was putting him in danger. Absolutely I had quite a few thoughts immediately. After the fall yeah number one was is he okay number two. I looked over my wife and my daughter both witnesses and the looks on their faces was probably the most disheartening thing that I can see see at that time. My son was OK. Thankfully yes but at the same time. I now realize that I've become a safety issue for kids in my mind. I've become a burden to my family because now not only does my wife have to worry about the kids. She has to worry about me yet so would you do. I thought about throwing in the towel to be honest. I'M NOT GONNA lie it was it's the dark time in our lives frustration anger depression all that stuff simply because I couldn't move. I couldn't play with my kids. I couldn't live <hes> quote unquote normal active lifestyle but then after I thought about a little bit I started doing research and for the first time I started to look an open pamphlet. I have never opened well. I finally opened it yeah and then my wife wife and I started talking about the things that we need to learn about Parkinson's. We studied it together and we learned yeah. I noticed that there's no cure out there obviously but also notice that there's a lot of clinical trials available. They were all starving for participants. Nobody's signing up for these things so that's what I told my wife I told her hey you know we both know. I'm not smart enough to find a cure right. She should not have had immediately. We obviously can't Fund A. Cure 'cause. It takes a lot of money so that's what I was going to do. I was going to give up my body for Science Alzheimer's sign up for as many of these clinical trials as I possibly can take part in them somewhere as simple as answering questions some involve experiment therapies so I did them. All whoever wakes up me I did so you go from hyper passes into hyper active yes yeah and hyperactive in my education and one thing that I had noticed doing these clinical trials that everywhere I look exercises mentioned all the time and this was mind blowing to me because I have a movement disorder yeah right and they want me to move that was crazy yeah right but then it turns out that we now not today that high intensity exercise is the only treatment proven to slow progression of Parkinson's. Tell me what that feels like in your body. I always say that it's that moment. Of How do you describe it that moment right the just moments even yeah. I had to build my way up. Brian I started walking and then I started jogging started running but I was doing that long enough to develop what they call the runner's high and that's essentially release of endorphins in your brains that makes you feel oh happier than you really harm right because let's be honest. Running sucks for keeping unreal yes. I'm you know I'm not saying runnings for everybody but you know I was doing it because it was making we feel better yeah and it had to do with the runner's high but more I exercised the better I felt. It just made me WanNa do more. It really did become my drug in more ways than one. It was a therapy drug and it's also almost like narcotics because I wanted to do more and I couldn't get enough of it so I just kept pushing. I've read your stats feel like I'm looking at a sports program. At all players. Cardi's got one ultra marathon fifteen marathons one hundred half marathons on American Ninja Warrior two seasons three seasons see that's well. I always joke that on a playground nobody ever ever pick me but I think that's the mindset that have today. That allows me to do a lot of these things I mean. When I started running. I never run anything more than a mile but my first five K. came in two thousand twelve and ever since two thousand twelve. Iran all those racist you mentioned and then some 'cause there's also triathlons in there. There's also century <unk> bike rides in there. In fact I was the first person on record with Parkinson's to complete a hundred mile bike ride and under five hours and that's holding twenty miles per hour for five hi powers and that was able to do these things because I kept pushing myself. I kept putting one foot in front of the other and my motto was what can I do today. That's better than yesterday because I'm going to have good days and I'm going to have bad days and on those bad days. I'll be honest. I don't even want to get out of bed. I just WanNa lay down and I just want to sleep or I just wanted to rest but even those days I have to make myself get up. I know in those days. I'm not going to get more than yesterday but at least I'm up and moving moving and then when I come back the next day if I feel better than I go after it. Can you talk a bit about what's taken to emotionally. Retrain yourself mentally retain in yourself. One of the things that I I learned is that this is not a hobby so the mental preparedness that I have to tell myself I self to get after it every day to do my regimen whatever it is exercise stretching keeping track of my medications so I can keep a log from my doctor so we can both work better together to develop the right dosage and the right treatment plan for me because only person that has this data's me and my doctors. There's a smart enough to help me but I have to provide that data so you have to be disciplined to exercise to take your meds to keep track of what everything is and then provide that data so that you can to help yourself so this is a lifestyle change does that.

Parkinson Kerry dopamine movement disorder Lever Doper Carbon Yoga Iran Cardi Brian I forty pounds eight years six months twenty seven years fifty percent fifty pounds five hours ten months one foot one day
"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Locations around the twin cities here in Minnesota. So Dr if you had a client with Parkinson as far as DHA supplementation, what would you make as far as recommendation or what have you done? Oh, well, at least sixty HA lease. You know, six hundred milligrams of DHA at least. And then I have them eat a couple of eggs. Yes, because organic eggs, grass-fed eggs, grandson chicken night from for what you know from the west. In the pastor, they have about one hundred milligrams of DHA per gig. So then you're getting a couple more hundred, right? So that's a great idea and choline and all these other marine who seen your vitamin a good idea. So that's a good idea. Yeah, and all that. Good fat, right. Exactly where your brain. So today we've been talking about Parkinson's and back to our topic at hand. You know, as a nutritionist, I, you know, have to share this research to that was published ten years ago in the journal of movement disorder. This two thousand eight research found that people who had the lowest all the all cholesterol often referred to as the quote uncle, bad cholesterol were at the increase risk of Parkinson's by about three hundred and fifty percent. That is just shocking. Yes. So again, these are lizard Clinton had really low bad or quote unquote bad. LDL cholesterol had three hundred fifty percent increase risk for Parkinson's. You know, in the book grain brain David POE mater Dr. David Pomona said, when cholesterol levels are low, the brain slim simply doesn't work. Well. An individuals are a significant increase risk for neurological problems as a consequence. And he's a neurologist, yes. A well-known urologist writes in has some personal investment because of his dad in this topic, right. So you're hearing it from both from a clinical point and from a personal point, right? So so we need that good cholesterol for healthy brain. Definitely. Yeah. Just yesterday I had a client and she was told to try to get her cholesterol as low as absolutely possible, which is scary, right, man. I mean. There's lots of research about how that too low cholesterol really negatively affects us. And you know, Dr promoter goes on to say that all d. l. cholesterol is not the enemy. Like we've been told, and the problem actually occurs when we're eating a lot of carbohydrates, and then that leads to accidents l. the out. So to explain this a little bit further, the access sugar processed, carbs, Brad's pastas crackers. That leads to accidents l. the oil molecules and that's going to reduce their capacity to deliver cholesterol to your brain south. And that might cause your brain function to really, really suffer. So yes, our brain needs cholesterol, fat and political. Exactly. So protecting our brain cells from damage is so complex and unfortunately in a weed. You know, we'd have to run into the next shoulder planner. Be here for a whole day I go. Right. So one of the things that we want to you know we have already talked about is certainly people need to have sufficient vitamin d. Yep. And we also talked about Lear, you just talked about DHA the mega three DHA. These are great things for your brain, and we just have to just keep going and talk about this more in detail. And so let's go now to the next part where we want to talk about, what do you eat to help to reduce some of these symptoms? Right. You know, we understand that Parkinson's is a movement disorder, but it's the lack of movement or constipation that is the most troublesome for many Parkinson's patients. So sometimes constipation is the first symptom experienced by person with Parkinson's and my recommendation for this lack of movement in your intestinal track and bowels and other, you know, shaky or stiff movements is to reduce stop and eliminate sugar and grains from your diet big, big step. That's a huge in a lot of, you know what? I find a lot of Parkinson's. These are the foods that they want to eat. They don't rave food. And so as a big step, it's a hard one, but it's a critical one in it's where I've seen some of the most benefit exactly with reduction of symptoms in relation. To Parkinson's, which I thought it was also as we were is, is reading more of the research, putting the show together that one of the first symptoms is constant passion. I've seen that and we don't know for sure that afterwards when once they've been diagnosed constipation is a big issue for a lot of people with Parkinson's and sugar and in processing processed grains. So we're talking cereals and bagels and breads pasta for they're all high sugar inflammatory for everyone, but in relation to the issues with bowel, I mean, can drive more of that issue now constipation. Yup. We say a lot of clients with constipation, a lot of we do unfortunately, but always always tell them make sure they drinking enough water, eight to ten glasses a day hydrate at colon. And then you also really wanna be avoiding those the hydrating beverages. So one Cup of coffee, totally fine. But six to ten. No, that's just too much. And really dehydrating, of course, pop throw that out the window. Yes, but here's some other practical ways prevent that constipation. So leeann mentioned cereal concentrating. No. Starting your day with cereal is only gonna make things worse, which two eggs saute some spinach in their use coconut oil or butter to saute that spinach Soto at just a good amount of fiber in there. You get that beneficial fat, and then some foods that are really concentrating. Cheese. Now that sad for people to learn bananas and. Paphos all constipated foods. You know when I worked with clients with Parkinson's constipation has always been one of their first concern's. So in addition to eating eggs or meat and vegetables, sauteed in butter or coconut oil, I recommend that they supplement with a probiotic befo bacteria, two or three times a day, the more the better and a bedtime. Take a different product called acid off less. And that seems to balance out and help a lot of people. Well, it makes a lot of sense to Dr because if we know you know, in the coal in, there's a lot of bifida bacteria in the colon. It's the bit that's a major bacteria that really, really helps with that regularity. Make sure you have the right type of bowel movement. Yes. Yeah. You know, in my go-to for constipation is to add on top of that is to add four to eight capsules of mixed magnesium. And this myth. Magnesium has some citrate which is good more regularity and bowel movements than glysophate, which is really highly absorbable, which is good for our muscles in me, lack station of our colon. You could start with, you know, two three per day usually have haven't taken at bedtime an increase if necessary. And if you get too much, magnesium, you'll get loose stool. So that's kind of the the no two. If you're. A little bit too much. So mixed Nick knees. Eum is very helpful for all also very helpful for getting a good night's sleep as well. So that's and I think that's the other thing that people with Parkinson's disease sometimes struggle with is their sleep. Yes. So you get a twofer? Yes. They tend to have lighter states of sleep like they don't get good deep sleep. Yes. And the magnesium is a great support for that. Yeah. Well, it's it's break time again. Okay. So you're listening to dishing up nutrition. We are pleased to be offering our weight and wellness classes, theories this fall, starting Tuesday, October second, and Thursday, October October. Fourth. If if six classes is in the evening aren't really not convenient for you, and maybe that's one of the reasons why you haven't signed up for this class of this point. You really may wanna think about in sign up for our weekend weight and wellness seminar. On the weekend of October twelfth and thirteenth. That's a great jam packed weekend full of great information register in for the weekend series and also are a regular six weeks series. You can do so on our website, our office. And if you do buy Tober, fifth, you'll receive an early fifty dollars early bird discount. You know, I think of the weight and wellness theories as nutrition one, oh one, everything you need to know to stay healthy and it's taught in our way that will motivate you to make the necessary changes. You need it really. Once you know that information, it's hard. It's hard not to know what to do. You know collar office today at six, five one, six, nine, nine, three, four, three, eight, or go to our website weight and wellness dot com to sign up to end or to get your answers. Questions answered. We'll be right back. Welcome back to dish. Attritional. Dahmer's bottom we mentioned before in the show, Parkinson sees is a very complicated neuro degenerative disease and symptoms vary greatly in from one person to another you. Everybody has different symptoms. One thing we know for sure is food matters when it comes to calming the symptoms of Parkinson's. That's a big step for people to think about in of course, I encourage individual nutrition therapy appointment for anyone suffering from this disease. So call six, five one, six, nine, nine, three, four, three eight to set up a personal to our consultation. One of the things I wanted to put out a reminder then on November tenth, we're having our menopause survival seminar and that's a whole day on Saturday. November tenth know I'll be there along with registered and licensed dietitian. JoAnn in nutrition 'age cater Chris, and we have a lot of information

Parkinson constipation Minnesota journal of movement disorder movement disorder Clinton degenerative disease Brad Lear David POE Soto JoAnn Dahmer Nick knees Eum Chris
"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"The risk of Parkinson's disease. Now, think about this. This study was done eighteen years ago. Yeah, and I don't see it being flashed across the TV screen or it's not front page news, right? But it should be. It should be. And you know, really Dr growing up on a farm as the as a young one. Right. Did you realize the typical type of large scale farming is one of the most dangerous occupants of occupations you can have really as a farmer, you know, using these chemicals because of the large exposures to these chemicals while you know? It's really interesting. I think my dad was well, a hail of, I don't know he, he didn't believe in doing any of these chemicals. Right? I mean, I think all of our neighbors believed in them, but he didn't. And so we didn't get that exposure which now is I look back? I think he was really so knowledgeable so ahead of his time that I fake him for, you know. Yeah, you know, working with a few, my Parkinson's clients myself. Unfortunately, a lot of them have been farmers and they have some of them have realized that maybe some of their chemical exposures specifically, there was talk about roundup being maybe one of the reasons why they develop the condition unfortunately and have stopped stopped. So it's interesting just before we started the show today, you were talking about going to a seminar to learn more about this eight, which is the active chemical around up? Yes, and and that it isn't just farmers being exposed to it is right. So the largest consumption of of roundup this life is eight is a commercial use. So it's what we're buying at Menards or at Home Depot, and we're using spray weeds on our lawns in our or. Our crops, maybe we have a garden. So that's where the that's where a roundup makes most of it sales. We think a lot about the farming piece which is critical and important, but it's it's really, unfortunately all around us, but in you know what? The my neighbors have a service that comes out. Yes, and I know that's what's being sprayed on their lawns. So I don't let my dogs walk on their lunch. Are are. So I live in in the heart of the city and I and I live next to a complex and the complex used to spray there on we, we share a lot. I mean, we basically share our our yards together and the community itself last year went together and had the the building stop using the roundup on the line because they wanted to be they have a hubby hive on the roof and the u. of m. wouldn't allow them have the beehive if they had round up on the line. So I was very happy because my kids would go and me only a couple of feet away from us. And so we know it's hard to avoid these exposures. I think one of the other places that we should caution people about is the golf course. Yeah, right. And they don't even realize that they're getting exposed and some of my clients have quit golf golfing because of that. Yeah, I have clients I've talked to about that you, yeah. Okay. We'll get on with. All right. So in two thousand five, the report, the environmental working group or also knows e WG found that DDT is still in them Bill cords of babies. Even though this chemical was banned decades earlier, this clearly shows the facts of toxic pesticides are long lasting, sadly this toxic chemical, maybe with us for another hundred years and continue to affect our health. You know, just think of it sixty thousand more cases of Parkinson's every year. Wow. Yeah. The residue really stays for a long time. Okay. You know, before we get onto any more details on this, we got to go to break, okay, you're listening to dishing up nutrition. And today we are discussing nutrition for Parkinson's disease. There is no cure at this time for this complicated neurodegenerative disease. But as with all chronic conditions, food makes a diff-. Prince certain foods seem to increase symptoms while certain foods, calm symptoms. Stay tuned as we share valuable information about the foods that can calm, Parkinson's symptoms and next week, be sure to tune in as Cassie and Jennifer discuss when to use probiotics and prebiotics will be right back. There are some things we wish for you to do what everyone else can do hop in your car. Go to work flip right into a movie seat. Now there's a perk by Keith jeans right off the rack dance at the next wedding to love shack, play tag with your kids and hear them say that was the most awesome day walk your dog dog or both. Just because he can comfortably fly coach all the way to Japan be there on graduation day, especially if it's yours and you got your MBA meet your greatest love and ride off into the sun. This is your life go live it. You've. Only got one. If you think you've tried everything to lose the weight that's keeping you from your best life. Think again, learn the new science of weight loss in the nutrition for weight loss program at nutritional weight and wellness onsite or online. You can do this. We'll help you. You're not alone. This is a promise not just upon join us at weight and wellness dot com. Welcome

Parkinson m. golf neurodegenerative disease Menards Home Depot Keith jeans Japan Cassie Jennifer hundred years
"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Welcome to dishing up nutrition with license nutritionists and dietitians from nutritional weight and wellness weeks plane. The connection between what you eat and how you feel. Stay tuned for practical real life solutions for healthier living through real food nutrition down. You got to make a mom last just down. Addition, nutritional, this show today brought you by nutritional weight and wellness. And our topic for discussion is nutrition for Parkinson's. I'm Darlene Kevin. I've been a certified nutrition specialist and a license nutritious since nineteen Ninety-six. So over the past twenty years, I worked with hundreds of clients as you know. Know. But honestly, in all those years, I've only worked with just a few clients with Parkinson's disease. It is interesting to note that Parkinson's disease is affects almost a one million people in the United States. Yeah, but six million worldwide, which is interesting. And I think he's even more shocking that every year now this is every year sixty thousand people are diagnosed with Parkinson's in. I think that number is increasing every year. Yeah. So you know. So when I was preparing for the show, I couldn't decide if we should talk about how we can prepare our clients in our clients immune systems to protect us and them from Parkinson's disease or pay. Should we talk about nutrition, how it can help to calm down some of those symptoms. So I decided it was important to do both, and we actually need a longer show for this. And Romy run overtime. So possibly just hang in there with us, you know, because you know this neuro degenerative disorder is very complex and we want to explain how nutrition can be useful both to preventing this disorder and to reduce some of the symptoms. You know, I have the pleasure of working with two co-hosts this morning. They're gonna keep me together. I know. I, I wanted to sleep Wetzel. She's been on the show many times and she's a licensed nutritionist with a master's degree in nutrition and has been practicing nutrition therapy for how many years Levin here. Eleven years, you know, and I know that her clients appreciate or knowledge. I hear it all the time and her ability to listen and understand what they're going through. Leah. We both understand that Parkinson's disease of the very complicated neuro degenerative disease. And I said at one more time and I got it out. And honestly, at this point, there is no care, right? That's that's kind of shocking and kind of sad. So as a nutritious, I wanna start our discussion by talking about what we can do to protect ourselves from the damage so that we can avoid getting Parkinson's or another neurological or neurodegenerative disease. How can we actually protect ourselves? Yes. Well, high NAR high. View with you this morning scrape tabula. Yeah, and I totally agree that you know, we really need to talk about them portent of a strong cell membrane and really underlying that that's why this is so important, you know. And that's something we, I don't think even people think about, I know how do you protect that cell membrane, right? Or how do you keep yourself healthy? Your first line defend right. Also, I'd like to introduce our other co hosts today, joining us today is Britney Thomas and she is a registered in licensed dietitian, and she's been practicing nutrition for the past seven years. Right. Britney. What are some common symptoms that people with Parkinson's disease experience? Good morning, first of all, Parkinson's disease. It's a type of movement disorder, and it happens when nerve sows in the brain don't produce enough of the brain chemical dopamine. So that's. Kind of interesting Brittany, it'll it's like your brain cells. Your nurse cells are not producing enough dopamine. I mean, Yep, very low. And it's when those dopamine levels become very low, that people start to begin to see those Parkinson's symptoms. You know, we talk about dopamine and a lot of our classes don't. We do so low dopamine is also associated with addiction. Yep, depression, eating disorders, low energy, low focus. I mean, we could go on and on depression. Depression dopamine is an important Niro transmitter that affects both movements, our bodies movements and our behavior just this little chemical mazing yes, mazing in when those nerves thousand the brain don't produce enough of the brain chemical called dopamine. Symptoms often begin to appear infrequently. This symptoms will start. Showing up on one side of the body. And then as the disease progresses later, both sides of the body might be affected. So that's interesting, too, isn't. It is it is, you know, a person with Parkinson's may start with trembling hands or maybe trembling legs or trembling, Java or arms. There may be stiffness of the legs or stiffness of the arms, and the trunk of the body movement is slowed and poor balance and coordination start to show up Nassau's symptoms. We can do worse than people often have trouble walking talking or even just doing simple everyday tasks like cleaning or cooking. And then later people may have trouble swallowing speaking and then the depression release that's in. So you know, Parkinson usually begins around the age of sixty, but has really been known to start much earlier in it is. More common in men than women. And since there is no cure for Parkinson's thus far as nutritious, I thought, how can I protect my brain from this neuro degenerative disease and this damage that is occurring? Yeah. So here's an interesting study was reported in the international journal of narrow toxicology in the year two thousand that found that chronic exposure to some very common Pistole sides significantly increases the

Parkinson dopamine Parkinson's disease degenerative disease neurodegenerative disease Darlene Kevin movement disorder Leah Britney Thomas United States Depression international journal of narro NAR Romy Wetzel Levin poor balance
"parkinson" Discussed on podnews

podnews

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on podnews

"In the latest pod news. I happen to be forty six year old. Happily married proud dad of a nine year old with a great career and Parkinson's. I shake yet. I can't shake this. So what do you do with life? Gives you Parkinson's. You tell your story while you still can ten million people have been diagnosed with it, but few people know much about it when life gives you Parkinson's launches tomorrow co hosted by Larry Gifford a thirty year broadcast veteran who was diagnosed in August twenty seventeen. It's with curious, cost, Parkinson, Canada, and Omni studio. Paul squad is a new app designed to help small independent podcasters build that audience, his more efficiently on social media that hoping together feedback from as many podcasters as possible. And you can sign up to be part of the beater on their website. Podcast addict is now adding support. This podcast links, the author announces that the start the app is looking for patriot tippy and anchor link. WCHS rather than the rally quos payments standard, but who knows what the future might be at the end of the AB podcast up front last week was a chat with Bob Pittman who is CEO and chairman of media, and y'all Mon who CEO of National Public Radio willing to it in print form his a question from the moderator, how do you ensure the podcasts don't cannibalize terrestrial live radio? You'll guests are an opportunity feel podcast growth, say, radio public, a two part series, and in a survey, adobe analytics claims that forty eight percent of US consumers. We'll have a smart speaker by the end of the year. Apparently thirty two percent of US consumers have one. Now, the Lincoln tech crunch article to the full research is no longer working. If you'd like to dig a little deeper into those surprising numbers. Oh, and the US military have develops a microphone and earpiece that clamps to your teeth. You will find more details on this at pulled news dot net.

Parkinson US CEO Larry Gifford Bob Pittman Omni Canada Paul adobe chairman forty eight percent thirty two percent forty six year thirty year nine year
"parkinson" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"There i think there were seven known seven to twenty known psychoactive substances that were illegal in the year two thousand is something like four hundred now because labs all over the world keep tweaking the molecules right because molecule is illegal so chemists just shifted a little bit and they have a new hallucinogen and which might be finding might not be because now in their new can produce a chemical that's unbelievably dangerous sentinel sort of like that there is a drug awhile back that i kid named i can't remember the name was an acronym it was a fun drug if you took it once it gave you permanent irreversible total parkinson's disease so people would take it and they were frozen and that was it so mp tp i think it was called so it because it destroyed the same area of the brain that the parkinson's destroys accepted did it right away so all you know designer drugs right a little caution is in order how we might approach the issue of hallucinogen use in a mature manner well that's a topic for an entirely other discussion i'm not even necessarily sure that it can be approached that way although i would say at minimum determining what it is that you're up to if you're going to experiment would be a good thing like what is it exactly that you're serving they're not party drugs and not for fun right whatever they are that's not what they're for and so maybe they could be used by people who were carefully orienting themselves towards the good although i wouldn't say that that should be read as a recommendation.

parkinson